Hospice Admission Criteria for Dementia Patients – Neurology Center: Medical Information on

#hospice criteria for dementia

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TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) — Many people with advanced dementia aren’t getting much-needed hospice care because the admission criteria is flawed, researchers say.

“Dementia is a leading cause of death in the U.S. and hospice care can benefit patients with dementia. The main hindrance to getting palliative [comfort] care is guidelines that try to guide practitioners to wait until an estimated life expectancy of six months,” said Dr. Susan L. Mitchell, a senior scientist at the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife in Boston, and lead author of a new study.

Such end-of-life predictions are difficult to make with certainty in dementia cases. Instead of using life expectancy as the requirement for admission, hospice care for dementia patients should be offered based on the patient’s and family’s desire for comfort care, suggest Mitchell and colleagues in the study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association .

Hospice, or palliative, care is most often associated with cancer patients. The goal is to provide comfort and support to patients and their families, instead of life-prolonging treatments.

For people with cancer, the decision to switch to palliative care is more clear-cut. It generally occurs when someone decides to forgo traditional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation, that don’t seem to be working anymore, and instead receive comfort care, which includes better pain management and discussions about important end-of-life care decisions.

For people with dementia, the decision process is murkier. Most people with advanced dementia are already in nursing homes, receiving around-the-clock care, but palliative care can provide families with additional support and help families make difficult decisions, such as whether or not to treat infections with antibiotics or to use a feeding tube to deliver nutrition. Palliative care may also provide better pain management and symptom relief, said Mitchell.

To improve the likelihood of dementia patients getting palliative care, Mitchell and her co-authors tried to come up with a better tool to assess their potential life expectancy.

This new method, dubbed the Advanced Dementia Prognostic Tool (ADEPT), includes 12 items, such as body mass index, ability to perform tasks of daily living like self-feeding, bowel incontinence, shortness of breath and oral food intake.

The researchers compared their assessment tool with the standard Medicare hospice eligibility guidelines on 606 residents in 21 nursing homes.

Their tool accurately predicted a life expectancy of fewer than six months 67% of the time, versus 55% for the Medicare guidelines, said Mitchell.

“While ADEPT was better than the Medicare criteria, its predictive ability isn’t perfect,” said Mitchell. “The delivery of palliative care should be guided by a preference of comfort care rather than by life expectancy,” she added.

A 2009 study by Mitchell and her colleagues was the first to label dementia a terminal illness like cancer and other incurable diseases.

Dr. Joseph Shega, an associate professor in the section of geriatrics and palliative medicine at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said he agrees that the issue of comfort care for dementia patients deserves attention.

“It’s important to recognize that we’re not really good at figuring out how long someone with dementia might live, and I agree with these authors that we should focus more on the goals of care and stop spending resources on trying to figure out how long someone might live,” said Shega.

“Hospice provides more support for nursing home staff, better support for the family, and can help better educate the family on the natural process of dementia so they know what’s going on,” he explained.

Hospice also helps manage symptoms, like discomfort or agitation, Shega added, while making sure that care plans and treatment goals agree with the values and wishes of the patients and their families.

SOURCES: Susan L. Mitchell, M.D. M.P.H. senior scientist, Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston; Joseph Shega, M.D. associate professor, section of geriatrics and palliative medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center; Nov. 3, 2010, Journal of the American Medical Association





GBM – end stage question – Brain Tumors Forum – Cancer Forums

#brain hospice

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Thread: GBM – end stage question

Re: GBM – end stage question

Dear Imli, sorry to know what you are going through. As I understand, that is the way this disease progresses. The patient switches to coma later and then passes away in sleep. When death is close, breathing pattern changes and the color of urine goes darker due to lack of sufficient oxygen in the body. Death is usually painless.

My mother is in the end stages of GBM. She is currently completely bedridden, cannot talk or comprehend and sleeps all the time. When she does open her eyes, her gaze is unfocussed and glazed. Her vitals are strong, and she is being fed via a tube. Has a catheter- Urine and stools normal. I know this is progression of the disease, but I am still at a loss and its hard to see a loved one deteriorate. We were told that the symptoms in her case were due to edema and swelling post Gamma knife, may not be the tumor. This has been going on for 5 weeks now.How long can this go on? I know a lot of you have lost loved ones to the disease, and am hoping your collective response can give me a better picture on how much more time she has. She is diisplaying symptoms ( of the timeline chart on brain hospice) of 1-2 weeks for over 1 month now.

New User Join Date Jan 2010 Posts 14

An update on the situation and a little confused. Mom had been sleeping and opening her eyes for a few minutes at most, occasionally-when she was physically moved. This has been the situation for approx 6 weeks. No response to any other stimuli, no recognition or cognition. Last week she had low grade temperature for a few days and still feels warm occasionaly. Since the last 3 days however, her eyes are open and gazing at the ceiling for hours. Her breathing sounds like she is snoring lightly.Her last MRI was in Nov ’09 which showed lots of Edema, post Cyber knife ( Aug 2009). CT in Dec ’09-showed heavy midline shift, when she became paralysed. bedridden and non-cognizant after which she was given steroids that only marginally helped her.
I’m not sure what to make of this, in that she has gone from sleeping continuosly, to opening her eyes and gazing for hours. Is this a sign of improvement? Should I push for another MRI?

