How Long Can Cord Blood Stem Cells Be Stored? #how #long #can


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What Happens To Cord Blood Stem Cells After 20 Years of Storage

Companies have only started to store cord blood for the last 20 to 25 years or so, and for cord tissue a bit less than this. Given this limited time frame of those working in the field, there is no data on how well blood or tissue stores beyond 20 years. Studies have found, however, that cord blood may be able to be stored indefinitely at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 degrees Celsius), and there is no evidence that it degrades over time. Research conducted by one of the foremost experts on cord blood stem cells shows that after 23.5 years of storage, there was no degradation in the cord blood samples. In terms of payments, after 20 years of storage you can prepay $1999 for another 20 years of storage. It’s common to think of the payment process like life insurance. If you pay for the initial storage and cancel after 20 years, it’s like canceling life insurance early just because you’re still living.

Studies have found, however, that cord blood may be able to be stored indefinitely at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 degrees Celsius), and there is no evidence that it degrades over time.

Our Quality Promise

Americord is of the highest quality in cord blood and cord tissue storage. We believe in and follow all of the best practices for cord blood and cord tissue collection and storage. These include the following:

  • FDA
  • AABB standards
  • State guidelines
  • Federal guidelines and applicable licenses

Not only are our practices safe, but we also use the only commercially available FDA-approved sterile exterior cord blood bag that is on the market and the fastest medical courier. Using these quality methods and materials, we have been able to collect up to twice as much as other cord blood banks and industry standards. A larg er amount of stem cells opens up the possibility to treat larger patients or expand treatment options for smaller patients.

Learn more about the differences and benefits of cord blood banking and cord tissue banking to know what’s best for your family plan.

Ready to enroll? Just call 866-503-6005 or sign up online .

Have Cord Blood Questions?

Explore your birth plan options.


Colorado Bureau Of Investigation Admits Dozens Of Faulty DUI Blood Tests –


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Colorado Bureau Of Investigation Admits Dozens Of Faulty DUI Blood Tests

DENVER (CBS4) Responding to a CBS4 investigation, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation has acknowledged at least 56 of the DUI blood tests it conducted in the last six months were incorrect.

“The initial results in each of those 56 cases showed lower alcohol levels for the drivers than when additional quality assurance retesting occurred, said Susan Medina, a spokesperson for the CBI. “There is no indication that any defendant was inappropriately charged with an offense based on test results showing an erroneously high level of alcohol in a driver’s bloodstream.”

The CBI opened labs in July 2015 in Pueblo and Grand Junction and since then has done about 1,500 DUI blood tests for the Colorado State Patrol and other law enforcement agencies. Medina said the faulty tests amounted to about 4 percent of the DUI testing the labs have conducted since last July.

The CBI said it learned of its erroneous lab results “in recent months“ when an independent lab checked two blood samples that had also been tested by the CBI and the independent lab ChemaTox discovered what the CBI calls “anomalies.

ChemaTox told CBS4 it notified state authorities of the problems in December 2015. The CBI said it then checked some of its other DUI alcohol results and confirmed its lab testing problems.

“While a thorough review remains in progress, said CBI, “it is believed the cause of the anomalies has been identified and corrected.

Medina declined to say if the problem was human error, testing equipment, or some other factor.

Sarah Urfer of ChemaTox labs told CBS4, “I contacted CBI and said, Look, we had an anomaly and it s 24 percent different.’

Urfer said the anomalies are important “because those are people’s lives at stake.

David Miller, a Denver-based defense attorney who defends DUI clients, told CBS4 the CBI needs to come clean.

“It creates a problem with the integrity of the system. They’re not saying what the problem is so we don’t know what the problem is, so we’re going to have to get full disclosure to start with. I think it s up to prosecutors now to look at each case and see if the convictions are proper in the first place and notify the client or lawyer as to what s happening, said Miller.

David Miller (credit: CBS)

He said the CBS4 investigation revealing the faulty testing shows a “huge problem. It’s a big deal if you’re the person affected by it. It’s a big deal individually and if you look at the big picture, if you are the person affected by this it’s a very big deal.

Miller said to re-establish credibility, the CBI needs to have all 1,500 blood samples it has examined since last July re-tested.

In many cases, blood drawn from a suspect is a critical piece of evidence establishing either guilt or innocence in DUI cases. There are an estimated 30,000 DUI cases in Colorado each year, according to the CBI.

Dr. Pat Sulik, a chemist with Rocky Mountain Instrumental Laboratories, checked 16 blood samples from the CBI in recent months. She said of those 16 samples, seven were problematic having at least a 5 percent variance from the readings she found. Of those seven, she said five had more than a 10 percent discrepancy.

Dr. Pat Sulik (credit: CBS)

Sulik said she would normally expect to have her results and the CBI results be nearly identical 99 percent of the time.

“To see this many discrepancies when the CBI just started this summer, this is, at a simple overview, way too many discrepancies, said Sulik. “When we saw our first large discrepancy we retested the sample and gave ourselves a heart attack.”

Sulik said the CBI’s erroneous, lower testing numbers mean “they are not being taken off the road, the DUI law is not being enforced if the state lab is coming up with lower numbers.

