Palliative Care Patient Education Handouts #motel #rocks #uk

#palliative care education

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Handouts for Patients and Families

Palliative Care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.

Palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work together with a patient s other doctors to provide an extra layer of support. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided along with curative treatment.

  1. Where do I receive palliative care?
    Palliative care is provided in a variety of settings including the hospital, outpatient clinics, home, hospice and long term care facilities.
  2. Does my insurance pay for palliative care?
    Most insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid, cover palliative care. If costs concern you, a social worker or financial consultant from the palliative care team can help you.
  3. How do I get palliative care?
    Ask for it! Tell your doctors, nurses, family and caregivers that you want palliative care.
  4. How do I know if palliative care is right for me?
    Palliative care may be right for you if you suffer from pain, stress or other symptoms due to a serious illness. Serious illnesses may include cancer, cardiac disease, respiratory disease, kidney failure, Alzheimer’s, HIV/AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis and more. Palliative care can be provided at any stage of illness and along with treatment meant to cure you.
  5. What can I expect from palliative care?
    The palliative care team works in partnership with your own doctor to provide an extra layer of support for you and your family. The team provides expert symptom management, extra time for communication and help navigating the health system.
  6. Who provides palliative care?
    Palliative care is provided by a team including palliative care doctors, nurses and social workers. Massage therapists, pharmacists, nutritionists and others might also be part of the team.
  7. How does palliative care work with my own doctor?
    The palliative care team works in partnership with your own doctor to provide an extra layer of support for you and your family. The team provides expert symptom management, extra time for communication and help navigating the health system.

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Kitsap Hospice slated to open care center – Port Orchard Independent #hospice

#hospice of kitsap county

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Kitsap Hospice slated to open care center

Hospice of Kitsap County formally opened its Bremerton Care Center this week and plans to begin receiving patients within the next four to six weeks.

“This is another way for people to receive hospice care in the county,” said Deputy Executive Director Valerie Youngren. “Sometimes staying at home is not an option, because the symptoms are too complicated or there is no caregiver available. And there is nothing that can be done for them in the hospital.”

Hospice care is designed to make people with a terminal illness more comfortable at the end of their lives. The average stay in hospice care is seven days.

The new center, formerly the assisted-living portion of the Belmont Care Center, has 15 private rooms. It will be staffed around the clock by four to eight people at a time, plus volunteers.

Unlike long-term care facilities that are designed for years of care with an overall goal to rehabilitate patients and hospitals geared toward providing acute care for optimal wellness, hospice care is solely focused on end-of-life care.

The center is intended to create a a warm, home-like environment, where patients will be able to live their last days fully and say good-bye to their loved ones with peace and dignity.

At the same time, expert medical resources will ensure the highest possible level of care.

Youngren said there is no local facility solely dedicated to end-of-life care, and this center will “give them a place at the end of their lives that will be as comfortable and as dignified as possible.”

For more information go on line to www.hospiceofkitsapcounty.org/ or call (360) 698-4611.

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Derwentside Hospice Care Foundation – Willow Burn Hospice – Hospice Co Durham

#durham hospice

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Win your Happily Eve. Local hospice, Willow Burn, based in Lanchester are offering one very lucky couple the c. Read More

Consett Shop celebra. On Thursday 5th May the staff in our Consett Shop held a party to celebrate the annivers. Read More

Fantastic Volunteers. Our fantastic volunteers Julia and Beryl, together with the help of their friends, are b. Read More

Willow Burn Wonsie W. On Wednesday 20th April, St. Pius RC Primary School in Consett took part in a Willow Bur. Read More

Consett Shop holds 1. On 5th May Consett Shop will be holding a Birthday Party to celebrate the anniversary of. Read More

Thank you to our Vol. We recently held a bucket collection on the streets of Chester-le-Street raising a fanta. Read More

In Celebration of Qu. South Causey Inn are holding a special event on Thursday 21st April 2016 in celebration. Read More

Spring Fair held Sat. Our Spring Fair was an enormous success this year making a fantastic total of £5,821.92. Read More

Exhibition with a Te. On Thursday, 7th April 7 Willow Burn Hospice held an open day to unveil an exhibition wi. Read More

TEENAGER MAKES SPORT. A champion gymnast, whose dreams were shattered by a devastating injury, is making a spo. Read More

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Make a donation now and support a local charity who provides vital services to the community of Derwentside

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Find fundraising events at Willow Burn. Take part in our forthcoming events and help us to continue our vital work

Volunteer

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Newsletter

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Austin Hospice Care – Home Care Assistance of Austin Senior Care #motels

#austin hospice

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Leading Provider of Non-Medical Hospice Care In Austin

If your loved one has health complications and a cure or treatment is not possible, in home hospice care allows seniors who are nearing the end of their lives to remain at home. Most people prefer to live their final days in their home, not at a hospital or care facility. Home Care Assistance of Austin provides non-medical hospice care which grants the wish of patients, keeping them surrounded by their family, friends and personal belongings. Our dedicated caregivers are highly trained in assisting with activities of daily living such as meal preparation, household chores, medication administration and personal hygiene. The help of a loving caregiver brings peace of mind and respite for our clients and their families during this very difficult time.

Flexible Care Plans- Hourly or Live-In Hospice Care

Hospice care is a collaborative effort between the client, their family, the doctor, a caregiver, and a Hospice Agency who are all making sure the patient receives the best care possible to keep them comfortable. Hospice caregivers provide valuable companionship and support, in addition to assistance with various tasks, full time monitoring and personal care for their client. Our purpose is to provide end-of-life care customized to meet the needs of the patient and their family. We offer hourly or live-in hospice care depending on the specific requirements of our client. Let Home Care Assistance of Austin take on the everyday needs of your loved one, so you can enjoy precious quality time with them.

We are the Preferred In Home Hospice Choice in Austin

Home Care Assistance provides non-medical hospice care in Austin focused on dignity and respect for our client, maximum comfort and compassionate support. Our caregivers are personally committed to helping our client and their family to affirm the final stage of life as a uniquely personal experience in the comfort of their home. As the preferred choice for families in need of hospice care, Home Care Assistance makes it possible for seniors to live their final days as they wish. Call (512) 623-7800 now and learn more about our customized in home hospice care.

Copyright 2016 Home Care Assistance Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Each Home Care Assistance office is independently owned and operated.





Durham VA Geriatrics and Extended Care – Durham VA Medical Center #hotels

#durham hospice

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Durham VA Medical Center

About the Program

The Geriatric and Extended Care Service at the Durham VA Medical Center is composed of the following programs:

  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
  • Community Living Center
  • Home Community Care
  • Palliative and Hospice Care
  • Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center

View the comprehensive resource guide to all Geriatric and Extended Care Services.

Services Offered

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM R)

  • Occupational therapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Speech therapy
  • Specialized services to veterans in need of rehabilitation following amputation, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury

Community Living Center (CLC)

The CLC is a hospital-based transitional care unit. CLC maintains an average length of stay of 32 days. Most patients require extended rehabilitation and care following surgery and/or lengthy hospitalizations before returning to independent living.

Home Health Care (HHC)

HHC consists of programs that manage care in veterans’ homes and community settings. Services include:

  • Home-based primary care
  • Home telehealth care

Contacts

Community Living Center

Mary Francis MSN, ACNS Geriatrics and Lonterm Care, Co-Director CLC

Jack Twersky MD, Co-Director CLC

Palliative Care Consult Team and Hospice Unit

Toni Cutson, MD, Medical Director

Home Based Primary Care (HBPC)

Jeannette Stein, MD, Medical Director

Theodore Hodges, MSN, Acting Program Director

Community Nursing Home, Contract Adult Day Health Care, Homemaker Home Health Aide and Non-Institutional Respite

Ivey Chavis, LCSW, MSW, Contract Programs Coordinator





End-of-life care for cancer patients varies widely at Boston-area hospitals – The

#beth israel hospice

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Study says many patients enter hospice care too late

By Deborah Kotz Globe Staff September 05, 2013

Slightly more patients with terminal cancer are getting hospice care during the end of their lives, but they are still entering hospice care too late within days of death finds a new national analysis of Medicare patients conducted by Dartmouth researchers. And many are still dying in hospitals, often hooked to ventilators in an intensive care unit, despite studies showing that most cancer patients prefer to die at home.

The percentage of end-stage cancer patients who died in the hospital decreased from 29 percent on average to 25 percent from 2003 to 2010, but there are huge variations among hospitals: In Massachusetts in 2010, about 13 percent of terminally ill cancer patients treated at North Shore Medical Center in Salem died there compared with 41 percent of those treated at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, according to the analysis released Wednesday from the Dartmouth Atlas Project .

The project researchers receive funding from nonprofit groups to determine how medical resources are distributed and used in the United States. In the analysis, they also found that the percentage of cancer patients receiving hospice care rose nationwide from an average of 55 percent to 61 percent.

These trends can be called encouraging, but most of the hospice care received was within the last three days of life, said Dr. David Goodman, lead author of the report. What s more, the average number of days patients spent in the intensive care unit during the last month of life increased by 21 percent, which Goodman said could be driven by hospitals looking for more generous insurance payments for expensive services.

Massachusetts hospitals also had large differences in their utilization of ICU services during a patient s last month of life: A patient treated at Cape Cod Hospital spent two to three hours on average in the ICU compared with two to three days for someone treated at Lahey Clinic.

Graphic: Hospital outcomes for terminal cancer patients

There is no evidence anywhere that these variations are due to patients at these different hospitals having different preferences for their end-of-life care, said Dr. Lachlan Forrow, director of the ethics and palliative care programs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Even among teaching hospitals differences existed in the approach to caring for terminally ill patients, with fewer than 20 percent of patients dying in hospitals such as Maine Medical Center and Dartmouth-Hitchcock, while more than 30 percent died in Boston Medical Center and Beth Israel Deaconess.

I d like to think we do better than most places, Forrow said of Beth Israel Deaconess, but we don t do remotely as well as we should.

His institution is beginning a program to ask all patients about their end-of-life preferences and to insert that information into their electronic health record so it s easily accessible to any physician treating them.

Dr. Susan Block, chairwoman of psychosocial oncology and palliative care at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, said it s vital for doctors to have such conversations with patients preferably when initially diagnosed with a terminal illness.

Patient goals should be the biggest determiner of care and these goals should be set early enough in the illness process that patients can have the kind of ending that they want, she said.

Far too often, doctors do not bring up the delicate issue of dying until patients are entering their last week or two of life, Block added, sometimes after they ve been hospitalized repeatedly or given aggressive chemotherapy for incurable cancers.

Dana-Farber had 29 percent of its terminal patients dying in the hospital in 2010, which was above the national average.

Nearly 60 percent of its patients were admitted to the hospital during the last month of life, and 24 percent wound up in the ICU.

About 56 percent of terminal patients at Dana-Farber were enrolled in hospice care, spending an average of nine days there.

To improve those statistics, the cancer center has been testing a communication checklist that oncologists can use to have end-of-life care conversations with patients.

We re trying to measure whether these checklists will have an impact on providing patients with the kind of care they want at the end of their lives, Block said.

Much of the success will probably depend on doctors having more truthful conversations about just how effective or ineffective aggressive treatments are for metastatic cancer.

In a study published last year in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dana-Farber researchers found that 70 percent of patients with end-stage lung cancer in a national sample and 80 percent of those with terminal colorectal cancer did not report understanding that the chemotherapy they were receiving was unlikely to be curative.

We re not doing as good a job as we should be in helping patients make informed choices, Forrow said.





Holistic Nursing Care Plan For Terminally Ill Patient – Essay – 1497

#care of terminally ill patient

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Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

  • Length: 5 pages
  • Sources: 5
  • Subject: Healthcare
  • Type: Essay
  • Paper: # 65372827

Note. Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Document:

Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

The objective of this study is to create a holistic nursing care plan for a terminally ill patient. This study will explain how perceptions about quality of life and health promotion might affect care for a dying patient with a lingering illness such as cancer and discuss strategies that could be used in the situation to improve the quality of life for the patient and her husband during this illness.

It is important that the nursing care plan for the terminally ill includes the reassurance that the patient will not be abandoned and that the nurse assist the patient in discussing their care wishes and goals. To assist patients such as the patient in this scenario it is important to understand the concepts and elements of end-of-life care and that the nurse be a skilled practitioner of the nursing arts. The end-of-life care if “patient goal-centered and should be provided for those who have a limited life expectancy.” (Norlander, nd, p.3) The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization states that Hospice:

” affirms the concept of palliative care as an intensive program that enhances comfort and promotes the quality of life for individuals and their families. When cure is no longer possible, hospice recognizes that a peaceful and comfortable death is an essential goal of health care. Hospice believes that death is an integral part of the life cycle and that intensive palliative care focuses on pain relief, comfort, and enhanced quality of life as appropriate goals for the terminally ill. Hospice also recognizes the potential for growth that often exists within the dying experience for the individual and his/her family and seeks to protect and nurture this potential.” (Norlander, nd, p. 4)

The holistic nursing practice is defined as “all nursing practice that has healing the whole person as its goal.” (Mariano, 2007, p.64) Holistic nursing care is a caring and healing relationship and values the cultural values and beliefs as well as the individuals’ spirituality in the nursing care. Holistic nursing care involves care of the individual’s physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual being with a focus on the individual’s comfort and relief from pain.

Because the patient is terminally ill and is in a great deal of pain one of the first considerations for this patient is relieving her pain so that she is able to function without a great deal of pain. Relieving the patient’s level of depression is also of great importance so that she does not spend the end of her life crying in bed as she is doing presently. The nurse should meet with the family members who are reluctant to visit and explain to them that they have a great role to play in the end-of-life care of this patient. The family members should be brought to the understanding that their role is critical.

