Hospice Basics Video Series #cheap #vegas #hotels

#is hospice free

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Hospice Basics Video Series

NHPCO and the National Hospice Foundation are pleased to offer a series of six short videos that review the basics of hospice care. Developed in collaboration with the Internet educator Knowlera, they are also available on NHPCO’s YouTube Channel .

Videos Available to Support Outreach Education

Current NHPCO members have permission to post the videos on their websites, YouTube pages, or other social media sites. Each video runs from 2 to 4 minutes and features an introduction by NHPCO President and CEO J. Donald Schumacher.

The videos may be embedded or linked as a series that include all six videos or posted/linked as individual video files.

All Six Videos as One File

Code to embed the YouTube playlist shown above – this includes all six Hospice Basics videos and plays them in sequential order.

object width=”480″ height=”385″ param name=”movie” value=”http://www.youtube.com/p/BE4D0C4D8E1F663D hl=en_US fs=1″ /param param name=”allowFullScreen” value=”true” /param param name=”allowscriptaccess” value=”always” /param embed src=http://www.youtube.com/p/BE4D0C4D8E1F663D hl=en_US fs=1 type=”application/x-shockwave-flash” width=”480″ height=”385″ allowscriptaccess=”always” allowfullscreen=”true” /embed /object

Code to Embed a Single Video from the Series

For allowing cameras and a film crew into their home, NHPCO and NHF extend special thanks to Mrs. Diane Smith, her husband, Bob, and their family. Additionally, our appreciation goes out to the nurse, social worker and chaplain from Gilchrist Hospice Care who cared for the Smith family and participated in the creation of this video series.





Workers Comp Benefits Explained #workman #compensation #lawyer, #workers’ #compensation #basics


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Workers’ Comp Benefits Explained

Workers’ compensation insurance is a type of insurance purchased by employers for the coverage of employment-related injuries and illnesses. FindLaw’s Workers’ Compensation Basics has more resources in addition to this article’s answers to frequently asked questions about workman’s compensation.

What is workers’ compensation or workman’s compensation?

Workers’ compensation insurance, often called workers comp, is a state-mandated program consisting of payments required by law to be made to an employee who is injured or disabled in connection with work. The federal government does offer its own workers’ compensation insurance for federal employees, but every individual state has its own workers’ compensation insurance program. Be sure to check your own state’s workers’ compensation benefits laws by referring to the appropriate office in your state on the State Workers’ Compensation official page of the U.S. Department of Labor’s website.

In most situations, injured employees receive workers’ compensation insurance. no matter who was at fault for the injury. Because these workers comp benefits act as a type of insurance, they preclude the employee from suing his or her employer for the injuries covered.

What types of incidents are and are not covered by workers’ compensation insurance?

Workers’ compensation insurance is designed to cover injuries that result from employees’ or employers’ carelessness. The range of injuries and situations covered is broad, but there are limits. States can impose drug and alcohol testing on the injured employee, and can deny the employee workers’ compensation benefits if such tests show the employee was under the influence at the time of the injury. Compensation may also be denied if the injuries were self-inflicted; where the employee was violating a law or company policy; and where the employee was not on the job at the time of the injury.

What types of expenses does workers’ compensation insurance cover?

Although the payments are usually modest, workers’ compensation insurance covers

  • medical care from the injury or illness
  • replacement income
  • costs for retraining
  • compensation for any permanent injuries
  • benefits to survivors of workers who are killed on the job

But remember that if a person collects workers’ compensation benefits, he or she cannot sue the employer. And workers’ compensation benefits do NOT cover pain and suffering.

Wage replacement is usually two/thirds of the worker’s average wage, but there is a fixed maximum amount that the benefits will not go over. That may seem modest, but note that these benefits are not taxed. So, as long as the employee was making a fair wage, he or she should have no major problems. The eligibility for wage replacement begins immediately after a few days of work are missed because of a particular injury or illness.

Does workers’ compensation insurance cover long-term and permanent injuries?

Yes. Workers’ compensation insurance is not limited to just incidental accidents. It also covers problems and illnesses that are developed over a long period of time of doing the same injurious activity–for example, carpal tunnel syndrome or back problems from some sort of repetitious movement.

Who is covered by workers’ compensation insurance?

Most types of employees are covered by workers’ compensation insurance. That said, states commonly exclude some workers from coverage, such as:

  • independent contractors
  • business owners
  • volunteers
  • employees of private homes
  • farmers and farmhands
  • maritime employees
  • railroad employees
  • casual workers

Because employees of the federal government are covered under the federal workers’ compensation insurance program, they are not covered by state workers’ comp. Some states do not enforce the workers’ compensation program on employers with fewer than 3 to 5 employees working for them. This varies from state to state.

