Visual Basic Tutorial Lesson 37: Adding Menus for Your Application #free #visual

#

Lesson 37: Creating Menus for Your Applications

The menu bar is the standard feature of most Windows applications. The main purpose of the menus is for easy navigation and control of an application. Some of the most common menu items are File, Edit, View, Tools, Help and more. Each item on the main menu bar also provides a list of options in the form of a pull-down menu. When you create a Visual Basic 6 program, you need not include as many menu items as a full-fledged Windows application. What you need is to include those menu items that can improve the ease of usage by the user. There are two ways to add menus to your application, using the Visual Basic’s Application Wizard and or the menu editor.

37.1 Adding Menu Bar Using Visual Basic’s Application Wizard

The easiest way to add a menu bar to your application is by using Visual Basic’s Application Wizard. This wizard allows the user to insert fully customized standard Windows menu into his or her application. To start using Visual Basic’s Application Wizard, click on the Application Wizard icon at the Visual Basic new project dialog box, as shown in Figure 37.1 below:

Figure 37.1: New Project Window

When you click on the VB Application wizard, the introduction dialog box will appear, as shown in Figure 37.2. As you are not loading any default setting, just click on the Next button.

Figure 37.2

After clicking the Next button, the interface type dialog box will be displayed, as shown in Figure 37.3. There are three choices of interface available for your project. As we currently not creating a Multiple Document Interface (MDI), we choose Single Document Interface (SDI). You can also type the project name in the textbox below, here I am using MyFirstMenu.

Figure 37.3

Clicking the Next button wiill bring up a list of menus and submenus that you can add them to your application. Check to select a menu item and uncheck to unselect a menu item as shown in Figure 37.4. Let say we choose all the menus and click next, then you will get an interface comprises File, Edit, View and Help menus, as shown in Figure 37.5

Figure 37.4

Figure 37.5

When you click on any menu item, a list of drop-down submenu items will be displayed. For example, if you click on the File menu, the list of submenu items such as New, Open, Save, Save As and more will be displayed, as shown in Figure 37.6

Figure 37.6

Clicking on any of the dropped down menu item will show the code associated with it, and this is where you can modify the code to suit your programming needs. For example, clicking on the item Open will reveal the following code:

Figure 37.7

Now, I will show you how to modify the code in order to open a graphic file and display it in an image box. For this program, you have to insert a Image box into the form. Next add the following lines so that the user can open graphic files of different formats.

Filter = Bitmaps(*.BMP)|*.BMP|Metafiles(*.WMF)|*. WMF|Jpeg Files(*.jpg)|*.jpg|GIF Files(*.gif)|*.gif|Icon Files(*.ico)|*.ico|All Files(*.*)|*.* .

Then, you need to load the image into the Image box with the following code:

Also set the Stretch property of the Image box to true so that the image loaded can resize by itself. Please note that each menu item is a special control, so it has a name too. The name for the menu File in this example is mnuFileOpen.

The Code

When you run the program and click on the File menu and then the submenu Open, the following Open dialog box will be displayed, where you can look for graphic files of various formats to load it into the image box.

Figure 37.8

For example, selecting the jpeg file will allow you to choose the images of jpeg format, as shown in Figure 37.9.

Figure 37.9

Clicking on the particular picture will load it into the image box, as shown in Figure 36.10 below

Figure 37.10

37.2: Adding Menu Bar Using Menu Editor

To start adding menu items to your application, open an existing project or start a new project, then click on Tools in the menu bar of the Visual Basic IDE and select Menu Editor. When you click on the Menu Editor, the Menu Editor dialog will appear. In the Menu Editor dialog. key in the first item File in the caption text box. You can use the ampersand ( ) sign in front of F so that F will be underlined when it appears in the menu, and F will become the hot key to initiate the action under this item by pressing the Alt key and the letter F. After typing File in the Caption text box, move to the name textbox to enter the name for this menu item, you can type in mnuFile here. Now, click the Next button and the menu item File will move into the empty space below, as shown in Figure 37.11:

Figure 37.11

You can then add in other menu items on the menu bar by following the same procedure, as shown in Figure 37.12 below:

Figure 37.12

When you click Ok, the menu items will be shown on the menu bar of the form.