Patient Emotional Health

Upon relieving the patient of the pain and depression through use of medication, the hospice-care nursing staff will be of great comfort to the patient through simply talking with the patient about her life and about her wishes for her end-of-life care. The patient should be highly active in determining any life support or alternatively lack of life support that she desires to receive. The patient should be assisted in thinking about her wishes for her funeral, the songs and music that will be used at the funeral and what she chooses to wear at the funeral.

Patient Spiritual Health

The patient’s spiritual affairs should be addressed as well so that the patient is both emotionally and spiritually prepared to deal with the ending of her life due to the progression of the cancer.

Patient Physical Care

Hospice Care is utilized by many patients who are terminally ill. Hospice Care involves nursing staff coming into the patient’s home and assisting them with bathing, dressing, their medication, monitoring the patient’s condition, counseling family members about what they can do to make the patient’s path of dying easier and more comfortable. The hospice philosophy is stated to be a holistic philosophy, is interdisciplinary in nature, and includes physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, volunteers, and staff assisting with grief of the family. It is reported that hospice care is ” synonymous with supportive care. Pain management and symptom control is state-of-the-art pain. Volunteers are available for respite care and companionship.

Factors Addressed By Hospice

The hospice team assists with the decisions and challenges that the patient and [continue]

Some Sources Used in Document:





End of life care – Alzheimer – s Society #san #antonio #motels

#end of life palliative care

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End of life care

Background

Dementia is a progressive condition for which there is currently no cure. All people who develop dementia will have dementia at the end of their lives, either as the condition they die from or as a factor which may complicate the care of a different condition. Diminishing capacity means that it is important for the person with dementia to plan for the end of their life at an early stage. Problems with capacity and communication can also contribute to undignified treatment and the under treatment of pain in people with dementia at the end of their lives. Significant, co-ordinated and holistic support is needed to ensure that all people with dementia end their lives with dignity, free from pain and in the place of their choosing.

Alzheimer’s Society calls for:

  • Ensuring a good death for people with dementia. The Department of Health (2008) suggests that, for many, a good death would involve being treated as an individual, with dignity and respect. without pain and other symptoms, in familiar surroundings and in the company of close family and friends. Too often, however, people with dementia receive undignified treatment and are ending their lives in pain (Alzheimer’s Society 2012, Health Service Ombudsman, 2011, Commission on Dignity in Care for Older People, 2012, Royal College of Psychiatrists 2011) and partnership between dementia care and palliative care are undeveloped (NCPC, 2009). People with dementia may not be referred for specialist end of life care or receive inappropriate treatment. Alzheimer’s Society believes that people with dementia have the same right to a good death as people with other health conditions.
  • Advance planning for end of life care. People with dementia should be involved in decisions about end of life care wherever possible. However, as dementia advances, in many cases capacity is lost and decisions need to be made on behalf of the person with dementia. Advanced planning for end of life care is vital. At present, taboos about discussing death and poor understanding of dementia mean that these conversations do not take place between people with dementia, families, friends and health and social care professionals. People with dementia should be supported to use their rights, under the Mental Capacity Act in England and Wales, to identify whom they want to make decisions and any treatments they would not want. In Northern Ireland, the Assembly is developing mental capacity legislation.
  • Improved training for health and social care professionals. Declining ability to communicate characterises the later stages of dementia. Health and social care professionals should be trained to provide high-quality, person-centred care to improve dignity and quality of life even when communication has diminished. People working with someone at the end of their life also need to be able to communicate sensitively themselves, both to families and to the person with dementia, following best practice set out by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (www.scie.org.uk ).
  • Focus on quality of life, rather than length of life, in the final stages of dementia. Withholding or withdrawing treatment is especially ethically complex and emotionally challenging for a person with dementia as they may lack the ability to communicate, the capacity to make decisions and may not have prepared instructions about their wishes. The NICE-SCIE Guideline on dementia states that artificial feeding and hydration should not commence if disinclination to eat or inability to swallow is considered to be part of the progression of the disease and will not change in future (NICE-SCIE, 2007). Alzheimer’s Society believes that when someone with dementia is close to dying the main issue of concern should be quality of life and quality of death, not length of life. However, it is important that there is an honest and open discussion between medical professionals and family, friends and carers about any decisions to withhold or withdraw treatment. The quality of life and comfort of the person with dementia is paramount. Specialist palliative and comfort care should be available to the person at all times and appropriate emotional support should be available for families.
  • Improved emotional and spiritual support. Research has suggested that the emotional and spiritual needs of people with dementia are disproportionately neglected (Sampson et al, 2006). It is still possible for a person with advanced dementia to be depressed, distressed or upset. People with dementia must receive holistic care that recognises and responds to individual wishes and needs.
  • Improved planning and co-ordination of care. Only half of people who express a preference to die at home actually die at home (ONS, 2014). This places pressure on the NHS, causing 52 per cent of unplanned hospital admissions, and adversely impacts on the quality of care received by a person with dementia (ONS, 2014). Alzheimer’s Society supports the government’s goal of ensuring that more people die in a place of their choosing (Department of Health, 2008). To achieve this, the Society calls for the implementation of the Palliative Care Funding Review (Hughes-Hallet et al 2011). This would provide commissioners with funding for palliative care, regardless of setting, in-line with a person with dementia’s wishes.
  • Implement the recommendations of the Leadership Alliance for the Care of Dying People. In July 2014, new best practice guidance from the LACDP replaced the Liverpool Care Pathway. Alzheimer’s Society supports the LACDP’s recommendations that, in the final weeks and days of life, the dying person should be the focus of care. However, Alzheimer’s Society is concerned that the guidance does not have statutory force.
  • Assisted dying. Alzheimer’s Society is not calling for a change in the law on assisted dying or euthanasia, although we monitor changes in legislation to ensure that people with dementia are appropriately safeguarded. We believe that people with dementia are entitled to good end of life care. This includes use of advance care planning and advanced decisions to refuse treatment so that people with dementia can receive the treatment and care that responds to individual needs and wishes.

References

Alzheimer’s Society (2012) My life until the end: dying well with dementia
Baker et al, (2012) Anticipatory care planning and integration: A primary care pilot study aimed at reducing unplanned hospitalisation. British Journal of General Practice, 62(595):e113-20.
Commission on Dignity in Care for Older People (2012) Delivering dignity: Securing dignity in care for older people in hospitals and care homes. A report for consultation. Commission on Dignity in Care for Older People, London.
Cox and Cook, (2002) Caring for people with dementia at the end of life in Hockley J, Clark D, eds. Palliative care for older people in care homes. Open University Press, Buckingham: 86-103.
Department of Health, (2008) End of life care strategy.
Neuberger (2013), More Care, Less Pathway: Independent review of the Liverpool Care Pathway.
General Medical Council (2010). Treatment and care towards the end of life: Good practice in decision making. General Medical Council, London.
Health Service Ombudsman (2011). Care and compassion? Report of the Health Service Ombudsman on ten investigations into NHS care of older people. The Stationery Office, London.
Hughes-Hallet, T, Craft, A, and Davies, C (2011). Funding the right care and support for everyone: Creating a fair and transparent funding system: The final report of the Palliative Care Funding review.
Mitchell et al (2009). The clinical course of advanced dementia. New England Journal of Medicine, 361(16):1529-1588.
NCPC (2009), The Power of Partnership: palliative care in dementia.
NICE-SCIE (2007) Dementia clinical guideline: supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care.
Office of National Statistics (ONS) (2011). Deaths registered in England and Wales in 2010, by cause.
Office of National Statistics (ONS) (2014). National Survey of Bereaved People (VOICES), 2013.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (2011). National audit of dementia.
Sampson, E, Gould, V, Lee, D, and Blanchard, M (2006). Differences in care received by patients with and without dementia who died during acute hospital admission: a retrospective case note study. Age and Ageing, 35(2):187-9.

Alzheimer s Society factsheet about the later stages of dementia.

The National Council for Palliative Care is the umbrella organisation for all those providing, commissioning and using palliative care.





Lion Hospice Inc, Bedford, TX – The Care Centers #hospice #rules #and

#lion hospice

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Lion Hospice Inc State Licensed Facility

Lion Hospice Inc in Bedford, TX provides Assisted Living services.

The staff at Lion Hospice Inc provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health professionals offer the assistance you need while respecting your independence.

Lion Hospice Inc is a licensed care provider with the State of Texas. The Texas Department of Aging and Disablity Services provides a list of registered care providers in Texas.

This facility offers:

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Heartland Home Health Care – Hospice – Career Tree Network #sharp #hospice

#heartland home health care and hospice

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Heartland Home Health Care and Hospice is where you can find big company employment advantages that are in step with the personal touches of a local agency. Our size works for you in terms of job stability, resources, supportive team environment, flexible schedules and industry leading benefits.

Organizational Culture: You will find an intimate, welcoming environment where you will be encouraged to grow your career while still finding a work/life balance that fits you.

Company History: Heartland Home Health Care and Hospice is a subsidiary of HCR ManorCare, a leading provider of short-term post-acute services and long-term care. Our nearly 60,000 employees have made us the preeminent care provider in the industry. Quality care for patients and residents is provided through a network of more than 500 skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers, assisted living facilities, outpatient rehabilitation clinics, and hospice and home health care agencies. The company operates primarily under the respected Heartland, ManorCare Health Services and Arden Courts names.

We care for patients in the cities of Milwaukee, Green Bay, and Kenosha, and their surrounding counties. We are well established and are continuing to experience growth. Nationally we are located in 32 states.

Year Founded: locally for 10 plus years

Company Locations: Various locations in Wisconsin.

Number of Employees: 60,000

Characteristics of an Ideal Candidate: We are looking for Health Care Professionals who believe in making a difference one life at a time.

If you love what you do the intensity of the patient relationship, the potential, the exhilaration of victories both small and large we invite you to join our team of experienced professionals who are doing what they love to do and feel as passionate about where they work.

We Hire the Following Therapists: OT, OTA, PT, PTA, SLP

Benefits Overview: We offer a full benefit package to include the following:

401 (k) with match

Generous paid time off that starts at date of hire

Continuing Education Assistance

Philosophy Towards Patient Care: At Heartland, we believe patients deserve the same specialized attention at home that they receive in the hospital or at the doctor s office. We re proud to offer a variety of services to help promote patient independence in the home environment. For patients experiencing an illness, hospitilization or surgery requiring recovery and healing or for those facing a new health care diagnosis requiring a change in daily lifestyles, home home health care may be the solution. Heartland Home Health Care provides care in the privacy and comfort of home. Many patients recover faster in familiar surroundings, where they have the love, support and understanding of family and friends. Heartland Home Health Care provides care for the mind, body and spirit that is comforting and compassionate. We respect our patients and their families choices. We accept and support our patients wherever they are in life s journey.

In addition to the above we offer our Caring Promises:

We promise to care for the mind, body and spirit in a way that is comforting and compassionate.

We promise to be the difference in our customers day working to make every connection a personal one, and creating memorable moments that define their Heartland experience.

We promise to discover what is important to our customers, respect their choices and customize our service specifically to their needs.

We promise to be leaders in care delivery, corporate responsibility and community action.

Practice Settings: Home Health

Practice Specialities: Home Health

Application Instructions: Email Kristin to explore a rewarding career or visit our website.

Recruitment Contact: Kristin Lueptow, PHR

Recruitment Contact Email: klueptow [at] hcr-manorcare [dot] com

Recruitment Phone Number: 262-389-1882

View our Company Profile on LinkedIn: HCR ManorCare





HEARTLAND HOME HEALTH CARE AND HOSPICE; NPI #1134173446 #motels #in #gatlinburg #tn

#heartland home health care and hospice

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HEARTLAND HOME HEALTH CARE AND HOSPICE
LBN IN HOME HEALTH LLC

1 Some organization health care providers are made up of components that furnish different types of health care or have separate physical locations where health care is furnished. These components and physical locations are not themselves legal entities, but are part of the organization health care provider (which is a legal entity). A covered organization provider may decide that its subparts (if it has any) should have their own NPI numbers. If a subpart conducts any HIPAA standard transactions on its own (e.g. separately from its parent), it must obtain its own NPI number.

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Hospice of the Valley – Bereavement Grief Support Care Compassion Illness Death

#hospice of the valley phoenix

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The Community Bereavement Center

Hospice of the Valley’s Community Bereavement Center exists to offer practical support for those grieving the loss of a loved one. As a hospice benefit, the Center provides ongoing bereavement support. As a community goodwill service, we offer educational resources, short term grief counseling sessions, and ongoing support groups to anyone in need. We offer peer support groups for children, adolescents, and adults. Bereavement support is also available for schools, businesses, churches, and other organizations struggling with unexpected or traumatic loss. For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at (256) 350-5585. Brad holds a Master in Divinity degree.

Hospice Bereavement Care

Bereavement services are provided to help patients, families and caregivers cope with the grief that occurs during the illness and eventual death of the patient. Bereavement services are provided through Hospice of the Valley’s Bereavement Center and include individual grief counseling, support groups and other services.

Wish List

There is never a charge for bereavement services, therefore we are always appreciative of donated items. Monetary donations for memory making supplies and resources is also a way of supporting The Community Bereavement Center programs.

Snacks:

  • Soft drinks juice boxes (individual cans/pouches only)
  • Pretzels, chips, crackers, etc.