Sulik said in at least one case she checked, the suspect in a DUI case would have faced a more serious charge had the CBI lab testing been correct the first time around.

Ironically, the CBI only began doing this kind of testing after similar testing by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment came under fire in 2013 and CDPHE testing of DUI blood samples was shut down. In that case, defense attorneys maintained that the Department of Health testing was biased in favor of prosecutors and that staff was inadequately trained in handling blood samples.

In 2014 the state Legislature approved a bill providing nearly $2 million in annual funding and the hiring of five new full-time employees for the CBI to take over the DUI blood testing that was previously conducted by the Department of Health. Now the Department of Health is assisting in the investigation of the faulty CBI testing.

According to Medina’s statement to CBS4, ”After the review the CBI will issue amended reports to the law enforcement agencies that submitted the blood samples, and work with stakeholders to ensure accurate scientific results and prosecutions statewide.

Mike Rankin, the CBI Director, said, ”While the CBI works extremely hard to avoid any testing errors in our laboratories, the quality assurance procedures served their designed purpose of safeguarding the integrity of the program.

The CBI declined to answer any other questions from CBS4 citing an ongoing review of what happened. Medina said the agency might be able to provide more information once the review is completed.

Miller told CBS4 he intended to reopen any DUI cases he has handled in the last seven months that involved CBI blood testing. Urfer called the problem “very frustrating. I’ve been through this twice before. It seems like this should be a preventable problem. There are a number of labs that have not had these problems.


LifeBank Placental and Cord Blood Banking – FemmPro OB #femmproobgyn, #femmpro, #professionals


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The time of labor and birth of your baby is a wonderful milestone in your family’s life, and a miraculous new beginning. Your baby’s birth is also the perfect time to collect your newborn’s umbilical cord and placenta blood for cryobanking and storage. While many parents are banking their babies’ cord blood, you can actually do more by banking stem cells from two usable sources of stem cell-rich blood: the umbilical cord and the placenta. This service is called placental and cord blood banking, and it is available only from LifebankUSA which is registered with the FDA.

Why is banking stem cells the right thing to do for your baby?

Banking placental blood in addition to cord blood doubles the number of segments preserved and increases the total number of stem cells available. This is important for two reasons. First, transplanting more stem cells has been shown to increase the probability of transplant success and survival if needed. Second, having multiple segments available may offer the potential to treat additional conditions that may affect your baby and/or other close family members. Whether this child is your first or an addition to your family, you want to do everything you can to provide for your newborn’s well-being now and in the future. Cord blood and placental blood and tissue banking provides you with the ability to collect and preserve potentially lifesaving stem cells and bank even more stem cells. This is accomplished by collecting them from two usable sources of stem cell-rich blood: the umbilical cord and the placenta. And, doing so could one day save the life of your child or a close family member.

FemmPro OB/GYN believes that banking the most stem cells may ensure the best possible outcome for your child or family member in case there is a need for a future transplant. Your doctor simply takes the blood and tissue in a special LifebankUSA collection kit and is sent to their local processing and storage facility in New Jersey.

With LifebankUSA, you also have the option to donate the umbilical cord and placenta to contribute to lifesaving medical breakthroughs that will help save lives through research and transplantation. LifebankUSA accepts donations from any hospital nationwide. So, please consider donating cord blood and placenta to help save lives, even if you make a personal decision not to pursue private banking.

For more information and enrollment, consult with your FemmPro OB/GYN Professional or visit www.LifebankUSA.com .


Comparing Cord Blood Banking Companies #cord #blood #registry #vs #viacord


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Comparing Cord Blood Banking Companies

With so many banks out there, it can be hard to know where to go. We give you guidelines for researching public and private banks so you can find the right one to fit your needs.

By Heather Morgan Shott

Qualities to Look for in a Cord Blood Bank

An accredited lab. In the United States, the FDA requires all public banks to have a Biologics License Application, but not private banks, though they are registered and inspected. Both public and private banks should have extra accreditation, which means banks are evaluated for the quality and accuracy of work. The two companies that handle accreditation are the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) and the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). Look for a bank with its own lab (some banks use labs at other banks), which means more regular quality control and testing standards.

A history of releasing cord blood units for therapy. “This shows they’re not just selling contracts to parents — there are doctors who are actually accepting units of cord blood that have been stored there for therapy,” says Frances Verter, Ph.D. founder and director of Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to educating parents about cord blood donation and cord blood therapists.

A courier collection service. Private banks have a person pick up your donated cord blood, which helps ensure that it arrives at your chosen bank quickly and doesn’t get lost along the way, and that the temperature will remain consistent enough to be accepted at the lab. (Public banks usually send an insulated kit for you to preserve and mail the cord blood.)