Administrator Top User Join Date Oct 2005 Location Tennessee Posts 7,967 Blog Entries 5

Hi Imli. I don’t know what it means that your mother now has her eye open for a long time but still not responding to others. Does she track? That is, if you put your finger in front of her eyes and move it, do her eyes follow your finger? If not, she is probably not really seeing anything just sleeping with her eyes opened. She needs to blink her eyes or they will dry. In hospitals, some times they go so far as to tap eyes closed when someone sleeps with their eyes open so that they do not dry.

In terms of getting an MRI. for sure you need to make her doctor aware of this change and let him/her advise you on what needs to be done.

New User Join Date Jan 2010 Posts 14

Brainman- No, she does not track. Keeps Gazing and but does blink on her own though. She has been off steroids for approx a month now as well.

Regular User Join Date Oct 2009 Posts 18

response to your queries

Sorry imli, as far as my experience with this disease goes, it appears that the disease is spreading within the brain and is taking away your mom slowly. I am not sure if scans can reveal anything since growth and spreading could be at microscopic level. A doctor would be able to advise you better. Sorry again, it is painful to observe the patient at this stage.

Regular User Join Date Oct 2009 Posts 18

Re: response to your queries

signs of increasing body temperature are also common, as I understand. I am not sure how that connects with the disease.

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THE JOURNEY with a brain tumor is an emotional roller coaster for patient and caregiving family alike. Anyone who has been a part of this experience understands the difficulty of these ups and downs. But no matter how long or hard the journey. no matter what the grade or type of tumor. when the road narrows and it is time to think about end-stage comfort, no one feels truly ready for the letting go. read more

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Concussion (Traumatic Brain Injury): Symptoms, Causes, Treatments, trauma brain injury symptoms.#Trauma #brain


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Concussion (Traumatic Brain Injury)

Concussion

The most common and least serious type of traumatic brain injury is called a concussion. The word comes from the Latin concutere, which means “to shake violently.”

According to the CDC, between 2001 and 2009, an estimated 173,285 people under age 19 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for concussions related to sports and recreation activities. Other causes include car and bicycle accidents, work-related injuries, falls, and fighting.

How can you tell if you have had a concussion? Is it always serious? And what should you do if you have a concussion? Here are answers to some important questions about concussions.

What Is a Concussion?

As seen in countless Saturday morning cartoons, a concussion is most often caused by a sudden direct blow or bump to the head.

The brain is made of soft tissue. It’s cushioned by spinal fluid and encased in the protective shell of the skull. When you sustain a concussion, the impact can jolt your brain. Sometimes, it literally causes it to move around in your head. Traumatic brain injuries can cause bruising, damage to the blood vessels, and injury to the nerves.

The result? Your brain doesn’t function normally. If you’ve suffered a concussion, vision may be disturbed, you may lose equilibrium, or you may fall unconscious. In short, the brain is confused. That’s why Bugs Bunny often saw stars.

Can Children Have Concussions?

Because their heads are disproportionately large compared to the rest of their body, concussions often occur in young children. As kids enter adolescence, they experience rapid height and weight gain. Both are factors that make them more prone to accidents than adults.

If a child has a concussion, an adult should monitor him or her for the first 24 hours. It’s important to watch for behavioral changes. Young children, especially, may not be able to fully communicate what they are feeling, so it is critical to watch them closely. Do not give medications, including aspirin, which may cause bleeding, to a child without consulting a doctor.

What Are the Signs of a Concussion?

Concussions can be tricky to diagnose. Though you may have a visible cut or bruise on your head, you can’t actually see a concussion. Signs may not appear for days or weeks after the injury. Some symptoms last for just seconds; others may linger.

Continued

Concussions are fairly common. Some estimates say a mild brain trauma is sustained every 21 seconds in the U.S. But it’s important to recognize the signs of a concussion so you can take the proper steps to treat the injury.

There are some common physical, mental, and emotional symptoms a person may display following a concussion. Any of these could be a sign of traumatic brain injury:

Are There Different Types of Concussions?

Concussions are graded as mild (grade 1), moderate (grade 2), or severe (grade 3), depending on such factors as loss of consciousness, amnesia, and loss of equilibrium.

In a grade 1 concussion, symptoms last for less than 15 minutes. There is no loss of consciousness.

With a grade 2 concussion, there is no loss of consciousness but symptoms last longer than 15 minutes.

In a grade 3 concussion, the person loses consciousness, sometimes just for a few seconds.

What Should I Do if I Have a Concussion?

The seriousness of a concussion dictates what kind of treatment you should seek. Most people with concussions fully recover with appropriate treatment. But because a concussion can be serious, safeguarding yourself is important. Here are a few steps to take:

  • Seek medical attention. A health care professional can decide how serious the concussion is and whether you require treatment. If you have suffered a grade 1 or grade 2 concussion, wait until symptoms are gone before returning to normal activities. That could take several minutes, hours, days, or even a week.

If you have sustained a grade 3 concussion, see a doctor immediately for observation and treatment. A doctor will ask how the head injury happened and discuss the symptoms. The doctor may also ask you simple questions such as “Where do you live?,” “What is your name?” or “Who is the president?” The doctor asks these questions to evaluate memory and concentration skills.

Continued

The doctor may test coordination and reflexes, which are both functions of the central nervous system. The doctor may also order a CT scan or an MRI to rule out bleeding or other serious brain injury.