Figure 37.13

Now, you may proceed to add the sub menus. In the Menu Editor, click on the Insert button between File and Exit and then click the right arrow key, and the dotted line will appear. This shows the second level of the menu, or the submenu. Now key in the caption and the name. Repeat the same procedure to add other submenu items. Here, we are adding New, Open, Save, Save As and Exit.

Figure 37.14

Now click the OK button and go back to your form. You can see the dropped down submenus when you click on the item File, as shown.

Figure 37.15

Finally, you can enter the code by clicking on any of the submenu items.





Body Paint: Silly Farm Supplies Inc #face #and #body #paints,face #and #body

#

Everything Face and Body Art

July 2017 Specials of the Month

Body Paint

Body paint is available in a variety of mediums perfect for every type of painter. We stock the largest selection of skin safe, vibrant, easy to use face and body paint. In this section you will find liquid, Airbrush ready, cake, latex, and all brands can be mixed and matched to create a work of art. If you have questions about types of paint and the differences between cake and liquid make up. Please feel free to call, email or LIVE chat us we are here to help.

  • Cake Makeup
  • Latex Effects
  • Liquid Makeup
  • Metallic Body Paint
  • UV/Neon Body Paint
  • Waterproof Makeup
  • Airbrush Body Paint

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Brisbane Auction Galleries 270 Abbotsford Road, Bowen Hills, Brisbane Australia #brisbane #auction

#

BRISBANE AUCTION GALLERIES 07-32571377

Welcome to

BRISBANE AUCTION GALLERIES

our next auction will be

OVER 850 NO RESERVE LOTS

Viewing Times:

Absentee bids can be left at the viewing on Sunday or by the following:

  • Phone / E-mail – Before 12 MIDDAY on the MONDAY of auction
  • Bids less than the start prices will NOT BE processed on lots not marked as N/R
  • Your bids DO NOT include Buyers Premiums or GST

Phone bids can be arranged but must be organised by5:00 pm prior toAuction and relate to lots with estimates above $ 50

For assistance please speak to one of our staff who will be happy to help you with these options.

JOIN US ON THE NEW

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(the one with the picture of the outside of the building)

Click this link for an illustrated catalogue.

THE MAJORITY OF LOTS ARE MARKED N/R (no reserve)

ESTIMATE PRICES ARE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE TO ASSIST CLIENTS FOR INDICATION PURPOSES ONLY, EXCEPT FOR THOSE LOTS NOT MARKED N/R WHEN THE ESTIMATE PRICE WILL BE USED TO COMMENCE THE LOT. E OE,PLS NOTE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ALTER ANY DETAILS OR SUBMISSIONS OR WITHDRAW ANY LOT AT ANY TIME WE SEE FIT AT THE DISCRETION OF MANAGEMENT.

THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE FOR

Brisbane’s most trusted Antique Auction and Valuation service.

Are you downsizing or dealing with a deceased Estate? The experienced team at Brisbane Auction Galleries are happy to assist.

We offer a range of services from Valuation (Commonwealth Government approved Valuer of Antiques and Art) to Estate Management and appraisal.

Our centrally located sale rooms are equipped to sell everything from entire home contents to single items and are open to the public for viewing prior to each sale.

Why not attend our next sale and see for yourself? Admittance is free unless held at an onsite location you are most welcome!





Bernhardt, sarah ophelia #auction, #art, #exhibition, #online, #catalogue, #bid, #buy, #collect, #contemporary,

#

Catalogue Note

“Her clothes spread wide;
And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up:
Which time she chanted snatches of old tunes;
As one incapable of her own distress,
Or like a creature native and indued
Unto that element: but long it could not be
Till that her garments, heavy with their drink,
Pull’d the poor wretch from her melodious lay
To muddy death.”

William Shakespeare
Hamlet, Act IV, Scene VII

Celebrated as one of the greatest actresses of all time, Sarah Bernhardt was also recognised for her talent in the medium of sculpture, a passion which complemented her success as a stage artist. The present marble relief of Ophelia is a rare surviving work signed by Bernhardt, and among her most important to appear at auction in recent memory. Deeply sensuous in form and conception, Ophelia testifies to the iconic actor’s considerable skill as a sculptor, while epitomising Bernhardt’s fascination with the morbid eroticism that surrounds Shakespeare’s heroine.