A well-established history. Public banks are affiliated with nonprofit research institutions or hospitals, so they have a better chance of being managed more soundly. For families without a history of diseases treated by cord blood, such as leukemia and sickle cell anemia, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that cord blood be donated to public banks. Although the AAP states cord blood has been used to treat certain diseases successfully, there isn’t strong evidence to support cord blood banking. If a family does choose to bank cord blood, the AAP recommends public cord blood banking (instead of private) to cut down on expenditures. Private cord blood banks are affiliated with business corporations, so, like any business, they may go under, says William T. Shearer, M.D. Ph.D. professor of Pediatrics and Immunology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Six Cord Blood Banks in the United States

Cryo-Cell, Viacord. and Cord Blood Registry are three of the oldest and largest private cord blood banks in the United States. They’ve been storing cord blood since the early ’90s, and they’re all accredited by the AABB. Cryo-Cell is located in Oldsmar, Florida; Viacord in Cambridge, Massachusetts; and Cord Blood Registry in San Bruno, California. Each of these banks has its own private labs that test for syphilis, HIV, hepatitis, cytomegalovirus, and human T-cell lymphotrophic virus (considered a precursor to leukemia); the testing is included in their registration fee.

Lifebank USA is another private bank, located in Cedar Knolls, New Jersey, that’s accredited by the AABB. What sets this bank apart from the others: it’s one of the few banks that store umbilical cord blood and placenta blood (this is done for free). Stem cells from placenta tissue can turn into skeletal tissue types such as bone, cartilage, fat tissue, and connective tissue, whereas cells from cord blood turn into different types of blood cells.

Family Cord. located in Los Angeles, has a high-quality lab, a top rating from the Better Business Bureau, and accreditation from AABB; it’s also been in business since 1997. Family Cord is one of the few banks that will also cover the cost of cord blood banking for the first year (there’s an annual fee after the first year) in cases where a baby has a sick sibling or another family member who could benefit from the cord blood.

Carolinas Cord Blood Bank. established in 1998, is one of the largest public cord blood banks. It’s affiliated with Duke University, where trials are currently taking place to treat children with cerebral palsy with their own cord blood. Parents can mail in their cord blood donations and receive financial aid if they have a sick older child or family member who can be treated with cord blood.

Find More Information About Cord Blood Banking

Parents Guide to Cord Blood Banking


What to Do When Your Poop is Dark Green #what #does #it


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What Does Dark Green Poop Mean?

Why are we here?

Are we alone in the universe?

Why is my poop green?

The first two questions are a bit beyond the purview of this site, but the last one can be answered quite readily.

Dark green poop may be surprising or alarming upon your first encounter, but it actually has a very simple biological explanation and, as far as the brilliant rainbow of feces is concerned, is not normally a cause of significant concern. There are also certain steps you can try taking when your poop is green in order to prevent a reoccurrence. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves. Let’s start with the basic question and move on from there.

What Causes Green Stool?

Understanding why you have dark green feces first requires knowing why it’s normally brown in the first place. Poo is a mix of undigested food, bile, bacteria, and dead blood cells. The brown coloration happens during the stool’s journey through the digestive tract where intestinal bacteria break down and feast on the leftover bile and other cell detritus it contains. The underlying process is surprisingly complicated but the main takeaway here is that poo is normally greenish until exposure to intestinal bacteria, where turns it brown.

It’s also important to distinguish between dark green stool (1 ) in adults and any dark green poop from a baby. During the first few days of life, an infant will pass dark green stool known as meconium. This is normal and is the result of waste that was accumulated during gestation. Meconium usually persists for several days until the baby begins breast or formula feeding, at which point it will start to turn yellow over time. Dark green poop in a breastfed baby or one being bottle-fed is therefore not normally a cause for alarm.

Now that the preliminaries are out of the way, let’s look at what dark green poop might mean.

Excess Nutrition

Sometimes, the color of your poo has less to do with your own body and more with what you’re eating. Consuming large amounts of green, leafy vegetables like kale or broccoli can sometimes result in your poo appearing dark green. Iron-rich foods such as beans or meats will produce a similar effect and may leave you with a dark green, almost black poop. This is more easily seen in the dark green poop a two month old might have if they are fed iron-fortified milk. In all of these cases, the underlying mechanism is the same. There is a biological limit to how much of any nutrient your body can make use, of and anything leftover can get excreted, dyeing the resulting poo. Iron supplements or supplements that contain chlorophyll or fructose can also cause green stools.

Food Coloration

Food dyes are generally not absorbed by the body and will get excreted along with other waste. If you have recently eaten a large number of foods that use green coloring (such as promotional St. Patrick’s Day treats), you may find yourself producing green stool over the following days. How susceptible someone is to food coloring will vary from one individual to the next. It’s fully possible, for instance, for you and a friend to eat the same dyed foods but for only one of you to have a green poo as a result.

Medication

Antibiotics, particularly the powerful ones that get prescribed for major infections, are capable of reducing the levels of bacteria in your intestinal tract. As mentioned earlier, these are the same bacteria responsible for why poo normally appears brown and their loss means your feces can’t be processed as thoroughly during its trip through the body. Due to this, green stool is a known side effect of some antibiotics.

Gastrointestinal Distress

Anything that causes food to move too quickly through the intestines can produce green stool since this cuts down on the amount of time it can be processed. This means that any situation capable of causing severe diarrhea, such as food poisoning, salmonella, a parasite, or irritable bowel syndrome, would also be able to produce dark green bowel movements. In other words, anything capable of aggravating your bowels will also be capable of producing dark green diarrhea.