If hospitalization is not required, the doctor will provide instructions for recovery. Aspirin-free medications may be prescribed and you will be advised to take it easy. Experts recommend follow-up medical attention within 24 to 72 hours if symptoms worsen.

  • Take a break. If your concussion was sustained during athletic activity, stop play and sit it out. Your brain needs time to properly heal, so rest is key. Definitely do not resume play the same day. Athletes and children should be closely monitored by coaches upon resuming play. If you resume play too soon, you risk a greater chance of having a second concussion, which can compound the damage. The American Academy of Neurology has issued guidelines about resuming activities after a concussion.
  • Guard against repeat concussions. Repeat concussions cause cumulative effects on the brain. Successive concussions can have devastating consequences, including brain swelling, permanent brain damage, long-term disabilities, or even death. Don’t return to normal activities if you still have symptoms. Get a doctor’s clearance so you can return to work or play with confidence.

Can I Prevent a Concussion?

By its very nature, a concussion is unexpected, so it is tough to prevent. But there are several common-sense precautions you can take to lessen the possibility of traumatic brain injury.

  • Wear protective equipment. Participation in high-contact, high-risk sports such as football, hockey, boxing, and soccer can increase the likelihood of a concussion. Skateboarding, snowboarding, horseback riding, and roller blading are also a threat to your brain’s health. Wearing headgear, padding, and mouth and eye guards can help safeguard against traumatic head injuries. Wearing a bike helmet can lower the risk of traumatic head injury by 85%. Ensure that the equipment is properly fitted, well maintained, and worn consistently.
  • Drive and ride smart. Always wear a seatbelt, obey posted speed limits, and don’t use drugs or alcohol, because they can impair reaction time.
  • Don’t fight. Concussions are often sustained during an assault, and more males than females report traumatic head injuries.

Sources

familydoctor.org: “Concussion in Sports.”

CDC: “Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports” and “What Is Traumatic Brain Injury?”

Dayton Children’s Child Health Information: “Instructions for Watching a Child Who Has a Brain Injury.”


Addiction to Facebook fame explained by researchers – Medical News Today #brain


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Addiction to ‘Facebook fame’ explained by researchers

published Monday 2 September 2013 published Mon 2 Sep 2013

Chances are that one of the first things many of us will do today is check Facebook, intrigued to see if anyone has commented on our latest status updates. Now, scientists say they have discovered exactly what makes some of us addicted to social media fame – and it is all to do with brain “reward” activity.

Researchers from Germany conducted the first study looking at how social media use is linked to brain activity, by analyzing the Facebook use of 31 participants.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. focused specifically on the participants’ nucleus accumbens. This is a small structure in the brain researchers say is responsible for the pleasure we get from “reward” processing, including money, food, sex and gains in reputation.

All participants were required to complete the Facebook Intensity Scale. This was to determine:

  • How many Facebook friends each participant has
  • How many minutes they spend on Facebook each day
  • Their general thoughts on Facebook and how they feel about the site.

The participants were then required to give a video interview, which involved them briefly introducing themselves and answering eight questions about their work, hobbies, social lives and long-term goals.

They were then told whether other participants thought highly of them after watching their interviews, and they were also required to take part in a card test to win money. Functional MRI (fMRI) scans were taken of the subjects throughout all of the tasks.

Positive Facebook feedback seen as a ‘reward’ in brain

The findings of the study revealed that participants who gained positive feedback about themselves showed stronger activity within the nucleus accumbens compared with when they saw another person receiving positive feedback. This corresponded with the subjects’ intensity of Facebook use.

However, when the participants received a monetary reward, activity in the nucleus accumbens did not correspond with their intensity of Facebook use.

Dar Meshi, postdoctoral researcher at the Freie Universität in Germany and lead author of the study, explains:

“As human beings, we evolved to care about our reputation. In today’s world, one way we are able to manage our reputation is by using social media websites like Facebook.”

” Our study reveals that the processing of social gains in reputation in the left nucleus accumbens predicts the intensity of Facebook use across individuals. These findings expand upon our present knowledge of nucleus accumbens function as it relates to complex human behavior.”

The study authors note that other research has revealed some negative effects of social media, including how Facebook may interrupt productivity in schools and reduce grade point averages.

Researchers have discovered that the reward center in the brain – the nucleus accumbens – is responsible for the addiction to “Facebook fame.”

They add that these most recent findings relating individual social media use to the individual response of the brain’s reward system may be relevant for both educational and clinical research in the future.

They warn, however, that their findings do not show whether positive social feedback drives people to use social media, or whether regular use changes the way the brain processes positive social feedback. They say further research is needed in this area.

Other research has looked at how social media use can affect our everyday lives. A recent study from the University of Michigan reveals that regular Facebook use may cause people to become miserable.

Research from the University of Missouri this year suggests that Facebook activity could be an indicator of our psychological health and be used as a tool to predict mental illness.

