Articles about Hospice #medicaid #hospice

#hospice articles

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Hospice

February 25, 2010 | By Bill Scanlon, Colorado Public News

After Ryan Fiegel fell into a coma in the wake of a brain tumor in February, his parents made the tough decision to take him off his ventilator. But Ryan, 26, didn’t die; he didn’t wake up either. The Fiegels decided they wanted Ryan’s last days to be at Grand Junction’s community hospice, the Hospice and Palliative Care Center of Western Colorado. He had received excellent care at St. Mary’s Hospital and Medical Center, but it was uncomfortable to be in the scurry and stress surrounding a place where staff was trained to do everything to fight death.

May 10, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times

A worrisome abdominal pain drove Jalal Afshar to seek treatment last year at healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente. The Pasadena resident and Kaiser member had lived for years with a rare condition known as Castleman’s disease, which affects the lymph nodes and the body’s immune system. But this was the first time he experienced such severe symptoms. Kaiser granted his request to see a specialist in Arkansas. But it ultimately declined to pay for his treatment there. By June, Afshar said, Kaiser was arranging for hospice care so that he could die at home.

February 3, 1989

The largest AIDS hospice in Los Angeles has received its permanent certificate of occupancy and is running “smoothly” after problems over fire and building codes were straightened out. Michael Weinstein, president of the AIDS Hospice Foundation, said the Chris Brownlie AIDS Hospice in Elysian Park has met requirements for a permit that allows it to operate as a dormitory.

November 9, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER

When Pearl Jemison-Smith was a nurse, she never understood why doctors would order the resuscitation of someone dying from a terminal illness. “We would never allow someone who was dying to die,” she said, remembering back to the days when she was a nurse caring for those with cancer and other illnesses. “We would beat on their chest and defibrillate them. I felt like I was member of the Gestapo and that I was torturing them.”

December 18, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER

When the residents of Group One hospice return to their facility in Sherman Oaks on Sunday, it may seem as if Santa Claus came calling early. Instead of coming home to drab walls and worn bedding, the nine AIDS patients and one terminal cancer patient will find freshly painted quarters and a new supply of linens, comforters, bath towels and accessories.

January 18, 1994 | TERRY SPENCER

Organizers of the county’s first nonprofit hospice say it will probably be spring before the facility opens. The Hospice of Orange County was scheduled to open in Anaheim Hills this month, but Helen Monroe, the group’s treasurer, now expects it to open by May. Monroe said the delay is due in part to efforts to corral a well-heeled benefactor to sponsor the facility. One benefactor, whom she would not name, is looking into adopting the project and taking care of its ongoing financial needs.

October 29, 1988 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer

An official at Barlow Hospital, a respiratory facility in Elysian Park, angrily denied Friday the existence of plans to expand a 25-bed AIDS hospice that will open next month on the hospital’s grounds. John R. Howard, Barlow’s chief administrator, said that Michael Weinstein, the head of the Los Angeles AIDS Hospice Foundation, which is opening the 25-bed hospice in December, had no authority to make plans for an expansion funded by state revenue bonds.

June 7, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer

Los Angeles’ chief zoning administrator has reluctantly ruled that a Hollywood hospice for AIDS patients–the only one in the city and one of just a handful in the county–violates zoning laws and cannot remain in the neighborhood where it has operated for five months. The operators of Hughes House, at 1308 N. Ogden Ave. in a neighborhood of single-family homes, say they are confident they can successfully fight the ruling and won’t have to move.

April 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy

In the days when American physicians dispensed oracular commands and their judgments were rarely questioned, a doctor could take it upon himself with few ethical qualms to keep from a patient the bad news of a terminal diagnosis. For better or worse, those days may be well behind us. But physicians have not ceased debating one of the stickiest and most universal ethical quandaries of medical practice: How, when and why does one inform a patient that he or she is dying? The latest evidence of that ongoing discussion was published Wednesday in the British Medical Journal.

April 15, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times

If you’re going to talk about a subject most people don’t want to talk about, why not do so over tea and cake and cookies? Why not gather in a sunny living room looking out on a lush tangle of green, where you can watch the breeze ruffle the leaves on the trees as you eat forkfuls of blueberry tart? Death comes to each of us, to everyone we love. Couldn’t talking about it in a safe, comfy setting make the prospect less frightening? This is what Betsy Trapasso thinks. This is why she’s asked friends to come – why on a Sunday afternoon, they’ve braved Topanga Canyon’s twists and turns and climbed the dozens of wooden steps to her end-of-a-rural-road front door.

February 5, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times

For Americans with a terminal diagnosis, death increasingly comes in the places and ways they say they want it – at home and in the comfort of hospice care. But for a growing number of dying patients, that is preceded by a tumultuous month in which they endure procedures that are often as invasive and painful as they are futile. New research finds that the proportion of Medicare patients dying in hospice care nearly doubled from 22% in 2000 to 42% in 2009, an apparent bow to patients’ overwhelming preference for more peaceful passings free of heroic measures.

October 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little

WASHINGTON — George McGovern, former senator and Democratic presidential candidate, has been placed in hospice care in Sioux Falls, S.D. After several recent hospitalizations — including admittances in 2011 for fatigue and an injury after striking his head in a fall, and most recently for testing in Florida in connection with frequent exhaustion and speech difficulties — his family has decided to move him to the Dougherty Hospice House in.

October 4, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times

We had to put Felix to sleep last month. I say “had to put him to sleep” because I can’t bear the thought there might have been an alternative. I had two other dogs who lived to be 21 before dying at home. Toward the end, several people had suggested I look into euthanasia, but the dogs mercifully died before I had to. I believe animals shouldn’t have to suffer because I can’t pull the trigger. But I don’t get how to tell when their time is up. Families once put pets to sleep if dad got a job transfer; now, the standards seem all over the map. Days after Felix’s death, an article appeared in the New York Times arguing that death too often is used to end animal suffering when “much less aggressive possibilities exist.

February 19, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times

“I’m not sick; I’m only dying,” a friend told Dr. William Lamers Jr. The man had inoperable cancer and wanted to go home to die, but his doctor wouldn’t let him out of the hospital. It was the early 1970s, when most people with incurable illnesses died in a hospital, in a lonely room, attended by doctors and nurses with no specialized knowledge of the dying patient’s emotional and physical needs. There was no system for caring for the dying at home. The experience opened Lamers’ eyes to a major failing of the healthcare system.

September 26, 2011 | By Ann J. Brady, Special to the Los Angeles Times

When people ask about my father’s death, I always respond the same way: “Except for the fact that he died, everything was perfect. ” Perhaps because I am an oncology nurse, they expect a different answer. But after a six-year battle with colon cancer, he died on his own terms — perfect for a less-than-perfect situation. He was home on hospice. He was comfortable. His wife of 53 years, his six children and several grandchildren surrounded his bed. We are stoic folks, but as Dad drew his last breath, one sister, perhaps tapping into our Irish heritage, started a keening wail.

February 2, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health

Patients at the end of their lives often receive their final care from hospice workers. Contrary to what the haven’t-really-though-about-it-crowd might suspect, not all such care involves administering drugs. Hospice therapists in Florida team up to use a combination of music and massage to treat dying patients such as Bernard Michels, 98. He, for one, sees the merits. “It brings back memories of when I was a younger guy,” he says in a South Florida Sun Sentinel story. The music-massage approach delivers more than a passing feel-good emotion.





Palliative Care Journal Articles #singleton #motels

#journal of palliative care

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Palliative Care Journal Articles

  • Healthcare-Associated Infections in the Elderly: What’s New From infection prevention to appropriate antibiotic administration, find out the current thinking regarding healthcare-associated infections in long-term care residents.

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases. September 2016

  • Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health Care Professionals Burnout is an issue faced by many health care workers, particularly those in the critical care field. The Critical Care Societies Collaborative aims to raise awareness of this important issue.

    American Journal of Critical Care. September 2016

  • Prevention of Alcohol and Other Drug Use in the Digital Age This systematic review summarizes recent substance abuse prevention programs delivered by computers and the Internet. What’s effective, and what’s not?

    Current Opinion in Psychiatry. August 2016

  • Case Series of Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication These cases highlight the potentially life-threatening toxicity associated with synthetic cannabinoid exposure.

    Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health. August 2016

  • Chronic Critical Illness in Infants and Children What can ICU clinicians do to help improve the care of pediatric patients with prolonged ICU stays?

    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. August 2016

  • Mainstream or Extinction: Saving Geriatrics Is there a future for geriatrics? This commentary examines what’s wrong with current strategies and suggests changes to increase the survival of geriatrics as a specialty.

    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. August 2016

  • Living With Dying in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit This new article provides insight into the experience of providing palliative care to children — from the perspective of pediatric ICU nurses.

    American Journal of Critical Care. August 2016

  • Gender Differences in ED Visits, Detox Referrals for Opioids What role does gender play in opioid-related ED visits and subsequent referrals to detox programs?

    Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health. August 2016

  • Acute Poisonings From Synthetic Cannabinoids, U.S. 2010-2015 How common is acute intoxication by synthetic cannabinoids? This report examines the demographics and the trends in the use of these potentially life-threatening drugs.

    Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report. August 2016

  • Decision Making for Infants at the Threshold of Viability The authors describe a new prognosis-based guideline to help clinicians and parents make decisions regarding the care of extremely premature infants.

    Journal of Perinatology. Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association. August 2016

  • Transitional Palliative Care for End-Stage HF Patients What benefits could home-based transitional palliative care offer patients with end-stage heart failure?

