Stomach cramps before bowel movement #stomach #cramps #before #bowel #movement


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Sulphuric/ Eggy burps and stomach cramps

I found the above topic last night at this same forum, though its dated 6 yrs back and I couldnt find anything more recent as I was searching for an answer to my own problem of the foulest burps that ever existed, then comes the diarhea and finally the vomitting. For me this can last up to two or three days. I was so relieved to find that other people have and are experiencing these same symptoms. Though im worried that no one has found and answer, maybe they have, as I said, the only forum I found for this is on this web site and its 6 yrs old. Im hoping someone has some new answer to this same problem. Its dibilitating when it happens, hard to go to work while im busy crapping and puking myself to half to death. Again, the burps are the absolute worst, those alone taste so bad its enough to make me sick and the sulphuric smell is just awful. Really its like im farting out my mouth. Hopefully after 6 yrs someone has some kind of real answer to this problem.

Discussion is closed

You may not be getting your food through your system adequately. Drink LOTS of water, less dairy/milk, and you might try adding some bulk to your food, in the form of flax seed or a little Metamucil. Taking Pepcid or other antacids may help. If you have not seen a gastroenterologist and had an upper GI and lower GI examination, I highly recommend you do so, and it should help. And don t fuss; these tests are not as bad as people will say, and well worth getting the issue resolved.

Discussion is closed

Discussion is closed

Thanks Klaaskoop – I had a look at your cure of vinegar. I have not tried that yet. Just wanted to add my 2 cents and whole experience here:
– Currently 38 years old and have had these bouts my whole life. my mother says it started when I was a baby.
– They seem to be worse when I m very stressed out or eat very rich foods or binge, but honestly sometimes they don t happeni nthat context, so it s hard to say that s why. Also same with thinking it s a particular food allergy. I always think this, but it can t be the reason (too many variables).
TESTS I VE HAD:
-Parasite test and didn t have any (fecal test)
-Barium test once at age 26, and it didn t turn up anything.
– h.Pylori tests: was negative in 2011 and positive in 2014. Was treated with antbiotic regimen in March 2015 and then air test showed it was gone in July. I had no bouts between April and October 2015.

So I feel as though the h.pylori, while it can t be the CAUSE, definitely made it worse. I know that I had more episodes between 2012 and 2015 because when I was pregnant in 2012, I was sick almost every month. And in early 2015, I was sick 2 or 3 times a month, missing a lot of work. It seem sto follow no pattern at all, which is super annoying.

Now, between April 2015 and November 2015 I had the longest time without any episodes, which was awesome. Was this because the h/pylori was gone? No idea.
But I did suddenly get sick last week, from what I thought was a bit different, maybe a regular stomach bug. There were hints of burps, but it wasn t the same. Unfortunately, I got it again several days later and this time it was totally the burp/vomiting/diarrhea expisode. It was bad. I m just getting better now and to my horror, this morning my husband came downstairs an had the burps.
NO ONE in my life has ever had them other than me, that I ve been in contact with. So that makes me wonder if it s transmittable.
So now I m thinking it s a parasite again.
I was seen by a gastroenterologist in the summer who said it was probably constipation and to take Metamucil. I have a follow-up in January and will try to0 remember to follow up here too.

Discussion is closed


Robin McGraw Plastic Surgery Speculations #robin #mcgraw #plastic #surgery,dr #phil #wife,celebrity #plastic


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Robin McGraw is an American author, speaker and actress, but best known for being wife of Dr. Phil McGraw . popular author and television talk show host. She was born on December 28, 1953 in Irving, Texas. She spends her time running and working for a non-profit charitable organization with the task of helping disadvantaged families and their children. Robin wrote and published two books – Inside My Heart and What’s Age Got To Do With It? Both of them reached number one on New York Times best-selling book chart.

As an actress she appeared in an episode of soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful. She also made appearances in Dr.Phil, Entertainment Tonight, Christmas in Washington, Larry King Live and many others.

Robin McGraw stated that she has never undergone plastic surgery procedures and that she takes care of her body in a natural way. She says that the most important thing is to stay hydrated and to drink a lots of water. She always uses hydrating hand creme because she is convinced that the hands are the first place you can see a woman aging. She also claims she has found some natural ways to make your face look like you had a facelift. Also, her recipe for aging well includes a proper amount of physical activity, so she takes Pilates lessons.

In spite of all that Robin claims, some critics and fans don t agree. They say they can hardly recognize her recently. Rumors are she has done some brow lift and porcelain veneers procedure to make her teeth look more natural. People also speculate about her regular use of Botox and other fillers, as about having a nose job done.