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Related coverage

Is Romantic Rejection A Specific Form Of Addiction? The pain and anguish of rejection by a romantic partner may be the result of activity in parts of the brain associated with motivation, reward and addiction cravings, according to a study. Read More

Study examines why couples post ‘lovey-dovey’ updates on Facebook A new study may make you think twice before posting romantic relationship content via social media; it suggests those who do so are trying to brag and mitigate fears of rejection. Read More

Could Facebook be making you miserable? Study asked Facebook users how much they logged in and how the social networking site was making them feel – and found reductions in psychological well-being. Read More

Happiness is viral, thanks to social media Unhappy Facebook status updates encourage unhappy posts from other users. But happy status updates are more powerful, according to a new study from the University of California. Read More

Comments (1)

It turns out that the majority of us are egocentrics stroking our egos as much as we possibly can – seeking Facebook recognition and feedback. Others are voyeurs who claim not to use Facebook but somehow know everything ever posted. Some of us Facebook users are afraid we will miss the party and will lead lonely and friendless lives and the “angels will weep for us” without Facebook. There are those who actually avoid Facebook, treating it as another job in life that can be eliminated from the debris of life’s clutter. One thing for sure is it is almost impossible to not have been touched by Facebook in some way – like it or not.


Does Death Exist? New Theory Says – No #science,mind.body.soul,brain,biocentrism,physics,albert #einstein,death,death # #amp;


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Does Death Exist? New Theory Says ‘No’

Many of us fear death. We believe in death because we have been told we will die. We associate ourselves with the body, and we know that bodies die. But a new scientific theory suggests that death is not the terminal event we think.

One well-known aspect of quantum physics is that certain observations cannot be predicted absolutely. Instead, there is a range of possible observations each with a different probability. One mainstream explanation, the “many-worlds” interpretation, states that each of these possible observations corresponds to a different universe (the ‘multiverse’). A new scientific theory – called biocentrism – refines these ideas. There are an infinite number of universes, and everything that could possibly happen occurs in some universe. Death does not exist in any real sense in these scenarios. All possible universes exist simultaneously, regardless of what happens in any of them. Although individual bodies are destined to self-destruct, the alive feeling – the ‘Who am I?’- is just a 20-watt fountain of energy operating in the brain. But this energy doesn’t go away at death. One of the surest axioms of science is that energy never dies; it can neither be created nor destroyed. But does this energy transcend from one world to the other?

Consider an experiment that was recently published in the journal Science showing that scientists could retroactively change something that had happened in the past. Particles had to decide how to behave when they hit a beam splitter. Later on, the experimenter could turn a second switch on or off. It turns out that what the observer decided at that point, determined what the particle did in the past. Regardless of the choice you, the observer, make, it is you who will experience the outcomes that will result. The linkages between these various histories and universes transcend our ordinary classical ideas of space and time. Think of the 20-watts of energy as simply holo-projecting either this or that result onto a screen. Whether you turn the second beam splitter on or off, it’s still the same battery or agent responsible for the projection.

According to Biocentrism, space and time are not the hard objects we think. Wave your hand through the air – if you take everything away, what’s left? Nothing. The same thing applies for time. You can’t see anything through the bone that surrounds your brain. Everything you see and experience right now is a whirl of information occurring in your mind. Space and time are simply the tools for putting everything together.

Death does not exist in a timeless, spaceless world. In the end, even Einstein admitted, “Now Besso” (an old friend) “has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me. That means nothing. People like us. know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.” Immortality doesn’t mean a perpetual existence in time without end, but rather resides outside of time altogether.

This was clear with the death of my sister Christine. After viewing her body at the hospital, I went out to speak with family members. Christine’s husband – Ed – started to sob uncontrollably. For a few moments I felt like I was transcending the provincialism of time. I thought about the 20-watts of energy, and about experiments that show a single particle can pass through two holes at the same time. I could not dismiss the conclusion: Christine was both alive and dead, outside of time.

Christine had had a hard life. She had finally found a man that she loved very much. My younger sister couldn’t make it to her wedding because she had a card game that had been scheduled for several weeks. My mother also couldn’t make the wedding due to an important engagement she had at the Elks Club. The wedding was one of the most important days in Christine’s life. Since no one else from our side of the family showed, Christine asked me to walk her down the aisle to give her away.

Soon after the wedding, Christine and Ed were driving to the dream house they had just bought when their car hit a patch of black ice. She was thrown from the car and landed in a banking of snow.

“Ed,” she said “I can’t feel my leg.”

She never knew that her liver had been ripped in half and blood was rushing into her peritoneum.

After the death of his son, Emerson wrote “Our life is not so much threatened as our perception. I grieve that grief can teach me nothing, nor carry me one step into real nature.”

Whether it’s flipping the switch for the Science experiment, or turning the driving wheel ever so slightly this way or that way on black-ice, it’s the 20-watts of energy that will experience the result. In some cases the car will swerve off the road, but in other cases the car will continue on its way to my sister’s dream house.

Christine had recently lost 100 pounds, and Ed had bought her a surprise pair of diamond earrings. It’s going to be hard to wait, but I know Christine is going to look fabulous in them the next time I see her.

Robert Lanza, MD is considered one of the leading scientists in the world. He is the author of “Biocentrism,” a book that lays out his theory of everything.


Free IQ Test – IQ Test Online – Brain Test #iq #test,


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Test Your Brain with our Free IQ Test online.

What is IQ TEST?

IQ test the term epitomizes for Intelligent Quotient test is basically conducted to access your ability to think and access a particular situation or issues. Therefore, in this regard the IQ score is considered as the standard way of comparing this ability with people of the same age in particular. Here people whose IQ test has to be conducted are divided into age groups.

Intelligence Test is a process of quantifying intelligence or basic thinking ability and therefore conducted to measure underlying mental ability of a person rather than academic achievement. Therefore intelligence test are psychological test that are basically designed to measure variety of mental abilities and skills such as reasoning, problem solving, judging etc.