General Supplies:

  • Blank journals
  • Stickers
  • Board games
  • Sculpting clay Play Dough
  • Jewelry art supplies
  • Stamp pads – washable
  • Unused/old phone books
  • Crayola crayons, colored pencils, markers
  • Sand art
  • Acrylic paints
  • Paint brushes

The Community Bereavement Center





Home Care Jobs In Ohio #hotel #cheap #rates

#hospice of dayton jobs

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Home Care And Hospice Jobs In Ohio

Power Weekend .6 Social Worker: 8:30am – 5pm(SOC-16-00010)

Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Ohio, Homecare

This position is responsible for the delivery of social work services to Hospice patients and families, which includes the initial psychosocial assessment, ongoing psychosocial counseling, direct casework, bereavement services and community education, outreach and referral. Social Workers are a core member of the Hospice Interdisciplinary team. Performs comprehensive initial and.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

Power Weekend .8 RN: 8am – 8:30pm(NUR-16-00035)

Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Ohio, Homecare

General Description This position is responsible for providing skilled professional nursing care in accordance with the Interdisciplinary Team Plan of Care. Essential Job Responsibilities Assesses patient/family in order to identify problems with patient/family, this includes assessment related to suicide and abuse/neglect. Develops plan of care in conjunction with patient/family and.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

Power Weekend .8 RN: 10:30am – 11pm(NUR-16-00036)

Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Ohio, Homecare

General Description This position is responsible for providing skilled professional nursing care in accordance with the Interdisciplinary Team Plan of Care. Essential Job Responsibilities Assesses patient/family in order to identify problems with patient/family, this includes assessment related to suicide and abuse/neglect. Develops plan of care in conjunction with patient/family and.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

RN Case Manager (Casual)(1347347)

AseraCare. Ohio, Independence

Job AdvertisementYou’re more than a RN Case Manager at AseraCare Hospice. With your vast experience, you know quality care and that’s why we’ve entrusted you to join together with a team of spiritual care coordinators, social workers and counselors. That’s because we know you’ll go to any length for our.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

Hospice Aide – Inpatient, Part-time, Nights(HOS-16-00019)

Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Ohio, Inpatient

General Description Hospice Aides provide personal care to hospice patients according to the patient’s plan of care. Essential Job Responsibilities Provides basic personal care to patients as delegated by the RN and included on the Hospice Aide plan of care. Answers call lights promptly and follows through with patient requests.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

Hospice Aide – Inpatient, Part-time, Days(HOS-16-00020)

Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Ohio, Inpatient

General Description Hospice Aides provide personal care to hospice patients according to the patient’s plan of care. Essential Job Responsibilities Provides basic personal care to patients as delegated by the RN and included on the Hospice Aide plan of care. Answers call lights promptly and follows through with patient requests.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

RN Case Manager (FT – Days)(1345000)

AseraCare. Ohio, Independence

Job AdvertisementYou’re more than a RN Case Manager at AseraCare Hospice. With your vast experience, you know quality care and that’s why we’ve entrusted you to join together with a team of spiritual care coordinators, social workers and counselors. That’s because we know you’ll go to any length for our.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

Social Worker Masters (Casual)(1344656)

AseraCare. Ohio, Independence

Job AdvertisementAs a Social Worker Masters (Casual) at AseraCare Hospice, you know that quality care is about much more than just addressing physical need. That’s why our Social Worker (Nonexempt) take care to understand the social, spiritual and emotional factors related to our patients’ health and end-of-life journey. In this.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

RN Case Manager(1338970)

AseraCare. Ohio, Fairlawn

Job AdvertisementYou’re more than a RN Case Manager at AseraCare Hospice. With your vast experience, you know quality care and that’s why we’ve entrusted you to join together with a team of spiritual care coordinators, social workers and counselors. That’s because we know you’ll go to any length for our.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.

Social Worker(SOC-16-00009)

Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Ohio, Homecare

This position is responsible for the delivery of social work services to Hospice patients and families, which includes the initial psychosocial assessment, ongoing psychosocial counseling, direct casework, bereavement services and community education, outreach and referral. Social Workers are a core member of the Hospice Interdisciplinary team. Performs comprehensive initial and.

Date posted: 09/08/2016.





Start a Non-Medical Home Care Business #end #of #life #hospice

#how to start a hospice business

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Start a Non-Medical Home Care Business

We developed our own successful non-medical home care agency. a home health care agency, hospice agency, transportation, GAFC and DME just to name a few. Our home health care agencies are CHAP Accredited and our Non-Medical Home Care Agency is Private Duty Accredited.

  • Setup of Incorporation or LLC, Tax ID and NPI number for your home care business.
  • Human Resources/HR Setup And Hiring Materials including but not limited to one on one training, video training, and customized high quality documents developing all aspects of your human resource department. This includes up-to-date. professionally bound, HR packets as well as other forms and documents.
We Prepare Your Agency For Operation
Operational Forms And Documents:
  • Everything required to successfully operate a home care agency, customized for your business.
  • Policies Procedures In Hard Copy And Word Format:
    • Complete State specific home care policies and procedures, customized by our home care consultants, then professionally designed, proof read and printed by one of the nations leading design firms.
    • **Note: Other home care consultants print their policies on a standard office printer and do not spend the extra time or money to have their home care policies professionally edited by a third party. We are the only home care consultants who will provide your home care policies and procedures to you in Word format so you can make changes to your home care policies when necessary .
  • 1 Year Home Care Software Subscription
    • Provided for you at our cost: ADLware – Home Care Software, developed by the highest rated home health care software company – Kinnser.
    • **Note: Other consultants offer discounted rates, but they will not pay for the software.
  • We Get Your Home Care Agency Licensed
    Complete State Home Care Business License Applications
    • We complete and submit your state’s Home Care Business License Application for you.
  • Pre-license Home Care Survey Preparation
    • Phone reviews to prepare for and assure compliance in your state
  • Home Care Consultation During Live State Survey
    • We make sure we are available to you during your on-site state survey to answer questions and provide support.
  • Completion Of Any Necessary Plans Of Correction
    • After the state home care business license survey, a Plan of Correction may be required as a condition to receive your home care business licensure.
  • Post Licensure Review And Education
    • A Plan of Correction is just the first step to successful licensure. We take the necessary time to help educate you on industry best practices .
    • **Note: Where other home care consultants take on too many clients to allow time for teaching and support, CHC does the work for you and then reviews and teaches you best practices. Our Goal: To assure your compliance beyond the startup process .
  • We Get Your Home Care Agency Accredited
    CHAP Accreditation For Your Home Care Agency.
    • We give all of our home care agency clients the option of becoming CHAP Accredited. This is not a requirement in most states, however, some states, such as New Jersey, are now requiring CHAP Accreditation. Other states, including Massachusetts, will not allow participation in state Medicaid programs, such as MassHealth, unless you achieve CHAP Accreditation.

    We Make Sure You Compete STRONG

    Logo Creation

    Your logo will be provided by one of the nations highest quality healthcare design firms. These logos are customized just for you by a healthcare design firm with a team of marketing experts and graphic designers. Unlike other home care consultants, we pay professionals to produce your marketing materials, not amateurs.

    Brochure Design

    You will receive 1000 professionally designed, high quality, glossy brochures, customized for your home care agency. These are professionally designed and printed trifold brochures.

    Business Cards

    You will receive 1000 professionally designed, high quality, glossy business cards, customized for your home care agency by one of the nations leading healthcare marketing firms. These are not vista print cards, they are high quality and customized for you.

    Professionally Designed Website

    * For ease of use, pricing, and the most time efficient design process, we advise all clients to purchase their website domain and hosting account through GoDaddy.com

    2 Day Sales and Marketing Home Care Business Training

    Your training will be hosted and presented by one of the best known sales and marketing coaches in the home care and home health care industry. Learn how to earn new patient referral sources and attract private pay, Medicaid and insurance patients. **Caution: Other home care consultant companies offer outdated marketing training from presenters with little actual industry experience. Always ask about training credentials before you buy!

    We Help You Get Paid

    Medicaid Enrollment

    We enroll our clients in state Medicaid programs in applicable states. This is a service in our program. Other home care consultants will “guide” or “assist” you in the process, we do it for you.

    VA Program Billing And Reimbursement Instructions.

    These VA programs allow your home care business to assist veterans who qualify for Veterans Affairs assistance.

    Lifetime Consulting

    While you are taking part in our program and even long after, we are part of your team. We will be by your side to assist you for the lifetime of your agency. and will be happy to answer your questions at no additional cost for as long as your home health care agency is in business.

    Advisory: Some home care consultants make promises they cannot keep. They boast about large client lists, but do not employ enough coaches and staff to be there when you need them? At CHC, we have a team of 12 employees and do not take on more than 6 new home care startup clients nationwide per month in effort to manage growth and maximize customer service. Remember, cheap service isn’t good and good service isn’t cheap.

    Call Us Today At (617) 477-9594 or email our home care consultants by completing the form below. We will teach you what is required to start a home care business in your state and help you take the first step in making your dream a reality.

    Are you interested in starting a home health care business or another type of healthcare business? We can help you with that too!

    Call CHC Today for a No-Hassle, Cost Free Consultation.





    Center for hospice care #half #price #hotels

    #center for hospice care

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    Compassion. Integrity. Excellence.

    Compassus is dedicated to clinical excellence, compassionate care, and providing comfort and support to patients and their families facing end-of-life issues. Focusing on the quality of life remaining, Compassus provides effective symptom control and care that focuses on the whole individual – addressing physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs.

    At Compassus, our mission is to provide hospice care to terminally ill patients and their families with Compassion, Integrity, and Excellence. The Colleagues of Compassus are committed to keeping The Hospice Promise by delivering the highest quality of care, serving the needs of patients and families and spreading the stories of hospice to those whom they come into contact. Our goal is to provide the greatest possible comfort and care for those who experience one of life’s most intimate and challenging moments.

    Compassus also provides palliative care to improve quality of life for patients and families who may also be seeking aggressive treatment for their serious illness. Compassus palliative care services can offer relief from symptoms and pain and a care plan based on your values and needs.

    Families

    Every patient is a unique story.
    Read more.


  • Healthcare Professionals

    We support our referring physicians.
    Find out how.


  • Volunteers and donors

    Make a difference in someone s life.
    Become a volunteer today.
    Learn how.





  • Spectrum Health Hospice, Grand Rapids, MI – The Care Centers #online #booking

    #spectrum health hospice

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    Spectrum Health Hospice

    Spectrum Health Hospice in Grand Rapids, MI provides Nursing Homes, Hospice care services.

    The staff at Spectrum Health Hospice provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health professionals offer the assistance you need while respecting your independence.

    The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services provides a list of registered care providers in Michigan.

    This facility offers:

    Is this your business? Claim your page!

    The Best Nursing Homes in Kent county

    Sign up for a Free Consultation!

    License & Payment Details

    Long Term Care Insurance

    Reviews Write a review

    Be the first to review this facility. Sharing your rating and experience will help people like you to decide if this is the right facility for them.

    Recommended Reading

    What is Nursing Home Care?

    4 Ways to Pay for Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Five Things to Know about Nursing Home Legal Matters

    Steps to Happier Living in a Nursing Home

    Nursing Home Conversation with Your Elder Loved One

    Checklist before entering a Nursing Home





    Home Care, Nursing and Personal Support in Toronto and Mississauga – Spectrum

    #spectrum health hospice

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    Investing in the development of your employees also means taking into account their health. Businesses that proactively promote corporate wellness are more likely to reduce employee absenteeism and increase employee morale, health and productivity. Corporate wellness has the ability to positively increase your employee’s productivity and demonstrates your dedication to the wellbeing of your employees. Let Spectrum Health Care help you build your corporate wellness program by developing customized wellness clinics for you and your staff.

    About Spectrum Health Care





    Las Vegas Hospice – Pro Care Hospice – Quality Care #discounted #hotel

    #hospice las vegas

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    Contact the Best Las Vegas Hospice

    Our Mission at ProCare Hospice of Nevada

    “ProCare Hospice of Nevada is committed to the philosophy of compassion, comfort, support and dignity. Hospice believes that the quality at the end of life is as important as the length of it. As a Las Vegas hospice care provider, we offer professional and ethical care to patients with a life-limiting illness or poor prognosis, as well as provide on-going support and education to families and caregivers. Our staff is dedicated to educating the community about the benefits of hospice care. At ProCare Hospice of Nevada, we strive to provide the most comforting end-of-life experience possible by valuing each patient as an individual.

    More About Us

    Find out more about ProCare Hospice of Nevada and our professional doctors, nurses and therapists.

    Las Vegas Hospice Care: Our Quality Services

    ProCare Hospice of Nevada offers some of the most comprehensive services in Nevada. See what we offer. To learn more about our Las Vegas Hospice care, contact us at 702.380.8300.





    Hospice of Cincinnati – Locations For Care – Inpatient Care Centers #fitzwilliam

    #hospice of southwest ohio

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    Inpatient Care Centers

    Hospice of Cincinnati provides four inpatient care centers throughout Southwest Ohio. Each care center features beautifully decorated private rooms with many of the amenities of home. These care centers provide short-term support for patients and families. Patients receive management of symptoms which can be difficult to manage at home. Family members are relieved of the stress of care-giving for short periods of time. Please call us to arrange a visit or tour of our facilities.
    We would be honored to show you around and answer your family’s questions.

    East
    Hospice of Cincinnati
    at Mercy Health Plaza
    7691 Five Mile Rd
    Cincinnati, OH 45230
    513-246-9700
    Photo Tour

    West
    Hospice of Cincinnati
    5343 Hamilton Ave
    Cincinnati, OH 45224
    513-389-5528
    View Map

    A Typical Experience The Dawson Family

    Mia Dawson had been chronically ill for years. She started experiencing increased chest pain and respiratory distress due to heart disease, and the treatments that used to work in the past were no longer working. So Mia was admitted to the hospital. The hospital physician determined that Mia’s heart disease was nearing end-stage and she had less than six months to live.