Do you think Robin McGraw is familiar with plastic surgery?

Comments


Signs of Impending Death a Few Hours Before Death #royal #marine #hotel

#hospice signs of impending death

#

What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death?

What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death? Emma’s Story Part 5 will take you there.

Death is getting close. Hours close. All the signs of impending death are there. This is the final stretch. We are nearly there. Nearly there. Let’s follow Emma and her dying.

Emma’s Story Part 5:
A Few Hours Before Death

By now Emma’s daughter Jane had decided to spend the night in the spare bedroom. She had promised her mom that she would be there. Would be there to see her mother and best friend die.

Jane had the monitor to give Arthur a good night’s sleep. A monitor to hear Emma while being in another room. All through the night Jane would wake up and listen. She would make sure that she still heard Emma breathing.

Ever so often she would get up and look. Emma’s eyes were closed. No movement. She was unresponsive. As if in a deep sleep.

Early in the morning Emma’s breathing changed. She would take a breath in and then stop. Stop for as long as 20 or 30 seconds. No breath.

Then slowly her body would start reaching for the next breath. Finally the next breath came. Then the breath stopped again. For another 20 to 30 seconds.

This went on for a few hours. It felt kind of eerie as it was so easy to think: “Oh, this is her last breath.” But it wasn’t yet. Not yet.

I am available as an inspirational speaker
about all aspects of death
including the luminous side of dying
for both US and international events.
Click here to find out more about my talks
and click here to contact me
.

This close to death, as in hours away, our bodies are giving us more signs to look for. More symptoms of dying as mile markers on the final journey home. More ways to know that death is near. Very near.

Emma’s breath, as described above, is called “Cheyne-Stokes” breathing. That kind of breathing consists of inbreaths followed by periods of no breath. Another inbreath. Another pause. Another inbreath. Another pause.

This kind of breathing can last for many hours. Or just for a short while.

Here is a list of your typical signs of impending death:

  • Our breathing is becoming more irregular and often slows down.
  • Our eyes might be closed. Or they might be open or half closed, but without actually focusing on anything.

  • Lips and nail beds can look purple or bluish.

  • Fluids may gather at the back of the throat, resulting in what sometimes is called the “death rattle”. It does not appear to disturb us when we are dying. But it can sound awkward for those sitting close by.

  • Our hands and feet may look blotchy and purplish (mottled). This mottling can slowly move up the arms and legs.

  • Our hearing seems to be the last sense to go. So talk to us. Tell us that all is well. That we are going home. That you love us. That it is all right for us to die. That it is OK for us to finally go home.
  • And again a reminder: not all signs of impending death show up for all who are dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death Continued

    By this time Emma was surrounded by her husband Arthur and her daughter Jane. One sitting on each side of the hospital bed. They took turns holding her hands.

    They had lit a candle. There were flowers some good friends had brought over on a night stand. The curtains were closed to keep the bright summer sunshine out.

    Every couple of hours one of them would get up to give Emma her next dose of liquid morphine. No need to swallow. The insides of Emma’s mouth just absorbed it. Her face looked easy and relaxed under the circumstances.

    There was a pillow under her knees. Her head was still on her favorite pillow and propped up with the help of the raised head piece of the hospital bed.

    Emma was as comfortable as she could be in these last hours.

    The Gifts of These Last Hours

    These last hours filled with signs of impending death can feel very special. They can be like a moment of hushed silence in the middle of a busy street. Like the sense of wonder just before a sunrise on the ocean. Like a holy moment in church full of imagined angels singing. Like a long prayer deeply soothing us.

    They have a similar quality to the time right after a baby is born. That same feeling. That same sense of wonder.

    As if they are like gateways. Gates to the other side. Gates to our souls.

    As if the veils keeping us here on this earth get lifted around death. As if we can reach across to the other side together with our loved ones who are dying.

    We only visit for a short time. They are the ones going there for good.

    Can you sense the sounds
    touching your heart?

    Are you feeling the call
    reaching for you?

    Do you know the voices
    singing your name in light?

    You are so close
    Dear One
    You are so close





    Finance Your Bariatric Surgery – Online Application #finance #surgery,patient #financing,finance #gastric #bypass,finance


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    Patient Financing for Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Our patient financing offers you a full range of payment plans. Our 3, 6, 12, 18 month No Interest* payment plans feature monthly payments as low as 3% of the balance and let you pay within the specified time without incurring interest charges. Simply make your minimum monthly payment and pay off your entire balance during the agreed upon time period, and you’ll pay no interest.