    Heart. July 2016

  • Communicating Findings of Delayed Diagnostic Evaluations Are secure emails better than telephone calls for alerting primary care physicians about ‘red flag’ findings?

    Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. July 2016

  • When Families Pressure Patients to Change Their Wishes This case highlights the challenges faced by seriously ill patients experiencing compromised autonomy due to family coercion.

    Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. July 2016

  • Safe Emergency Oxygen Therapy for Patients With COPD A survey including the general public, patients, and medical personnel provides insight into the knowledge and attitudes regarding the emergent use of oxygen for COPD patients.

    BMJ Open Respiratory Research. July 2016

  • Life-Sustaining Therapy in Intracranial Hemorrhage Patients The authors describe an algorithm that may help clinicians with the decision of when to withdraw support for patients who may not benefit from life-sustaining therapy.

    Critical Care Medicine. June 2016

  • Palliative Pharmacotherapy: State-of-the-Art Management Managing symptoms of advanced cancer can greatly improve patient quality of life. This review describes the latest therapy for cachexia, anorexia, fatigue, delirium, and dyspnea.

    Cancer Control: Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center. June 2016

  • When a Patient Discusses Assisted Dying End-of-life concerns and assisted dying are difficult topics for patients and clinicians to discuss. Will these strategies and resources help?

    Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. May 2016

  • The Value of Uncertainty in Critical Illness This study explores patterns of the decision-making processes during critical care, and pinpoints sources of conflict and resolution.

    BMC Anesthesiology. May 2016

  • Conflict Management Strategies in the ICU Differ A new study provides some insight into the differences in conflict management styles between palliative care specialists and intensivists over end-of-life care in the ICU.

    Critical Care Medicine. May 2016

  • Low-Dose Morphine vs Weak Opioids in Moderate Cancer Pain Does low-dose morphine reduce pain intensity better than weak opioids in patients with moderate cancer pain?

    Journal of Clinical Oncology. May 2016





  • How to Save Money on Gas (with Pictures) #money #saving #articles


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    How to Save Money on Gas

    Gas prices keep going up, and the money in our wallet keeps evaporating more quickly. There are many ways you can spend less money on gas and reduce your overall fuel consumption. But, you must think it through and begin formulating new plans! One technique that has been around for a while but has drawn more attention recently is hypermiling. However, use your head because some hypermiling techniques are illegal and extremely dangerous.

    Steps Edit

    Change those spark plugs often! Platinum spark plugs may claim to last 100,000 miles (160,000 km), but they have been known to foul up at just 75,000 miles (121,000 km). [citation needed ] Spark plugs are relatively inexpensive and (depending on the vehicle) easy to replace. If you’re not that handy or mechanically inclined, read some auto repair books or be-friend a mechanic.

    Limit your driving. This article includes ideas such as carpooling, combining trips and taking the first parking spot you find.

    Find good gas prices . This article offers tips about making sure you are paying a competitive price for the gas you do buy. Be sure to recognize the value of the gas you spend to go out of your way.

    Take care of your car . A properly maintained vehicle will run more efficiently and give you better mileage, which saves you money in gas.

    Fill up efficiently. This involves three things:

    • Consider whether to fill your tank up full or halfway. Filling up your tank halfway will reduce your car’s weight, increasing your mileage slightly. However, if your nearest gas station is significantly out of the way of your daily route, make sure to take into account the gas spent driving to the station and the value of your time.
    • Don’t top up your tank between fills. It is wasted money and bad for the environment because it invariably forces liquid fuel into the evaporative emissions system, where it overwhelms circuits that route fuel tank vapors to the engine. [citation needed ]
    • Wait until you have a quarter tank, but don’t push this any further. Doing this can extend your gas mileage because you are hauling a lighter fuel load. It also gives you the opportunity to buy more gas if you run across a bargain. However, in cold weather, you run an increased risk of condensation in the fuel tank. Running a car with less than a quarter tank can shorten the life of the electric fuel pump, and running on empty will often destroy the pump.

    Top off the air in the tires every few weeks to the car manufacturer’s recommended pressure. This is best done when the tires are cold (have not been driven on more than a mile or so). It is proper for them to have a few psi higher pressure after extensive driving, but filling them hot should generally be avoided unless they are very low on air to avoid inaccuracy. Excessive pressure adds very little efficiency and can cause bad handling and uneven tire wear. Some gas stations, notably Sheetz gas stations, have air pumps that are free to use and automatically inflate the tires to a pressure set on the pump. These are very convenient. (If an automatic pump seems to be adding an unexpectedly large amount of air, double-check its progress with a hand air gauge to avoid overfilling.)

    • In California, gas station operators are required to offer free air to customers who purchase fuel.

    If you are always stuck in rush hour traffic after work anyway, try to find something to do near your work until the traffic dies down, rather than try to fight through it.

    Learn how to coast between traffic lights, applying power only as needed to keep the car rolling (more or less) with traffic. Learn to judge terrain and use engine braking to its full potential to keep the car moving ‘for free’, and save more gas over time.

    Most car modifications do not improve mileage. Extra wings add drag. Power improvements often hurt mileage. However, if your car is turbocharged, chiptuning may result in a mileage boost. The mileage boost will be canceled out if you drive more aggressively due to power improvements.

    Keep meticulous records of what you spend and how many miles you drive so you can quickly spot changes in vehicle performance. It will also help focus you on the goal of saving.

    A manual transmission saves an average $1000 on the cost of a new vehicle, and eliminates routine transmission maintenance that an automatic transmission requires (and most people never do this maintenance once the warranty is up – so a used car with an automatic can be a risky purchase). In some cases, a manual transmission gets slightly better mileage overall than an automatic transmission.

    Every MPH faster yields you less advantage than the last one. Going 10 mph (16 km/h) is a big difference over 5 mph (8.0 km/h), but there is very little difference between 55 mph (89 km/h) and 60 mph (97 km/h), unless you are on a very long trip. Many people mindlessly speed wherever they go, and gain absolutely nothing but a heftier fuel bill. Assuming everything goes perfectly (and when does it?) going 5 mph (8.0 km/h), even 15 mph (24 km/h) faster on a highway for a short trip will yield nothing but aggravation as you keep catching up to slower traffic.

    Many of these tips change slightly if your engine is turbocharged or diesel. For instance, diesel engines use almost no fuel while idling. Diesel trucks will often be left idling all night to provide heat or power for the trucker inside the cab, at the cost of relatively little fuel.

    Get a smartphone app that helps to find the cheapest gas.

    Often the right-most lanes keep moving more than the left-most in areas prone to traffic-jams. Vehicles continue to exit, which keeps leaving ‘gaps’ to fill in.


    T-SQL Programming Part 5 – Using the CASE Function #microsoft, #articles, #microsoft


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    T-SQL Programming Part 5 – Using the CASE Function

    Have you ever wanted to replace a column value with a different value based on the original column value? Learn how, with the T-SQL CASE function.

    The CASE function is a very useful T-SQL function. With this function you can replace a column value with a different value based on the original column value. An example of where this function might come in handy is where you have a table that contains a column named SexCode, where 0 stands for female, 1 for male, etc. and you want to return the value “female” when the column value is 0, or “male” when the column value is 1, etc. This article will discuss using the CASE function in a T-SQL SELECT statement.

    The CASE function allows you to evaluate a column value on a row against multiple criteria, where each criterion might return a different value. The first criterion that evaluates to true will be the value returned by the CASE function. Microsoft SQL Server Books Online documents two different formats for the CASE function. The “Simple Format” looks like this:

    And the “Searched Format” looks like this:

    Where the “input_expression” is any valid Microsoft SQL Server expression, the “when_expression” is the value in which the input_expression is compared, the “result_expression ” is the value that will be return for the CASE statement if the “when_expression” evaluates to true, ” . n ” represents that multiple WHEN conditions can exist, the “else_result_expression ” is the value that will be returned if no “when_expression” evaluates to true and in the “Searched Format” the “Boolean_expression” is any Boolean express that when it evaluates to true will return the “result_expression”. Let me go through a couple of examples of each format to help you better understand how to use the CASE function in a SELECT statement.

    For the first example let me show you how you would use the CASE function to display a description, instead of a column value that contains a code. I am going to use my earlier example that I described at the top of this article where I discussed displaying “female” or “male” instead of the SexCode. Here is my example T-SQL Code:

    Here is the output from this T-SQL code:

    This example shows the syntax in action for a CASE function using the “Simple Format”. As you can see the CASE function evaluates the PatientSexCode to determine if it is a 0, 1, or 2. If it is a 0, then “female” is displayed in the output for the “Patient Sex” column. If the PatientSexCode is 1, then “male” is display, or if PatientSexCode is 2 then “unknown” is displayed. Now if the PatientSexCode is anything other than a 0, 1 or 2 then the “ELSE” condition of the CASE function will be used and “Invalid PatientSexCode” will be displayed for the “Patient Sex” column.

    Now the same logic could be written using a “Searched Format” for the CASE function. Here is what the SELECT statement would look like for the “Searched Format”:

    Note the slight differences between the “Simple” and “Searched” formats. In the “Simple” format I specified the column name for which row values will be compared against the “when_expressions” ,where as in the “Searched” format each WHEN condition contains a Boolean expression that compares the PatientSexCode column against a code value.