Free Online IQ Test

The IQ test or Intelligent Quotient test generally conducted in order to determine the mental abilities and qualities of a person that includes mental reasoning, problem solving, decision making and many other skills. In this regard, the purpose of taking the intelligence test is to evaluate the intellectual potential and abilities of a particular person. Here the tests are conducted.

IQ or Intelligent Quotient exam generally conducted in order to access one�s ability to think and face a particular situation or problems through correct decision-making, problem solving, and logical thinking qualities. Therefore, IQ exam is taken usually to determine these qualities among individual in a particular age group. So in this regard, it has been a common practice among people.

Copyright � 2004-2017 International Education Center


TBI: Injury Brain Car Accident #automobile #accident #lawyers,auto #accident #lawyers,car #accident #lawyers,traffic


Car Accident TBI

Over half of all reported traumatic brain injuries are the result of an automobile accident. A traumatic brain injury can occur as a result of any force that penetrates or fractures the skull; areas which are susceptible during an auto accident.

Trauma to the brain can occur during an automobile accident when the skull strikes, for example, an object like a steering wheel or windshield. There may or may not be an open wound to the skull due to the accident, however in automobile accidents, the skull may not necessarily need to have been penetrated or fractured for a traumatic brain injury to occur. In the case of an automobile accident the sheer force of the accident can cause the brain to collide against the internal hard bone of the skull. The reason why this can occur is that when a moving head comes to a quick stop, the brain continues in its movement, striking the interior of the skull. This can cause bruising of the brain (referred to as a contusion) and bleeding (brain hemorrhage) which may not be visible at the time of injury.

Blunt trauma is a more serious type of head injury that can occur in an automobile accident when a moving head strikes a stationary object like the windshield, where the head is impacted causing an open wound which can be sustained from a variety of sources such as roof crush or occupant ejection in a car accident. At impact the brain opposite the site of impact is pulled away from the skull, injuring the brain there.

When a traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or any type of severe injury in which the occupants of a motor vehicle have sustained serious, debilitating injuries severely affecting their way of life, there are a number of factors that should be evaluated. In some cases the extent of the injury may have been more severe due to outside factors that contributed to the accident.

Crashworthiness is a term used to define the ability of a structure, such as an automobile, to protect its occupants during an impact. The crashworthiness of a vehicle is a term used commonly when testing and investigating the safety of vehicles. In the case of an automobile accident which has led to a more severe injury such as a traumatic brain injury, you may want to discuss your case with an experienced attorney to find out if your injury was caused by factors outside of the types of injuries that one may see in a motor vehicle accident.

Depending on the nature of the impact and the vehicle involved, different criteria are used to determine the crashworthiness of the structure. In a crashworthiness case, it doesn t matter whose fault the accident was, and it doesn t matter how the accident occurred; the real question in the case is, Did the vehicle protect the person driving and the passenger(s) as it should have in the crash, according to attorney Joel Rosen of the law firm of Cohen, Placitella and Roth.

There is a duty known as the crashworthiness doctrine which states that although a collision may not be the normal or intended use of a motor vehicle, vehicle manufacturers must take accidents into consideration as reasonably forseeable occurences involving their products. The design and manufacture of products should not be carried out in an industrial vacuum, but with recognition of the realities of everyday use The manufacturer must evaluate the crashworthiness of his product and take such steps as may be reasonable and practicable to forestall particular crash injuries, continues attorney Joel Rosen.

In the case of an automobile accident, a traumatic brain injury may have occurred due to an automotive defect. Cases of an automotive defect have recently been featured in the news such as sudden acceleration, in which the vehicle suddenly accelerates due to a manufacturing defect. In these types of cases, there is a pre-existing defect in the vehicle, which may have actually caused the accident to occur. An automotive defect or defective part, can include anything from defective seatbelts, defective airbags, defective seatbelts, child seat safety failures or product recalls, tire failure or defective tires, improper window glazing, laminated versus tempered glass on windshields, side and rear windows, faulty door latches, improperly designed roofs which can crush in a car accident which results in a rollover, or defects in the vehicle which lead to rollovers.

When these types of automotive defects contribute to the accident, it can lead to more severe injuries for the victims.

No one expects to get hurt. But if you or a loved one has been injured in an automobile accident, you need to someone who can stand up for you, protect your rights and fight for what is fair.

You ll want to contact an attorney who has the experience you and your family need. The lawyer will be able to assist in determining if you are entitled to compensatory damages for your injuries from those responsible due to at-fault, negligent, reckless or aggressive drivers or by other means such as defective parts, defective or recalled vehicle, or automotive design defects. These include the cost of medical bills, property damage, lost wages, and pain and suffering. Victims may also be entitled to punitive damages, which are designed to punish the defendant for their reckless behavior in the case of automotive negligence/ liability claims. Click here to contact an experienced attorney now.

The following sections explain:


Siben – Siben Long Island Injury Lawyers #long #island #car #accident #lawyer,long


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Every day, many people are injured as a result of another person or entity’s negligence. This can happen in a vehicular accident, a slip and fall occurrence, injuries on the job, medical malpractice, wrongful death or other. While it is not mandatory to hire the skills of an attorney, pursuing restitution and compensation through an insurance carrier or a lawsuit can be challenging. Because of that, many choose to hire a skilled Suffolk County personal injury lawyer to handle their case.