    For patients/clients with higher treatment fees who would prefer more time to pay with lower monthly payments, our 24, 36, 48, 60 month extended payment plans* offer a low, fixed 11.9% interest rate and an extended term.

    We offer a variety of affordable financing programs through your doctors office with flexible payment options and low monthly payments. With available loan amounts from $1000 to $25,000 we have a loan program for every budget, even for those with less then perfect credit.

    Key benefits of our patient financing programs:

    • Fixed rates starting as low as 5.9%
    • Interest Rebate programs for up to 12 months
    • Fixed low monthly payments
    • Terms from 12 months to 84 months
    • No prepayment penalty
    • Bad credit financing available with a Co-Applicant
    • Easy application form with quick approval decisions

    Please enter your height and weight


  • What does it cost?

    Thank you for inquiring about this surgery

    In many cases your insurance will cover all/most of the cost of this surgery.

    If you want to pay cash, the cost can be as low as $10,000
    **cost varies region to region

    Another good reason to have surgery is that our patients have told us that weight loss surgery can reduce your monthly food bill as much as 50% or more

    What is your average monthly food bill?


  • Life Before Death – Consultations with Death – The Last Word –

    #hospice quotes

    #

    While so many people avoid talking about death and dying like it is the plague, some of our finest philosophers, poets and scholars have waxed lyrical about it. From cynical to profound, reflective to encouraging, inspiring to downright funny… they try and make sense of the eventuality we all have to face.

    “Live as you would have wished to live when you are dying.”

    – Christian Furchtegott Gellert, German poet (1715 – 1769).

    “You matter because you are you, and you matter to the end of your life. We will do all we can not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die.”

    — Dame Cicely Saunders, nurse, physician and writer, and founder of hospice movement (1918 – 2005).

    “The nearer she came to death, the more, by some perversity of nature, did she enjoy living.”

    – Ellen Glasgow, American novelist (1873-1945).

    “Some people are so afraid to die that they never begin to live.”

    – Henry Van Dyke, American short-story writer, poet and essayist (1852 – 1933).

    “Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.”

    – Isaac Asimov, American science fiction novelist scholar (1920 – 1992).

    “Death helps us to see what is worth trusting and loving and what is a waste of time.”

    — J. Neville Ward, Methodist minister (1915 – 1992).

    “The question is not whether we will die, but how we will live.”

    – Dr Joan Borysenko, medical scientist and psychologist (b.1945).

    “As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well used brings happy death.”

    – Leonardo da Vinci, Italian polymath (1452 – 1519).

    “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”

    — Mahatma Gandhi, Indian philosopher (1869 – 1948).

    “The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

    – Mark Twain, American novelist and humorist (1835 – 1910).

    “Forgive yourself before you die. Then forgive others.”

    – Morrie Schwartz, American educator and writer (1916 – 1995).

    “When you learn how to die, you learn how to live.”

    – Morrie Schwartz, American educator and writer (1916 – 1995).

    “Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside us while we live.”

    – Norman Cousins, American political journalist, author, professor, and world peace advocate (1915 -1990).

    “Somebody should tell us, right at the start of our lives, that we are dying. Then we might live life to the limit, every minute of every day. Do it! I say. Whatever you want to do, do it now! There are only so many tomorrows.”

    – Pope Paul VI, Italian Pope (1897 – 1978).

    “. almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

    – Steve Jobs, American Entrepreneur, Apple co-Founder (b.1955).

    “Every man dies – Not every man really lives.”

    – William Ross Wallace, American poet (1819 – 1881).

    “Try as much as possible to be wholly alive, with all your might, and when you laugh, laugh like hell and when you get angry, get good and angry. Try to be alive. You will be dead soon enough.”

    – William Saroyan, American writer (1908 – 1981)

    “I am not afraid of death, I just don’t want to be there when it happens.”

    – Woody Allen, American screenwriter, film director, actor, comedian, writer, musician and playwright (b.1935).

    “For mortals vanished from the day’s sweet light. I shed no tear; rather I mourn for those who day and night live in death’s fear.”





    Best of Fort Lauderdale Tourism 2016: Top Tips Before You Go #hospice

    #motel fort lauderdale

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    This canal-laced city is a far cry from its rowdy, party image of the past. Today, following renovation and renewal, upmarket stores and restaurants have replaced fast-food stands and T-shirt shops. But the city s biggest draws are its stretch of gorgeous beaches, great swimming, nearly year-round sunshine and close-to-ideal climate. For great shopping, dining and nightlife, you can t go wrong at Las Olas Riverfront, a waterfront entertainment centre with top-notch clothing and jewellery shops, bars and free entertainment. The city has a host of family-friendly options, such as Everglades Holiday Park and the Museum of Discovery and Science. With the network of canals and waterways, boats are part of the Lauderdale lifestyle, and tourists can get in on the act by hiring a boat or hailing a water taxi. There s a lot to do here, but make sure and spend some quiet time just soaking up the sun or strolling along the beach at dusk.