    Now the CASE function can be considerably more complex than the basic examples I have shown. Suppose you want to display a value that is based on two different columns values in a row. Here is an example that determines if a Product in the Northwind database is of type Tins or Bottles, and is not a discontinued item.

    The output for the above command on my server displays the following:

    As you can see I’m using a “Searched Format” for this CASE function call. Also, each WHEN clause contains two different conditions. One condition to determine the type (tins, or bottles) and another condition to determine if the product has been discontinued. If the QuantityPerUnit contains the string “Tins” and the Discontinue column value is 0 then the “Type of Availability” is set to “Tins”. If the QuantityPerUnit contains the string “Bottles” and the Discontinue column value is 0 then the “Type of Availability” is set to “Bottles”. For all other conditions, the “Type or Availability” is set to “Not Tins , Not Bottles , or is Discontinued.

    The WHEN clauses in the CASE function are evaluated in order. The first WHEN clause that evaluates to “True” determines the value that is returned from the CASE function. Basically, multiple WHEN clauses evaluate to “True”, only the THEN value for the first WHEN clause that evaluates to “True” is used as the return value for the CASE function. Here is an example where multiple WHEN clauses are “True.”

    The output on my machine for this query looks like this:

    If you look at the raw titles table data in the pubs database for the title “You Can Combat Computer Stress!” you will note that the price for this book is $2.99. This price makes both the “price 12.00” and “price 3.00” conditions “True”. Since the conditions are evaluated one at a time, and the “price 12.00” is evaluated prior to the “price 3.00,” the “Price Category” for the title “You Can Combat Computer Stress!” is set to “Cheap”.

    The CASE function can appear in different places within the SELECT statement, it does not have to only be in the selection list within the SELECT statement. Here is an example where the CASE function is used in the WHERE clause.

    The output for this query looks like this:

    Here I only wanted to display books from the titles table in pubs database if the price category is ‘Average’. By placing my CASE function in the WHERE clause I was able to accomplish this.

    Conclusion

    As you can see the CASE function is an extremely valuable function. It allows you to take a data column and represent it differently depending on one or more conditions identified in the CASE function call. I hope that the next time you need to display or use different values for specific column data you will review the CASE function to see if it might meet your needs.

    See All Articles by Columnist Gregory A. Larsen


    Scholarships for Military Members #grants #for #military #members, #scholarships #military #members #education


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    Scholarships for Military Members

    While looking for money for school many servicemembers, veterans, and their families tend to overlook more than $300 million of military — and veteran — related scholarships and grants. These scholarships often go unclaimed due to the following three myths:

    1. Military education benefits eliminate the need for scholarships and grants.

    • False The truth is that Tuition Assistance is limited to about $750 a class and usually only covers tuition and a limited amount of fees. This means that you have to pay for books, fees, and other items. There are hundreds of scholarships and grants specifically designed to supplement these education related costs, so you don t have to.

    2. Scholarships are too difficult to win and applying requires too much work.

    • It is true that some scholarships require a written essay. But, it is important to remember that scholarship and grant applications vary widely, and some require nothing more than a short application. Besides you should think of it this way: It may be the only essay you ever get paid to write.

    3. Scholarships are too difficult to find.

    • False Many scholarships go unclaimed because students don t know where to look. Fortunately, there is a great online resource to help servicemembers find the scholarship and learn how, where, and when to apply. Visit the Military.com s Scholarship Finder today and get started on your way to finding free money for school.

    Here are some quick tips to help your search:

    Do your homework. Take advantage of the free online scholarship search at Military.com s Scholarship Finder. The Scholarship Finder lists over 1,000 scholarships from a variety of sources.
    Don t limit yourself. You qualify for non-military related scholarships too. Visit your local library to find scholarship directories that list awards based on age, state of residence, cultural background, and field of study.
    Search in your military community. Many service aid organizations and associations, like the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, offer scholarships, grants, and low interest loans to help cover education expenses. Click here to find out more about your Service Aid Organization s education assistance programs.
    It s never too soon to start your scholarship search. Many scholarship application deadlines are as early as a year in advance.

    Remember: Not applying for scholarships is like turning down free money. Get started on your search for scholarships today visit the Scholarship Finder .


    T-SQL Programming Part 1 – Defining Variables, and logic #articles, #databases, #microsoft


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    T-SQL Programming Part 1 – Defining Variables, and IF. ELSE logic

    Whether you are building a stored procedure or writing a small Query Analyzer script you will need to know the basics of T-SQL programming. This is the first of a series discusses defining variables, and using the IF. ELSE logic.

    This is the first of a series of articles discussing various aspects of T-SQL programming. Whether you are building a stored procedure or writing a small Query Analyzer script you will need to know the basics of T-SQL programming. This first article will discuss defining variables, and using the IF. ELSE logic.

    Local Variables

    As with any programming language, T-SQL allows you to define and set variables. A variable holds a single piece of information, similar to a number or a character string. Variables can be used for a number of things. Here is a list of a few common variable uses:

    • To pass parameters to stored procedures, or function
    • To control the processing of a loop
    • To test for a true or false condition in an IF statement
    • To programmatically control conditions in a WHERE statement

    More than one variable can be defined with a single DECLARE statement. To define multiple variables, with a single DECLARE statement, you separate each variable definition with a comma, like so:

    Here is an example of how to use the SELECT statement to set the value of a local variable.

    One of the uses of a variable is to programmatically control the records returned from a SELECT statement. You do this by using a variable in the WHERE clause. Here is an example that returns all the Customers records in the Northwind database where the Customers Country column is equal to ‘Germany’

    IF. ELSE

    T-SQL has the “IF” statement to help with allowing different code to be executed based on the results of a condition. The “IF” statement allows a T-SQL programmer to selectively execute a single line or block of code based upon a Boolean condition. There are two formats for the “IF” statement, both are shown below:

    Format one: IF condition then code to be executed when condition true

    Format two: IF condition then code to be executed when condition true ELSE else code to be executed when condition is false

    In both of these formats, the condition is a Boolean expression or series of Boolean expressions that evaluate to true or false. If the condition evaluates to true, then the “then code” is executed. For format two, if the condition is false, then the “else code” is executed. If there is a false condition when using format one, then the next line following the IF statement is executed, since no else condition exists. The code to be executed can be a single TSQL statement or a block of code. If a block of code is used then it will need to be enclosed in a BEGIN and END statement.

    Let’s review how “Format one” works. This first example will show how the IF statement would look to execute a single statement, if the condition is true. Here I will test whether a variable is set to a specific value. If the variable is set to a specific value, then I print out the appropriate message.

    The above code prints out only the phrase “The number is 29”, because the first IF statement evaluates to true. Since the second IF is false the second print statement is not executed.

    Now the condition statement can also contain a SELECT statement. The SELECT statement will need to return value or set of values that can be tested. If a SELECT statement is used the statement needs to be enclosed in parentheses.

    Here I printed the message “Found A-D Authors” if the SELECT statement found any authors in the pubs.dbo.authors table that had a last name that started with an A, B, C, or D.

    So far my two examples only showed how to execute a single T-SQL statement if the condition is true. T-SQL allows you to execute a block of code as well. A code block is created by using a “BEGIN” statement before the first line of code in the code block, and an “END” statement after that last line of code in the code block. Here is any example that executes a code block when the IF statement condition evaluates to true.

    Above a series of “PRINT” statements will be executed if this IF statement is run in the context of the master database. If the context is some other database then the print statements are not executed.

    Sometimes you want to not only execute some code when you have a true condition, but also want to execute a different set of T-SQL statements when you have a false condition. If this is your requirement then you will need to use the IF. ELSE construct, that I called format two above. With this format, if the condition is true then the statement or block of code following the IF clause is executed, but if the condition evaluates to false then the statement or block of code following the ELSE clause will be executed. Let’s go through a couple of examples.

    For the first example let’s say you need to determine whether to update or add a record to the Customers table in the Northwind database. The decision is based on whether the customer exists in the Northwind.dbo.Customers table. Here is the T-SQL code to perform this existence test for two different CustomerId’s.

    The first IF. ELSE logic checks to see it CustomerId ‘ALFKI’ exists. If it exists it prints the message “Need to update Customer Record”, if it doesn’t exist the “Need to add Customer Record” is displayed. This logic is repeated for CustomerId = ‘LARS’. When I run this code against my Northwind database I get the following output.

    As you can see from the results CustomerId ‘ALFKI’ existed, because the first print statement following the first IF statement was executed. Where as in the second IF statement CustomerId ‘LARSE’ was not found because the ELSE portion of the IF. ELSE statement was executed.

    If you have complicated logic that needs to be performed prior to determining what T-SQL statements to execute you can either use multiple conditions on a single IF statement, or nest your IF statements. Here is a script that determines if the scope of the query is in the ‘Northwind’ database and if the “Customers” table exists. I have written this query two different ways, one with multiple conditions on a single IF statement, and the other by having nested IF statements.

    As you can see I tested to see if the query was being run from the Northwind database and whether the “Customers” table can be found in sysobjects. If this was true, I printed the message “Table Customers Exists”. In the first example I had multiple conditions in a single IF statement. Since I was not able to determine which parts of the conditions in the IF statement where false the ELSE portion printed the message “Not in Northwind database or Table Customer does not exist”. Now in the second example where I had a nested IF statement I was able to determine whether I was in the wrong database or the object “Customers” did not exist. This allowed me to have two separate print statements to reflect exactly what condition was getting a false value.