Can I sue my employer for a work injury ?

Yes. You may sure your employer for any reckless or intentional action of your employer that caused your injury. If you choose to do this, you will waive your right to workers’ compensation insurance. If you are successful, the court may award a broad range of damages, such as punitive damages, medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering, and mental anguish.

Can my employer fire me for or tell me not to file a workers’ compensation claim?

No. Most states prohibit this by law. If an employer does retaliate against an employee for filing a workers’ compensation claim, the employer should be reported immediately to the local workers’ compensation office.

Free Initial Case Review from an Experienced Workers’ Compensation Attorney

Accidents occurring on the job should be covered by workers’ compensation insurance. If you’ve been injured on the job and your employer disputes your workers’ comp claim, you likely need legal help. Have an experienced attorney provide an initial review your claim for free with no obligations.


The Workers Compensation Claim Process #do #i #need #a #workers #compensation #lawyer,


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The Workers’ Compensation Claim Process

Most employers are required to carry workers’ compensation. or workers’ comp, insurance to cover employees who are injured on the job. Employees do not have to prove fault in order to recover, but benefits are not automatic. Specifics of the workers’ compensation claims process vary by state, but injured employees generally must notify their employer and the workers’ comp carrier. Regardless of state laws, however, injured employees are always encouraged to obtain any necessary medical treatment first.

Assuming you’ve already received medical attention, the workers’ compensation claim process involves several important steps. You must notify your employer in writing; fill out an official claim form (which should be provided by your employer); and keep detailed records about your treatment.

The workers comp claim process is discussed in greater detail below.

Get Immediate Medical Attention

Before filing a workers’ comp claim, make sure you get the necessary medical treatment. Some workers’ comp policies require injured employees to see a specified doctor, so you may want to ask your supervisor. But many state laws allow you to get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the first one. Even if you don’t feel the need to get medical attention, it may be a requirement for the workers’ compensation claim process.

Keep in mind that a medical report will serve as an official record of your injuries and the basis for any workers’ comp reimbursement.

Notify Your Employer

Make sure you notify your employer about the injury within the statutory deadline, preferably soon after the injury occurs. In New York, for example, an employee has 30 days in which to notify their employer about a job-related injury. It’s a good idea to report all workplace accidents even if you don’t suspect an injury, just in case an injury is discovered after the deadline expires.

As with any legal process, make sure you notify your supervisor in writing. Even if you give verbal notification first, a written follow-up notification will provide an official record. The sooner you do this, the more details you will be able to recall.

Your employer probably will give you an official claim form as part of the workers’ compensation claim process. But if not, you should request one from the workers’ compensation board of your state. Generally, you will need to provide the following information on your workers comp claim form:

  1. Type of injury and affected areas of the body;
  2. Date, time, and location of injury;
  3. Parties involved in the accident;
  4. How the accident occurred; and
  5. Any medical treatment you have received

Workers’ Comp Claim Process: Employers’ Responsibilities

Employers that are required by law to provide workers’ comp coverage face the prospect of fines, criminal charges, and lawsuits if they fail to do so. Also, employers may not retaliate against a worker who claims workers’ comp. Therefore, employers have strong incentives to comply with the law and complete all valid claims.

Usually, your employer will file your claim with its insurer and the state workers’ comp board office. After your claim is evaluated by the insurer, an administrator will notify you about whether your claim has been accepted and the amount of benefits to which you are entitled.

After the Claim

Most of your involvement with the workers’ compensation claim process is complete after filling out the necessary paperwork. But you still want to follow up on your claim and make sure you keep detailed records. For instance, you may want to keep a journal of how the injury affects your work and day-to-day activities. Also, be sure to keep receipts for out-of-pocket expenses and proof of any other hardships caused by the injury.

If your claim is rejected, you will have the opportunity to appeal in most cases.

Need Help with Your Claim? Get Free Legal Assistance Today

Dealing with complicated legal matters can be very stressful for non-lawyers, especially after sustaining a work-related injury. The workers’ compensation claim process is often uneventful, but sometimes can require the delicate touch of an experienced legal professional. Have a workers’ comp attorney evaluate your claim today. at absolutely no charge.

See FindLaw’s Workers’ Compensation Basics section for more articles.