    Planning your Fort Lauderdale trip?

    Price Finder checks up to 200 sites to find today’s best hotel prices.




    View All Photos





    Laser Hair Removal Before and After Photos #laser #hair #removal #before #and


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    Laser Hair Removal Photos

    Browse our photos to see the results of laser hair removal. These photos include case histories, tracking clients results after treatment with the Candela GentleLASE .

    We don’t want to take up your time waiting for images to load. Because we have had many requests for before and after pictures we want to give you a chance to preview each photo – you can decide which photos to wait for. However. it is worth the wait to enlarge the image. These photos are detailed and look better larger !

    Female Underarm Before

    Female Underarm After

    Before Laser Hair Removal
    (photo flash was not used)

    Immediately Following Laser Hair Removal Treatment. The shiny glare is from a double antibiotic ointment that was applied to speed the healing process.
    Notice that there is minimal redness following treatment.


    What is the GASTRIC SLEEVE? Information on cost, benefits of vertical sleeve?


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    GastricSleeve (Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy)

    The gastric sleeve is the lastest weight loss procedure that shows promising results. By restricting food absorbtion and reducing hunger the gastric sleeve might be your best option. Please consult with our surgeon or staff to find out if this is the best procedure for you. Advantages of gastric sleeve include lower cost, less dumping, fewer complications and does not require adjustments after the initial surgery.

    The vertical sleeve gastrectomy is a restrictive form of weight loss surgery in which approximately 85% of the stomach is removed leaving a cylindrical or sleeve shaped stomach with a capacity ranging from about 60 to 150 cc, depending upon the surgeon performing the procedure. Unlike many other forms of bariatric surgery, the outlet valve and the nerves to the stomach remain intact and, while the stomach is drastically reduced in size, its function is preserved. Again, unlike other forms of surgery such as the Roux en Y gastric bypass, the sleeve gastrectomy is not reversible.

    Because the new stomach continues to function normally there are far fewer restrictions on the foods which patients can consume after surgery, albeit that the quantity of food eaten will be considerably reduced. This is seen by many patients as being one of the great advantages of the sleeve gastrectomy, as is the fact that the removal of the majority of the stomach also results in the virtual elimination of hormones produced within the stomach which stimulate hunger.

    Perhaps the greatest advantage of the gastric sleeve lies in the fact that it does not involve any bypass of the intestinal tract and patients do not therefore suffer the complications of intestinal bypass such as intestinal obstruction, anemia, osteoporosis, vitamin deficiency and protein deficiency. It also makes it a suitable form of surgery for patients who are already suffering from anemia, Crohn’s disease and a variety of other conditions that would place them at high risk for surgery involving intestinal bypass.

    Facts about the gastric sleeve or sleeve gastrectomy:

    Alternative names: vertical sleeve gastrectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, greater curvature gastrectomy, parietal gastrectomy, gastric reduction and vertical gastroplasty.

    Surgery for high BMI patients. For patients with a particularly high body mass index (typically 50+) many forms of weight loss surgery are either difficult to perform or present increased risk. As a result, a vertical sleeve gastrectomy (or increasingly a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) is sometimes performed as the first of a two-part weight loss solution to provide an initial drop in weight which then makes other bariatric follow up possible at a reduced level of risk.

    Surgery for low BMI patients. For obese patients with a relatively low body mass index the vertical sleeve gastrectomy can also prove a good choice, especially where existing conditions (such as anemia or Crohn’s disease) prevent them from having other forms of bariatric surgery. In addition, patients may choose this form of surgery if they are concerned about the long-term affects of bypass surgery or object to having a ‘foreign’ body implanted into their body, as is the case with lap band surgery.

    Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery

    During sleeve gastrectomy, the surgeon will remove the larger, rounded part of the stomach.