    I hope that this article has helped you understand how to declare and use local variables, as well as IF. ELSE logic. Local variables are useful to hold the pieces of information related to your programming process. Where as the IF statement helps control the flow of your program so different sections of code can be executed depending on a particular set of conditions. As you can see nesting IF statements and/or having multiple conditions on an IF statement allows you to further refine your logic flow to meet your programming requirements. My next article in this T-SQL programming series will discuss how to build a programming loop.

    See All Articles by Columnist Gregory A. Larsen


    Articles of Incorporation – Free Template Form #articles #of #incorporation, #articles #of


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    Articles of Incorporation Free for Download

    Articles of Incorporation form used to incorporate a corporation

    Articles of Incorporation is the actual document name that you file with the state governing agency. When I say governing agency I am referring to an agency such as a Secretary of State or Corporation Division.

    Upon filing Articles of Incorporation, some states give you back a certificate of incorporation or a corporate charter. Articles of Incorporation must be filed with the state to incorporate the corporation.

    We provide free Articles of Incorporation below in a PDF format or a Word doc format. Please feel free to use our article template, but please do not take this form as a replacement of competent legal counsel for your specific needs.

    Articles of incorporation can be long and drawn out articles or they can be drastically simplified. The main purpose is to have something in writing to file with the state.

    States have minimum filing requirements, and most states have generic pdf forms you can use on their website to file. The funny trend we’ve noticed in Articles of Incorporation filing has honestly been started by Secretaries of State. They are simplifying their filing processes. Let me explain: Articles of Incorporation used to be specifically drafted by attorneys. As you know, attorneys take on a lot of liability for offering their advice, so their drafted documents can get quite wordy. Ultimately you can write whatever you want in your Articles of Incorporation, as long as the state minimum requirements are met when you file the articles with the Secretary of State. If you meet the requirements you’ll get a new corporation established.

    When it started to change was around when the internet came out. People started getting a little smarter. The states started providing generic Articles of Incorporation forms, where they just wrote the state minimum requirements on a form. Why did they start doing that? Well some attorneys can write articles that are 15 pages long, and basically say the same thing as a one page Articles of Incorporation form provided by the state. Can you imagine the training process and how much longer the state agencies would take to just process and read through the never-ending stack of corporations waiting to be filed? All a state clerk is looking for is the minimum requirements so that person can put their approved stamp on it, and move on. When a state only requires 3 things to incorporate, and there are 15 pages of text to look through well, you can see how much of a potential waste of time it can be for the states.

    Why are the state generic forms basically the same thing as long drawn out Articles of Incorporation you ask? The law is the law. You can cite code after code about your articles, but if an article contradicts the law, it doesn’t really mean anything. To take it a step further… almost every state has laws stating the limitation of liability of the officers and directors of a corporation. That’s the whole point of incorporating, but some people like to state this fact on the Articles of Incorporation too. When we file Articles of Incorporation, we state this, so it makes people feel good. When you state on your Articles of Incorporation that the officers and directors are limited in their liability, it’s basically regurgitating a state law that if you ended up in court, would be the basis of the judge s decision anyway; not the Articles of Incorporation. That being said, every state is different. For the everyday business, basic Articles of Incorporation are just fine. For bigger businesses with complicated management needs, a more definitive attorney drafted Articles of Incorporation should be required,

    Most Articles of Incorporation include:

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    • A statement of acceptance of the role of the registered agent
    • Principal office address and mailing address of the corporation
    • The authorized shares of stock of the corporation
    • The class of stock
    • The par value of the shares
    • The initial directors and officers
    • The adoption of the corporate bylaws
    • Dissolution procedure
    • Indemnification of the officers and directors
    • The incorporator information
    • Correspondence information

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    Early Childhood Education Journal Articles #early #childhood #education #masters #degree, #early #childhood


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    Early Childhood Education Journal Articles: List of Sources

    Parents, preschool teachers and even expectant mothers can all benefit from the wealth of information in the blogosphere about.

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  • Nursing Shortage – Causes of the Nursing Shortage #nursing #shortage #journal #articles


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    Nursing Shortage – Page 2

    Causes of the Nursing Shortage

    The nursing shortage is not a recent phenomenon, in fact it has been occurring since World War II. It is however, only in the last few years that the shortage has begun to have a significant impact to our healthcare systems. A steep population growth, a declining number of applicants to nursing schools, an aging workforce and a baby boom generation that will require concentrated healthcare services in the coming years are all contributing to this situation.

    Professional Alternatives
    As new opportunities have opened up for young women and stresses have been added to the profession, many are opting to choose other careers besides nursing. Women and men are weighing their interests with a career choice that will bring them worthy compensation as well as enhancing their quality of life. Unfortunately, nursing is currently falling short on both of these. Women are now pursuing many competitive, attractive, and lucrative careers that were impossible to achieve thirty years ago. Women are entering law school, medical school, and the corporate world in droves. Research indicates that 35% fewer women would choose nursing as a career in the 1990s than they would have in the 1970s.

    Declining Enrollment and Educators
    New admissions into nursing schools have dropped dramatically and consistently for the past six years. Additionally, nursing colleges and universities denied 32,617 qualified applicants in 2005 due to the shortage of nursing educators. Faculty age continues to climb; higher compensation can be found elsewhere luring potential educators away from teaching. The Health Resources and Services Administration stated in a 2006 report that, “to meet the projected growth in demand for RN services, the United States must graduate 90 percent more nurses.”

    Age
    The lack of younger people entering nursing has raised the average age of nurses. In Maryland, the average practicing RN is 46 years old, nationally the average working RN is over 43 years old. About half of the RN workforce will reach retirement age in the next 15 years. On top of this, the average age of new RN graduates is 31. Nurses are entering the profession at an older age and offer fewer years of work.

    Future Concerns

    America’s demand for nursing care is expected to balloon over the next 20 years. The future demand for nurses is expected to increase dramatically when the baby boomers reach their 60s and beyond. The population aged 65 years and older will double from 2000 to 2030. Furthermore, the population aged 85 and older is the fastest growing age group in the U.S. The Bureau of Labor Statistics ranks the occupation of nursing as having the seventh highest projected job growth in the United States. The real issue is that during this time of increased demand for health care, the overall number of nurses per capita will begin to decline. By 2020 the number of nurses will fall nearly 20 percent below requirements.

    Pages


    T-SQL Programming Part 5 – Using the CASE Function #microsoft, #articles, #microsoft


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    T-SQL Programming Part 5 – Using the CASE Function

    Have you ever wanted to replace a column value with a different value based on the original column value? Learn how, with the T-SQL CASE function.

    The CASE function is a very useful T-SQL function. With this function you can replace a column value with a different value based on the original column value. An example of where this function might come in handy is where you have a table that contains a column named SexCode, where 0 stands for female, 1 for male, etc. and you want to return the value “female” when the column value is 0, or “male” when the column value is 1, etc. This article will discuss using the CASE function in a T-SQL SELECT statement.

    The CASE function allows you to evaluate a column value on a row against multiple criteria, where each criterion might return a different value. The first criterion that evaluates to true will be the value returned by the CASE function. Microsoft SQL Server Books Online documents two different formats for the CASE function. The “Simple Format” looks like this:

    And the “Searched Format” looks like this:

    Where the “input_expression” is any valid Microsoft SQL Server expression, the “when_expression” is the value in which the input_expression is compared, the “result_expression ” is the value that will be return for the CASE statement if the “when_expression” evaluates to true, ” . n ” represents that multiple WHEN conditions can exist, the “else_result_expression ” is the value that will be returned if no “when_expression” evaluates to true and in the “Searched Format” the “Boolean_expression” is any Boolean express that when it evaluates to true will return the “result_expression”. Let me go through a couple of examples of each format to help you better understand how to use the CASE function in a SELECT statement.

    For the first example let me show you how you would use the CASE function to display a description, instead of a column value that contains a code. I am going to use my earlier example that I described at the top of this article where I discussed displaying “female” or “male” instead of the SexCode. Here is my example T-SQL Code:

    Here is the output from this T-SQL code:

    This example shows the syntax in action for a CASE function using the “Simple Format”. As you can see the CASE function evaluates the PatientSexCode to determine if it is a 0, 1, or 2. If it is a 0, then “female” is displayed in the output for the “Patient Sex” column. If the PatientSexCode is 1, then “male” is display, or if PatientSexCode is 2 then “unknown” is displayed. Now if the PatientSexCode is anything other than a 0, 1 or 2 then the “ELSE” condition of the CASE function will be used and “Invalid PatientSexCode” will be displayed for the “Patient Sex” column.

    Now the same logic could be written using a “Searched Format” for the CASE function. Here is what the SELECT statement would look like for the “Searched Format”:

    Note the slight differences between the “Simple” and “Searched” formats. In the “Simple” format I specified the column name for which row values will be compared against the “when_expressions” ,where as in the “Searched” format each WHEN condition contains a Boolean expression that compares the PatientSexCode column against a code value.

    Now the CASE function can be considerably more complex than the basic examples I have shown. Suppose you want to display a value that is based on two different columns values in a row. Here is an example that determines if a Product in the Northwind database is of type Tins or Bottles, and is not a discontinued item.

    The output for the above command on my server displays the following:

    As you can see I’m using a “Searched Format” for this CASE function call. Also, each WHEN clause contains two different conditions. One condition to determine the type (tins, or bottles) and another condition to determine if the product has been discontinued. If the QuantityPerUnit contains the string “Tins” and the Discontinue column value is 0 then the “Type of Availability” is set to “Tins”. If the QuantityPerUnit contains the string “Bottles” and the Discontinue column value is 0 then the “Type of Availability” is set to “Bottles”. For all other conditions, the “Type or Availability” is set to “Not Tins , Not Bottles , or is Discontinued.

