Marine Biology with Biodiversity and Conservation – BSc (Hons) – Anglia Ruskin


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Marine Biology with Biodiversity and Conservation BSc (Hons)

Overview

If you’re passionate about protecting our planet, our Royal Society of Biology-recognised course will give you the skills to make a difference. Explore diverse ecosystems in our labs and on international field trips, while studying in a world-renowned centre for wildlife conservation. This course has been validated to include an optional Sandwich Placement year in industry.

For more information about Sandwich Placement opportunities, please contact the Placements Team .

Full description

Individuals, organisations and governments around the world are increasingly concerned about the welfare of our planet and everything on it. This includes our marine environments where many factors, including human behaviour, have left a large number of species at risk.

Our course allows you to develop a deep understanding of concerns relating to marine environments, and to look at ways of resolving those concerns.

You ll learn about marine biodiversity locally and around the world, and explore conservation ecology, which aims to support, recover and maintain populations and their habitats.

If you choose our work placement year option, you could have the opportunity to put your knowledge into practice at the Sea Life London Aquarium.

On our field trips you might experience marine biology in Scotland; zoos in the Netherlands; wildlife and ecology in Africa; and diving and marine biology oversea. In your second year you ll take a week-long field trip to north Devon to experience both marine and terrestrial zoology, the costs of which are included in your course fees. There s also a final-year residential at a UK marine biology station, which is included in your course fees. You ll need to pay for any optional trips.

Cambridge is becoming a world centre for wildlife conservation, with Fauna and Flora International, Birdlife International and the World Conservation Monitoring Centre based here. Throughout the course, you ll have opportunities to attend lectures in the city and visit specialist museums and libraries.

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I mportant additional notes

We don’t accept AS level qualifications on their own for entry to our undergraduate degree courses. However for some degree courses a small number of tariff points from AS levels are accepted as long as they’re combined with tariff points from A levels or other equivalent level 3 qualifications in other subjects.

International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you’ll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for undergraduate courses .

Improving your English language skills

If you don’t meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry onto a degree course.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers .

UCAS Tariff calculator – 2017 entry

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Biological Sciences Marine Biology #florida #institute #of #technology, #florida #tech, #fit, #college


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What is Marine Biology?

Marine Biology spans a broad range of biological investigations, including the study and experimental use of marine organisms like mammals, fish, crustaceans, corals, molluscs, seagrasses algae and echinoderms.

What Will I Study?

Florida Tech’s undergraduate marine biology program was one of the first of its kind in the United States, started in 1971. Students are provided with a strong background in general biology, such as biometry, genetics and biochemistry. Additional specialized courses that focus on the biology and ecology of marine organisms include invertebrate zoology, fish biology, marine biology, marine ecology, marine mammals and summer field courses in Australia, Jamaica and the Bahamas.

What Courses Will I Take?

Review the core courses online at the University Catalog. In addition to the required program core courses, elective courses can be selected in biology, chemistry, environmental science and oceanography.

What Research Opportunities are Available?

In addition to research opportunities provided through our Office of Sponsored Programs and other university sources, we offer unique and exciting field research opportunities as part of the curriculum.

Our Ecology majors are required to take at least two summer field courses, but students in other disciplines are encouraged to enroll in these courses as well:

  • Tropical Ecology of Costa Rica
  • Tropical Ecology of Peru
  • Field Biology and Ecology in Africa
  • Australian Ecosystem Ecology
  • Smoky Mountains
  • Florida Barrier Islands
  • Bahamas Reef Ecology
  • Rocky Mountains

Why study Marine Biology at Florida Tech?

  • Ranked #7 among the country’s marine biology programs (Gourman Report 1998)
  • Broad training in biological sciences with specialization in marine topics
  • Intense hands-on field, ship-board and laboratory experiences, beginning in freshman year
  • Undergraduate research opportunities including work-study, volunteer assistant and formal research courses
  • Located on the Indian River Lagoon, the most diverse estuary in North America

150 W. University Blvd. Melbourne, FL 32901


Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve Costa Rica maps of trails, photos, sounds, weather,


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Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve

Areas with poor drainages support swamp forests, while other parts dissected by deep, expansive gorges have numerous streams tumbling through, creating rapids, waterfalls and standstill pools. It is, however, not merely the forest and landscape that are so diversified.