Cleansing

A colon cleanse is a type of home treatment some individuals use to try and flush “toxins” from the body. Cleanses come in numerous varieties but typically employ some combination of supplements, enemas, and/or laxatives. Since colon cleanses essentially force-evacuate your bowels, it’s possible for them to produce green stool by virtue of triggering a bowel movement prematurely, before feces has been properly processed.

Pregnancy

It’s also possible to have dark green poop while pregnant. During pregnancy, a woman’s body produces more blood, and if she doesn’t get enough iron, she could become anemic. If that happens, she might then take iron supplements, a side effect of which is black or green poop. Iron supplements can cause other discomfort, such as constipation, so it may be in the best interest of pregnant women to increase their iron intake through diet, by consuming liver, red meat, and leafy greens.

Treating Dark Green Poop

Anyone can be affected by dark green poop; toddlers and adults alike. Treatment for dark green poo begins with identifying what the actual cause was. Fortunately, this is not a difficult task. Meconium is easy to rule out simply by asking whether the person was born recently.

Similarly, you should be able to remember whether or not you recently engaged in a colon cleanse (enemas are kind of hard to forget). If you suspect antibiotics or a nutritional supplement are involved, it’s best to consult with your doctor on how this can be determined. It’s strongly inadvisable to discontinue an antibiotic without your doctor’s approval since you were likely prescribed that medicine for a good reason.

Lastly, conditions such as food poisoning or irritable bowel syndrome come with other associated symptoms that can help identify them. In these instances, the green stool is likely accompanied by diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, or other signs of digestive disagreement.

Once your cause is identified, treatment becomes relatively simple:

  • Meconium goes away on its own, so time is the only remedy needed.
  • Talk to your doctor about switching to a new, less severe antibiotic to give your intestinal bacteria time to recover.
  • Over-enthusiastic eating of green foods or iron-rich items can be curtailed with simple diet adjustments, as can any indulgence in overly-dyed treats.
  • Food poisoning requires bed rest, maintaining fluid intake, and easing in to bland foods once you’re able to keep them down. Most food poisoning cases resolve within a few days with or without treatment.
  • Avoid giving yourself a colon cleanse.

When to See Your Doctor

A one-off incidence of green stool is rarely a cause for concern and can be safely ignored. If you find that you are having recurrent or repeat episodes of green bowel movements, however, a doctor’s appointment may be in order.

Often, an exam for green stool will involve some questions about any recent dietary or lifestyle changes that may be affecting digestion and the stool itself may get examined if nothing can be ruled out.

One important thing to keep in mind is that although most causes of green stool are benign, this does not stop green stool from occurring alongside other more problematic situations.

If your stool seems to have mucus or blood in it (bright red or tarry, almost black) or is very watery, medical attention may be advised. This also applies if you experience rectal pain, intermittent bouts of constipation, fever, or loss of appetite. These symptoms should always be paid attention to and investigated regardless of whether you have dark green poop or not.

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About the Author, Browse Victor’s Articles

Victor Marchione, MD received his Bachelor of Science Degree in 1973 and his Medical Degree from the University of Messina in 1981. He has been licensed and practicing medicine in New York and New Jersey for over 20 years. Dr. Marchione is a respected leader in the field of smoking cessation and pulmonary medicine. He has been featured on ABC News and World Report, CBS Evening News and the NBC Today Show and is the editor of the popular The. Read Full Bio »


Cord Blood Banking Education for Parents and Professionals #chord #blood


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Parents, Cord Blood Saves Lives.

Educate yourself. Get the facts. Make the choice that is right for you.

Expectant parents are faced with an overwhelming number of important decisions before their baby is even born. Cord blood banking or cord blood donation is one of the most important, life-altering decisions a new parent can make. Learn more ››

Save the Cord Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization. is dedicated to making this important decision as simple as possible for parents by providing unbiased educational information regarding cord blood banking / donation and the life-saving qualities of cord blood.

Since 1988, there have been more than 35,000 cord blood transplants worldwide. Far from science-fiction, cord blood is currently used to treat over 80 diseases including sickle cell anemia, lymphoma and leukemia. In the emerging field of regenerative medicine there is great promise in treating things like autism, diabetes, hearing loss, stroke, brain injury and more.

Find the best public donation program or private cord blood bank for your family, explore our interactive map .

CONSERVACIÓN DE LA SANGRE DE CORDÓN UMBILICAL ( version español )

Share the Science

Free educational webinar series.

Next on Share the Science: Dr. Omar Aljitawi, MBBS, will join us to discuss Promising Strategies to Improve Cord Blood Transplant Outcomes. Register now to view the recording of this free webinar.

Share the Science is a unique webinar series dedicated to the cord blood industry. Share the Science is always free and open to the public. Learn more about this exciting educational series bringing you the latest in research and industry best practices.

NEXT GENERATION. Cord Blood

for Schools & Universities

This educational program is designed specifically to reach the Next Generation of parents, doctors, scientists and decision makers with key information about cord blood. We give students an inside look at the science and industry behind cord blood. Learn more .