    Mia spent five days at the hospital and was still experiencing ongoing fatigue and circulatory problems. It became clear that she would need round-the-clock professional care to manage her symptoms and to keep her as comfortable as possible.

    The hospital physician suggested to Mia and her family that hospice care would be the best way to continue keeping Mia as comfortable as possible. A meeting was quickly arranged with a Hospice nurse to discuss Mia s condition, and it was determined that admission to Hospice of Cincinnati s Blue Ash Inpatient Care Center was appropriate. A detailed plan of care was developed for Mia based on the physician s orders and recommendations.

    The Hospice of Cincinnati nurse took care of all the arrangements and assisted with Mia s transfer to our Blue Ash Inpatient Care Center that same day. When Mia arrived at the care center, she was greeted by a member of her care team who helped her settle into her private room and feel welcome in her new surroundings. An admission nurse worked closely with family members to complete consent forms and prepare them for what to expect next.

    Mia immediately began feeling better as her symptoms were managed aggressively by a team of highly-skilled, caring professionals including physicians, RNs and nurses aides. In addition, Hospice social workers, chaplains and volunteers provided additional support to help Mia and her family prepare for the final stages of life.

    Visiting hours were 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Mia was able to spend quality time with her family and assure them that she was ready to go. She also enjoyed additional visits from compassionate Hospice volunteers who shared their time and talents with her. From time to time, Mia s symptoms changed and her care was immediately modified to alleviate any pain or respiratory issues that occurred.

    On her third day at the care center, Mia s illness progressed to the final stages, and her life came to a peaceful end with the loving support of her family all around her. All family members had a chance to speak their hearts and say their goodbyes and were as prepared as one can be for the grievous loss of their loved one. A Hospice nurse confirmed Mia’s death and helped prepare her body for the trip to the funeral home.

    The months that followed were difficult at times for Mia’s family. Occasionally, they received a call from bereavement counselors at Hospice of Cincinnati who offered their support and encouragement through the grieving process. For Mia s family, the calls were a welcome, friendly voice from a team of caring people that would forever hold a dear place in their hearts.





    Palliative Care – Lancaster University #hotels #reservations

    #palliative care course

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    Palliative Care: Making it Work

    0:11 Skip to 0 minutes and 11 seconds Dame Cicely Saunders, the pioneer of the hospice movement in the UK, said “You matter because you are you. And you matter until the end of your life. We will do all we can, not only to help you die peacefully but also to live until you die.” How we die is incredibly important, not only to the person approaching the end of their life but also to those around them. The modern-day palliative care movement aims to help people realise a good death. Every day, more than 150,000 people die across the world. And of those only a small minority receive palliative care services. And even in the most developed countries, these services need improvement.

    1:00 Skip to 1 minute and 0 seconds A number of healthcare agencies are involved in the care of someone in the last year of life. But integrating these services for individual patients is challenging. Do you have a personal or professional interest in palliative care? Are you a patient, a carer, a healthcare professional, or an academic? If so, this course is for you. I am Dr Nancy Preston, a senior lecturer at the International Observatory on End of Life Care, which is a world leader in palliative care research at Lancaster University. I will be leading you through this course on Palliative Care– Making It Work. Drawing on research from five European countries, the course features guest speakers who will provide real-life examples of best practise in providing integrated palliative care.

    1:50 Skip to 1 minute and 50 seconds In addition, we will discuss practical tips and strategies with professionals on how to successfully deliver palliative care. By taking part in this course, you will have the opportunity to explore and discuss the best ways to care for people who have advanced cancer, heart failure, or lung disease who are approaching the end of their life. Our aim is to improve end-of-life care, to enable more people to experience a good death. So please join us for this important course.

    About the course

    The modern day palliative care movement aims to help people live well in their last year of life and ultimately realise a good death. However, every day more than 150 thousand people die across the world and of those only a small minority receive palliative care services. Do you have a personal or professional interest in palliative care? If so this course is for you.

    Understand what palliative care is

    Over three weeks, you will be introduced to the concept of palliative care and how it can be integrated with other types of care. The course will feature examples of where this has been done well.

    Learn how palliative care is managed across Europe

    Drawing on research from the EU funded project InSup-C, we will learn how integrated palliative care is managed across five European countries. It will include international guest speakers to provide real-life examples of best practice in delivering integrated palliative care.

    Explore the best ways to care for people approaching the end of life

    The programme is co-ordinated by the International Observatory on End of Life Care, a world-leader in the field of palliative care. By taking part in this course, you will have the opportunity to explore and discuss the best ways to care for people who have advanced cancer, heart failure or lung disease who are approaching the end of life.

    Educators





    Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Careers #shop #fashion

    #vitas hospice careers

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    Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Company Information Is this your company? Add your own content to this page.

    2 Anonymous Employees from Vitas Innovative Hospice Care submitted reviews

    3.5 Worked for Vitas over 8 yrs. Started as an OK place to work. The job itself is very satisfying. Immediate supervisors are good to work with. The starting salaries way below industry. NO shift differentials. Salaries have been frozen a couple of times and currently frozen until further notice (NO INFLATION ADJUSTMENT). The benefits package sucks! Insurance for family is just unplayable. Retirement plan has barely a tiny match. It has a standard PTO. CEO compensation for 2012 = $2,162,222.00.

    1 Medicare Biller from Vitas Innovative Hospice Care submitted reviews

    3.5 I have been working for Vitas Innovative Hospice Care for 5 years. It has always been a financially stable and generous company. I have learned a lot and I am very proud of my achievements. The company has great incentives and values its employees.

    1 Director of Marketing from Vitas Innovative Hospice Care submitted reviews

    1.5 Treat all equally. Trust your sales reps. LISTEN to reps. Do exit interviews to uncover the realities of mass exodus of great people.

    Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Careers & Info

    Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Overview

    VITAS Innovative Hospice Care began providing valuable hospice services to terminally ill patients in 1978 when it was founded as Hospice Care, Inc. For over 30 years, VITAS has made a substantial impact on the industry and in the lives of those seeking their caring, professional services. They played a large role in efforts to establish hospice as a service eligible for payment under Medicare.

    VITAS headquarters are located in Miami, Florida, although they have over 250 patient care teams providing their valuable services across the United States. Their services are provided in a variety of settings, including over 2,500 skilled nursing facilities. As a result of providing outstanding service, VITAS founders have received numerous awards, including the Founders Award and the Healthcare Architects award from the National Hospice Foundation and the National hospice and Palliative Care Organization.

    Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Job Information

    VITAS offers a fulfilling atmosphere to its employees, who share a common desire to provide much needed end-of-life services to patients and their families. As a result of hard work and dedication, employees receive a competitive salary package along with health, dental, vision, life, and disability insurance. Other personal benefits include tuition reimbursement, paid time off, pre-paid legal services, and more.





    Hospice House Levels of Care #mystery #hotel #deals

    #hospice levels of care

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    Hospice House Levels of Care

    The following levels of care can be provided at The Good Shepherd Hospice House:

    Residential Care: Residential Care is simply the day to day hospice care that individuals receive at The Good Shepherd.

    • A hospice client may move to the hospice house simply because it is their desire to reside at The Good Shepherd. The decision may also be based on caregiver issues or any of a number of factors considered by the client and/or family.
    • Homecare Hospice does not make it a practice to move current hospice clients residing in their home or another facility to the hospice house unless it is at the client or family’s request.

    Respite Care: Respite Care is short term inpatient care provided to hospice clients to relieve family members or other persons caring for the individual at home.

    • Medicare and most insurance pay to give the caregiver a break from the 24-hour task of caring for a loved one. Respite care allows the client’s caregiver up to five (5) consecutive days “off” from taking care of the client.
    • Respite care is a service that is designed to be used for a specific need and may be utilized only on an occasional basis.
    • Respite care is paid for as long as the intent is that the client will be returning home after five (5) days.
    • If after a few days, the caregiver decides that they can no longer care for the client at home, the client and family have two options to consider: To utilize Residential Care at The Good Shepherd Hospice House or to make other arrangements, i.e. to relocate to a nursing home or alternative care location.

    General Inpatient Care (GIP): General Inpatient Care (GIP) is made available to all hospice client’s who are in need of pain control or symptom management that cannot be provided in any other setting.

    • GIP is considered short term care because the team’s job and overall goal is to get the client’s acute symptoms to a controlled level within 24-48 hours.
    • When the client’s symptoms have been managed for at least 24 hours, the doctor will order a discharge of the client to the Residential Care level if that client chooses to remain at The Good Shepherd. It is the client’s choice whether he/she wants to stay in the hospice house, go back home with care, or move to a nursing home.

    For more information about these levels of care, or about The Good Shepherd Hospice House in general, please feel free to call us at any time at 785-537-0688.

    Title





    Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice #hospice #of #dayton #jobs

    #hospice tampa

    #

    Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice

    You’re not from hospice, are you?

    They ask because they aren’t ready for hospice. They may equate it with death. They may not want to stop medical treatments meant to cure or prolong life, even if their suffering is intense.

    Enter the palliative care movement — aimed at providing the comfort of hospice for people who aren’t yet at the end of life.

    The distinction is important both to patients and the physicians seeking to help them. And while it is touted as a less expensive way to provide better care, it also represents a new line of business for health care facilities.

    Farmer is the medical director of Chapters Health Palliative Care. It’s affiliated with LifePath Hospice, the major hospice provider in Hillsborough County.

    Chapters Health Palliative Care started in 2006 for patients who need help managing their pain and other symptoms. Many of them are still getting curative treatment such as chemotherapy and radiation, which hospice patients — defined by Medicare as people with six months or less to live have usually abandoned.

    Hospices around the country see a growing demand for palliative care, especially as b aby boomers age and develop chronic illnesses that require comfort care.

    Hospitals, too, are expanding their palliative care services, often in coordination with hospice institutions, since research findings show that it improves patient outcomes. It is thought that patients who are less stressed by pain are better able to stabilize or even improve their health.

    The palliative care program at the region’s largest hospital, Tampa General, served 1,300 patients last year. The hospital’s foundation is about halfway toward its goal of raising $320,000 to convert some hospital rooms into palliative care suites.

    At Suncoast Hospice, the dominant provider in Pinellas County, new chief executive officer Rafael Sciullo plans to expand the palliative care program, which last year served nearly 1,730 people.

    Suncoast already has a home-based palliative care program and a consult service to two hospitals, Mease Countryside Hospital and Mease Dunedin Hospital, said Sciullo. He wants to expand the consults to more hospitals, and increase marketing for home-based care.

    We do want to dispel any myths that it’s all about dying, said Sciullo. Because it isn’t.

    Pasco-Hernando Hospice has an in-home palliative care program for patients who don’t qualify for hospice. Gulfside Regional Hospice in New Port Richey started a spin-off company, Pasco Palliative Care LLC, which provides services to non-hospice patients at several facilities, including Morton Plant North Bay Hospital in New Port Richey and Medical Center of Trinity, said chief executive officer Linda Ward.

    It’s really going to grow, said Ward. Many hospitals have come on board to recognize that palliative care helps prevent readmissions.

    That’s important at a time when the Medicare program is penalizing hospitals whose patients are readmitted too soon.

    Palliative care could also provide new Medicare income to hospices, who stand to lose money if the federal government clamps down on who qualifies for Medicare’s hospice benefit.

    Why is Medicare eyeing hospice payments? Because most of Medicare spending on hospice in 2011 — $13.8 billion — was for patients who lived longer than six months, the trigger for the hospice benefit. While it’s often not possible to predict when a person will die, that large imbalance, critics say, indicates that some hospices are admitting people who should not qualify for the Medicare hospice benefit.

    As a physician, Farmer says he sees every day how palliative care improves the lives of patients who face not only major illness, but also complicated treatment plans that can be difficult to navigate outside of the hospital. In fact, he said, LifePath’s parent company began its palliative program as a consult service at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Florida Hospital, both in Tampa. Patients were leaving the hospital and going on to live for years at home but without a coordinated plan to address their symptoms, he said.

    Pain is just one issue. An emphysema patient, for instance, might also need low doses of morphine to help him deal with severe shortness of breath. The palliative team helps patients prepare advanced directives explaining what kind of health care they want as they reach the end of their lives.

    What you find is a lot of these doctors know that (their patients) needed this type of care, but they just didn’t have the time, said Farmer.

    Denise Alessandro is the sole caregiver for her 86-year-old mother, who has dementia, advanced arthritis and other ailments.

    We didn’t feel Mom was quite ready at that point for hospice, but we wanted some direction, the Apollo Beach woman said. Farmer helped them with some small changes that made a huge difference, from getting them a hospital bed and wheelchair, to connecting Alessandro with caregiver support groups.

    In recent weeks, Alessandro’s mother began qualifying for hospice care. As is the case in many families, the time in palliative care is making that transition easier to accept.

    I think it’s a wonderful program, Alessandro said of palliative care. I wish more people knew about it.

    Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice 04/27/13 [Last modified: Saturday, April 27, 2013 9:14pm]
    Photo reprints | Article reprints





    Tampa Hospice care- The Care Centers #motel #in #san #francisco

    #hospice tampa

    #

    Hospice care in Tampa, FL

    Tampa, FL has 1 top rated Hospice care facilities among a total of 12 available. Hospice care is necessary when seniors are faced with the inevitable outcome of a terminal illness or other irreversible conditions, and require the special attention to help them be as comfortable as possible. The average monthly cost for Hospice care in Tampa, FL is $6852 compared to the national average of $6559. Use The Care Centers listings to find the best Hospice care option that suits you and your family’s needs.