    The WHEN clauses in the CASE function are evaluated in order. The first WHEN clause that evaluates to “True” determines the value that is returned from the CASE function. Basically, multiple WHEN clauses evaluate to “True”, only the THEN value for the first WHEN clause that evaluates to “True” is used as the return value for the CASE function. Here is an example where multiple WHEN clauses are “True.”

    The output on my machine for this query looks like this:

    If you look at the raw titles table data in the pubs database for the title “You Can Combat Computer Stress!” you will note that the price for this book is $2.99. This price makes both the “price 12.00” and “price 3.00” conditions “True”. Since the conditions are evaluated one at a time, and the “price 12.00” is evaluated prior to the “price 3.00,” the “Price Category” for the title “You Can Combat Computer Stress!” is set to “Cheap”.

    The CASE function can appear in different places within the SELECT statement, it does not have to only be in the selection list within the SELECT statement. Here is an example where the CASE function is used in the WHERE clause.

    The output for this query looks like this:

    Here I only wanted to display books from the titles table in pubs database if the price category is ‘Average’. By placing my CASE function in the WHERE clause I was able to accomplish this.

    Conclusion

    As you can see the CASE function is an extremely valuable function. It allows you to take a data column and represent it differently depending on one or more conditions identified in the CASE function call. I hope that the next time you need to display or use different values for specific column data you will review the CASE function to see if it might meet your needs.

    See All Articles by Columnist Gregory A. Larsen


    FHA Refinancing Options from #fha #refinance, #fha #refinancing, #fha #mortgage #refinance, #fha


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    FHA Refinancing

    Changes in the housing market have given you-and thousands of other Americans-the option to refinance your current home mortgage with a FHA Refinance.

    FHA Refinancing is a better option if you have a fair to good credit rating because, generally, FHA standards are less strict. Even if you likely will not qualify for conventional refinancing because of your income level, a FHA Refinance may still be an option for you.

    FHA Refinance Requirements

    There are some requirements that may apply when trying to refinance your current loan with the FHA. Keep in mind the following are simply guidelines-each borrower’s situation is different.

    • The mortgage that is to be refinanced must ultimately be insured through the FHA.
    • The current mortgage must be current and not delinquent.
    • The results of the refinance must lower the monthly principle and interest payments for the borrower.
    • No cash may be taken out on mortgages refinanced using the streamline refinance process.

    Other Information on FHA Refinances

    One Streamline Refinancing option you have is one that includes the closing costs into the new mortgage amount. This of course is only available if enough equity is in the home after it is appraised. The streamline refinance can occur without an appraisal but the new loan will not be able to exceed the original loan amount. If you are not living in the property (i.e. it is an investment property), the refinance can only occur without an appraisal.

    FHA Loans by State

    The FHA Home Loan Program

    The FHA has been insuring loans since the 1930’s, and their refinancing department has been around since the early 1980’s. The FHA/HUD also offers the option of FHA Streamline Refinancing. The “streamline” refers to the amount of paperwork and underwriting involved and not to a monetary factor (such as being cheaper or having no cost at all).

    Let FHA Mortgage Center.com be your guide to the benefits of a FHA Loan. FHA Mortgage Center.com is your one stop for all your FHA-related questions.

    We update our FHA Lending articles and Help Guide frequently with new FHA information. Our FHA Blog is another great source of information from top industry experts with topics ranging from FHA Loan Limits to current changes in the FHA Program. We offer these resources because, most of all, we want to provide you with information to help you decide if a FHA Loan is the right choice for you.

    FHA Mortgage Center.com Blog

    Latest Articles


    HR Magazines #human #resources, #hr #community, #hr #best #practices, #hr #articles, #hr


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    • Having read all of the issues in these 17 long years, I can confidentially declare that HC today is a world class HR journal, with its positioning that is strong and erudite. Articles by your correspondents are sharp, researched extremely well, global in its outlook and contemporary. Proud to be associated with Human Capital. Dr. Ganesh Shermon, Partner – Platform Solutions, North America, TCS Canada Inc.
    • I like the breadth of topics which are covered in the different functional domains of HR. It gives me an opportunity to meet many thought leaders from a wide spectrum of organizations. Also periodical views from business leaders on HR as well as a section for new age professionals are something that I look forward to. Hemalakshmi Raju, Head L sexual or ot.
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      While joint families and easy availability of dome.

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      Zillow, SoFi and LinkedIn have been in the forefro.

    Uncertainties in the business environment, augment.

  • The spate of consolidation in the telecom sector c.
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    Sakshi Sood is a Graduate in Electronics Engineer.

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    Sakshi Sood is an electronics engineering graduat.

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  • Articles about Hospice #benidorm #hotels

    #hospice articles

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    Hospice

    February 25, 2010 | By Bill Scanlon, Colorado Public News

    After Ryan Fiegel fell into a coma in the wake of a brain tumor in February, his parents made the tough decision to take him off his ventilator. But Ryan, 26, didn’t die; he didn’t wake up either. The Fiegels decided they wanted Ryan’s last days to be at Grand Junction’s community hospice, the Hospice and Palliative Care Center of Western Colorado. He had received excellent care at St. Mary’s Hospital and Medical Center, but it was uncomfortable to be in the scurry and stress surrounding a place where staff was trained to do everything to fight death.

    May 10, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times

    A worrisome abdominal pain drove Jalal Afshar to seek treatment last year at healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente. The Pasadena resident and Kaiser member had lived for years with a rare condition known as Castleman’s disease, which affects the lymph nodes and the body’s immune system. But this was the first time he experienced such severe symptoms. Kaiser granted his request to see a specialist in Arkansas. But it ultimately declined to pay for his treatment there. By June, Afshar said, Kaiser was arranging for hospice care so that he could die at home.

    February 3, 1989

    The largest AIDS hospice in Los Angeles has received its permanent certificate of occupancy and is running “smoothly” after problems over fire and building codes were straightened out. Michael Weinstein, president of the AIDS Hospice Foundation, said the Chris Brownlie AIDS Hospice in Elysian Park has met requirements for a permit that allows it to operate as a dormitory.

    November 9, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER

    When Pearl Jemison-Smith was a nurse, she never understood why doctors would order the resuscitation of someone dying from a terminal illness. “We would never allow someone who was dying to die,” she said, remembering back to the days when she was a nurse caring for those with cancer and other illnesses. “We would beat on their chest and defibrillate them. I felt like I was member of the Gestapo and that I was torturing them.”

    December 18, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER

    When the residents of Group One hospice return to their facility in Sherman Oaks on Sunday, it may seem as if Santa Claus came calling early. Instead of coming home to drab walls and worn bedding, the nine AIDS patients and one terminal cancer patient will find freshly painted quarters and a new supply of linens, comforters, bath towels and accessories.

    January 18, 1994 | TERRY SPENCER

    Organizers of the county’s first nonprofit hospice say it will probably be spring before the facility opens. The Hospice of Orange County was scheduled to open in Anaheim Hills this month, but Helen Monroe, the group’s treasurer, now expects it to open by May. Monroe said the delay is due in part to efforts to corral a well-heeled benefactor to sponsor the facility. One benefactor, whom she would not name, is looking into adopting the project and taking care of its ongoing financial needs.

    October 29, 1988 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer

    An official at Barlow Hospital, a respiratory facility in Elysian Park, angrily denied Friday the existence of plans to expand a 25-bed AIDS hospice that will open next month on the hospital’s grounds. John R. Howard, Barlow’s chief administrator, said that Michael Weinstein, the head of the Los Angeles AIDS Hospice Foundation, which is opening the 25-bed hospice in December, had no authority to make plans for an expansion funded by state revenue bonds.

    June 7, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer

    Los Angeles’ chief zoning administrator has reluctantly ruled that a Hollywood hospice for AIDS patients–the only one in the city and one of just a handful in the county–violates zoning laws and cannot remain in the neighborhood where it has operated for five months. The operators of Hughes House, at 1308 N. Ogden Ave. in a neighborhood of single-family homes, say they are confident they can successfully fight the ruling and won’t have to move.

    April 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy

    In the days when American physicians dispensed oracular commands and their judgments were rarely questioned, a doctor could take it upon himself with few ethical qualms to keep from a patient the bad news of a terminal diagnosis. For better or worse, those days may be well behind us. But physicians have not ceased debating one of the stickiest and most universal ethical quandaries of medical practice: How, when and why does one inform a patient that he or she is dying? The latest evidence of that ongoing discussion was published Wednesday in the British Medical Journal.

    April 15, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times

    If you’re going to talk about a subject most people don’t want to talk about, why not do so over tea and cake and cookies? Why not gather in a sunny living room looking out on a lush tangle of green, where you can watch the breeze ruffle the leaves on the trees as you eat forkfuls of blueberry tart? Death comes to each of us, to everyone we love. Couldn’t talking about it in a safe, comfy setting make the prospect less frightening? This is what Betsy Trapasso thinks. This is why she’s asked friends to come – why on a Sunday afternoon, they’ve braved Topanga Canyon’s twists and turns and climbed the dozens of wooden steps to her end-of-a-rural-road front door.