Learn about NEXT GENERATION: Cord Blood

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. are proud to announce the next edition in our Share the Science series. On July 19th, 2017, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. welcomed Dr. Omar Aljitawi, MBBS to speak about his research on our popular Share the Science series. Dr. Aljitawi presented Promising Strategies to Improve [ ] Continue Reading

Save the Cord Foundation recently interviewed Dr. Michael Chez (Sutter Health / Sutter Neurological Institute) about the encouraging results coming out of his autism clinical trials using cord blood. In addition, Dr. Chez spoke about the exciting work in this area also being done at Duke University by Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg and Geraldine Dawson, PhD. [ ] Continue Reading

April 20th, 2017

Cutting edge research at the MAYO Clinic is leading to new hope for individuals with HLHS Heart Syndrome and cord blood is a critical part of the story. Can cord blood strengthen the heart? Dr. Timothy Nelson recently discussed his latest clinical trial on Share the Science. Free Webinar: Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. [ ] Continue Reading

About Save the Cord Foundation

Save the Cord Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization, was established to promote awareness of the life-saving benefits of cord blood based on unbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and family cord blood banks worldwide.

Support Save the Cord Foundation

Our mission depends on supporters like you. Please support our cause by making a donation or promoting our website and message where you can. We appreciate all the support!
(We NEVER ask for cash donations. Online donations are easier and safer. Thank you.)


National Cord Blood Program #chord #blood


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Welcome to the New York Blood Center’s National Cord Blood Program Website – an interactive, informational resource for patients, their families and caregivers, health care professionals, expectant parents and the general public.

NYBC’s Howard P.Milstein Cord Blood Center (supported by the Howard and Abby Milstein Foundation) and its National Cord Blood Program (NCBP) is the world’s first and largest single public cord blood bank. We collect, process, test and store cord blood that mothers donate to us for patients in need for a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Our Program makes cord blood available – either as a product (HEMACORD ) licensed by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or under an Investigational New Drug (IND) exemption from the FDA – for children and adults who face a life-threatening illness and need stem cell transplants from unrelated donors. NYBC’s NCBP was also the first public cord blood bank in the world to receive NetCord-FACT accreditation (June 2003). Click here for more information on NetCord-FACT accreditation. The NetCord-FACT Accreditation was last renewed on February 9th, 2015.

The Food and Drug Administration granted the National Cord Blood Program an Investigational New Drug (IND) exemption in 1996, making us the first cord blood bank to obtain such an exemption. To achieve and maintain this status, we applied voluntarily, submitted our policies and protocols to the FDA and have provided annual reports on our program and on the results of transplants using cord blood units from our bank. As a result of the FDA requirement for a specific clinical protocol, we amended our banking IND by expanding it with a Clinical Protocol accepted by the FDA. We are currently increasing the number of participating Transplant Centers. A different and more detailed application was submitted to the FDA in January 2011 for licensure of our cord blood units and processes. The application and our product, HEMACORD , were approved on November 10th, 2011. This is the first time ever that the FDA has licensed a stem cell product (Press release: FDA. PR Newswire ). HEMACORD , the First FDA-Licensed stem cell product, was awarded the prestigious Best Biotechnology Product Award by Prix Galien USA. in October 2014. The award recognizes biomedical products that advance the human condition and which were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) during the past five years, according to the Galien Foundation (Press release ).

The FDA considers cord blood to be a “biological” product. Cord blood units that meet all the prescribed FDA cGMP criteria and process requirements can be licensed (as the HEMACORD� products are). Unlicensed cord blood units are considered “investigational” products, which can only be used for human transplantation under an active FDA IND (such as NCBP IND), but their use requires review by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) and particular patient and physician approval, which must be documented on IRB-approved informed consent forms.

From the regulatory perspective, the donors of cord blood (the mothers who donate their newborn’s cord blood) and the patients who receive investigational cord blood transplants are “human research subjects” under FDA and Office for Human Research Protection (OHRP). For this reason, since 1996, we collect cord blood following protocols, policies and procedures submitted to the FDA and formally accepted by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the New York Blood Center as well as by the IRB of each of the hospitals that collaborate with us as collection centers.

To date, cord blood donations from more than 60,000 mothers have been made to the NYBC’s National Cord Blood Program. Our donors come from all ethnic backgrounds. For example, approximately 20% of the donors are African-American (having at least one African-American parent). Asians represent approximately 8% of all donors and multi-race donors make up 13-15%. Donors of Hispanic ancestry represent 21%. This ethnic diversity has made it possible for patients of different ethnic backgrounds to find suitable matches, thereby improving access to hematopoietic transplantation. [See: See: Why is cord blood important for ethnic minorities? ].

Cord blood from unrelated donors has been used as an alternative to bone marrow or mobilized stem cells as a source of hematopoietic stem cells for more than 20 years. There have been more than 35,000 cord blood transplants performed worldwide so far. In the United States, more than one half of all stem cell transplants from unrelated donors in children now use cord blood. In Japan, this is true for adults as well. Our program has provided over 5,300 cord blood units for transplantation, thus far (more than one seventh of all units transplanted from unrelated donors). Most patients were affected by leukemia, lymphoma, severe aplastic anemia, other lethal diseases of the blood or immune system or certain inherited metabolic diseases [See: Patients Outcomes for a listing of all diseases treated thus far].