    • The remaining stomach looks like a sleeve (or hose or tube) and holds about 15 percent as much food as the original stomach.
    • The surgeon will remove the larger, rounded part of the stomach from the body. (This is the only gastric surgery in which part of the stomach is taken out of the body.)
    • Unlike gastric bypass, which changes stomach openings, sleeve gastrectomy leaves the openings intact.
    • It may be a safer and more effective option than gastric bypass for patients with very high BMI, those with medical problems like anemia, Crohn�s disease, osteoporosis, extensive prior surgeries and other complex medical conditions.
    • Sleeve gastrectomy may be safer than gastric bypass for patients who have a number of health risks.
    • It lowers the risk of ulcers compared to gastric bypass.
    • The surgery cuts away the part of the stomach that produces grehlin, a stomach hormone that stimulates hunger.
    • Though the stomach is smaller, the openings are left intact, so digestion can go on as normal.
    • The body is free of foreign objects like the LAP-BAND� or Realize Band.
    • May be converted to gastric bypass or duodenal switch if necessary for additional weight loss
    • Expected excess weight loss for stand-alone procedure is 60 to 70% at two years
    • Sleeve gastrectomy is more common in Europe, but most American health insurance carriers still consider it an investigational procedure and do not cover the cost. But that is rapidly changing so please consult our office to see if your insurance will cover the gastric sleeve.
    • Anytime you have anesthesia or surgery, there is a risk of blood clots, other complications or death.
    • Do not smoke. Smoking would put you at high risk for infection, blood clots, slow healing and other life-threatening complications.
    • Complications can occur with the stapling, such as leaks or bleeding.
    • You may need malabsorptive surgery � intestinal bypass or duodenal switch � in addition to your sleeve gastrectomy in order to lose all the weight you need and want to lose.
    • The smaller portion of the stomach may stretch.
    • Foods that you eat now may cause discomfort, nausea or vomiting after your surgery.
    • Gastric surgery puts you at higher than normal risk of developing gallstones and gallbladder disease.
    • You will not lose weight or maintain your weight loss unless you eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly. This is the reason we stress long-term follow-up with our center and your doctor.


    Signs of Impending Death a Few Hours Before Death #hospice #and #palliative

    #hospice signs of impending death

    #

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death?

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death? Emma’s Story Part 5 will take you there.

    Death is getting close. Hours close. All the signs of impending death are there. This is the final stretch. We are nearly there. Nearly there. Let’s follow Emma and her dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5:
    A Few Hours Before Death

    By now Emma’s daughter Jane had decided to spend the night in the spare bedroom. She had promised her mom that she would be there. Would be there to see her mother and best friend die.

    Jane had the monitor to give Arthur a good night’s sleep. A monitor to hear Emma while being in another room. All through the night Jane would wake up and listen. She would make sure that she still heard Emma breathing.

    Ever so often she would get up and look. Emma’s eyes were closed. No movement. She was unresponsive. As if in a deep sleep.

    Early in the morning Emma’s breathing changed. She would take a breath in and then stop. Stop for as long as 20 or 30 seconds. No breath.

    Then slowly her body would start reaching for the next breath. Finally the next breath came. Then the breath stopped again. For another 20 to 30 seconds.

    This went on for a few hours. It felt kind of eerie as it was so easy to think: “Oh, this is her last breath.” But it wasn’t yet. Not yet.

    I am available as an inspirational speaker
    about all aspects of death
    including the luminous side of dying
    for both US and international events.
    Click here to find out more about my talks
    and click here to contact me
    .

    This close to death, as in hours away, our bodies are giving us more signs to look for. More symptoms of dying as mile markers on the final journey home. More ways to know that death is near. Very near.

    Emma’s breath, as described above, is called “Cheyne-Stokes” breathing. That kind of breathing consists of inbreaths followed by periods of no breath. Another inbreath. Another pause. Another inbreath. Another pause.

    This kind of breathing can last for many hours. Or just for a short while.

    Here is a list of your typical signs of impending death:

    • Our breathing is becoming more irregular and often slows down.
  • Our eyes might be closed. Or they might be open or half closed, but without actually focusing on anything.

  • Lips and nail beds can look purple or bluish.

  • Fluids may gather at the back of the throat, resulting in what sometimes is called the “death rattle”. It does not appear to disturb us when we are dying. But it can sound awkward for those sitting close by.

  • Our hands and feet may look blotchy and purplish (mottled). This mottling can slowly move up the arms and legs.

  • Our hearing seems to be the last sense to go. So talk to us. Tell us that all is well. That we are going home. That you love us. That it is all right for us to die. That it is OK for us to finally go home.
  • And again a reminder: not all signs of impending death show up for all who are dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death Continued

    By this time Emma was surrounded by her husband Arthur and her daughter Jane. One sitting on each side of the hospital bed. They took turns holding her hands.

    They had lit a candle. There were flowers some good friends had brought over on a night stand. The curtains were closed to keep the bright summer sunshine out.