    February 5, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times

    For Americans with a terminal diagnosis, death increasingly comes in the places and ways they say they want it – at home and in the comfort of hospice care. But for a growing number of dying patients, that is preceded by a tumultuous month in which they endure procedures that are often as invasive and painful as they are futile. New research finds that the proportion of Medicare patients dying in hospice care nearly doubled from 22% in 2000 to 42% in 2009, an apparent bow to patients’ overwhelming preference for more peaceful passings free of heroic measures.

    October 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little

    WASHINGTON — George McGovern, former senator and Democratic presidential candidate, has been placed in hospice care in Sioux Falls, S.D. After several recent hospitalizations — including admittances in 2011 for fatigue and an injury after striking his head in a fall, and most recently for testing in Florida in connection with frequent exhaustion and speech difficulties — his family has decided to move him to the Dougherty Hospice House in.

    October 4, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times

    We had to put Felix to sleep last month. I say “had to put him to sleep” because I can’t bear the thought there might have been an alternative. I had two other dogs who lived to be 21 before dying at home. Toward the end, several people had suggested I look into euthanasia, but the dogs mercifully died before I had to. I believe animals shouldn’t have to suffer because I can’t pull the trigger. But I don’t get how to tell when their time is up. Families once put pets to sleep if dad got a job transfer; now, the standards seem all over the map. Days after Felix’s death, an article appeared in the New York Times arguing that death too often is used to end animal suffering when “much less aggressive possibilities exist.

    February 19, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times

    “I’m not sick; I’m only dying,” a friend told Dr. William Lamers Jr. The man had inoperable cancer and wanted to go home to die, but his doctor wouldn’t let him out of the hospital. It was the early 1970s, when most people with incurable illnesses died in a hospital, in a lonely room, attended by doctors and nurses with no specialized knowledge of the dying patient’s emotional and physical needs. There was no system for caring for the dying at home. The experience opened Lamers’ eyes to a major failing of the healthcare system.

    September 26, 2011 | By Ann J. Brady, Special to the Los Angeles Times

    When people ask about my father’s death, I always respond the same way: “Except for the fact that he died, everything was perfect. ” Perhaps because I am an oncology nurse, they expect a different answer. But after a six-year battle with colon cancer, he died on his own terms — perfect for a less-than-perfect situation. He was home on hospice. He was comfortable. His wife of 53 years, his six children and several grandchildren surrounded his bed. We are stoic folks, but as Dad drew his last breath, one sister, perhaps tapping into our Irish heritage, started a keening wail.

    February 2, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health

    Patients at the end of their lives often receive their final care from hospice workers. Contrary to what the haven’t-really-though-about-it-crowd might suspect, not all such care involves administering drugs. Hospice therapists in Florida team up to use a combination of music and massage to treat dying patients such as Bernard Michels, 98. He, for one, sees the merits. “It brings back memories of when I was a younger guy,” he says in a South Florida Sun Sentinel story. The music-massage approach delivers more than a passing feel-good emotion.





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    What is the Social Responsibility of Business? #business #social #responsibility #articles


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    What is the Social Responsibility of Business?

    Ever since Milton Friedman famously proclaimed The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits (NYTimes 1970 ), pundits have pondered whether his purist interpretation was really the only way.

    Profit is certainly a lot easier to quantify than something like ‘happiness’, but the intangible benefits of good, honest business clearly go way beyond pure finance….Must the word ‘profit’ always refer to money in the strictest sense?

    Collected on this page are various interpretations of the idea of social responsibility and the responsibility of business to take an active, passive or indifferent role in building a more sustainable world.

    160 articles


    Some Pet Owners Game the Emotional Support Animal System to Fly Pets


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    Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2017 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved.

    Some Pet Owners Game the System to Fly Pets for Free

    WATCH How Easy Is It to Pass Off an Everyday Pet as an Emotional Support Animal?

    Emotional support animals can help people suffering from anxiety and other emotional disorders, but some pet owners are gaming the system in order to have their everyday pets travel with them for free.

    Federal regulations allow a legitimate emotional support animal, whether it be a dog, a cat, a pot-bellied pig or even a miniature horse in one case, to travel on airplanes in the cabin with the owner, outside of a carrier, and for free if the owner has proper documentation, which means a letter from a doctor or other mental health professional. The animal must be well-behaved and there must be adequate space onboard. The airlines are allowed to ask people traveling with emotional support animals for that documentation, but they are not required to.

    Genevieve from Atlanta, who asked that her last name not be used, told ABC News’ “20/20” she never had a need for an emotional support animal, or ESA. She simply wanted to fly with her dog, a lab-terrier mix named Kali, by her side in the cabin of the plane. So, about four years ago, she said she lied about having an emotional illness so that Kali could become an emotional support animal.

    “I heard from a friend. that you could get your dog certified as something called an ‘emotional support animal,’ an ESA, and at the time, I thought it was a very good idea,” Genevieve said. “I had wanted to take flights with her for family functions. At that point, I thought, ‘what’s the harm?’”

    Genevieve took an online psychological questionnaire to obtain a letter to qualify her dog Kali as an emotional support animal.

    Genevieve found a website that provided a psychological evaluation for free, all she had to do was fill out a questionnaire.

    “It was a website where I was able to. answer questions and possible emotional symptoms I had, and if I answered them in a certain way, I could get a diagnosis,” she said.

    Genevieve said she provided fake answers for the psychological questionnaire, and received the special letter she needed to show she was permitted to have an emotional support animal. She said the diagnosis she was given was a “panic attack disorder.”

    Once she had the letter, Genevieve said, “I could begin taking [Kali] on airplanes with me.”

    Emotional support animals help people by being companions, unlike service dogs, which are trained to perform specific tasks to help people with physical and mental disabilities.

    Paul Mundell, the CEO of Canine Companions for Independence, said emotional support animals “provide a valuable service” to people who need them. The problem is there are some pet owners like Genevieve who find it easy to take advantage of the law and the airlines.

    “I flew about six times with Kali and I think they looked at my letter twice,” Genevieve said.

    To see how easy it is to have a pet fly for free as an emotional support animal, ABC News bought meaningless certificates, instead of getting a letter from a mental health professional, proclaiming three different animals as emotional support animals and tried to get those animals on three different airlines.

    First, we got our correspondent’s 28-pound dog Archie declared an emotional support animal through USDogRegistry.org, where for a fee of $254, with expedited shipping, we bought the deluxe kit, which included a leash, a vest, a photo ID and a certificate with Archie’s name and registration number.

    While the paperwork looked official, in reality, it had no meaning. The website mentioned the need to have a doctor’s note, but did not ask for any proof.

    On our first flight, we called ahead to JetBlue to let them know our correspondent was boarding a flight with an emotional support animal. But when we got to the ticket counter, the JetBlue attendants didn’t check our paperwork or Archie’s tags. They just sent our correspondent and Archie on their way onto the plane.

    Next, we bought an emotional support animal certificate for a Lionhead rabbit named Leo. For $99, the ESA (Emotional Support Animal) Registration of America sent us the ESA VIP Kit, which included a registration certificate. This website also says you need to have a note from a mental health professional.

    We called ahead to Delta Air Lines to let them know we were bringing an emotional support animal on a flight with us. Delta said to bring documentation, but no one checked it at the ticket counter so we got on a flight with Leo. The airline wasn’t doing anything wrong since it’s not required to ask for documentation at the terminal.

    The airlines “don’t want to be intrusive into a person’s private life. They don’t want to embarrass someone or put them on the spot,” Paul Mundell said. “They want to do the right thing, [which] is probably to, if in doubt, accept someone’s presence with their animal at face value as an emotional support animal.”

    Then, the ESA Registration of America sold us a certificate for an albino African pygmy hedgehog named Snickers. We tried to take him on a Delta flight to Boston from New York City, but this time, a Delta agent stopped us, saying we didn’t have the proper letter from a mental health professional to allow the hedgehog onboard.

    So we wanted to try again. We booked our correspondent on a Southwest Airlines flight from Newark to Nashville. At the ticket counter, the Southwest agent asked for documentation for Snickers. Once we showed her the ESA certificate, we were allowed to board our flight.

    Airlines for America, an airline industry trade group, said in a statement to ABC News, “We trust our passengers are honest in communicating their need for service assistant animal support.”

    United States Dog Registry declined to comment, but ESA said its certificate is a valuable addition to a doctor’s note.

    Paul Mundell of Canine Companions say people who fake their need for an emotional support animal should be ashamed. He said fake ESAs are taking up valuable cabin space, possibly denying accommodations for real assistance animals. What’s more, he said, he has started to hear that poorly-behaved fake ESAs have been disrupting the work of real service animals.

    Genevieve said at first she didn’t see anything wrong with faking a condition so she could fly with her dog, but after taking Kali on half a dozen or so trips, she said a friend confronted her.

    “[My friend] started to tell me that people were having adverse consequences from this. Legitimate people with legitimate animals were getting confronted,” Genevieve said.

    So Kali’s flying days are over, and Genevieve said she is now confessing her story in hopes that other fakers will think twice about what they’re doing.


    Newspaper articles on bullying in schools #newspaper #articles #on #bullying #in #schools


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    We can reduce bullying. We can help children and teens who have been bullied. This website has ideas for schools, for parents, and for young people.

    For more detailed information and strategies, see my new book with Dr. Charisse Nixon, Youth Voice Project: Student Insights into Bullying and Peer Mistreatment. This 2013 book presents a wide range of research-based practical interventions for reducing bullying and reducing harm. You can find a brief summary of the research the book is based on here .