    • 12

    Senior Care Facilities

    Showing 1-12 of 12 providers
    Brighton Gardens Of Tampa Top Rated

    16702 North Dale Mabry Hwy, Tampa, FL, 33618

    Ranked as one of the Best Care Centers in Hillsborough county, FL.

    Brighton Gardens Of Tampa in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Brighton Gardens Of Tampa provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated.

    1513 W Fletcher Ave, Tampa, FL, 33612

    Belvedere Commons Of Tampa in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Belvedere Commons Of Tampa provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated.

    215 E. Palm Avenue Baptist Tower, Tampa, FL, 33602

    Palm Ave Baptist Tower in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Palm Ave Baptist Tower provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health.

    907 CLANTON AVENUE, Tampa, FL, 33603

    Wellswood Care Center in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Wellswood Care Center provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health.

    211 N. ALBANY AVENUE, Tampa, FL, 33606

    Albany Avenue Aclf, Inc. in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Albany Avenue Aclf, Inc. provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated.

    3213 WEST CASS STREET, Tampa, FL, 33609

    Gloria’S Alf Of Tampa, Inc in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Gloria’S Alf Of Tampa, Inc provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated.

    503 N. MATANZAS, Tampa, FL, 33609

    Aguila Adult Care Center in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Aguila Adult Care Center provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated.

    4902 Bayshore Blvd Ofc Ofc, Tampa, FL, 33611

    Brookdale Bayshore in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Brookdale Bayshore provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health.

    5813 Lake Bend Ave, Tampa, FL, 33614

    Buena Vida Residence Inc. in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Buena Vida Residence Inc. provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated.

    3010 W AZEELE ST, Tampa, FL, 33609

    Lifepath Hospice in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Lifepath Hospice provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health professionals.

    6015 N HIMES AVE, Tampa, FL, 33614

    Loving Hearts Alf in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Loving Hearts Alf provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health.

    3211 W SITKA STREET, Tampa, FL, 33614

    Maria’S Alf in Tampa, FL provides care services.

    The staff at Maria’S Alf provide personalized services designed to meet the needs of every patient. The dedicated health professionals offer the.





    Health care information #westerwood #hotel

    #health care information

    #

    6 September 2016 – Every 40 seconds someone dies by suicide. For each of one of those people, WHO estimates that at least another 20 attempt to take their own life. However, suicides are preventable. World Suicide Prevention Day, on 10 September, is an opportunity to find out what each of us can do to help prevent suicide.

    6 September 2016 – The interim guidance on prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus has been updated with new evidence and advice. The primary transmission route of Zika virus is via the Aedes mosquito, however mounting evidence shows that sexual transmission of Zika virus is possible and more common than previously assumed. This is of concern due to an association between the Zika virus and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    2 September 2016 — The fourth meeting of the Emergency Committee on Zika and microcephaly convened by the Director-General under the International Health Regulations (2005) regarding microcephaly, other neurological disorders and Zika virus was on 1 September 2016. The Committee agreed that Zika virus infection and its associated congenital and other neurological disorders continues to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

    30 August 2016 – In response to the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, WHO has issued new treatment guidelines for 3 common sexually transmitted infections: chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis. All 3 are generally curable with antibiotics, however they are becoming more difficult to treat, as some antibiotics are now failing due to misuse and overuse. The new recommendations are based on the latest available evidence.

    31 August 2016 — The Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations concerning yellow fever met today. It decided that the yellow fever outbreak in Angola and DRC does not constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Despite considerable progress, the outbreak remains a serious public health event that warrants continued action and international support.





    Residential Care #hospice #nurse #salary

    #residential home care

    #

    Residential Care

    The community residential care sector encompasses a range of living options for people, primarily seniors, with different support needs. With varying terminology across the country, residential care facilities can include lodges, assisted living, supportive housing and long-term care homes. Other terms across Canada are nursing and personal care homes.

    These facilities offer different levels of care and may be free-standing or co-located with other types of care or hospitals.

    CIHI collects and reports on clinical, administrative and resource utilization data from long-term care homes in Canada. These facilities serve diverse populations who need access to 24-hour nursing care, personal care and other therapeutic and support services.

    We also collect information on transitions of long-term care home residents to and from hospitals or emergency rooms.

    We welcome your feedback and questions

    Residential care information

    Reports and analyses

    Public reporting of long-term care indicators
    CIHI is working diligently to make long-term care information available through Your Health System. an easy-to-use, interactive web tool. In spring 2016, a number of facility-level long-term care indicators were be integrated into the In Depth section of the tool.

    Find out more about long-term care indicators on Your Health System .

    Databases and data sources

    Continuing Care Reporting System

    The Continuing Care Reporting System (CCRS) contains demographic, clinical, functional and utilization information. This data refers to individuals receiving continuing care services in hospitals or long-term care homes in Canada. Participating organizations also provide information on facility characteristics to support comparative reporting and benchmarking.

    The clinical data standard for CCRS was developed by interRAI. an international research network. It was modified with permission by CIHI for Canadian use. Clinicians assess their residents using interRAI’s Resident Assessment Instrument–Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS 2.0)©.

    The information is entered into a computer at the point of care. Real-time reports flag resident risks and inform care planning. The information then flows to CIHI. With no additional collection effort, evidence is available to guide care and system-wide planning as well as quality improvement.

    Metadata

    Metadata is information about data. It helps users understand and interpret data from a specific source.

    Find out more about metadata in the following data source:

    Multimedia

    Key resources

    Continuing and residential care information sheets

    Continuing and residential care user manuals

    Continuing and residential care specifications manuals

    Continuing and residential care quality indicators

    Continuing and residential care education





    Hospice care plan #bangkok #hotels

    #hospice care plan

    #

    Compassion. Integrity. Excellence.

    Compassus is dedicated to clinical excellence, compassionate care, and providing comfort and support to patients and their families facing end-of-life issues. Focusing on the quality of life remaining, Compassus provides effective symptom control and care that focuses on the whole individual – addressing physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs.

    At Compassus, our mission is to provide hospice care to terminally ill patients and their families with Compassion, Integrity, and Excellence. The Colleagues of Compassus are committed to keeping The Hospice Promise by delivering the highest quality of care, serving the needs of patients and families and spreading the stories of hospice to those whom they come into contact. Our goal is to provide the greatest possible comfort and care for those who experience one of life’s most intimate and challenging moments.

    Compassus also provides palliative care to improve quality of life for patients and families who may also be seeking aggressive treatment for their serious illness. Compassus palliative care services can offer relief from symptoms and pain and a care plan based on your values and needs.

    Families

    Every patient is a unique story.
    Read more.


  • Healthcare Professionals

    We support our referring physicians.
    Find out how.


  • Volunteers and donors

    Make a difference in someone s life.
    Become a volunteer today.
    Learn how.





  • Hospice Tyler, TX – Compassionate Hospice Care Inc #hotel #compare #price

    #compassionate hospice

    #

    Tyler, TX Hospice

    Compassionate Hospice Care Inc of Tyler, TX will be there for you when you need us most. We recognize death as a normal part of life, and focus on maintaining the highest quality of life for the patient and their family. Dealing with end of life issues is a difficult task that we assist in by offering high quality, team-oriented, palliative care that supports our patients’ wishes and values. We are sensitive and responsive to the special requirements of each individual and family.

    Compassionate Hospice Care Inc’s Staff Services Include:

    • Registered Nurses
    • Licensed Vocational Nurses
    • Medical Social Workers
    • Certified Nursing Assistants
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Dietician
    • Bereavement Counselor
    • Specially Trained Volunteers
    • A Chaplain and a Medical Director Both on Staff
    • At-Home Treatment and Support

    We are now Grace Hospice of East Texas. Click link below for more details.
    http://www.gracehospice.org

    We are locally owned operated by a team of licensed, experienced, medical professionals totally dedicated to the hospice concept of caring.

    Also, we are CHAP certified!



    Long Term Care #lowest #hotel #prices

    #long term hospice care

    #

    Planning Resources by Setting

    Long-term, Acute, and Chronic Care:

    Individuals living in long-term, acute, and chronic care settings are among the most vulnerable populations during a public health emergency. Therefore, it is important for caregivers and planners who care for persons residing in these settings to be prepared and know how to respond in the midst of an emergency. The following resources are intended to provide guidance and assistance for long-term, acute, and chronic care facilities on how to plan for public health emergencies.

    Healthcare Preparedness Activity Tools

    • Long-Term, Home Health, and Hospice Care Planning Guide for Public Health Emergencies
      The Long-Term, Home Health, and Hospice Care Planning Guide for Public Health Emergencies was developed to help improve the planning efforts of these healthcare entities and their coordination and integration within the community. This Planning Guide focuses on six topic areas: situational awareness, continuity of operations, facility or agency operations, crisis standards of care, staffing, and fatality management. Each topic area is presented in a manner that allows the user to develop needed sections in a facility or agency’s emergency preparedness and response plan.

    Other Tools

    • AHRQ Emergency Preparedness Atlas: U.S. Nursing Home and Hospital Facilities
      This Atlas was designed by AHRQ to support state and local planning and response efforts for a bioterrorism or other public health emergency. It is intended to stimulate discussion about how nursing homes may be used to handle a surge of patients in response to emergency situations.
    • Emergency Planning Checklist (80 KB/6 pages)
      CMS developed this tool for persons in long-term care facilities and their family members, friends, personal caregivers, guardians, and long-term care ombudsmen.
    • Emergency Preparedness Checklist for Long Term Care Homes (74 KB/5 pages)
      This checklist was developed by the Survey Certification Division of CMS to evaluate current preparedness plans for every emergency.
    • Long-Term Care and Other Residential Facilities Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist
      This checklist developed by HHS and CDC helps long-term care and other residential facilities assess and improve their preparedness for responding to pandemic influenza. This tool identifies key areas for pandemic influenza and can be used to self-assess the strengths and weaknesses of current planning efforts.
    • Nursing Homes in Public Health Emergencies: Special Needs and Potential Roles and Appendix B: Model Long-term Care Preparedness Needs Assessment
      This AHRQ assessment tool provides background about the preparedness level of nursing home administrators and staff on disaster plans, including bioterrorism response. The findings in this document assess the special needs of the older adult population in nursing home settings during a public health emergency.
    • Pandemic Influenza Workbook for Long Term Care Providers (1.71 MB/92 pages)
      The California Association of Health Facilities provided this workbook as guidance to long-term care providers and to explain what providers should consider in preparing and making preparations for an influenza pandemic.

    Reports and Guidance

    • AARP Tips to Help Older Americans Prepare for Emergencies
      AARP has compiled a list of resources to aid caregivers of older adults with preparedness planning.
    • Caring for Vulnerable Elders during a Disaster (215 KB/62 pages)
      This report is provided by the Florida Health Care Association looking at ways state and local leaders can keep vulnerable elders and other persons with disabilities residing in long-term care facilities safe during a disaster.
    • Emergency Planning for Long Term Care / Seniors Nursing Home Residential-Care-Facilities
      This guide was developed by OnWellness. info’s to provide senior and long-term care facilities with an overview of risk factors and practical contingency plans.
    • Just In Case: Emergency Readiness for Older Adults and Caregivers
      This is a supplement to Aging in Stride, developed by the Administration of Aging within HHS. It describes a three step approach for older adults and caregivers to improve their personal emergency readiness and includes an Emergency Readiness Checklist for Older Adults and Caregivers.
    • Kidney Community Emergency Response Coalition
      This website provides patients, providers, and public health emergency coordinators insight into emergency and disaster preparedness for the entire end-stage renal disease community.
    • Preventing and Controlling Influenza Transmission in Long-term Care Facilities
      A list of Ggeneral guidance resources provided by the CDC for the prevention and control of influenza transmission in healthcare facilities, including specific guidance for long-term care facilities.

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    Health Care Organization – Policy #marina #motel #san #francisco

    #health care organization

    #

    The collected laws, regulations, and approaches taken to making decisions and implementing policy to protect the health of communities and populations. Public health policy issues include a wide range of topics including health care reform, insurance reform, prevention of communicable diseases, food safety, and stem cell research.

    The Department of Health Care Organization and Policy provides training and education at the masters and doctoral level. At the masters level, programs are available for those desiring a career in the analysis of health services policy or in the management of public health services resources. At the doctoral level, programs offer rigorous training in research methods and evidence-based public health practice suitable for careers in public health leadership or academic settings.






    Health Care Facilities #good #deals #on #hotels

    #health care organization

    #

    Health Care Facilities

    Within This Page

    Overview

    We shape our buildings and afterwards our buildings shape us. Winston Churchill (May 10, 1941)

    Health care facilities encompass a wide range of types, from small and relatively simple medical clinics to large, complex, and costly, teaching and research hospitals. Large hospitals centers may include all the various subsidiary health care types that are often independent facilities. The old expression, You never get a second chance to make a good first impression applies to health care facilities. The facility conveys a message to patients, visitors, volunteers, vendors, and staff. The facility also communicates a torrent of clues about the organization and the medical care being provided there. The clues start at the approach to the facility, the drop-off area, the parking lots, and the street signs. Ideally, that message is one that conveys welcoming, caring, comfort, and compassion, commitment to patient well-being and safety. where stress is relieved, refuge is provided, respect is reciprocated, competence is symbolized, way-finding is facilitated, and families are accommodated. The facility also influences employee service attitudes and behaviors. Finishes, signage, and artwork must be carefully selected, well coordinated, and integrated. Security can be balanced with some features apparent to patients/visitors, while conveying a message of safety. Thoughtful design can help ensure the proper first impression is created and sustained.

    The design of health care facilities is governed by many regulations and technical requirements. It is also affected by many less defined needs and pressures. The most pressing of these are workforce shortages, reimbursements, malpractice insurance, physician-hospital relations, capacity, care for the uninsured, patient safety, advances in technology, and patient satisfaction per a recent American College of Healthcare Executives survey of hospital CEOs.