When considering a transplant, the transplant physician is responsible for assessing whether his/her patient needs a hematopoietic stem cell transplant and if so, for choosing the most appropriate source of those stem cells�cord blood, bone marrow or mobilized stem cells. When matched cord blood units from our bank are being considered for a transplant, we work with the transplant physician to help select the most appropriate unit (based, in part, on what we have learned from the reports transplant centers send to us on their patients who have already received cord blood units from our Program). The physician, however, makes the final decision with the patient or, in the case of a minor, with the family.

This Website attempts to provide accurate and timely information about cord blood transplants and public donations, as well as about technical aspects of our Program’s operations. Patients and families considering a possible transplant must be told that other than cord blood units licensed by FDA, all units must be distributed as investigational products. They can read about the potential advantages and disadvantages of cord blood transplantation in Cord Blood Q A and in a Comparison between Bone Marrow Cord Blood. Encouraging Patient Stories can be found in the Patients Outcomes section. Website visitors can find out how the NCBP works in Program Overview. More technical information about cord blood collection and processing can be found in NCBP at Work.

Expectant parents can get useful information about donation from Cord Blood Donation. You can keep current with News Articles. You can use the new SiteMap to help navigate the site.


Cord Blood 2 #umbilical #cord #blood #stem #cells


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What is Cord Blood 2.0™?

Americord® gives parents the chance to collect enough stem cells to treat children into adolescence and even adulthood. Our Cord Blood 2.0 technology has the ability to collect enough stem cells to treat a person with certain conditions up to 165 pounds. Traditional cord blood banks often collect only enough stem cells to treat a child under 65 pounds.

Collect up to twice as many stem cells as the industry standard with Cord Blood 2.0™

More stem cells means the chance to treat larger patients.

More Stem Cells = More Options

Until now, a huge limitation of cord blood banking has been that the number of stem cells that are preserved in a typical cord blood collection are only sufficient to treat someone up to about 65 pounds. With Cord Blood 2.0™, up to twice as many stem cells can be preserved, making it possible to treat larger patients and expand treatment opportunities for smaller patients.

Included With Every Purchase

Americord is the leader in umbilical cord blood, cord tissue and placenta stem cell banking. Learn more about cord blood banking and get your free Info Kit.

This Privacy Policy and Terms of Use sets out how Americord Registry uses and protects any information that you give Americord Registry when you use this website.

Preserving stem cells does not guarantee that the saved stem cells will be applicable for every situation. Ultimate use will be determined by a physician. Please note: Americord Registry s activities are limited to collection of umbilical cord tissue from autologous donors. Americord Registry s possession of a New York State license for such collection does not indicate approval or endorsement of possible future uses or future suitability of cells derived from umbilical cord tissue.

Copyright © 2008 – 2017 Americord Registry. All rights reserved.


Northwest Georgia Oncology Centers, P #georgia #cancer #doctors,cancer #treatment,northwest #georgia,marietta, #cobb #county,douglasville,bremen,canton,carrollton,cartersville,jasper,paulding,hiram,dallas,austell,power


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NGOC Receives Full Accreditation by the Commission on Cancer as an Oncology Medical Home Summer 2015Read more

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Icing on the Cake Cindy from Talking RockRead her story

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Renaissance Man Ricky from CantonRead his story

Woman defies odds in battle with breast cancer

Cancer Centers Providing Compassionate Cancer Care

The cancer care and treatment experts at Northwest Georgia Oncology Centers, P.C. (NGOC) provide patients with the most advanced cancer treatment options and the best collaborative cancer care available in Georgia. Our cancer care team fights cancer at nine community-based cancer centers in five northwest Georgia counties and specializes in the treatment of breast cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, and all other types of cancer. The 22 oncologists at NGOC are actively involved in cancer research through clinical trials, the treatment of difficult cancer cases and public policy to ensure people in Georgia have access to the best possible cancer care.

Refer to NGOC

Physicians, family or friends can start the process online or call
678-331-3277


Cord Blood Facts – Save The Cord Foundation #blood #cord #banks


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Cord Blood Facts

Do you have the latest cord blood facts?

Cord blood is the blood left in the umbilical cord and placenta following the birth of a child. Here are a few cord blood facts that maybe you didn t know:

  1. Cord blood is a potent and noncontroversial source of stem cells.
  2. Cord blood stem cells are currently being used to treat and cure more than 80 life-threatening illnesses . including many cancers, immune deficiencies and genetic disorders.
  3. Just as important, neither the mother nor child is harmed in the collection of cord blood. The collection does not interfere with the birthing process.

Cord blood is quickly becoming the favored source of stem cells used in transplant therapy. It has many distinct advantages . Cord blood is easy to collect, store and access quickly for a transplant. Unfortunately, cord blood facts are not always easy to find or understand and the media does not help by presenting confusing terms.

Unlike embryonic stem cells, cord blood is not controversial or unethical in any way. Cord blood has no political or religious issues.

Save the Cord Foundation understands that many pregnant women have questions about cord blood and the collection process. Please visit our FAQ or read stories shared by families who have gone through the process.