The state laws, procedures, statutes and legal processes concerning personal injury are extensive. In fact, there is a statute of limitation on the length of time you have the file for compensation from an injury suffered at the hands of another’s negligence. To ensure that you receive fair compensation, you need to consider hiring an experienced Suffolk County Personal Injury Lawyer . They will work on your behalf to protect your rights throughout the entire process.

Whether you are looking for a Long Island Medical Malpractice Lawyer . a Suffolk County Car Accident Lawyer . a Long Island Real Estate Lawyer . or a Long Island Bankruptcy Lawyer . Siben Siben has the expertise and experience to meet your most demanding legal needs.

Siben Siben was founded in 1934 and has been the leading personal injury law firm on Long Island and the surrounding areas for many decades. Many other firms are simply “referral mills”. At Siben Siben, the client is provided with the personal and professional service he or she needs to recover damages or get through trying legal times. We pride ourselves in being the firm that cares for our clients and have been around for nearly eight decades to prove it.

Call us TOLL FREE NOW

Click on MAIN CONTACT on our top menu and send us an email.


Brain Injury Association of Kansas Events #brain, #injury, #kansas, #biaks


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Events

Training, education and professional development are important parts of BIAKS programming. After all, knowledge is a powerful thing. It is critical that people receive accurate and timely information about brain injury.

Annual Conferen ce for Professionals Beyond Rehab: Succeeding at Life

Our 9th annual conference for professionals who work with people following a brain injury will take place March 30-31, 2017 at the BEST Conference Center on the KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park, KS. Up to 12.75 Continuing Education Units will be offered.

Current trends, research and therapy techniques will be discussed, including personal stories form survivors.

The Keynote Speaker is Richard Payne, MD.

The Gary Berger Memorial Lecture will be given by Michael Sokol, MD. Dr. Sokol will discuss, Pituitary Dysfunction Following Brain Injury .

Please view the conference brochure here. and agenda here. To register online, please click here. You may also register by sending a check to our office or by calling 913-754-8883, x1 with your credit card information.

New this year – in an effort to go-green , participants will receive a link to handouts via email. Participants are encouraged to download these presentations to their personal computer or flash drive to access during the event, or print online beforehand.

If you would like to be included on the mailing list for for future conferences, please complete the Contact Us form.

Walk for Thought

Walk For Thought celebrates the accomplishments of individuals affected with brain injuries while raising awareness and funds for the Brain Injury Association of Kansas. All funds raised stay in our state to provide resources, support and information to thousands of survivors and their families.

1 in 10 individuals will be touched by brain injury. Brain injury can occur anytime, anywhere, and to anyone. Let s do our part to honor those whose lives have been impacted by brain injury.

In 2017, you can participate in the Walk for Thought on Memorial Day by registering for the 2K walk as part of the Amy Thompson Run for Brain Injury.

Survivor and Family Member Seminars

BIAKS presents two seminars each fall for survivors of brain injury and their family members. These seminars offer opportunities to meet others facing the same hurdles, talk with area service providers and learn more about brain injury. If you would like to be included on the mailing list for these seminars, please complete the Contact Us form.

Certified Brain Injury Specialist

Certified Brain Injury Specialist (CBIS) is a national certification program that establishes best practices for the training of individuals working with this population. Because of the wide variety of unique skills and knowledge required of those who treat persons with brain injury, certification is designed to address specific training issues in brain injury services and to complement other existing credentials. For information, please visit Academy of Brain Injury Specialists.


Just a quick word about the Brain Hospice timeline – Brain Tumors

#brain hospice

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Thread: Just a quick word about the Brain Hospice timeline

Just a quick word about the Brain Hospice timeline

So, I’ve recommended the brainhospice dot com symptom timeline as a reference point to others in the past. I’m not finding it very accurate as we wind down.

At this time it is about six weeks since my sister fulfilled the timeline’s descriptors for 2 to 5 days left, and for roughly two weeks she’s fulfilled the descriptors for just hours .

I knew the top of that timeline was kind of iffy but now I’m finding the bottom is too.

Thank you all for your good thoughts and kind wishes. I send ’em back atcha.

Top User Join Date Jan 2013 Location Central Wyoming Posts 720

This process must just be so heartbreaking for you. God bless you, pal. God bless your sister.

64 yrs old
March 6, 2012: Diagnosed Anaplastic Large (T-) Cell Lymphoma, Stage 1 (ALK-)
3 rounds of CHOP unsuccessful.
Beginning mid-June, 2012, received 6 cycles of Brentuximab at Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah. Pet scans after 4th and 6th cycles showed no evidence of lymphoma.
Autologous bone marrow transplant in November of 2012.
17 radiation treatments for consolidation purposes between Dec. 26 and Jan.17.
100 day post BMT check-up (2/26/13): NED. Pet scan on 7/10/13: Still NED.
One year post transplant check-up: Still fine; NED.
18month post-translant scans, etc. All fine, save a bit of arthritis.
11/14/14: 24 month post transplant check-up–still NED. Scanziety still sucks.
5/15/15: No NED this time; reactive nodes in groin; scheduling biopsy.
Relapse confirmed/ started every 3 week brentuximab
Allo transplant in Feb 2016.
100 day post transplant scans in June 2016 fine.