    The entire health care system is under great pressure to reduce costs. and at the same time, be more responsive to customers . The aging are the heaviest users of health care services, and the percentage of the aging in our population is increasing significantly. At the same time, rapid technological advances, often involving very sophisticated techniques and equipment, make more diagnostic and treatment procedures available. The consequent increase in health care costs is not easily accommodated. Designers find increasing focus on limiting both construction costs and the costs of their design services, while compressing construction schedules and still meeting the highest quality standards.

    As cost pressures increase, health care facilities find themselves in increasing competition for both patients and staff. Architecture is often recognized as an important tool in attracting and retaining the best doctors and nurses, the most successful HMOs and insurance plans, and the most patients. Consumer decisions are based on cost. accessibility. quality of service, and quality of medical care. An aesthetically pleasing facility is a key aspect of the perceived quality of care.

    Health care is a labor-intensive industry, and much of that labor is highly skilled and highly paid. Since 60 to 75% of hospital expenses are labor costs, a design that increases operational productivity or efficiency and reduces staffing needs can have a major impact on the bottom line. (Don Blair, then at Perkins + Will, estimated that the cost of one full-time staff person is equivalent to the debt service on $1 million of borrowing per Architectural Record of May 1997.) Likewise, operations and maintenance costs over the typical 50-year life cycle of a hospital contribute up to 80% to the equation, so anything designers can do to facilitate maintenance and reduce total life-cycle cost will have tremendous returns on a relatively small up-front investment. (Source: Federal Facilities Council.)

    Flexibility must be a basic feature of any new health care facility to keep it from rapid obsolescence in the face of changing needs and technologies. Health care facility needs are evolving rapidly, and the direction of that evolution is difficult to forecast with any certainty. New equipment technologies, new treatment methodologies, changes in diseases, and changes in the patient population base all impact the facilities that house them. Inpatient care is steadily being reduced while outpatient services are growing. There is increasing emphasis on special-care units and smaller satellite facilities rather than large, centralized facilities.

    In the past, communicable diseases were the major health problem, and sanitation or cleanliness was the main characteristic of a healing or therapeutic environment. Cleanliness remains extremely important, but there is increasing recognition of the value of a pleasant. easily-understood, and non-threatening environment for patient recovery. For example, the Planetree Hospital philosophy of demystifying medicine emphasizes such a physical environment as part of its approach. Good design in the health care setting starts by recognizing the basic functional needs, but does not end there it must also meet the emotional needs of those who use such facilities at times of uncertainty, dependency, and stress.

    The HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accessibility Act of 1996) regulations address security and privacy of “protected health information” (PHI). These regulations put emphasis on acoustic and visual privacy. While HIPAA does not regulate facilities design, its implications for healthcare facilities may affect location and layout of workstations that handle medical records and other patient information, paper and electronic, as well as patient accommodations.

    There is a noticeable movement from hospital-based acute care to outpatient care, and toward a more holistic, preventative, and continuous care of health and wellness.

    Sustainability must be a consideration for the design of all health care facilities. Many sustainable design features can be incorporated into health care facility design, including daylighting, energy and water conservation, nontoxic materials and finishes, and sustainable operations and maintenance. Health care facility energy and water conservation standards must meet EPAct 2005 (PDF 1.3 MB, 550 pgs) and Executive Order 13693 requirements. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) (PDF 740 KB, 310 pgs) provides additional requirements for energy conservation.

    Emerging Issues

    There is an increasing emphasis on security. especially in large public facilities, and the need to balance this with the desired openness to patients and visitors.

    Evidence-based design. According to the Center for Health Design, “Evidence-Based Design is the process of basing decisions about the built environment on credible research to achieve the best possible outcomes. Evidence-based health-care architecture creates safe and therapeutic environments for patient care and encourages family involvement. It promotes efficient staff performance and is restorative for workers under stress. These designs ultimately should improve the organization’s clinical, economic, productivity, satisfaction, and cultural measures.”

    Classification

    A trend towards specialization has resulted in a growing number of health care types. Among them are hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient facilities, psychiatric facilities, rehabilitation facilities, hospices, assisted living facilities, congregate housing, adult day care facilities, and various specialized outpatient facilities. The WBDG currently includes sections on the following four specific building types:

    • Hospital
    • Nursing Home. including Alzheimer’s Related Dementia (ARD) units
    • Outpatient Clinic. including the specialized diagnostic and treatment areas which may be stand-alone facilities
    • Psychiatric Facility. including psychiatric hospitals

    Major Resources

    WBDG





    Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary,

    #hospice aide job description

    #

    Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary, Employment – Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

    Training/Educational Requirements: High school diploma preferred

    Median Salary: $9.34 per hour

    Job Prospects: Excellent

    Job Description

    A hospice care aide helps individuals unable of helping themselves. These aides travel to the patient s home and help them perform activities required for daily life. Hospice care aides are often associated with the elderly or disabled who are unable to take care of themselves, so they perform all required functions specific to the patient.

    Most of the time, a hospice aide is the first position an individual may take at the beginning of their career. Alternatively, an individual may seek such a career if they are interested in the nursing field, but do not have the required education or training. Most functions performed are rather fundamental in nature, and do not require much training.

    Hospice aides usually work within a hospice environment or travel to the patient s home. They help the individual eat, get up out of bed, or help them with the bathroom or a bedpan. The number of duties involved depends on the nature and the status of the patient, since they are expected to help the patient function as normally as possible. If working within a hospice environment, they work with individual patients to make their final days as comfortable as possible. If working in a home environment, they spend time sitting with or caring for an elderly or disabled patient who requires extra care.

    Many times, families of patients in either a home or hospice environment can t commit to 24 hour care, so they hire a hospice aide to help during the times they are absent. Hospice aides travel to the home and work in shifts providing round the clock supervision and care. They aren t usually a registered nurse or hold a license and cannot usually administer medication, so the responsibilities are typically fundamental.

    Training/Educational Requirements

    There is no educational or training requirement for this position. A hospice aide learns from on-the-job training with a registered nurse or a nurse s aide. They learn the proper way to do things such as help a patient out of bed or assist with a bedpan by observing other nurses and by practicing. Oftentimes the family of the patient has a particular way they want things done, so the best training comes from working directly on the job.

    The National Association for Home Care and Hospice ( NAHC ) offers certification for personal and home care aides throughout the country. This certification is not mandatory although individuals may opt to gain it to demonstrate they have met established industry standards. It can be a simple certification and lend way to further development within this role. Those individuals wishing to gain their certification must complete a 75-hour course, observe and document work in up to 17 different skills signed off by a registered nurse. In addition, they must successfully pass a final exam. Although this isn t a requirement, it can certainly lend way to more opportunities for advancement.

    There are some high school courses that prepare for this role. At the early stages, an individual can do a co-op job to better prepare themselves for becoming a hospice aide. There are some standalone classes an individual can take in patient care which prepares them for the real thing. Individuals interested in a career as a hospice aide receive basic training from the company they work for before they are sent to a patient s home.

    When working in a hospice environment, the facility will provide some training not only in how to care for a patient but also in how to make them comfortable as they prepare for death. There are certain personality traits such as patience and compassion that are required for such a role since most patients are elderly, disabled, or dying.

    How to Get Hired

    Most individuals wishing to get a job as a hospice aide look for employment with a home health care services company. This is usually the best way to get hired because the patients and their families go to such a company to hire this type of individual. It helps to take training classes or work through a high school co-op to prepare for this role. In turn, this also helps to get hired much faster.

    For the hospice aide wishing to get hired into a hospice environment, it helps to apply to the facility directly. Usually these facilities are looking for background and experience since patients who come in here require a certain type of personality. It is also helpful to have experience working with a dying patient.

    Although there is no specific educational requirement for this position, experience helps to get hired. It is especially true for families who are hiring someone to come to their home and care for their loved one.

    Job Prospects, Employment Outlook, and Career Development

    There is expected to be a better than average increase in the hiring of hospice aides. This role is expected to grow as families continue to look for individuals to care for their loved ones in a home or hospice environment. Since this is an entry-level position, the requirements for hiring are much lower. Therefore, it appeals to those who may not have a college education. There is a high potential for growth since people oftentimes don t want to work within an entry-level role.

    As more hospice centers become a popular environment, the need for hospice aides will increase. So, too, will the need to keep aging or disabled family members in their home rather than sending them to a nursing home. This means there will be an increased need for individuals in this role, and within the home health care services business.

    Working Environment

    Depending on the type of facility a hospice aide wishes to work within, the environment may be slightly different. If focused within home health care, the individual will often travel to patient s homes. The assignment may last for a short time or may become a regular job. Individuals in this role care for more than one patient in their home or sometimes travel between a variety of different patient s homes. It all depends on the patients, the workload and the hours required. However, if focused within the home health care niche, hospice aides can expect the working environment to be an actual home. If focused within the hospice niche, it is expected to work within such a facility or institution. These facilities strive to create a cozy environment for their patients so they can be comfortable before they die. This work environment is more like an actual medical facility, but feels cozier.

    Salary and Benefits

    As of 2006, the average earnings for a hospice aide was about $9.34 an hour. The range averaged anywhere from $7.99 all the way up to $13 per hour depending on the facility. In some instances, a home health care company pays slightly higher depending on the environment and patient s needs. The more experience an individual has, the more they can expect to earn per hour.

    Since these are hourly positions, most of the time hospice aides work without any true benefits. Any travel expenses incurred are the individuals responsibility and are often not reimbursed. Instead, a flat hourly rate is given to hospice aides. For those working within a hospice environment, they can expect some benefits if they are hired by the facility directly.

    Citing this material

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    Highlight the text below, right-click, and select copy . Paste the link into your website, email, or any other HTML document.





    Hospice care guidelines #best #hotel #deals

    #hospice care guidelines

    #

    Compassion. Integrity. Excellence.

    Compassus is dedicated to clinical excellence, compassionate care, and providing comfort and support to patients and their families facing end-of-life issues. Focusing on the quality of life remaining, Compassus provides effective symptom control and care that focuses on the whole individual – addressing physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs.

    At Compassus, our mission is to provide hospice care to terminally ill patients and their families with Compassion, Integrity, and Excellence. The Colleagues of Compassus are committed to keeping The Hospice Promise by delivering the highest quality of care, serving the needs of patients and families and spreading the stories of hospice to those whom they come into contact. Our goal is to provide the greatest possible comfort and care for those who experience one of life’s most intimate and challenging moments.

    Compassus also provides palliative care to improve quality of life for patients and families who may also be seeking aggressive treatment for their serious illness. Compassus palliative care services can offer relief from symptoms and pain and a care plan based on your values and needs.

    Families

    Every patient is a unique story.
    Read more.


  • Healthcare Professionals

    We support our referring physicians.
    Find out how.


  • Volunteers and donors

    Make a difference in someone s life.
    Become a volunteer today.
    Learn how.





  • American Hospice – Hospice of New Jersey offering Hospice Care and Inpatient

    #hospice of nj

    #

    Hover over date to view event details
    Visit the Events Page

    Hospice of New Jersey is the leading Hospice provider in delivering passionate, competent and comprehensive end-of-life care in New Jersey and the surrounding communities. For more than ten years Hospice of New Jersey has been devoted to easing the physical, emotional and spiritual pain and suffering that often accompanies terminal illness.

    We provide comprehensive services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We have a very compassionate, experienced and well-trained hospice team of physicians, nurses, hospice aides, medical social workers, spiritual care specialists, clinical pharmacists, bereavement counselors and volunteers. We promise to always put patients and families first and strive to make every contact with you or your loved one meaningful.

    Hospice of New Jersey accepts most private insurance and is a Medicare and Medicaid licensed provider. Both Medicare and Medicaid provide 100% coverage for care related to the terminal illness. This includes physicians, nurses, hospice aides, medical social workers, counselors, equipment, medications, oxygen, and medical supplies. Medicare and Medicaid patients will never receive a bill from us.

    Please call us at (973) 893- 0818 to speak with one of our caring healthcare professionals about hospice. Learn if hospice is right for you, your loved one, or your patient. Also, feel free to browse our web site for additional information about our hospice, our locations, virtual tours of our facilities, and other useful information.





    Global Hospice Care #south #padre #island #hotels

    #hospice of el paso

    #

    Global Hospice Care

    Knowledge. Hope and compassion. Love and dignity. This is the essence of Global Hospice.

    Global Hospice Care, Inc. operating since 2005

    Knowledge, Hope and compassion. Love and dignity. This is the essence of Global Hospice.
    Founded on a commitment to quality care, Global Hospice is licensed in the state of Texas, certified by Medicare and Medicaid and accredited to higher standards by The Joint Commission. We are a locally owned and operated company providing personalized, one-to-one care in the comfort of your home. No strict hospital rules or sterile surroundings. Just the care you want in the company of those closest to you.

    Hospice is not simply a path to the end. It is about enhancing quality of life through comfort care. With a skilled team of physicians, nurses, therapists and spiritual advisors, Global Hospice takes care of everything so you can be there for those who need you most.
    It is terrible and devastating to find out that your loved one has a terminal illness. You might think that there is not much to be done. But in fact a lot has to be done and we can help you.

    With knowledge, love and compassion we will help you. We will be there with you every step of this path of sorrow and sadness.

    Our promise to you; we will provide you with knowledge, support, love and compassion to survive grief.

    Some day the pain will lessen, leaving you with cherished memories of your loved one.

    The happiness that you had when your loved one was still alive will make you strong until you and your loved one meet again.

    Until that time comes, you may find the support you need here with us at Global Hospice Care 915-543-6060 anytime, any day.