Born in Paris to a courtesan and an unknown father, Sarah Bernhardt received her first training as an actor at the Comédie-Française from which she was expelled, prompting a brief period of activity as a courtesan. Resuming her acting career in 1866, Bernhardt began to develop a reputation on the stage at prestigious Parisian theatres. She soon found unprecedented fame across Europe and beyond, enjoying several worldwide tours during the 1880s and 1890s. Known in particular for her magisterial portrayals of tragic characters, Sarah Bernhardt’s legendary status continued into the early 20 th century, when she starred in silent films and remained active on the stage until her death in 1923.

Sarah Bernhardt was as flamboyant a personality off the stage as she was in her dramatic roles. Famously, the actress acquired a coffin in the 1860s, in which she would pose and sleep regularly throughout her life. By thus fetishising her hypothetical corpse, Bernhardt displayed an erotically charged obsession with death that was both personal and symptomatic of her time – a time when morgues were places of public spectacle, and morbidly beautiful phenomena such as the death mask of ‘L’Inconnue de la Seine’ captivated the art scene.

It was the same 19 th -century environment which gave rise to an artistic fascination with the character of Ophelia in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The tragic fate of the heroine, who becomes Hamlet’s lover but falls victim to the Prince’s plotting of revenge and, in her eventual madness, drowns in a stream, was depicted by painters such as Eugène Delacroix and, notably, John Everett Millais.

Bernhardt’s activity as a sculptor began in the 1870s with guidance from Roland Mathieu-Meusnier and Jules Franceschi. Taking a studio in 1873, she went on to model a number of highly accomplished works, such as the group Après la Tempête. which she exhibited at the Salon in 1876.

Despite being the most famous actress of her day, Sarah Bernhardt had never performed the role of Ophelia at the time her marble was conceived – it was not until 1886 that she appeared as Ophelia in a production of Hamlet. followed by a controversial turn as the eponymous character of Shakespeare’s tragedy in 1899. Yet Bernhardt’s prominent obsession with death had led to a long-lived fascination with the tragic heroine, and her sculptural representation of Ophelia became one of her most significant works. Modelled in 1880, the relief accompanied Bernhardt on her first tour of North America before being shown at the Paris Salon in 1881. Reviews of Ophelia were positive, praising it as a work ‘of which any sculptor might be proud’ (see Mason, op. cit. p. 312) – a choice of words which highlights Bernhardt’s unique status as both a woman and a full-time actress active in the profession of sculpture.

The relief is thought to exist in a handful of versions in marble, the present example being an important rediscovery. The only other version whose location is known is that in Copenhagen, which was gifted to the Royal Theatre by Bernhardt in June 1881 and remains on display in its foyer. Another version is recorded to have been a gift to the Austrian painter Hans Makart, while a third was exhibited at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Photographs reveal very slight variations between the marbles, and it is possible that the present version is that which was given to Makart. Bernhardt’s personal attachment to the work is revealed by her inclusion of a photograph of Ophelia – probably the plaster – in her 1907 memoirs.

Bernhardt’s high relief represents Ophelia in bust-form, her head turned, her eyes closed, wearing a garland of flowers, and enveloped by water which merges with her tresses. The subtlety of Bernhardt’s modelling is showcased in the beautifully detailed flowers, as well as the delicate waves of the ‘glassy stream’, whose texture contrasts with the smooth and bulging form of Ophelia’s exposed right breast. Though seemingly depicted in the moment of her death, the woman’s sensuous open-mouthed expression, overt nudity, and languid pose exude an undeniable eroticism. Unaware of her suffering, the heroine appears to embrace her death as an ecstatic consummation. Bernhardt thus offers an original interpretation of the references to female sexuality and deflowering made by Shakespeare throughout the scene of Ophelia’s madness and Queen Gertrude’s speech describing her death, which makes use of sexualised imagery such as ‘long purples / That liberal shepherds give a grosser name’.