The variable climate and large altitudinal gradient have helped to produce an amazingly heterogeneous set of creatures that live here. Some of these include the jaguar, ocelot, Baird s tapir, three-wattled bellbird, bare-necked umbrellabird, and the famously elusive resplendent quetzal.

History. In the early 1950s, a group of Quakers from the United States left their homes in Alabama and arrived in Monteverde at a time when the region was just beginning to be settled. The Quakers, fleeing the United States to avoid being drafted into the Korean War, established a simple life in Monteverde centered on dairy and cheese production. Some of these families helped establish the Monteverde and Santa Elena Cloud Forest Reserves some 20 years later.

In 1972, the Monteverde rainforest was threatened by local farmers looking to expand their property and homestead on certain forest sites. With this prospect in mind, visiting scientists George Powell and his wife joined forces with longtime resident Wildford Guidon to promote the establishment of a nature preserve. The Tropical Science Center, a non-governmental scientific and environmental organization, proved receptive to the efforts of the Powells and Guidon, and accepted institutional responsibility for ownership and management of the protected areas. An initial land purchase of 328 hectares formed the core of the Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve.

Following the preserve’s creation, the Tropical Science Center continued to secure the financial and human resources necessary to expand, consolidate, and properly protect the preserve s current 10,500 hectares. See more Monteverde photos .

Hours. For daily schedules and rates, please click the tour reservation options below. Children ages 6 and under are free.

Information. The restaurant, souvenir shop and art gallery are open from 7 AM to 4 PM. There are restrooms at the entrance but none on the trails.

Location. 3.6 miles (6 km) SE of Santa Elena, Monteverde. See Monteverde map for more information.

Getting there. Buses heading to the reserve leave from the Banco Nacional in Santa Elena at 6:15 AM, 7:20 AM and 1:15 PM. Return buses leave the reserve at 11:30 AM, 2:00 PM and 4:00 PM. Cost is $1 each way. Visitors can board the bus anywhere along the road between the town of Santa Elena and the entrance of the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve. Those that do not wish to take the bus can take a taxi either way, which costs around $10 (for up to five passengers) each way.

Hiking Trails in Monteverde. The trails here are well maintained. Regular shoes are fine, as long as you are able to walk comfortably. There is no need for rubber boots or hiking shoes for daily trips. You may, however, need this type of footwear if you plan on staying overnight in one of the huts.

Trails Description

Sendero Bosque Nuboso (Cloud Forest Trail): 1.2 miles (1.9 KM) long with an elevation gain of 213 feet (65 m), this trail generally takes around 1.5 hours to complete. A self-guided tour booklet of the trail available in both English and Spanish can be purchased at the entrance. This is one of the most popular trails because it’s extremely pretty and has good examples of strangler fig plants.

El Camino (The Road): 1.2 miles (2 km) long with an elevation gain of 131 feet (40 m), this trail generally takes around 1.25 hours to complete. It is wider and more open than other trails, allowing for more sunlight and thus more butterflies. This trail is also excellent for bird watching.

Sendero Pantanoso (Swamp Trail): 1 mile (1.6 km) long with an elevation gain of 131 feet (40 m), this trail takes around 1.25 hours to complete. It passes through a swamp forest while traversing along the Continental Divide, and is adorned with magnolias, plants bearing stilt roots, podocarpus (the only conifer tree in the preserve), and more.

Sendero El R o (River Trail): 1.2 miles (1.9 km) long with an elevation gain of 213 feet (65 m), this trail takes around 1.5 hours to complete. This trail leads along the Quebrada Cuecha and has a short side trail to a waterfall, where there are several zapote trees.

Sendero Chomogo: 1.1 miles (1.8 km) long with an elevation gain of 492 feet (150 m), this trail generally takes about 1.25 hours to complete. This is the highest trail in the preserve, reaching 5,510 feet (1,680 m) above sea level. Oak, bamboo and heliconia are common in the higher areas, and hot lip plants abound throughout most of the walk.