    Here are some early reviews of the Youth Voice Project findings and book:
    This book is the game-changer the field of bullying prevention has needed for some time. It debunks many cultural adult mindsets about bullying and clarifies what really works to provide safety and belonging to our marginalized students in school. The data present a treasure trove of fresh ideas, directly from students, on how adults and students can work together to build caring school communities.

    Chuck Saufler, lead trainer for bullying education, Maine Law and Civics Education Program, University of Maine School of Law

    “Not only did a growing understanding of the Youth Voice Project data help a school I was working with over the past year become a more positive environment for both students and staff, it also played a role in their movement from being designated Persistently Low Performing to being recognized as a Reward School. It clearly demonstrates how changes in our attitude and the way we engage students can make a BIG difference.”

    Dee Lindenberger, Co-Founder, Michigan Bully-Free Schools Program

    “Stan Davis’s signature insightfulness into the unique perspectives of young people, combined with Charisse Nixon’s keen research skills and developmental expertise, has produced one of the most valuable research projects in this field in the last five years.”

    Elizabeth K. Englander, PhD, Director, Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center, Bridgewater State University

    The Youth Voice Project findings have been an invaluable resource as we strive to debunk the societal myths and misperceptions surrounding bullying prevention and learn what truly helps kids develop prosocial relationships and resilience.

    Denise Koebcke, Valparaiso, Indiana, community schools educator and school climate coordinator

    The interventions described on this website and in Stan Davis’s books and trainings are based on the work of many researchers in bullying prevention, including Norway s Dan Olweus, England s Smith and Sharp, the USA s Dorothea Ross, Canada s Wendy Craig and Debra Pepler, Australia s Ken Rigby, and on Stan Davis s forty-plus years of experience with children, families, and schools as a social worker and school counselor. In addition, these interventions are based on the input of more than 13,000 young people across the United States who participated in the Youth Voice Project survey conducted in 2009-2010 by Stan Davis and Dr. Charisse Nixon.

    Stan’s book with Charisse Nixon, YOUTH VOICE PROJECT, is now available. Click here to learn more.

    Youth Voice Project offers a great deal of information and advice for school professionals in addressing peer mistreatment.…The Youth Voice Project successfully links survey data to important messages about a need for changes in the atmosphere of school systems.…The Youth Voice Project is a must-read for school psychologists, educators, and professionals working in schools who want inspiration and guidance in how to help identify and address issues of peer mistreatment, and more importantly, how to improve the success and well-being of the student youth—our future.”

    —Hunter McEnroe, NCSP, school psychologist,
    Communiqué. National Association of School Psychologists

    Also- Read a review of this book by the New York Association of School Psychologists


    San Francisco 2017: Best of San Francisco, CA Tourism #san #francisco, #california,


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    Every neighborhood in San Francisco has its own personality, from the hippie chic of the Upper Haight to the hipster grit of the Mission. The Marina district boasts trendy bistros and postcard-perfect views of the Golden Gate Bridge, while Noe Valley offers quaint and quiet boutiques. Wave hello to the sea lions at Pier 39, and sample local cheese and charcuterie at the Ferry Building. Sit in on a yoga session in Dolores Park or marvel at the Dutch Windmill across from Ocean Beach.

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    Palliative care Journals and Research Articles – Libertas Academica #fashion #womens

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    • Rigorous, expert peer review
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    In my opinion the review process in all the Libertas Academica journals I have had the privilege of reviewing papers for is second to none. The entire process is a click away and all the editorial staff are very cooperative. The papers that are submitted are of top quality and I am sure the journals will gain the status of high impact journals in a very short time.

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    (Children’s Memorial Research Center, Chicago, IL, USA)





    Articles about Hospice #hotel #booker

    #hospice articles

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    Hospice

    February 25, 2010 | By Bill Scanlon, Colorado Public News

    After Ryan Fiegel fell into a coma in the wake of a brain tumor in February, his parents made the tough decision to take him off his ventilator. But Ryan, 26, didn’t die; he didn’t wake up either. The Fiegels decided they wanted Ryan’s last days to be at Grand Junction’s community hospice, the Hospice and Palliative Care Center of Western Colorado. He had received excellent care at St. Mary’s Hospital and Medical Center, but it was uncomfortable to be in the scurry and stress surrounding a place where staff was trained to do everything to fight death.

    May 10, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times

    A worrisome abdominal pain drove Jalal Afshar to seek treatment last year at healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente. The Pasadena resident and Kaiser member had lived for years with a rare condition known as Castleman’s disease, which affects the lymph nodes and the body’s immune system. But this was the first time he experienced such severe symptoms. Kaiser granted his request to see a specialist in Arkansas. But it ultimately declined to pay for his treatment there. By June, Afshar said, Kaiser was arranging for hospice care so that he could die at home.

    February 3, 1989

    The largest AIDS hospice in Los Angeles has received its permanent certificate of occupancy and is running “smoothly” after problems over fire and building codes were straightened out. Michael Weinstein, president of the AIDS Hospice Foundation, said the Chris Brownlie AIDS Hospice in Elysian Park has met requirements for a permit that allows it to operate as a dormitory.

    November 9, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER

    When Pearl Jemison-Smith was a nurse, she never understood why doctors would order the resuscitation of someone dying from a terminal illness. “We would never allow someone who was dying to die,” she said, remembering back to the days when she was a nurse caring for those with cancer and other illnesses. “We would beat on their chest and defibrillate them. I felt like I was member of the Gestapo and that I was torturing them.”

    December 18, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER

    When the residents of Group One hospice return to their facility in Sherman Oaks on Sunday, it may seem as if Santa Claus came calling early. Instead of coming home to drab walls and worn bedding, the nine AIDS patients and one terminal cancer patient will find freshly painted quarters and a new supply of linens, comforters, bath towels and accessories.

    January 18, 1994 | TERRY SPENCER

    Organizers of the county’s first nonprofit hospice say it will probably be spring before the facility opens. The Hospice of Orange County was scheduled to open in Anaheim Hills this month, but Helen Monroe, the group’s treasurer, now expects it to open by May. Monroe said the delay is due in part to efforts to corral a well-heeled benefactor to sponsor the facility. One benefactor, whom she would not name, is looking into adopting the project and taking care of its ongoing financial needs.

    October 29, 1988 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer

    An official at Barlow Hospital, a respiratory facility in Elysian Park, angrily denied Friday the existence of plans to expand a 25-bed AIDS hospice that will open next month on the hospital’s grounds. John R. Howard, Barlow’s chief administrator, said that Michael Weinstein, the head of the Los Angeles AIDS Hospice Foundation, which is opening the 25-bed hospice in December, had no authority to make plans for an expansion funded by state revenue bonds.

    June 7, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer

    Los Angeles’ chief zoning administrator has reluctantly ruled that a Hollywood hospice for AIDS patients–the only one in the city and one of just a handful in the county–violates zoning laws and cannot remain in the neighborhood where it has operated for five months. The operators of Hughes House, at 1308 N. Ogden Ave. in a neighborhood of single-family homes, say they are confident they can successfully fight the ruling and won’t have to move.

    April 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy

    In the days when American physicians dispensed oracular commands and their judgments were rarely questioned, a doctor could take it upon himself with few ethical qualms to keep from a patient the bad news of a terminal diagnosis. For better or worse, those days may be well behind us. But physicians have not ceased debating one of the stickiest and most universal ethical quandaries of medical practice: How, when and why does one inform a patient that he or she is dying? The latest evidence of that ongoing discussion was published Wednesday in the British Medical Journal.

    April 15, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times

    If you’re going to talk about a subject most people don’t want to talk about, why not do so over tea and cake and cookies? Why not gather in a sunny living room looking out on a lush tangle of green, where you can watch the breeze ruffle the leaves on the trees as you eat forkfuls of blueberry tart? Death comes to each of us, to everyone we love. Couldn’t talking about it in a safe, comfy setting make the prospect less frightening? This is what Betsy Trapasso thinks. This is why she’s asked friends to come – why on a Sunday afternoon, they’ve braved Topanga Canyon’s twists and turns and climbed the dozens of wooden steps to her end-of-a-rural-road front door.

    February 5, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times

    For Americans with a terminal diagnosis, death increasingly comes in the places and ways they say they want it – at home and in the comfort of hospice care. But for a growing number of dying patients, that is preceded by a tumultuous month in which they endure procedures that are often as invasive and painful as they are futile. New research finds that the proportion of Medicare patients dying in hospice care nearly doubled from 22% in 2000 to 42% in 2009, an apparent bow to patients’ overwhelming preference for more peaceful passings free of heroic measures.

    October 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little

    WASHINGTON — George McGovern, former senator and Democratic presidential candidate, has been placed in hospice care in Sioux Falls, S.D. After several recent hospitalizations — including admittances in 2011 for fatigue and an injury after striking his head in a fall, and most recently for testing in Florida in connection with frequent exhaustion and speech difficulties — his family has decided to move him to the Dougherty Hospice House in.

    October 4, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times

    We had to put Felix to sleep last month. I say “had to put him to sleep” because I can’t bear the thought there might have been an alternative. I had two other dogs who lived to be 21 before dying at home. Toward the end, several people had suggested I look into euthanasia, but the dogs mercifully died before I had to. I believe animals shouldn’t have to suffer because I can’t pull the trigger. But I don’t get how to tell when their time is up. Families once put pets to sleep if dad got a job transfer; now, the standards seem all over the map. Days after Felix’s death, an article appeared in the New York Times arguing that death too often is used to end animal suffering when “much less aggressive possibilities exist.