    Every couple of hours one of them would get up to give Emma her next dose of liquid morphine. No need to swallow. The insides of Emma’s mouth just absorbed it. Her face looked easy and relaxed under the circumstances.

    There was a pillow under her knees. Her head was still on her favorite pillow and propped up with the help of the raised head piece of the hospital bed.

    Emma was as comfortable as she could be in these last hours.

    The Gifts of These Last Hours

    These last hours filled with signs of impending death can feel very special. They can be like a moment of hushed silence in the middle of a busy street. Like the sense of wonder just before a sunrise on the ocean. Like a holy moment in church full of imagined angels singing. Like a long prayer deeply soothing us.

    They have a similar quality to the time right after a baby is born. That same feeling. That same sense of wonder.

    As if they are like gateways. Gates to the other side. Gates to our souls.

    As if the veils keeping us here on this earth get lifted around death. As if we can reach across to the other side together with our loved ones who are dying.

    We only visit for a short time. They are the ones going there for good.

    Can you sense the sounds
    touching your heart?

    Are you feeling the call
    reaching for you?

    Do you know the voices
    singing your name in light?

    You are so close
    Dear One
    You are so close





    Signs of Approaching Death a Few Days Before Death #how #to #start

    #hospice signs of dying

    #

    What signs of approaching death can we expect
    a few days before death?

    Read about the signs of approaching death a few days before death occurs by following Emma’s Story Part 4.

    Our journey into dying is moving closer to its final destination. There are more signs of approaching death. We are down to a few days.

    Just a few more days to be in this particular body at this particular time. Nothing more to do. Just letting go. Just letting go.

    Emma’s Story Part 4: A Few Days Before Death

    One afternoon close to sunset Emma woke up out her slumber. First she looked at Arthur with her big blue eyes. Then she looked out of the window of her living room.

    She asked whether Arthur would help her go outside. She wanted to sit on her lovely deck, look out at her back yard and enjoy the warm summer breeze. It was June and all her pots were in bloom.

    Emma and Arthur sat out there for while. Not saying much.

    Arthur told her about the friends who had brought over her favorite pot roast dinner. And some home grown raspberries. Freshly picked that morning.

    Small things. Things that are part of the fabric of life between two married people. Married for a long time.

    After about an hour Emma was ready to go back to bed.

    That was the last time Emma left the house and her bed.

    I am available as an inspirational speaker
    about all aspects of death
    including the luminous side of dying
    for both US and international events.
    Click here to find out more about my talks
    and click here to contact me
    .

    A few weeks before death one day might be very different. Different in terms of all the other days. It will stand out, for sure. It has a definite place among the signs of approaching death.

    When we are dying we might be deeply lost in our inner world. Not wanting to see anyone. Or talk to anyone. Not even to our closest friends or family members.

    All days are the same. Look the same. Not much happening.

    One day is different.

    We might want to go for drive to see the colorful fall leaves. We might ask for some food from our favorite restaurant. A whole meal. We might want to take a roll in our wheel chair through the neighborhood.

    This different day is called a Golden Day or Golden Moment.

    As if our life force flares up one more time. In brilliant colors. In a spectacular display of one more day of life. One more hour of life. One more moment of life.

    Just one more time.

    And then – time to go now. Time to let the body do its thing. Time to move a step closer to death. We passed another sign of approaching death.

    Emma’s Story Part 4: A Few Days Before Death Continued

    After Emma’s one more Golden Afternoon with Arthur she went back to bed and back to sleeping. Her sleep was getting deeper. She was harder to rouse. She would not talk anymore. Even if we asked her a question. There was no response.

    By that time she was neither eating nor drinking anymore. She was not moving her body on her own anymore. She just lay there in her bed. Her head raised up. Resting peacefully. On her way home.

    A Few Physical Signs of Approaching Death

    At this point most of the signs that death is getting close, are physical signs. These are signs of our bodies shutting down dying. Just shutting down. Slowly but surely for some. Rapidly and all at once for others.

    My friend Allison was caring for an 85 year old gentleman, called Bill. She had been with him for 2 years. A few days ago he had been admitted to hospice as he was going down fast.

    It was a Sunday afternoon. Bill was dozing in his favorite chair. Allison had just turned around to put away some towels.

    When she looked back at Bill he had died. Just like that. No build up. No waiting for him to take his last breath. He just died.

    The following changes in our bodies can be clearly observed when we look closely. When we allow ourselves to get close to this loved one dying. Our loved one dying.

    Here are a few typical symptoms of our bodies shutting down while dying:

    • Our bodies are too weak to stand up or even sit up anymore.
  • We may be sweating more.