Craig J #stock #market #quotes, #online #quotes, #stock #market, #stock #market #quote,


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Business Leaders

Craig J. Duchossois, MBA

Mr. Craig J. Duchossois is Independent Director at Churchill Downs, Inc. Chairman & Chief Executive Officer at Trinity Rail Group LLC, Chief Executive Officer & Director at The Duchossois Group, Inc. a Principal at Duchossois Technology Partners LLC, Chief Executive Officer at TCMC, Inc. a Member at World Presidents’ Organization, a Member at Economic Club of Chicago, Chairman at The Chamberlain Group, Inc. a Principal at Duchossois Capital Partners LLC, Managing Member at HeathCo LLC, and a Member at Chief Executive Officers’ Club of Boston.

He is on the Board of Directors at Churchill Downs, Inc. The Duchossois Group, Inc. World Business Chicago, The Culver Educational Foundation, The University of Chicago, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, Northwestern University, The Executives Club of Chicago, AMX Corp. Milestone AV Technologies, Inc. The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, AMX UK Ltd. Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, AMX LLC, Amsted Industries, Inc. and Kellogg School of Management.

Mr. Duchossois was previously employed as Independent Director by Levy Acquisition Corp. a Board Member by LaSalle National Bank, Chairman by United States Naval Academy, and a Principal by United States Marine Corps.

He also served on the board at Platinum Entertainment, Inc. Blue Rhino Corp. and Trinity Industries, Inc.

He received his undergraduate degree from Southern Methodist University and an MBA from Southern Methodist University.

Current positions of Craig J. Duchossois, MBA

Chief Executive Officer

The Chamberlain Group, Inc.

Duchossois Capital Management LLC

Amsted Industries, Inc.

The Duchossois Group, Inc.

Chief Executive Officer & Director

Milestone AV Technologies, Inc.

The University of Chicago Medical Center

Illinois Institute of Technology

The University of Chicago

World Business Chicago

The Executives Club of Chicago

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs

The Culver Educational Foundation

Edgewater Funds LP

Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation

Kellogg School of Management

Duchossois Technology Partners LLC

World Presidents’ Organization

Economic Club of Chicago

Duchossois Capital Partners LLC

Chief Executive Officers’ Club of Boston

Holdings of Craig J. Duchossois, MBA

Craig J. Duchossois, MBA: Personal Network

Churchill Downs, Inc.
Duchossois Capital Partners LLC
The Duchossois Group, Inc.
Milestone AV Technologies, Inc.
TCMC, Inc.
The Chamberlain Group, Inc.

Churchill Downs, Inc.
The Duchossois Group, Inc.
Milestone AV Technologies, Inc.
AMX LLC
The Executives Club of Chicago
Duchossois Technology Partners LLC
The Chamberlain Group, Inc.
Economic Club of Chicago
AMX Corp.

Kellogg School of Management
Northwestern University
The Executives Club of Chicago
The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
Economic Club of Chicago

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
Northwestern University
Kellogg School of Management
Economic Club of Chicago
The Executives Club of Chicago

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
World Business Chicago
Economic Club of Chicago
The Executives Club of Chicago

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
The Executives Club of Chicago
World Business Chicago
Economic Club of Chicago

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
World Business Chicago
The Executives Club of Chicago
Economic Club of Chicago

Economic Club of Chicago
World Business Chicago
The Executives Club of Chicago
The University of Chicago

The Duchossois Group, Inc.
AMX Corp.
The Culver Educational Foundation

Economic Club of Chicago
World Business Chicago
World Presidents’ Organization
The University of Chicago
The Executives Club of Chicago


How Car Insurance Works #auto #insurance #basics


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How Car Insurance Works

It may be fun to drive, but that sports car will raise your premiums. See more sports car pictures.

If you own your own car, you probably already know a little about car insurance. You may have heard the words deductible or premium. But, do you truly understand the different parts of an auto insurance policy and do you know how to choose the best coverage?

Forty-seven states require that you have at least some kind of car insurance, so it’s a good idea to know what the law requires you to have and what additional or optional coverage will help to protect you in the event of an accident.

Before purchasing auto insurance, you must consider a variety of factors including what kind of car you have, your driving record and the amount of money you are willing to pay. Understanding the simple basics of auto insurance will make you confident that the car insurance policy you choose will take care of your needs in the event of an accident.

In this article, we will walk you through the types of coverage that insurance companies offer and discuss possible insurance needs. Additionally we will look at what affects the price of auto insurance, how to bring the costs down and how to understand the components of your policy.

We’ll start with the different types of coverage you can choose from on the next page.