    February 19, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times

    “I’m not sick; I’m only dying,” a friend told Dr. William Lamers Jr. The man had inoperable cancer and wanted to go home to die, but his doctor wouldn’t let him out of the hospital. It was the early 1970s, when most people with incurable illnesses died in a hospital, in a lonely room, attended by doctors and nurses with no specialized knowledge of the dying patient’s emotional and physical needs. There was no system for caring for the dying at home. The experience opened Lamers’ eyes to a major failing of the healthcare system.

    September 26, 2011 | By Ann J. Brady, Special to the Los Angeles Times

    When people ask about my father’s death, I always respond the same way: “Except for the fact that he died, everything was perfect. ” Perhaps because I am an oncology nurse, they expect a different answer. But after a six-year battle with colon cancer, he died on his own terms — perfect for a less-than-perfect situation. He was home on hospice. He was comfortable. His wife of 53 years, his six children and several grandchildren surrounded his bed. We are stoic folks, but as Dad drew his last breath, one sister, perhaps tapping into our Irish heritage, started a keening wail.

    February 2, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health

    Patients at the end of their lives often receive their final care from hospice workers. Contrary to what the haven’t-really-though-about-it-crowd might suspect, not all such care involves administering drugs. Hospice therapists in Florida team up to use a combination of music and massage to treat dying patients such as Bernard Michels, 98. He, for one, sees the merits. “It brings back memories of when I was a younger guy,” he says in a South Florida Sun Sentinel story. The music-massage approach delivers more than a passing feel-good emotion.





    Palliative Care Journal Articles #hospice #pharmacia

    #journal of palliative care

    #

    Palliative Care Journal Articles

    • Healthcare-Associated Infections in the Elderly: What’s New From infection prevention to appropriate antibiotic administration, find out the current thinking regarding healthcare-associated infections in long-term care residents.

    Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases. September 2016

  • Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health Care Professionals Burnout is an issue faced by many health care workers, particularly those in the critical care field. The Critical Care Societies Collaborative aims to raise awareness of this important issue.

    American Journal of Critical Care. September 2016

  • Prevention of Alcohol and Other Drug Use in the Digital Age This systematic review summarizes recent substance abuse prevention programs delivered by computers and the Internet. What’s effective, and what’s not?

    Current Opinion in Psychiatry. August 2016

  • Case Series of Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication These cases highlight the potentially life-threatening toxicity associated with synthetic cannabinoid exposure.

    Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health. August 2016

  • Chronic Critical Illness in Infants and Children What can ICU clinicians do to help improve the care of pediatric patients with prolonged ICU stays?

    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. August 2016

  • Mainstream or Extinction: Saving Geriatrics Is there a future for geriatrics? This commentary examines what’s wrong with current strategies and suggests changes to increase the survival of geriatrics as a specialty.

    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. August 2016

  • Living With Dying in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit This new article provides insight into the experience of providing palliative care to children — from the perspective of pediatric ICU nurses.

    American Journal of Critical Care. August 2016

  • Gender Differences in ED Visits, Detox Referrals for Opioids What role does gender play in opioid-related ED visits and subsequent referrals to detox programs?

    Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health. August 2016

  • Acute Poisonings From Synthetic Cannabinoids, U.S. 2010-2015 How common is acute intoxication by synthetic cannabinoids? This report examines the demographics and the trends in the use of these potentially life-threatening drugs.

    Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report. August 2016

  • Decision Making for Infants at the Threshold of Viability The authors describe a new prognosis-based guideline to help clinicians and parents make decisions regarding the care of extremely premature infants.

    Journal of Perinatology. Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association. August 2016

  • Transitional Palliative Care for End-Stage HF Patients What benefits could home-based transitional palliative care offer patients with end-stage heart failure?

    Heart. July 2016

  • Communicating Findings of Delayed Diagnostic Evaluations Are secure emails better than telephone calls for alerting primary care physicians about ‘red flag’ findings?

    Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. July 2016

  • When Families Pressure Patients to Change Their Wishes This case highlights the challenges faced by seriously ill patients experiencing compromised autonomy due to family coercion.

    Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. July 2016

  • Safe Emergency Oxygen Therapy for Patients With COPD A survey including the general public, patients, and medical personnel provides insight into the knowledge and attitudes regarding the emergent use of oxygen for COPD patients.

    BMJ Open Respiratory Research. July 2016

  • Life-Sustaining Therapy in Intracranial Hemorrhage Patients The authors describe an algorithm that may help clinicians with the decision of when to withdraw support for patients who may not benefit from life-sustaining therapy.

    Critical Care Medicine. June 2016

  • Palliative Pharmacotherapy: State-of-the-Art Management Managing symptoms of advanced cancer can greatly improve patient quality of life. This review describes the latest therapy for cachexia, anorexia, fatigue, delirium, and dyspnea.

    Cancer Control: Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center. June 2016

  • When a Patient Discusses Assisted Dying End-of-life concerns and assisted dying are difficult topics for patients and clinicians to discuss. Will these strategies and resources help?

    Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. May 2016

  • The Value of Uncertainty in Critical Illness This study explores patterns of the decision-making processes during critical care, and pinpoints sources of conflict and resolution.

    BMC Anesthesiology. May 2016

  • Conflict Management Strategies in the ICU Differ A new study provides some insight into the differences in conflict management styles between palliative care specialists and intensivists over end-of-life care in the ICU.

    Critical Care Medicine. May 2016

  • Low-Dose Morphine vs Weak Opioids in Moderate Cancer Pain Does low-dose morphine reduce pain intensity better than weak opioids in patients with moderate cancer pain?

    Journal of Clinical Oncology. May 2016





  • Articles about Hospice Beds #fashion #shop

    #hospice beds

    #

    Hospice Beds

    June 4, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The County Board of Supervisors has committed another $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and central Los Angeles. The supervisors withheld long-term support, however, from the hospice that serves the coastal area. The new three-year commitments, approved last week amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extend hospice funding to mid-1992.

    ARTICLES BY DATE

    June 4, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The County Board of Supervisors has committed another $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and central Los Angeles. The supervisors withheld long-term support, however, from the hospice that serves the coastal area. The new three-year commitments, approved last week amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extend hospice funding to mid-1992.

    June 1, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The County Board of Supervisors has committed an additional $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting Tuesday to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and Central Los Angeles. The new three-year commitments, approved amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extends hospice funding to mid-1992. The action comes close to fulfilling pledges by the supervisors a year ago to spend $2 million annually on shelters for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    June 1, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The County Board of Supervisors has committed an additional $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting Tuesday to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and Central Los Angeles. The new three-year commitments, approved amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extends hospice funding to mid-1992. The action comes close to fulfilling pledges by the supervisors a year ago to spend $2 million annually on shelters for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    June 1, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has committed another $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting this week to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and central Los Angeles. The new commitments, approved amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extends hospice funding to mid-1992. The action comes close to fulfilling pledges by the supervisors a year ago to spend $2 million annually on shelters for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    June 1, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The County Board of Supervisors has committed another $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting Tuesday to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and central Los Angeles. The new three-year commitments, approved amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extends hospice funding to mid-1992. The action comes close to fulfilling pledges by the supervisors a year ago to spend $2 million annually on shelters for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    September 23, 1996

    In a sign of the changing nature of AIDS care as well as the financial problems of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, the organization is closing its oldest hospice. Opened in late 1988 in a former nurse’s dorm of Barlow Respiratory Hospital in Elysian Park, the 25-bed Chris Brownlie House will close this week. “The demand for hospice beds has radically diminished,” foundation President Michael Weinstein said, citing advances in drug treatment that are extending the lives of people with AIDS.

    February 22, 1988

    There is encouraging progress in Los Angeles County to fill the shortage of hospice services to those dying of acquired immune deficiency syndrome–AIDS. But the advances that have been made also measure some other critical problems that continue to be neglected.

    August 8, 1985 | Associated Press

    About one-third of the patients studied in Veterans Administration hospitals in 1984 did not belong there and were admitted because of mismanagement and poor testing by doctors, the General Accounting Office said today. In a report, the congressional watchdog agency concluded that the VA could save billions of dollars on planned expansion by cutting unnecessary admissions and excessive stays at its 172 hospitals across the country.

    October 29, 1988 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer

    An official at Barlow Hospital, a respiratory facility in Elysian Park, angrily denied Friday the existence of plans to expand a 25-bed AIDS hospice that will open next month on the hospital’s grounds. John R. Howard, Barlow’s chief administrator, said that Michael Weinstein, the head of the Los Angeles AIDS Hospice Foundation, which is opening the 25-bed hospice in December, had no authority to make plans for an expansion funded by state revenue bonds.

    June 1, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has committed another $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting this week to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and central Los Angeles. The new commitments, approved amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extends hospice funding to mid-1992. The action comes close to fulfilling pledges by the supervisors a year ago to spend $2 million annually on shelters for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    June 1, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer

    The County Board of Supervisors has committed another $2.38 million over three years to AIDS hospices, voting Tuesday to support new shelters in Pomona and Willowbrook and to back existing ones in Van Nuys and central Los Angeles. The new three-year commitments, approved amid complaints that the county’s AIDS program is moving too slowly, extends hospice funding to mid-1992. The action comes close to fulfilling pledges by the supervisors a year ago to spend $2 million annually on shelters for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.