More about Cord Blood Stem Cells

More information about cord blood is also available at:

  • BetheMatch.org (NMDP/National Marrow Donor Program)
  • AABB (American Association of Blood Banks now an international group)
  • FACT (Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapies)

It is important to note when conducting further research regarding cord blood that many “informational” cord blood sites appear to be unbiased, but are actually owned by various for-profit, private cord blood banks. Be sure to thoroughly research the site before considering the information you read.

About Save the Cord Foundation

Save the Cord Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization, was established to promote awareness of the life-saving benefits of cord blood based on unbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and family cord blood banks worldwide.

Support Save the Cord Foundation

Our mission depends on supporters like you. Please support our cause by making a donation or promoting our website and message where you can. We appreciate all the support!


Whole blood storage for RNA isolation – Molecular Biology #whole #blood #storage


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whole blood storage for RNA isolation – (Dec/22/2008 )

Hey all, i am here again.

Truly speaking, i have none experience in dealing blood to isolate the RNA with neither any RNA isolation method. Hope there is a reply from any of you in this post.

I have a problem of store the whole blood for RNA isolation since i am not going to isolate the RNA immediately.

I read some information that Tri-reagent is specifically used to isolate RNA from whole blood. However, i have some questions in mind:

1. The Tri-reagent can be used to store the whole blood? how about the buffy coat fraction?

2. The point of blood collection doesn t have an equipped molecular lab, with no aspirator, and no sterile workbench. Can i separate the buffy coat (1,000-1,500 x g, 10 min) from the whole blood, and pipette out (with no aspirator help) to collect the buffy coat only?

3. what are the maximum period can store the tri-reagent contained whole blood/buffy coat in -80c to have a good RNA quality?

Need ur help. Thanks first. =)

QUOTE (ah ni Dec 22 2008, 09 34 AM)

Hey all, i am here again.

Truly speaking, i have none experience in dealing blood to isolate the RNA with neither any RNA isolation method. Hope there is a reply from any of you in this post.

I have a problem of store the whole blood for RNA isolation since i am not going to isolate the RNA immediately.

I read some information that Tri-reagent is specifically used to isolate RNA from whole blood. However, i have some questions in mind:

1. The Tri-reagent can be used to store the whole blood? how about the buffy coat fraction?

2. The point of blood collection doesn t have an equipped molecular lab, with no aspirator, and no sterile workbench. Can i separate the buffy coat (1,000-1,500 x g, 10 min) from the whole blood, and pipette out (with no aspirator help) to collect the buffy coat only?

3. what are the maximum period can store the tri-reagent contained whole blood/buffy coat in -80c to have a good RNA quality?

Need ur help. Thanks first. =)

Hi,
My experience with this kind of thing is limited but I have extracted RNA from parasite infected RBCs with Trizol and stored at -80 for a week or so before shipping to another lab on dry ice. The RNA must have been ok because they got a publication out of it.

My lab also did not have an aspirator and I managed to separate plasma, buffy coat and RBCs with a pipette. Are you worried about contamination of your samples. Just find a clean area of bench, wash down with RNAse-ZAP or 70% ethanol and work under a bunsen flame – not ideal but it might be ok.

Hope this helps a bit,
P

QUOTE (Penguin Dec 22 2008, 04 48 PM)

QUOTE (ah ni Dec 22 2008, 09 34 AM)

Hey all, i am here again.

Truly speaking, i have none experience in dealing blood to isolate the RNA with neither any RNA isolation method. Hope there is a reply from any of you in this post.

I have a problem of store the whole blood for RNA isolation since i am not going to isolate the RNA immediately.

I read some information that Tri-reagent is specifically used to isolate RNA from whole blood. However, i have some questions in mind:

1. The Tri-reagent can be used to store the whole blood? how about the buffy coat fraction?

2. The point of blood collection doesn t have an equipped molecular lab, with no aspirator, and no sterile workbench. Can i separate the buffy coat (1,000-1,500 x g, 10 min) from the whole blood, and pipette out (with no aspirator help) to collect the buffy coat only?

3. what are the maximum period can store the tri-reagent contained whole blood/buffy coat in -80c to have a good RNA quality?

Need ur help. Thanks first. =)

Hi,
My experience with this kind of thing is limited but I have extracted RNA from parasite infected RBCs with Trizol and stored at -80 for a week or so before shipping to another lab on dry ice. The RNA must have been ok because they got a publication out of it.

My lab also did not have an aspirator and I managed to separate plasma, buffy coat and RBCs with a pipette. Are you worried about contamination of your samples. Just find a clean area of bench, wash down with RNAse-ZAP or 70% ethanol and work under a bunsen flame – not ideal but it might be ok.

Hope this helps a bit,
P

Hi
thanks for the comment.

will it get more tricky if i use the buffy coat to isolate the RNA by trizol method? i couldn t find any detail of store buffy coat for RNA analysis or to isolate the RNA from buffy coat using trizol/tri-reagent BD method.

I just did a quick search and found this paper

Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;37 Suppl 1:i11-5.
Levels of 5 RNA tags in plasma and buffy coat from EDTA blood increase with time.
Salway F, Day PJ, Ollier WE, Peakman TC.
PMID: 18381387

The methods say they collected the buffy coat and plasma and stored them directly at -80C doing the Trizol extraction at a later date.