  • Our body temperature can be lower by a degree or more.

  • Our pulse may become irregular and may either slow down or speed up.

  • Our blood pressure can be lower.

  • We are unable to swallow fluids anymore. Even those muscles are too weak.

  • Our stomachs cannot digest food anymore. Not enough stomach acid is being produced.

  • No more bowel movements without suppositories. Our bowels have stopped moving food along.

  • Very little to no urine output. As there is no liquid going in, there is very little or no liquid coming out.

  • Our skin color may change as circulation becomes diminished.
  • As you can see from this list, a number of processes in our bodies are slowing down or stop altogether. As preparation for our dying.

    Just another miraculous thing our bodies know how to do without us telling them.

    Dying is so much part of being human. As much a part as living is. As much a part as being born is.

    Emma’s Story Part 4: A Few Days Before Death Continued

    By the next morning Emma was not looking so peaceful anymore. There was a frown on her face. Especially between her eyebrows.

    Ever so often she was moving her head back and forth. She was even moaning a bit.

    Emma was definitely not feeling comfortable. Something was irritating her. This was hard to watch.

    Sometimes we can feel uncomfortable when our bodies are breaking down. It can be like one big irritation.

    One of the signs of approaching death is called “terminal agitation”. It is most visible in our faces. But we can feel it all over our bodies.

    We might have a frown between our eyebrows. We might moan and groan. We might move our heads back and forth.

    This phase can be intense for the one dying as we are not used to seeing a body breaking down. A body stopping all its normal functions. At this point in our journey modern pain medication definitely can make a difference.

    Imagine being in a body where you cannot move your limbs anymore. You are too weak. You cannot say anything. Your mouth is too dry. You are only half awake. But you are feeling very uncomfortable.

    To me this would be hell. Feeling in pain and not being able to do anything about it. Or even say anything about it.

    When this happens, it really helps to have been admitted to hospice (at least in the USA). Or to get admitted. Even at that late stage.

    By being on hospice a trained nurse will stop by daily to prescribe and often deliver any pain medication that would be helpful. The hospice nurse is also able to help us decipher some of the signs of approaching death. Plus a nurse is on call 24/7 in case additional help or medication is needed.

    A Word About Knowing When Death Might Occur

    Caregivers, nurses and doctors are often asked: “How much longer till my loved one will die?”. To be honest, no one can accurately predict, when our loved ones will actually die. There are too many factors involved which determine the time of death.

    Jerrye Wright, the director of Ashland Hospice, shared with me an interesting observation: What we can do, when we are around someone who is dying, is to simply watch for any changes occurring.

    If the changes occur every few weeks, we or our loved ones have weeks to live. Changes like loss of appetite or emotional releases.

    If the changes occur within days, we or our loved ones have days to live. Changes like being unable to swallow fluids.

    If the changes occur within hours, we or our loved ones have hours to live. Changes like terminal agitation.

    I liked this way of looking at dying as it empowers us to watch for these changes and then make our own rough estimates.

    Click here to read Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death

    Return from Signs of Approaching Death to Emma’s Story Part 1

    Return from Signs of Approaching Death to A Good Dying Home

    In loving and celebrating our letting go into death’s arms
    We are graced with being birthed breathtakingly into more living

    I give permission to copy and redistribute this content as long as full credit is given and it is distributed freely. © 2013 A-Good-Dying.com
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    Anyone booked before? Playa de las Americas Message Board #motels #in #wisconsin

    #hotels 4 u

    #

    Newcastle 1,221 forum posts

    From wikipedia, just for ease

    There is no statutory for airlines providing flight-only or other companies providing any accommodation-only holidays to give consumer protection in unforeseen difficult circumstances. ABTA looks after consumer protection from the tour operator end of the contract, which is in turn legally overseen by the Air Travel Organisers Licensing (ATOL) scheme of the Civil Aviation Authority which came into effect in 1973. The ATOL regulations are the core of the consumer protection which ABTA members have to conform by; all UK-bought package holidays including a flight have to abide by ATOL. UK tour operators have to be ATOL-licensed by the CAA.

    For package holidays (provided by tour operators) there is also:

    the Package Travel, Package Holidays and Package Tour Regulations 1992, regulated by the BIS – all package holidays must have consumer protection.

    the Civil Aviation (Air Travel Organisers’ Licensing) Regulations 1995, regulated by the CAA – covers flight-only holidays bought from tour operators.