    We have built a state of the art facility to provide in-patient hospice care. Our facility is the only free standing facility in El Paso licensed by the State of Texas to provide hospice care and accredited by the Joint Commission. www.texaspalliative.com

    An Impulse Development Website Copyright 2016 – Global Hospice Care





    Nurses Care Inc #discount #on #hotels

    #home health care nurse

    #

    Friendly and Compassionate Care

    Professional home health care

    Certified health care services

    Wide range of skilled services

    Welcome to Nurses Care Inc.

    Rely on our skilled professionals.

    Quality Health Care From Highly Qualified Professionals

    Nurses Care has won the 2016 Eclipse Integrity Award by the judges of the BBB award! Businesses in the area are nominated if they show integrity in the way they conduct business contribute to the well being of the community. To be chosen is quite an honor! We are very proud of this want to thank all of Nurses Care’s staff who make Nurses Care a great place to work contribute to our impeccable reputation in the communities we serve! Great job Nurses Care. the agency that cares!

    LATEST NEWS

    © 2016. The content on this website is owned by us and our licensors. Do not copy any content (including images) without our consent.

    Nurses Care Inc. | Health Care | Miamisburg, OH





    Hospice and Palliative Care Services #hotel #review

    #hospice of santa barbara

    #

    Hospice/Palliative Care Support

    Whether you are simply trying to relieve someone’s pain during a serious illness or whether you’re trying to provide end-of-life care, it can produce a lot of stress for everyone involved in caregiving.

    Right at Home can give you a respite from the daily tasks that seem to build. From light housekeeping to meal preparation, Right at Home caregivers can provide support during trying times.

    Skilled Nursing is also available in many areas as allowed by state law for the medical needs of palliative and hospice care.

    We started working with Right at Home about a month ago to provide services for my mother who has Alzheimer’s and to provide support to my father (her primary caregiver) six days a week. So far we have had an excellent experience. The caregivers are supportive, caring people and have given my Dad a much deserved break as well as providing knowledgeable care for my Mom. I have also been impressed with the structures and processes put in place to insure that we get consistent, reliable care. Our relationship with Right at Home is still new but we couldn’t be happier.

    Give us a call.

    We’re always available to discuss your particular situation and needs. Just call us at the number below. We’re here to help however we can.





    Faith Hospice Care Inc #trinity #hospice #clapham

    #faith hospice

    #

    We Welcome You!

    Faith Hospice Care, Inc. provides end-of-life care for adult and pediatric patients with life-limiting illnesses. We promote quality care by providing skilled and compassionate palliative care.

    In these challenging moments, it is important to know that you have an option that can help your loved one get the most out of life and live as fully and as comfortably as possible.

    Faith Hospice Care is centered around the entire family by providing a team that focuses on individual care while offering your family all the support and help needed.

    Houston Hospice Care

    We bring hospice care home to Harris County and surrounding counties.

    Faith Hospice Care, Inc. is fully accredited by the State of Texas to provide safe and effective end-of-life care of the highest quality.

    According to Medicare guidelines, in some critical crises, patients may receive a 24-hour nursing assistant at the bedside to continally monitor and provide, adjust medications to ensure the patient’s comfort, and offer support and education to families.

    Discover quality hospice care

    Each patient of Hospice receives individualized care based on their needs, which may include:

    • Pain and symptom management
    • On-call nursing
    • Physician
    • Registered Nurse, Licensed Vocational Nurse, and Hospice aides
    • Social Worker
    • Chaplain
    • Coordination of durable medical equipment, supplies and medications
    • Volunteer Support




    Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior

    #solari hospice

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    Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior Hospice Care

    February 09, 2011 11:20 AM Eastern Standard Time

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–( BUSINESS WIRE )–The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published an article in its February 2 issue titled “Association of Hospice Agency Profit Status, With Patient Diagnosis, Location of Care, and Length of Stay.” Solari Hospice Care wants to emphasize that this article offers no supporting research or evidence that nonprofit hospice programs provide better care to terminally ill patients, are more ethical, or are more compassionate than for-profit hospices.

    Solari Hospice Care would like to address the rampant misinformation regarding for-profit hospice care and stress that the fundamental principle of hospice will always be providing people with the greatest quality of life in the time they have left.

    With more than one million people in the United States receiving hospice care in 2009 1. it’s apparent that hospices meet a very important need in this country — and to suggest that the primary motivation is financial does a disservice to the devoted hospice staffs caring for their patients facing life-limiting illnesses.

    “Having IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit status does not automatically equate to superior care for terminally ill patients,” said Gary W. Polsky , chief executive officer , Solari Hospice Care. “There is no correlation between the profit status of a hospice program and the quality of care provided.”

    So what is similar between nonprofit and for-profit hospices? The regulations are identical. All licensed and certified hospices must comply with state law and the Code of Federal Regulations governing hospice care. In addition, Medicare’s reimbursement rate is fixed regardless of the care needs of individual patients, the services patients receive, or the tax status of the hospice providing the care.

    “For those who continue to pit nonprofit hospices against for-profit hospices, it’s my opinion that you are fighting the wrong battle,” Polsky remarked. “What we all should be advocating for is helping people to live with dignity and comfort by providing comprehensive and compassionate hospice care. Hospice practices, including quality of care, depend on an organization’s staff and leadership, not tax status. In any field of business, there are ‘good’ companies and ‘bad’ companies, and hospice is no different.”

    According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s (NHPCO) recent comprehensive survey, the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care, detailed analysis of data submitted by hospices shows no difference in family caregivers’ evaluation of the quality of care based on a hospice program’s profit status.

    Polsky added, “As a member of the NHPCO, I am proud to say that Solari Hospice Care exceeds NHPCO’s Standards of Practice for Hospice Programs and fully complies with all hospice regulations.”

    “I am focused on and passionate about providing the highest quality of care to patients facing complex end-of-life issues,” Polsky commented. “My education in health care administration and my experience in the health care field over the years have given me the opportunity to work with some of the most skilled doctors, nurses, specialists, counselors and caring staff members. When I founded Solari Hospice Care in 2002, I knew that I wanted and expected the same level of passion and dedication from my staff in Las Vegas and Houston. Hospice patients deserve nothing less than excellent care specific to their unique needs.”

    Polsky concluded, “Ultimately, the most important measure of a hospice should be the quality of care provided to patients — not its tax status.”

    With this insight, you and your loved ones will be better informed how hospice care can address symptoms and pain management, ease suffering and grief, as well as provide emotional and spiritual support during the final phase of life. To learn more about the issues, opportunities and trends impacting the hospice industry, please read the new CEO Viewpoint blog from Solari Hospice Care’s Gary Polsky at http://bit.ly/f6evtE.

    1 “Hospice Care in America,” National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, October 2010

    About Solari Hospice Care

    Contacts





    Taking Hospice Care to the Next Level in 2012 #motels #in #denver

    #solari hospice

    #

    As I look back on the milestones we reached in 2011 and forward to the possibilities poised to unfold in 2012, I feel tremendous pride in the strides our Solari Hospice Care family has taken and will continue to take together to position our company as the hospice provider of choice in the Houston and Las Vegas communities we serve.

    I believe our one-of-a-kind recipe for hospice care is so successful because we all share a passion for providing the highest quality, most compassionate care to our patients and families. And, by mixing just the right ingredients into our hospice care “soup,” we will continue to demonstrate our ability to serve unparalleled end-of-life care.

    Strong Leadership. I truly believe that hiring and empowering proven and passionate leaders is one of the most proactive steps possible for achieving stellar hospice care — a key ingredient. I feel very lucky to have established long-term Professional Intimate Relationships with some of the most intelligent and passionate hospice professionals in the field — leaders who represent Solari with great integrity in their work to deepen existing relationships and to build new ones.

    Solari’s consistently successful leadership team in Las Vegas led that program to its best year ever in 2011. In Houston last year, we welcomed several highly qualified and enthusiastic healthcare professionals into our hospice family to guide that program’s growth in tandem with the opening of our new Houston Inpatient Home. In both locations, our medical team leaders demonstrate their dedication to excellence through continuing education and training to obtain valuable hospice and palliative care certifications. These leadership teams, in addition to the incredible group of leaders who help keep things cooking from our Central Office in Arizona, show no signs of slowing down in 2012.

    They say the proof’s in the pudding … Well, the fantastic Average Daily Census (ADC) in both cities over the past year demonstrates the skill and commitment of our company’s leaders. On the cusp of its 10th anniversary in 2012, our Las Vegas program celebrated another milestone — its highest monthly ADC ever at nearly 230 patients. That’s amazing! And it simply accentuates the need for another Solari Hospice Care Inpatient Home to serve Las Vegas’ growing end-of-life care needs. I’m excited to announce that we are in the process of finalizing the purchase of land to build our next Inpatient Home in Northwest Las Vegas, with the expectation of opening our newest “vortex of love” in late 2013. As our growth momentum builds, we also envision opening a third Inpatient Home in Southeast-Central Las Vegas the following year.

    Visionary Inpatient Care. I always call our Inpatient Homes “vortexes of love” because that’s just what they are…high-energy centers for the most compassionate, highest quality palliative care and support for our patients and families when they need it the most. Designed and built from the ground up to meet the special needs of hospice patients and families, our Inpatient Homes truly differentiate us in the marketplace. With state-of-the-art medical equipment housed in a warm and inviting setting with myriad home-like amenities and no visitation restrictions, our Inpatient Homes help keep our patients out of the cold and impersonal hospital environment. And what takes place within the walls of our IPUs is magical … teams of top-notch hospice professionals taking an integrative approach to individualized patient and family care.

    I couldn’t be happier that we are now able to offer this incredible service in the greater Houston community. 2011 saw the opening of Houston Solari Hospice care’s first Inpatient Home, which earned acclaimed accreditation by the Joint Commission in December. To achieve this huge goal, our Houston program underwent a complete leadership and operational transformation last year. With the Houston IPU accepting patients and new leaders and systems in place, 2012 promises to be an exciting growth year in Houston!

    New Technologies. Forward-thinking companies embrace new technologies because such innovation enables businesses to work smarter. As we prepare this year to implement a 100-percent electronic medical records system companywide, I look forward to working even more efficiently so we can offer the next level of service to our patients, families and professional healthcare partners. Going paperless will enable us to continue speeding up patient care response, in addition to improving communication among team members. With less paperwork to fill out, our Solari “angels” will have more time to spend face-to-face with patients and family members, allowing for increased eye-to-hand patient observation and documentation.

    Giving Back. In addition to offering the highest caliber of hospice care to our patients and families, it has always been my vision to give back to the communities we serve and beyond through the Solari Hospice Foundation. I have never been more committed to the nonprofit Foundation’s mission to help children and families through Camp Solari, and to educate the public about hospice care. With this mission in mind, we just began working with a fund development expert to help us evolve into a national resource for hospice education and bereavement support.

    To take our camp programs in Las Vegas and Houston to the next level in 2012, we recently recruited locally based professional counseling teams in both cities. Leveraging their expertise and their established relationships in their prospective communities, these counseling teams will help the Foundation realize its vision for a greater number of bereavement camps — potentially nationwide — to give children and families the tools they need to work through their grief and live the most joyful lives possible.

    Building Buzz. Thanks to the efforts of a talented Communications Media Relations team that came together in 2011, Solari Hospice Care’s and Solari Hospice Foundation’s hard work in Houston and Las Vegas is gaining broader recognition. It feels great to open a magazine or newspaper, turn on the TV, or log onto a website and see our company showcased in one way or another for the awesome service we provide to terminally ill patients and their loved ones! Beyond that satisfaction, however, lies that fact that our media coverage helps spread the word about Solari Hospice Care to both patients/families and potential referral sources. Whether they see our beautiful new commercial while watching the local news, read an article about Solari while waiting at a doctor’s office, or check out a Solari story or video clip while surfing the Web, media coverage in all forms is a valuable tool. I’m thankful for all the Solari family members who are making it happen! I have no doubt that the media buzz about our company will continue to build throughout 2012.

    All in all, I feel utterly confident that we’ve added the right ingredients to our recipe for stellar hospice care. As we continue to stir, sample, tweak and occasionally, turn up the fire in 2012, we’re sure to create a soup that’s even better than we dreamed it would be.





    Palliative cancer care #hotels #in #edinburgh

    #palliative cancer care

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    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    The Real Issues of End-of-Life Care #hospice #reviews

    #end of life care issues

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    The Real Issues of End-of-Life Care

    The health-care-reform bill the U.S. House of Representatives will debate when it returns from recess next month contains a provision that would have Medicare reimburse doctors for counseling patients on end-of-life care every five years. Opponents of health-care reform have latched onto the provision, claiming it would lead to forced euthanasia or “death panels” to decide whether lifesaving care for the elderly is cost-effective despite the fact that the bill says nothing about either of these frightening issues. In fact, geriatricians doctors trained specifically to care for the elderly support the provision, arguing that it will encourage patients to express their own preferences rather than leave doctors and family members to guess what they want once they’re no longer able to say so themselves. There are only about 7,500 geriatricians in the U.S. and one of them is Dr. Laurie Jacobs, vice chairman of the Department of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Jacobs, who has been a practicing geriatrician since 1988, talked to TIME about why end-of-life counseling is important, when it should start and how to talk to patients and families about planning for death. (Read “If a Health-Care Bill Passes, Nurse Practitioners Could Be Key.”)

    Does this House provision for funding end-of-life counseling concern you?
    This provision says that people should talk about what their goals of care are and what they want at the end of life. That could be anything. This is an opportunity for patients and physicians to share information with each other and come up with a plan. It is one of the special things about being a physician. You get to know your patient and what matters to them, and their inner thoughts, and their lives, and that’s a very special role that most physicians value and that patients appreciate.