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Hospice Care: The Basics #cheapest #motel

#who qualifies for hospice care

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Hospice Care: The Basics

The use of hospice care (end-of-life comfort care) — services that focus on keeping a dying patient as comfortable and pain-free as possible during their last days — is becoming more and more popular. Many elderly folks and terminally ill people choose this low-fuss, low-frills medical care as their lives come to an end. If you are considering hospice care for yourself or a loved one, take the time to learn what it is, how to qualify and pay for it, and how to find hospice care services that work for your particular situation.

What is Hospice Care?

Hospice provides an alternative to the traditional medical care that hospitals and nursing facilities commonly deliver toward the end of a patient’s life. In hospice, the goal is shifted from attempting to cure an illness or performing life-saving measures to keeping a patient as comfortable and free of pain as possible. In addition to providing a seriously ill patient with care and comfort, hospice services often extend to his or her family members and friends — involving and training them in giving care, and providing breaks and counseling services to those who need them.

Hospice care has been growing in popularity in recent years. The National Hospice and palliative care Organization estimates that 1.4 million patients received services from hospice in 2008. And it noted that 38.5% of all people that died in the United States were under the care of a hospice program.

Provided the patient meets certain criteria, Medicare and most insurance plans cover hospice care.

Where hospice care is provided. Many people think of hospice as care provided at home, and that is generally the case. But it may also be given in a hospital, nursing home, or separate hospice facility. Because hospice care is focused on easing pain rather than radical medical intervention, it usually does not require sophisticated or cumbersome machinery, such as life-support systems or dialysis devices.

Types of care included. The specific type of hospice care provided may depend on which people or what agency provides it, as well as what care is most fitting. But hospice services are generally provided by a team of caregivers and may include:

  • medical care — a hospice doctor generally oversees and coordinates the care, sometimes working in tandem with a patient’s primary care physician
  • nursing care — provided either around-the-clock, if needed, or sporadically for check-ups or special services, such as administering injections
  • help with daily needs, such as bathing, cooking, or cleaning
  • visits from a religious counselor, if requested
  • counseling services, both for the patient and for family members
  • social services support, such as help with insurance and financial matters
  • respite care to provide breaks and rest time for caregivers, especially family members
  • medical supplies and equipment — such as hospital beds, bedside commodes, wheelchairs, and oxygen
  • medications to help control pain and symptoms
  • physical, speech, dietary, and occupational therapists, and
  • bereavement care following a death.

Qualifying for Hospice Care

To qualify for hospice care, a doctor must certify that a patient has a terminal illness and will probably have six months or less to live.

In reality, of course, it is often difficult or impossible for doctors to put a specific timeline on a patient’s life. But most insurers and all Medicare administrators will require this diagnosis before they will cover the cost of hospice care, as discussed below.

Patients may also switch in and out of hospice care as a medical condition worsens or improves. For example, a person whose cancer goes into remission may switch out of hospice care, but enter it again if symptoms recur. It’s also acceptable for a patient to move in or out of hospice care simply because he or she has a change of heart or is anxious to try a new type of medical treatment.

Finding Hospice Care Providers

There are several Internet sources available to help locate hospice care in your area. The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization at www.nhpco.org and the Hospice Association of America at www.nahc.org/HAA are good starting points for a search.

Friends, neighbors, and relatives who have had good experiences with a particular hospice provider may also be invaluable resources. Or, you can check with your local Office on Aging. Staff members may be able to direct you to reputable hospice care providers. To find your local Office on Aging, do an Internet search using your state name and “office on aging” as the search words.

However, for older people who are already enmeshed in the medical system or who are receiving care through a hospital or skilled nursing facility, often the best way to find appropriate hospice care is to talk with medical and other personnel who are already involved with the patient, including:

Treating physicians. A doctor who has practiced medicine in one place for a while will likely be familiar with one or more hospice agencies in the locale. One caveat is that primary care physicians often bow out of the caretaking picture once hospice care begins. So if a treating physician recommends an agency, ask for a description of the experience behind that recommendation.

Discharge planners. If a patient is in a hospital or skilled nursing facility, the hospital or facility discharge planner should have contact information for area hospice services. Some medical facilities have a contract with and refer to only one hospice service, so find out whether this is the case.

Long-term care facilities. Assisted living and other types of long-term care facilities usually have relationships with one or more hospice providers. A person who is a resident in such a facility will often experience the smoothest transition in care by taking up with a familiar hospice, because the staffs at both spots most likely have an established working relationship.

Whatever method you use to find hospice service, be sure to investigate a few and comparison shop before making a final decision.