In her later theatrical interpretations of the character, Bernhardt would add a heightened level of eroticism to Ophelia’s death by choosing to appear on stage herself as the dead Ophelia – instead of the conventional coffin – in the graveyard scene, in which her brother Laertes throws himself upon her body. Mirroring her sculptural portrait of the heroine, Bernhardt was described thus in a review by Joseph Knight (1886, as quoted in Young, op. cit. p. 23): ‘She is once more seen with her face rigid as marble, and her body, covered with flowers, …’

RELATED LITERATURE
M. E. Mason, Making Love/ Making Work: The Sculpture Practice of Sarah Bernhardt. doctoral thesis, The University of Leeds, May 2007, vol. II, pp. 310-348; A. R. Young, ‘Sarah Bernhardt’s Ophelia’, Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation. 8, no. 1, 2013

Condition Report

the frame with a title plaque inscribed: OPHELIA / PAR / SARAH BERNHARDT
signed: SARAH. BERNHARDT
white marble, in a wood frame
marble: 70 by 59cm. 27½ by 23¼in.
frame: 98.5 by 76.5cm. 38¾ by 30 1/8 in.

Estimate 50,000 70,000

Overall, the condition is good, with minor dirt and wear to the surface consistent with age, in particular to the proper right shoulder and arm, to the side of the proper right breast, and to the water above the sternum and by the bottom right corner. There is minor veining to the marble, consistent with the material, including a few slightly visible yellowish veins to the proper left cheek, the neck, and the proper right breast. There are a few small chips and abrasions to the edges of the flowers, in particular to the two larger flowers lying on the proper left breast. It is possible there may be a few further minor abrasions in the flowers and hair, though these would be difficult to identify due to the extraordinary intricacy of the carving. There is some paint residue to the top of one of the flowers above the forehead, possibly concealing a minor chip. There are a few small abrasions to the edges of the relief. There are some yellowish dirt marks to the proper right side of the nose. The frame is stable, with wear consistent with age, including some stable splitting, consistent with the material, notably to the top section at the front. There are various small holes and specks of paint to the frame.
“In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby’s is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.”





Benchmark Passages #reading #program, #leveled #reading, #leveled #books, #lesson #plans, #student #worksheets,

#

Digital Running Records on Raz-Plus

With our Online Running Record tool, Raz-Plus or Raz-Kids members can:

  • Assign and listen to recordings of Benchmark Passages and Books.
  • Score recordings using an online running record tool.

BENCHMARK PASSAGES & RUNNING RECORDS

Find students’ instructional levels by assessing their reading skills with developmentally appropriate texts while recording reading behavior. Benchmark Passages are short text selections that are one part of a three-part process to help place students at their instructional levels for leveled reading sessions and to assess their readiness to progress to the next level.

Why Benchmark Passages

Benchmark Passages assess comprehension and reward students’ progress from level to level. They are one part of a three-part process that provides a more complete assessment of reading behavior and comprehension than any of the parts independently.

  • Each level has 2 fiction and 2 nonfiction passages.
  • Each level has at least 1 fiction-nonfiction passage pair on the same topic.
  • Each passage uses a level-appropriate percentage of words from leveled books at that reading level.
    • aa-E = 100%
    • F-J = 95% + 5% new words
    • K-Z = 90% + 10% new words
  • The text of the entire passage is used in the Running Record.
  • Most are one page long, but upper level passages can be two pages.
  • ALL are available on Raz-Plus .

How to Use Benchmark Passages

  1. Give a student a Benchmark Passage he or she has never seen before to read aloud. If you prefer to use familiar text, use the fiction-nonfiction topic pair at each level. Use one passage from the pair to support a student’s understanding of the topic before assessing with the other passage.
  2. Record the student’s reading behavior using the passage’s Running Record form.
  3. If a student scores 90 percent, assess the student’s comprehension using a Quick Check from Level A-Z and Retelling Rubrics .
  4. If a student scores from 90%-94% percent on the running record and answers comprehension questions at 80%-100%, he or she is at an instructional level. (For more details, see About Running Records ).
  5. Use Benchmark WOWzers to reward students’ progress from level to level.