    ABTA members protect themselves for consumer protection (unforeseen events) claims via the ABTA Protection Plan. Unforeseen events have mainly included travel operators going into administration or liquidation. The government, via ATOL and the 1992 and 1995 regulations, provides the obligations on travel agent consumer protection, and ABTA is the organisation that implements the insurance policies. ABTA s insurance policies are provided by International Passenger Protection (IPP) of West Wickham in Bromley.





    Best of Hong Kong Tourism 2016: Top Tips Before You Go #cheap

    #hotels in hong kong

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    Hong Kong s a great city for an adventurous eater. Stop at a street vendor for fish balls on a stick or stinky tofu. Bakeries offer wife cake, pineapple buns and egg tarts. Or opt for as much dim sum as you can eat. If you re tired of local and regional Chinese specialties, check out upscale offerings from some of the world s top chefs, like Joel Robouchon and Alain Ducasse.

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    Signs of Impending Death a Few Hours Before Death #the #lowry #hotel

    #hospice signs of impending death

    #

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death?

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death? Emma’s Story Part 5 will take you there.

    Death is getting close. Hours close. All the signs of impending death are there. This is the final stretch. We are nearly there. Nearly there. Let’s follow Emma and her dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5:
    A Few Hours Before Death

    By now Emma’s daughter Jane had decided to spend the night in the spare bedroom. She had promised her mom that she would be there. Would be there to see her mother and best friend die.

    Jane had the monitor to give Arthur a good night’s sleep. A monitor to hear Emma while being in another room. All through the night Jane would wake up and listen. She would make sure that she still heard Emma breathing.

    Ever so often she would get up and look. Emma’s eyes were closed. No movement. She was unresponsive. As if in a deep sleep.

    Early in the morning Emma’s breathing changed. She would take a breath in and then stop. Stop for as long as 20 or 30 seconds. No breath.

    Then slowly her body would start reaching for the next breath. Finally the next breath came. Then the breath stopped again. For another 20 to 30 seconds.

    This went on for a few hours. It felt kind of eerie as it was so easy to think: “Oh, this is her last breath.” But it wasn’t yet. Not yet.

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    This close to death, as in hours away, our bodies are giving us more signs to look for. More symptoms of dying as mile markers on the final journey home. More ways to know that death is near. Very near.

    Emma’s breath, as described above, is called “Cheyne-Stokes” breathing. That kind of breathing consists of inbreaths followed by periods of no breath. Another inbreath. Another pause. Another inbreath. Another pause.

    This kind of breathing can last for many hours. Or just for a short while.

    Here is a list of your typical signs of impending death:

    • Our breathing is becoming more irregular and often slows down.
  • Our eyes might be closed. Or they might be open or half closed, but without actually focusing on anything.

  • Lips and nail beds can look purple or bluish.

  • Fluids may gather at the back of the throat, resulting in what sometimes is called the “death rattle”. It does not appear to disturb us when we are dying. But it can sound awkward for those sitting close by.

  • Our hands and feet may look blotchy and purplish (mottled). This mottling can slowly move up the arms and legs.

  • Our hearing seems to be the last sense to go. So talk to us. Tell us that all is well. That we are going home. That you love us. That it is all right for us to die. That it is OK for us to finally go home.
  • And again a reminder: not all signs of impending death show up for all who are dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death Continued

    By this time Emma was surrounded by her husband Arthur and her daughter Jane. One sitting on each side of the hospital bed. They took turns holding her hands.

    They had lit a candle. There were flowers some good friends had brought over on a night stand. The curtains were closed to keep the bright summer sunshine out.

    Every couple of hours one of them would get up to give Emma her next dose of liquid morphine. No need to swallow. The insides of Emma’s mouth just absorbed it. Her face looked easy and relaxed under the circumstances.

    There was a pillow under her knees. Her head was still on her favorite pillow and propped up with the help of the raised head piece of the hospital bed.

    Emma was as comfortable as she could be in these last hours.

    The Gifts of These Last Hours

    These last hours filled with signs of impending death can feel very special. They can be like a moment of hushed silence in the middle of a busy street. Like the sense of wonder just before a sunrise on the ocean. Like a holy moment in church full of imagined angels singing. Like a long prayer deeply soothing us.

    They have a similar quality to the time right after a baby is born. That same feeling. That same sense of wonder.

    As if they are like gateways. Gates to the other side. Gates to our souls.

    As if the veils keeping us here on this earth get lifted around death. As if we can reach across to the other side together with our loved ones who are dying.

    We only visit for a short time. They are the ones going there for good.

    Can you sense the sounds
    touching your heart?

    Are you feeling the call
    reaching for you?

    Do you know the voices
    singing your name in light?

    You are so close
    Dear One
    You are so close