Sib we are going through the same thing here. I’ve been searching for a better lung cancer death timeline. Jody

May The Odds Be Ever In Your Favour. Born 1960. Diagnosed 4/2011 with one tumor, LUL, NSCLC. Tumor size 1.1 inches. Thoracic surgery 6/1/2011. No action taken. Eight weeks of radiation and chemo. Carbo and Taxol. Follow up with four rounds of Carbo and Alimta.
December 2011 CT scan shows all clear.
April 2012 CT scan shows all clear. July 2012 had several x-rays taken at the chiropractor for shoulder pain. Took them to the onc and nothing suspicious noted. See them again in Oct.
October didn’t work out. Pain in the left shoulder continued to worsen and lymph nodes in the supraclavical swelled so I called the onc and they bumped the regular scan up to September 19 and we went for the results on the 24th. The tumor is back and the spread is extensive. Option 1: Try targeting chemos that may work and then on to clinical trials. These would give me about a year or so if the cancer responds. Option 2: Do no treatment and let nature take its course. This will give me six months give or take. As good as I feel right now, I�m going for door #2 and will continue to live well and enjoy myself until I don�t. I�ll keep you posted. Live it up everyone!

7 months into hospice and palliative care. It has been a very good relationship with the organization as a whole with a minor glitch. April 2013 spent the night at hospice facility, PICC line inserted for morphine drip. I said I wouldn�t but, had a hospital bed delivered. Started 10 rounds of palliative radiation to shrink the neck tumor. Busy month for me!

I’ve taken a couple of nasty falls this last week. (first of mid-May) Right on the cancer shoulder. So I have a life alert necklace on me now. I wish I could get my hands on a small scooter!

There is another node swelling on the other side of my neck. Still small.

April51’s (Jody) daughter posted that her Mother’s journey in this world had ended on July 8th 2013.You touched so very many lives. Soar high Jody!

Senior User Join Date Feb 2013 Posts 291

dear sibling maybe its yours sisters age and young heart that keeps her alive. i havent read the timeline (out of fear ) and i cant imagine what she is feeling these moments. do you think she can hear you if you whisper something? i suppose it can relief her in some way

Moderator Top User Join Date May 2011 Location Illinois Posts 717

Sorry you are going through this (yet again). She sure is lucky to have you in her corner.





Brain Health #hospice #chaplain

#brain hospice

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Overview

There are lifestyle habits that you can adopt to maintain or potentially improve your health as you age.

These habits, spanning four categories — physical health and exercise, diet and nutrition, cognitive activity, and social engagement — can help keep your body and brain healthy and potentially reduce your risk of cognitive decline.

Research has suggested that combining good nutrition with mental, social and physical activities may have a greater benefit in maintaining or improving brain health than any single activity. At the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference ® 2014, a two-year clinical trial of older adults at risk for cognitive impairment showed that a combination of physical activity, nutritional guidance, cognitive training, social activities and management of heart health risk factors slowed cognitive decline.

  • 10 Ways to Love Your Brain

10 tips to help reduce your risk of cognitive decline.

Learn More

  • Stay Physically Active

    Physical activity is a valuable part of any wellness plan.

    Learn More

  • Adopt a Healthy Diet

    Eat a heart-healthy diet that benefits both your body and your brain.

    Learn More

  • Stay Mentally Active

    Mentally challenging activities and social engagement may support brain health.





  • Hospice Admission Criteria for Dementia Patients – Neurology Center: Medical Information on

    #hospice criteria for dementia

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    TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) — Many people with advanced dementia aren’t getting much-needed hospice care because the admission criteria is flawed, researchers say.

    “Dementia is a leading cause of death in the U.S. and hospice care can benefit patients with dementia. The main hindrance to getting palliative [comfort] care is guidelines that try to guide practitioners to wait until an estimated life expectancy of six months,” said Dr. Susan L. Mitchell, a senior scientist at the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife in Boston, and lead author of a new study.

    Such end-of-life predictions are difficult to make with certainty in dementia cases. Instead of using life expectancy as the requirement for admission, hospice care for dementia patients should be offered based on the patient’s and family’s desire for comfort care, suggest Mitchell and colleagues in the study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association .

    Hospice, or palliative, care is most often associated with cancer patients. The goal is to provide comfort and support to patients and their families, instead of life-prolonging treatments.

    For people with cancer, the decision to switch to palliative care is more clear-cut. It generally occurs when someone decides to forgo traditional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation, that don’t seem to be working anymore, and instead receive comfort care, which includes better pain management and discussions about important end-of-life care decisions.

    For people with dementia, the decision process is murkier. Most people with advanced dementia are already in nursing homes, receiving around-the-clock care, but palliative care can provide families with additional support and help families make difficult decisions, such as whether or not to treat infections with antibiotics or to use a feeding tube to deliver nutrition. Palliative care may also provide better pain management and symptom relief, said Mitchell.

    To improve the likelihood of dementia patients getting palliative care, Mitchell and her co-authors tried to come up with a better tool to assess their potential life expectancy.

    This new method, dubbed the Advanced Dementia Prognostic Tool (ADEPT), includes 12 items, such as body mass index, ability to perform tasks of daily living like self-feeding, bowel incontinence, shortness of breath and oral food intake.

    The researchers compared their assessment tool with the standard Medicare hospice eligibility guidelines on 606 residents in 21 nursing homes.

    Their tool accurately predicted a life expectancy of fewer than six months 67% of the time, versus 55% for the Medicare guidelines, said Mitchell.