Features and Chart

  • 2 7 words per line; 4.5 words average
  • 1 line per page
  • 30 55 words total
  • Complete sentences
  • Repetition of high-frequency words
  • Repetitive pattern with one or two word changes per page
  • Pattern may change on last page, such as a surprise ending
  • Predictable language
  • One-to-one text-to-picture correspondence
  • Familiar topics
  • Consistent text placement
  • 10 pages

Big and Little

Ted Sees a Pond

Near the Pond

We Read About Animals

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Books That May Help – Hospice of Humboldt #online #hotels

#hospice books

#

Books That May Help

All of these books can be found at the main branch of the Humboldt County library.

Books for Younger Children

  • Annie and the Old One by Miska Miles is a beautiful story of a little Navajo girl whose grandmother is very old. It is gently explained in the book that dying is a natural process.
  • Everett Anderson s Goodbye by Lucille Clifton is a picture book that illustrates the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) through the eyes of a five-year-old whose father has died.
  • Saying Good-bye to Grandma by Jane Thomas helps children understand what goes on at a funeral. This book gives details of this event that seldom includes children.
  • The Fall of Freddie the Leaf by Leo Buscaglia uses a leaf named Freddie and his companion leaves to discuss natural change and is a gentle way of addressing the balance between life and death.
  • The Mountains of Tibet by Mordicai Gerstein is a story about an old woodcutter and his choices when he faces the chance to live life over again. This story is a gentle look at one human being dealing with life s choices and possibilities.
  • The Tenth Good Thing About Barney by Judith Viorst shows how remembering the good things about those we love, even a cat, can make their death less sad.
  • When a Pet Dies by Fred Rogers deals with a child s feelings about the loss of a beloved pet. Mr. Rogers is sensitive but clear and direct when he explains the finality of death.
  • When Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to Understanding Death by Laurie Krasny Brown is a beautifully illustrated book that addresses children s fears and curiosity about death by answering some very basic questions.
  • Where Is Grandpa? by T. A. Barron and Chris K. Soentpiet is a touching story of a boy and his family who remember Grandpa after his death by sharing special memories of him.

Books for Older Children and Teenagers

  • Charlotte s Web by E.B. White is the story of friendship. When Charlotte, the spider, dies at the fair grounds, her friends Templeton the rat and Wilbur the pig take her eggs back to the farm where they can safely hatch. (on video)
  • Lifetimes by Bryan Mellonie and Robert Ingpen tells about plants, animals, and people all having a lifetime. This beautifully illustrated book lets children see how dying is as much a part of living as being born.
  • Meet the Austins by Madeleine L Engle tells the story of Maggy, a child orphaned when her father is killed in a plane crash. Maggy is insolent and sullen when she comes to live with the Austins but eventually accepts the loss, aided by the warmth and security of the Austin family.
  • The Two of Them by Aliki is about a little girl who takes care of her sick grandfather because of all the love and caring he had always given her.
  • How It Feels When a Parent Dies by Jill Krementz includes the conversations of eighteen boys and girls from seven to sixteen years-old as they discuss their experiences and feelings about the deaths of their parents. The causes of the deaths include accidents, illness and suicide.
  • Straight Talk about Death for Teenagers: How to cope with losing someone you love by Earl Grollman discusses normal reaction to the shock of death, how grief can affect a teen s relationship with others, how participating in a funeral can help and how to work through the grief process. A journal section is included.
  • The Grieving Teen: A Guide for Teenagers and Their Friends by Helen Fitzgerald is a compassionate guide that pays attention to the special needs of adolescents struggling with death and gives them the tools to work through their pain and grief.
  • Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume explains how a young girl and her brother cope with the murder of their father. This story is particularly useful in helping children deal with sudden and traumatic death.
  • Where the Lilies Bloom by Vera and Bill Cleaver tells the story of a 14-year-old girl and her sibling who survive a bitter winter together after the death of their parents.
  • How to Help Children Through a Parent s Serious Illness by Kathleen McCue contains two chapters on death and grief. This book helps with children s anticipatory grief by discussing what to tell the child about the illness; how children of different ages are likely to act; how to recognize early warning signs of grief; and how to find out what a child is really thinking or feeling.
  • Talking about Death: A dialogue between parent and child by Earl Grollman is divided into three sections: a Children s Read-Along picture book with large type and beautiful illustrations; a Parent s Guide to Explaining Death which contains ways of answering children s questions; and a Resources listing of professional organizations, self-help groups, and books as well as audio and video tapes.