Blood Gases: The Test #blood #gas, #blood #gases, #arterial #blood #gases, #arterial


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Blood Gases

How is it used?

Blood gas measurements are used to evaluate a person’s lung function and acid/base balance .

They are typically ordered if someone is having worsening symptoms of a respiratory problem, such as difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, and a condition such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suspected. Blood gases may also be used to monitor treatment for lung diseases and to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental oxygen therapy.

Blood gases can also be used to detect an acid-base imbalance, which can occur in kidney failure. heart failure. uncontrolled diabetes. severe infections, and drug overdose. They may be ordered along with other tests, such as electrolytes to determine if an electrolyte imbalance is present, glucose to evaluate blood sugar concentrations, and BUN and creatinine tests to evaluate kidney function.

When is it ordered?

A blood gas analysis is ordered when someone has symptoms of an oxygen/carbon dioxide or pH imbalance, such as difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, nausea, or vomiting. It may also be ordered when someone is known to have respiratory, metabolic, or kidney disease and is experiencing respiratory distress.

When someone is “on oxygen” (ventilation), blood gases may be measured at intervals to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. Other treatments for lung diseases may also be monitored with blood gases.

Blood gases may also be ordered when someone has head or neck trauma, which may affect breathing, and when someone is undergoing prolonged anesthesia – particularly for cardiac bypass surgery or brain surgery – to monitor blood gases during, and for a period after, the procedure.

Checking blood gases from the umbilical cord of a newborn may uncover respiratory problems as well as determine acid/base status. Testing is usually only done if a newborn is having difficulty breathing.

What does the test result mean?

Normal values will vary from lab to lab. They are also dependent on elevation above sea level as a person’s blood oxygen level will be lower if he or she lives higher than sea level.

Results from an arterial blood gas analysis are not diagnostic; they should be used in combination with the results of other tests and exams to evaluate someone for a respiratory, metabolic, or kidney problem.

Abnormal results of any of the blood gas components may indicate one or more of the following issues:

  • A person is not getting enough oxygen
  • A person is not getting rid of enough carbon dioxide
  • There is a problem with a person’s kidney function

A low partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 ) suggests that a person is not getting enough oxygen, while results that are within normal range usually mean that oxygen intake is sufficient.

All other components of the blood gas analysis (pH. PaCO2. HCO3 -) are interrelated and the results must be considered together. Certain combinations of results, if abnormal, may indicate a condition that is causing acidosis or alkalosis. These may include the following:

  • Respiratory acidosis is characterized by a lower pH and an increased PaCO2 and is due to respiratory depression (not enough oxygen taken in and carbon dioxide removed). This can be caused by many things, including pneumonia. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). and over-sedation from narcotics.
  • Respiratory alkalosis, characterized by a raised pH and a decreased PaCO2. is due to over-ventilation caused by hyperventilating, pain, emotional distress, or certain lung diseases that interfere with oxygen exchange.
  • Metabolic acidosis is characterized by a lower pH and decreased HCO3 -, causing the blood to be too acidic for proper metabolic/kidney function. Causes include diabetes. shock, and renal failure .
  • Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by an elevated pH and increased HCO3 – and is seen in hypokalemia. chronic vomiting (losing acid from the stomach), and sodium bicarbonate overdose.

Examples of test results associated with the above conditions are summarized below:


How Much Does Cord Blood Banking Cost? Question On Stem Cell Storage


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How Much Does Cord Blood Banking Cost?

What Are The Costs Of Stem Cell Blood Banking?

The following is an average costing for private blood banking in Western Europe. While the service of public banking is free it does mean you are giving up rights to the stem cells. They go into a public pool available for use by the general public for medical treatment or by scientists for research.

United States
Most private cord blood banks charge between $1,000 and $2,500 for the collection, processing and initial storage of stem cells. Then you will be required to pay an additional annual maintenance fee of between $200 and $400. Additionally, you may need to pay the hospital a fee for organizing a health provider to withdraw the blood after delivery. Most health insurance companies will not cover these costs. When choosing a cord bank company to store your baby’s blood, ensure they are at a minimum accredited by the AABB, formerly known as the American Association of Blood Banks. Accredited blood banks are inspected every 2 years by the AABB. In an ideal world choose a bank which has also passed the FACT (Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy, FACT) inspection process. Only a handful of American companies have managed to do this.

Canada
The average cost of collection, processing and initial storage is about $1,200 and an annual ongoing fee of $100 to $150. You can normally reduce the annual fee by agreeing to pay a certain amount of years up front.

United Kingdom
The average combined cost of collection, processing and storage for 25 years is about £1,500 to £2,000. Currently about 100,000 sets of parents have chosen to bank their children’s blood in the UK.

Ireland
The average cost of collection, processing and initial storage is about 1,700 Euros with an annual ongoing storage fee of 200 Euros. Irish people are less likely to use this service than their European counterparts. For example, while 18.5 percent of Greeks, 12 percent of Spaniards and 8 percent of Portuguese preserve the stem cells of their children, the figure stands at 0.0001 percent in Ireland.

Other Related Questions
What is it and why do parents consider it? What is cord blood banking?
An explanation of the procedure and when it takes place: How is cord blood collected?

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