Sendero George Powell (George Powell Trail): 0.1 mile (0.2 km) long with an elevation gain of 66 ft (20 m), this trail takes about 10 minutes to complete. This trail, named after one of the preserve s founders, runs through second growth forest.

Sendero Brillante (Shining Trail): 0.2 miles (0.3 km) long with an elevation gain of 49 feet (16 m), this trail takes about 10 minutes to walk. You are led along the Continental Divide to La Ventana (The Window), an overlook with a wide view of an elfin forest below. Bamboo is common along much of this trail.

Sendero Roble (Oak Trail): 0.4 miles (0.6 km) long, this lovely trail is narrow and leads to a beautiful grove of heliconia trees.

Suspended Bridge. 300 feet (100 meters) high, this bridge has spectacular views of the canopy, bromeliads, orchids and more. For a tour of all five suspended bridges, see Sky Walk

Wilford Guindon. Named in honor of one of the preserve s founder, this trail rises and falls through patches of sunlight.

Guided Tour Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve Times and Booking


Access: Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching: Nature #nature, #science, #science #news, #biology,


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Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching

Victoria Gomez-Roldan 1. Soraya Fermas 2. Philip B. Brewer 3. Virginie Puech-Pag s 1. Elizabeth A. Dun 3. Jean-Paul Pillot 2. Fabien Letisse 4. Radoslava Matusova 5. Saida Danoun 1. Jean-Charles Portais 4. Harro Bouwmeester 5. 6. Guillaume B card 1. Christine A. Beveridge 3. 7. 8. Catherine Rameau 2. 8 Soizic F. Rochange 1. 8

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence that carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 shoot branching mutants of pea are strigolactone deficient and that strigolactone application restores the wild-type branching phenotype to ccd8 mutants. Moreover, we show that other branching mutants previously characterized as lacking a response to the branching inhibition signal also lack strigolactone response, and are not deficient in strigolactones. These responses are conserved in Arabidopsis. In agreement with the expected properties of the hormonal signal, exogenous strigolactone can be transported in shoots and act at low concentrations. We suggest that endogenous strigolactones or related compounds inhibit shoot branching in plants. Furthermore, ccd8 mutants demonstrate the diverse effects of strigolactones in shoot branching, mycorrhizal symbiosis and parasitic weed interaction.

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

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What Is Health Economics? Master of Health Science in Health Economics (MHS)


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What Is Health Economics?

Health Economics is an applied field of study that allows for the systematic and rigorous examination of the problems faced in promoting health for all. By applying economic theories of consumer, producer and social choice, health economics aims to understand the behavior of individuals, health care providers, public and private organizations, and governments in decision-making.

From economic modeling to policy analysis, I am confident that the skills I have gained throughout the year will stay with me throughout my life. I am beyond lucky to have been at this incredible school alongside inspiring classmates, learning from professors who are true experts in this field. The MHS in Health Economics here at Hopkins is by far the best thing I could have done to start my career.

Analyst, Healthcare Value Analytics

McKinsey Company

The MHS in Health Economics
Program at Hopkins

Health economics is used to promote health through the study of health care providers, hospitals and clinics, managed care and public health promotion activities. Health economists apply the theories of production, efficiency, disparities, competition, and regulation to better inform the public and private sector on the most efficient, or cost-effective, and equitable course of action. Such research can include the economic evaluation of new technologies, as well as the study of appropriate prices, anti-trust policy, optimal public and private investment, and strategic behavior.

Health economics can also be used to evaluate how certain social problems, such as market failure and inequitable allocation of resources, can impact on the health of a community or population. Health economics can then be used to directly inform government on the best course of action with regards to regulation, national health packages, defining health insurance packages and other national health programs.

Faculty of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School are currently conducting research on a wide variety of topics including the impact of health care, health insurance and preventative services on health lifestyles as well as providing research and advice to governments around the globe to enable a more effective and equitable allocation of resources. Further information on faculty retreat can be found on individual faculty research pages.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205