Books for Adults and Caregivers

  • Dying Well: Peace and possibilities at the end of life by Ira Byock, M.D. brings readers to the homes and bedsides of the dying and tells stories of love and reconciliation in the face of tragedy, pain, and conflict.
  • Final Gifts by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley describes the messages that the dying give as they enter Near Death Awareness. This book helps caregivers to listen to those they love and become less fearful of what their loved one is saying.
  • Who gets Grandma s Yellow Pie Plate? by M. Stum is a family-focused guide to transferring non-titled property such as Grandma s yellow pie plate or Grandpa s gold watch. It treats the matter with sensitivity, recognizing that belongings have different meanings to different individuals.
  • I m With You Now: A guide through incurable illness for patients, families, and friends by M. Catherine Ray teaches the communication skills necessary to deal with the frightening topics and situations that accompany incurable illness.
  • The Dying Time: Practical wisdom for the dying and their caregivers by Joan Furman and David McNabb is a comprehensive and thorough handbook for the dying and their caregivers. It provides details on how to make the environment conducive to peace and tranquility, give physical care, and understand and respond to the emotional and spiritual crises that naturally occur.
  • The Grace in Dying: How we are transformed spiritually as we die by Kathleen Dowling Singh describes phases that signal when a dying person is entering the final stages of spiritual and psychological transformation and through this understanding subdues the ultimate fear of the dying process.

Books about Grief and Recovery

  • After Goodbye: How to Begin Again After the Death of Someone You Love by Ted Menten and Theodore Menten is designed to help the survivors find ways to grieve, let go, and move on after the death of a loved one.
  • A Broken Heart Still Beats: After Your Child Dies by Anne McCracken and Mary Semel, two mothers who share that unfortunate experience of having a child die. The authors describe their grieving process and how it affected their lives. The book also includes excerpts from works by authors such as Melville, Frost, and Shelley about the death of a child.
  • A Time to Grieve: Meditations for healing after the death of a loved one by Carol Staudacher begins with a quote from a survivor before each meditation then reflects upon the feeling and content of the quote. Affirmations follow to lead one forward in the grief process.
  • Grieving the Death of a Friend by Harold Ivan Smith guides the reader to move with the natural process of one of the most significant but unrecognized experiences of grief, the death of a friend. The book explores the aspects of friendship, passing, burying, mourning, remembering, and reconciling.
  • Swallowed by a Snake: The gift of the masculine side of healing by Thomas Golden blends folklore, cross-cultural analysis, and clinical advice to help both men and women understand the specific context and needs of grieving men.
  • The Courage to Grieve by Judy Tatelbaum presents the three phases of grief, talks about unsuccessful grieving, children s grief, and the recovery process.

Books That May Help – Hospice of Humboldt #palliative #radiation #therapy

#hospice books

#

Books That May Help

All of these books can be found at the main branch of the Humboldt County library.

Books for Younger Children

  • Annie and the Old One by Miska Miles is a beautiful story of a little Navajo girl whose grandmother is very old. It is gently explained in the book that dying is a natural process.
  • Everett Anderson s Goodbye by Lucille Clifton is a picture book that illustrates the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) through the eyes of a five-year-old whose father has died.
  • Saying Good-bye to Grandma by Jane Thomas helps children understand what goes on at a funeral. This book gives details of this event that seldom includes children.
  • The Fall of Freddie the Leaf by Leo Buscaglia uses a leaf named Freddie and his companion leaves to discuss natural change and is a gentle way of addressing the balance between life and death.
  • The Mountains of Tibet by Mordicai Gerstein is a story about an old woodcutter and his choices when he faces the chance to live life over again. This story is a gentle look at one human being dealing with life s choices and possibilities.
  • The Tenth Good Thing About Barney by Judith Viorst shows how remembering the good things about those we love, even a cat, can make their death less sad.
  • When a Pet Dies by Fred Rogers deals with a child s feelings about the loss of a beloved pet. Mr. Rogers is sensitive but clear and direct when he explains the finality of death.
  • When Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to Understanding Death by Laurie Krasny Brown is a beautifully illustrated book that addresses children s fears and curiosity about death by answering some very basic questions.
  • Where Is Grandpa? by T. A. Barron and Chris K. Soentpiet is a touching story of a boy and his family who remember Grandpa after his death by sharing special memories of him.