    “While ADEPT was better than the Medicare criteria, its predictive ability isn’t perfect,” said Mitchell. “The delivery of palliative care should be guided by a preference of comfort care rather than by life expectancy,” she added.

    A 2009 study by Mitchell and her colleagues was the first to label dementia a terminal illness like cancer and other incurable diseases.

    Dr. Joseph Shega, an associate professor in the section of geriatrics and palliative medicine at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said he agrees that the issue of comfort care for dementia patients deserves attention.

    “It’s important to recognize that we’re not really good at figuring out how long someone with dementia might live, and I agree with these authors that we should focus more on the goals of care and stop spending resources on trying to figure out how long someone might live,” said Shega.

    “Hospice provides more support for nursing home staff, better support for the family, and can help better educate the family on the natural process of dementia so they know what’s going on,” he explained.

    Hospice also helps manage symptoms, like discomfort or agitation, Shega added, while making sure that care plans and treatment goals agree with the values and wishes of the patients and their families.

    SOURCES: Susan L. Mitchell, M.D. M.P.H. senior scientist, Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston; Joseph Shega, M.D. associate professor, section of geriatrics and palliative medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center; Nov. 3, 2010, Journal of the American Medical Association





    Just a quick word about the Brain Hospice timeline – Brain Tumors

    #brain hospice

    #

    Thread: Just a quick word about the Brain Hospice timeline

    Just a quick word about the Brain Hospice timeline

    So, I’ve recommended the brainhospice dot com symptom timeline as a reference point to others in the past. I’m not finding it very accurate as we wind down.

    At this time it is about six weeks since my sister fulfilled the timeline’s descriptors for 2 to 5 days left, and for roughly two weeks she’s fulfilled the descriptors for just hours .

    I knew the top of that timeline was kind of iffy but now I’m finding the bottom is too.

    Thank you all for your good thoughts and kind wishes. I send ’em back atcha.

    Top User Join Date Jan 2013 Location Central Wyoming Posts 720

    This process must just be so heartbreaking for you. God bless you, pal. God bless your sister.

    64 yrs old
    March 6, 2012: Diagnosed Anaplastic Large (T-) Cell Lymphoma, Stage 1 (ALK-)
    3 rounds of CHOP unsuccessful.
    Beginning mid-June, 2012, received 6 cycles of Brentuximab at Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah. Pet scans after 4th and 6th cycles showed no evidence of lymphoma.
    Autologous bone marrow transplant in November of 2012.
    17 radiation treatments for consolidation purposes between Dec. 26 and Jan.17.
    100 day post BMT check-up (2/26/13): NED. Pet scan on 7/10/13: Still NED.
    One year post transplant check-up: Still fine; NED.
    18month post-translant scans, etc. All fine, save a bit of arthritis.
    11/14/14: 24 month post transplant check-up–still NED. Scanziety still sucks.
    5/15/15: No NED this time; reactive nodes in groin; scheduling biopsy.
    Relapse confirmed/ started every 3 week brentuximab
    Allo transplant in Feb 2016.
    100 day post transplant scans in June 2016 fine.

    Sib we are going through the same thing here. I’ve been searching for a better lung cancer death timeline. Jody

    May The Odds Be Ever In Your Favour. Born 1960. Diagnosed 4/2011 with one tumor, LUL, NSCLC. Tumor size 1.1 inches. Thoracic surgery 6/1/2011. No action taken. Eight weeks of radiation and chemo. Carbo and Taxol. Follow up with four rounds of Carbo and Alimta.
    December 2011 CT scan shows all clear.
    April 2012 CT scan shows all clear. July 2012 had several x-rays taken at the chiropractor for shoulder pain. Took them to the onc and nothing suspicious noted. See them again in Oct.
    October didn’t work out. Pain in the left shoulder continued to worsen and lymph nodes in the supraclavical swelled so I called the onc and they bumped the regular scan up to September 19 and we went for the results on the 24th. The tumor is back and the spread is extensive. Option 1: Try targeting chemos that may work and then on to clinical trials. These would give me about a year or so if the cancer responds. Option 2: Do no treatment and let nature take its course. This will give me six months give or take. As good as I feel right now, I�m going for door #2 and will continue to live well and enjoy myself until I don�t. I�ll keep you posted. Live it up everyone!

    7 months into hospice and palliative care. It has been a very good relationship with the organization as a whole with a minor glitch. April 2013 spent the night at hospice facility, PICC line inserted for morphine drip. I said I wouldn�t but, had a hospital bed delivered. Started 10 rounds of palliative radiation to shrink the neck tumor. Busy month for me!

    I’ve taken a couple of nasty falls this last week. (first of mid-May) Right on the cancer shoulder. So I have a life alert necklace on me now. I wish I could get my hands on a small scooter!

    There is another node swelling on the other side of my neck. Still small.

    April51’s (Jody) daughter posted that her Mother’s journey in this world had ended on July 8th 2013.You touched so very many lives. Soar high Jody!

    Senior User Join Date Feb 2013 Posts 291

    dear sibling maybe its yours sisters age and young heart that keeps her alive. i havent read the timeline (out of fear ) and i cant imagine what she is feeling these moments. do you think she can hear you if you whisper something? i suppose it can relief her in some way

    Moderator Top User Join Date May 2011 Location Illinois Posts 717

    Sorry you are going through this (yet again). She sure is lucky to have you in her corner.