Books for Older Children and Teenagers

  • Charlotte s Web by E.B. White is the story of friendship. When Charlotte, the spider, dies at the fair grounds, her friends Templeton the rat and Wilbur the pig take her eggs back to the farm where they can safely hatch. (on video)
  • Lifetimes by Bryan Mellonie and Robert Ingpen tells about plants, animals, and people all having a lifetime. This beautifully illustrated book lets children see how dying is as much a part of living as being born.
  • Meet the Austins by Madeleine L Engle tells the story of Maggy, a child orphaned when her father is killed in a plane crash. Maggy is insolent and sullen when she comes to live with the Austins but eventually accepts the loss, aided by the warmth and security of the Austin family.
  • The Two of Them by Aliki is about a little girl who takes care of her sick grandfather because of all the love and caring he had always given her.
  • How It Feels When a Parent Dies by Jill Krementz includes the conversations of eighteen boys and girls from seven to sixteen years-old as they discuss their experiences and feelings about the deaths of their parents. The causes of the deaths include accidents, illness and suicide.
  • Straight Talk about Death for Teenagers: How to cope with losing someone you love by Earl Grollman discusses normal reaction to the shock of death, how grief can affect a teen s relationship with others, how participating in a funeral can help and how to work through the grief process. A journal section is included.
  • The Grieving Teen: A Guide for Teenagers and Their Friends by Helen Fitzgerald is a compassionate guide that pays attention to the special needs of adolescents struggling with death and gives them the tools to work through their pain and grief.
  • Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume explains how a young girl and her brother cope with the murder of their father. This story is particularly useful in helping children deal with sudden and traumatic death.
  • Where the Lilies Bloom by Vera and Bill Cleaver tells the story of a 14-year-old girl and her sibling who survive a bitter winter together after the death of their parents.
  • How to Help Children Through a Parent s Serious Illness by Kathleen McCue contains two chapters on death and grief. This book helps with children s anticipatory grief by discussing what to tell the child about the illness; how children of different ages are likely to act; how to recognize early warning signs of grief; and how to find out what a child is really thinking or feeling.
  • Talking about Death: A dialogue between parent and child by Earl Grollman is divided into three sections: a Children s Read-Along picture book with large type and beautiful illustrations; a Parent s Guide to Explaining Death which contains ways of answering children s questions; and a Resources listing of professional organizations, self-help groups, and books as well as audio and video tapes.

Books for Adults and Caregivers

  • Dying Well: Peace and possibilities at the end of life by Ira Byock, M.D. brings readers to the homes and bedsides of the dying and tells stories of love and reconciliation in the face of tragedy, pain, and conflict.
  • Final Gifts by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley describes the messages that the dying give as they enter Near Death Awareness. This book helps caregivers to listen to those they love and become less fearful of what their loved one is saying.
  • Who gets Grandma s Yellow Pie Plate? by M. Stum is a family-focused guide to transferring non-titled property such as Grandma s yellow pie plate or Grandpa s gold watch. It treats the matter with sensitivity, recognizing that belongings have different meanings to different individuals.
  • I m With You Now: A guide through incurable illness for patients, families, and friends by M. Catherine Ray teaches the communication skills necessary to deal with the frightening topics and situations that accompany incurable illness.
  • The Dying Time: Practical wisdom for the dying and their caregivers by Joan Furman and David McNabb is a comprehensive and thorough handbook for the dying and their caregivers. It provides details on how to make the environment conducive to peace and tranquility, give physical care, and understand and respond to the emotional and spiritual crises that naturally occur.
  • The Grace in Dying: How we are transformed spiritually as we die by Kathleen Dowling Singh describes phases that signal when a dying person is entering the final stages of spiritual and psychological transformation and through this understanding subdues the ultimate fear of the dying process.

Books about Grief and Recovery

  • After Goodbye: How to Begin Again After the Death of Someone You Love by Ted Menten and Theodore Menten is designed to help the survivors find ways to grieve, let go, and move on after the death of a loved one.
  • A Broken Heart Still Beats: After Your Child Dies by Anne McCracken and Mary Semel, two mothers who share that unfortunate experience of having a child die. The authors describe their grieving process and how it affected their lives. The book also includes excerpts from works by authors such as Melville, Frost, and Shelley about the death of a child.
  • A Time to Grieve: Meditations for healing after the death of a loved one by Carol Staudacher begins with a quote from a survivor before each meditation then reflects upon the feeling and content of the quote. Affirmations follow to lead one forward in the grief process.
  • Grieving the Death of a Friend by Harold Ivan Smith guides the reader to move with the natural process of one of the most significant but unrecognized experiences of grief, the death of a friend. The book explores the aspects of friendship, passing, burying, mourning, remembering, and reconciling.
  • Swallowed by a Snake: The gift of the masculine side of healing by Thomas Golden blends folklore, cross-cultural analysis, and clinical advice to help both men and women understand the specific context and needs of grieving men.
  • The Courage to Grieve by Judy Tatelbaum presents the three phases of grief, talks about unsuccessful grieving, children s grief, and the recovery process.

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Books for hospices

‘A great resource for patients…the service is another way of offering comfort and relaxation to patients and ensures that staff and carers feel they are doing that little bit extra for the people they care for. I would recommend the service to other hospices…
Candy Welch, St Helena Hospice, Essex

In May 2010, Listening Books launched its books for hospices project, supplying mini libraries of audiobooks to voluntary-run hospices. We are delighted to have been able to offer these mini libraries to hospices free of charge through the generous donations of charitable trusts and companies. We have so far delivered to over 160 adult hospices in England and to the majority of children’s hospices throughout the UK, ensuring our audiobooks bring comfort to as many adults and children as possible.

The mini libraries consist of a huge range of fantastic audiobooks on MP3 CD by some of the biggest names in the publishing world, including

Margaret Atwood, Bill Bryson, Dan Brown and Jacqueline Wilson. Each hospice has so far also received MP3 CD players and headphones to distribute to its patients.

Director, Bill Dee, says:

‘We have long been aware that many of our members under hospice care find our audiobooks an invaluable distraction from pain and anxiety. This development of our service allows us to reach people under hospice care in a more structured and effective way. The feedback to date has been overwhelmingly positive and we are delighted with the progress of the project thus far.’

Clare Collins, who works at St Giles Hospice in Lichfield which offers specialist care for patients with cancer and other serious illnesses, tells us how the service is being used to benefit their patients:

‘The mini library is currently used in the Day Hospice. Listening Books are used on a weekly basis by the patients. On a monthly basis, we operate a book of the month service whereby patients can gather together in one place to listen to the book.

The library has given some of our patients access to books when they are unable to physically get to a library or shop. For others who are not able to hold a book, and therefore have been unable to read for a long time, Listening Books have opened up a wider accessibility for them. Because the hospice covers a wide area, we have a wide range of people who access our services, and therefore have access to the book library.

Being able to access the library has really been so useful to our patients. They have thoroughly enjoyed the independence of having this facility.’

It really is fantastic to see such positive responses from participating hospices. We are also grateful to have the support of David Praill, Chief Executive of charity, Help the Hospices, who had this to say about the project:

‘The Books for Hospices project from Listening Books has already made a tremendous difference to hundreds of hospice patients and their families, with mini libraries being installed at more than 30 local hospices across the UK. These audiobook libraries have supported hospices in their mission to help people live well until they die, by giving people with life-limiting and terminal illnesses the chance to reap the therapeutic benefits of books, and continue to do the things they love – like relaxing with a novel or learning about something new.

Listening Books patron, Stephen Fry, was equally positive about the initiative:

‘It s wonderful to hear that Listening Books is now extending its vital audiobook service to include adults and children in hospice care who cannot read books. The comfort and escapism audiobooks can bring will provide welcome relief to those struggling with life-limiting illnesses who are no longer able to participate in the usual activities one uses to escape pain and anxiety.’

Listening Books members can download thousands of fantastic titles to an iPod or other portable player!