    How important is Medicare reimbursement for doctors counseling patients about end-of-life care?
    For some people one conversation is enough, and you get the whole picture and they tell you exactly what they want. For other people, 10 conversations in 10 weeks won’t suffice. Coverage for this is expensive, but I think offering it is a wonderful first step in highlighting the importance of it by paying for it.

    What kind of end-of-life-care counseling do you provide to your patients? How does it work?
    Many patients have chronic illness and some disability or medical issue, and part of providing care is to speak with them about what to expect with their illness, what alternatives exist, and to have a conversation about what their preferences are. This shouldn’t just happen at the end of life. You should get to know people and have these conversations throughout providing care. I like to talk individually with the patient if they are comfortable with that. If they are more comfortable with having family members there at the time, then I do it with the group. What I need to know from the patients is how they view their illness in the context of their life. Did they know somebody else with the same condition and therefore they have some preconceived idea about this? What are their values? How to they want to live their life? I also talk to them about whether there is someone who could make decisions for them if they are unable in the future.

    How often do you provide end-of-life counseling?
    It comes up very frequently in our practice, either with new patients who present very ill, or patients we have known for a very long time that have encountered a new serious condition that may be life-threatening. Death is not an option. Everyone is going to die at some point.

    How important is for you to talk with people about options like hospice or do-not-resuscitate orders? This must be really stressful for patients and their families.
    That’s why it’s so important to talk about values and preferences long before you are at the moment of having to do an intervention. If I have a patient who has early dementia, they still may be able to participate in a conversation about what matters to them, how they want to live their life, who they want to make decisions, and it may be 10 years before the point at which an illness happens and an intervention may be required. So, it enables me to get a sense of who they are and what’s important to them. When you talk to family members when a patient cannot participate in the conversation, it’s even more difficult. If it was for themselves, they might say, “Gee, I don’t want to go through that,” but they are afraid to limit options for family members, and I can understand that. If a proxy knows that the patient always said, “This is how I want to live my life, this is how I want my life to end,” they feel very much more comfortable in making those decisions. So I think the fact that there is some national conversation about this is good in that it starts people talking to their friends and family about what is important to them.

    How often does money come up with families or patients when you are talking about end-of-life care?
    This is a question that medical students often ask. Health-care finance and social issues regarding health-care expenditures nationally are policy issues, and they are never to be decided at the bedside.





    Capital – Coast DHB Palliative Care Service – Healthpoint #metropark #hotel #kowloon

    #hospice wellington

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    Capital Coast DHB Palliative Care Service

    Description

    What is Palliative Care?
    Palliative care is care for people of all ages with a life-limiting illness, to support and help the person live as comfortably and fully as possible. A life-limiting illness is one that cannot be cured and may at some time result in the person dying, be that years, months, weeks or days away. For example: lung, heart, nerve or kidney diseases that get progressively more troublesome despite everything; cancers that can’t be cured but might still be responsive to drugs or radiation.

    A palliative care approach aims to improve a person’s quality of life by addressing the person’s cultural, social, psychological and spiritual needs as well as physical needs such as managing pain and other distressing symptoms. It aims to support and comfort the individual’s family whanau, and other caregivers where needed, through the illness and after death.

    When is Palliative Care Helpful?
    Palliative care helps at all stages of life-limiting illness. It is often best introduced early on – sometimes even at the point it first becomes clear what is wrong. It can be helpful at any time, even when someone is having intensive treatments, for instance chemotherapy for cancer or renal dialysis for kidney failure. In other words, palliative care could be there to provide support, help and comfort at those times when illness is causing major problems or distress.

    Palliative care is provided according to an individual’s need, and may be suitable whether death is days, weeks, months or years away,

    Who Provides Palliative Care?
    It is provided by all healthcare professionals, supported where necessary, by specialist palliative care services. General practitioners and District Nurses all have knowledge of, and ability to provide, palliative care. Hospices are the main providers of specialist palliative care services for people living in the community and who are not inpatients in a public hospital.

    Where is Palliative Care Provided?
    It aims to be available wherever the person may be – in the community in an outpatient setting or at home. Care may also be provided by the hospice or by a member of the hospital palliative care team when you are in the hospital.

    What Services are Available through Hospice?
    Mary Potter Hospice is a community-based service, providing specialist palliative care services to the people of Wellington, Porirua and Kapiti. Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients, and their whānau, facing problems associated with life threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.
    The service is free to all patients accepted, and receiving, the service.
    There are four teams: multidisciplinary community teams in Wellington, Porirua and Kapiti, and an inpatient unity in Wellington.
    The hospice teams work closely with Primary Health Organisations, District Nurses, and other community based services.
    Care is available in people’s homes, residential facilities, day unit, outpatient clinics, and as an inpatient at the hospice.

    How Can Palliative Care Help When you are in Hospital?
    The hospital palliative care team can often help out and offer you and your family support, relief, comfort, information, choice and expertise in many different situations. These might include:

    • times when your illness is causing discomfort, for example bothersome pain or shortness of breath, or nausea and vomiting. We may be able to help ease these symptoms and improve your comfort.
    • periods when your thoughts and feelings are distressing. Having someone to help you talk through and address these things can often make a major difference.
    • occasions when your illness may be having a big impact elsewhere in your life – maybe with your partner, children, whanau, work or perhaps financial affairs. Professional support and advice in these situations can often help you find solutions and resolve some of your concerns.
    • you may also be faced with decisions and choices that are confusing or difficult to make during your illness. The palliative care team may be able to help explain things to you, and help you find answers that you feel most comfortable with.
    • on leaving hospital you may need ongoing support and care. The palliative care team is often able to link in with the right services for you.

    We also recognise that sometimes nature is stronger than any medical treatments we have on offer. When this happens and death is close, it is extremely important that you get the care in hospital that will support you and your family and whanau, meet your wishes and needs, and also keep you comfortable. The palliative care team may be involved in your care during these times too.

    Who are the Hospital Palliative Care Team?
    Our team consists of specially trained nurses and specialist doctors. We work together with the specialist who is in charge of your care and his or her team. That means we do not take over your care. Instead we work alongside both you and your primary hospital team during your stay in hospital.

    Dr Jonathan Adler, Consultant and Clinical Leader

    Dr Emma McMenamin, Consultant

    Dr Anne MacLennan, Consultant (Part-time)

    Alison Rowe, Nurse Practitioner,

    Janice Tijsen, Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Gabrielle Driscoll, Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Barbara Eddy, Administrator

    Who are the Mary Potter Hospice Community Palliative Care Team?

    Dr Brian Ensor, Director of Palliative Care

    Dr Annabel Dunn, Consultant in Palliative Care





    HMC Hospice Care Center – Hospice of Medina County #macmillan #hospice

    #hospice brochure

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    HMC Hospice Care Center

    Our Inpatient Care Center serves the needs of patients who require more advanced symptom management or residential care. When a patient s condition calls for constant or intensive care that can no longer be accommodated at home or their place of residence, Hospice of Medina County offers our beautiful, new Hospice Care Center.

    Open to patients in January of 2012, our new Hospice Care Center offers sixteen elegantly-appointed patient rooms to provide a home-like setting. The inpatient unit is specifically designed to meet the needs of the terminally ill and their families with peace and serenity.

    The Hospice Care Center recently received Gold Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. HMC Hospice of Medina County is the first LEED Gold certified hospice facility in Ohio! This is quite an honor and achievement said James Faulkner, President of Matrix Architects and project designer. HMC is now in select company as only 148 other buildings in Ohio have achieved the gold level since 2006. We are so proud to have been a part of this project.

    Some of the key sustainable features of the facility include a cool roofing system, energy-efficient windows and doors, construction waste management plan, and the use of regional building materials with high recycled content throughout. As we work towards LEED Certification, we are ensuring a healthy and natural environment for our patients, families and employees. For more information on LEED and green building requirements click here.

    For more information about our Inpatient Care Center, please contact our intake department at 330.722.4771 or simply use our contact form .

    View our Inpatient Care Center brochure here.





    Palliative Care Unit – St #super #eight #motels

    #palliative care unit

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    Clinics Inpatient Care Units

    Palliative Care Unit

    The focus of the palliative care unit (PCU) is to manage distressing symptoms (pain, nausea, difficulty breathing) and ensure comfort when cure is no longer possible.

    The PCU is a 10-bed unit comprised of three large semi-private rooms and four single rooms. The environment on PCU is structured for the comfort of patients and their families and friends. Facilities include an open concept kitchen/lounge/dining area, laundry facilities, a whirlpool bath, educational reading materials and small private meeting rooms.

    • Visiting hours are flexible.
    • Family and friends wishing to stay overnight with a patient may arrange a cot and sleeper chair with our staff.
    • Children are welcome to visit.
    • Pets are welcome to visit, with clearance from staff.
    • Open dialogue with our specially trained staff is encouraged at all times.
    • Trained volunteers are part of the team, and help to enrich the patient s quality of life.
    • All religions are respected, all personal spiritual advisors are encouraged to visit and a multi-faith meditation room and chapel are located in the Hospital.
    • All basic ward rooms and professional care are covered by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP).

    Accessing Palliative Care

    Applications to the palliative care unit are normally made by a member of the health care team caring for the patient.

    Our criteria for admission:

    • The patient and family agree with a palliative plan of care. This means that a decision has been made by the patient and family to stop any further active treatment aimed at cure of the illness, and to focus instead on promoting patient comfort by managing symptoms.
    • A do not resuscitate (DNR) status has been discussed and agreed upon by the patient and the patient s family.
    • The patient should have an estimated life expectancy of three months or less. If the condition of the patient stabilizes or improves and the care team feels the patient may have a longer life expectancy than initially thought, we work with the patient and the patient s family to find a more appropriate care setting.

    Tours of the unit are encouraged so patients and families can see the facility and have an opportunity to talk with our staff to answer any questions about palliative care.

    Contact Us

    Palliative Care Unit
    Donnelly wing, fourth floor
    St. Michael s Hospital
    30 Bond Street
    Toronto, Ontario
    M5B 1W8, Canada
    Phone: 416-864-5226 (nursing station, 24-hour direct line)
    Fax: 416-864-5297

    The easiest access is through the Queen Street entrance. Take the elevators on your immediate left.





    MDHHS – Health Care Providers #history #of #hospice #care

    #home health care providers

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    You are here

    1. MDHHS
    2. Doing Business with MDHHS
    3. Health Care Providers

    Health Care Providers


    • This website offers information for service providers, managed care organizations and trading partners related to healthcare programs administered by the Michigan Department of Community Health. Programs include Medicaid, Children’s Special Health Care Services, Children’s Waiver, Adult Benefits Waiver, MOMS, and Plan First!.

    This section is focused toward servicing providers and includes recent communications, participation information, Medicaid Provider Manual, draft and final policy bulletins, forms, billing instructions, fee screens, training opportunities, and other information relevant to providers.

    This section provides MCOs information regarding recent communications, participation, policies, contractual requirements, and encounter reporting.

    This section provides information regarding trading partner (authorized biller) requirements, enrollment, electronic claim submission, recent communications, and other information relevant to trading partners.





    Home Health Care Services, Elderly Care in New York NYC #best #deal

    #home healthcare services

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    A Quality Home Healthcare Agency for Your Loved One

    We Provide Excellent Concierge Home Care Services

    Concierge Home Care service ensures full coordination of care. Every client is assigned a dedicated Care Manager that works to facilitate communication between the client’s families, caregivers and other healthcare providers. We offer a list of ancillary services. including medical supply ordering, wealth management, pet services, massage therapy and more.

    We Hire the Best Caregivers in the Industry

    Our staff of Bachelors educated prepared Nurses stems from our relationships with some of the top hospitals in New York City, including New York Presbyterian and Weill-Cornell. Their experiences on the critical care floors of these hospitals provide our Nurses with applicable medical skills when they are in the home.

    Our recruiting philosophy, “The Grandma Rule ”, stems from Founder and CEO, Gregory Solometo’s personal experience with his own Grandmother who had suffered with dementia. When interviewing a potential Home Health Aide candidate, our recruiting team asks themselves, ”Could I see this caregiver taking care of my grandmother?” Learn more about our recruiting strategy .

    At Alliance Homecare we believe in hiring team members that maintain high standards. We care for our Home Health Aides and Nurses by paying 40%-100% more than industry average. Learn more about our intensive interviewing process ; with the last round of interviews ending with a one-on-one sit down with our CEO.

    Areas We Service

    Alliance Homecare provides high-quality service to Nassau. Suffolk, New York. Rockland and Westchester Counties.





    Hospice care and palliative care: What – s the difference? #benefits #of

    #palliative care versus hospice

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    Hospice care and palliative care: What s the difference?

    I’ve talked to hundreds of people about the health care options and decisions they face at the end of life. It’s a challenging time and understandably many have little knowledge, while others have misconceptions, and some have bitter disagreements.

    Here’s a basic primer for two common approaches: hospice and palliative care.

    Two myths about hospice care are prevalent. First, many people believe hospice is provided in a place like a hospital. While it’s true many hospices have residential facilities, hospice care is usually given at home.

    Second, people often believe that with hospice, there is no treatment but pain control. That’s not the case at all. Medical care will continue as before, except that further attempts to cure the major disease will stop. If a person gets a bladder infection, or pneumonia, for example, regular treatment will be available. If the person chooses to not go to a hospital for treatment of something like pneumonia, treatment at home will be offered. And if a breakthrough cure of the primary disease occurs, it will not be denied to the hospice patient.

    Often I am the first one to bring up hospice care with the patient or their family. As geriatricians, my colleagues and I see many people with incurable and late stage disease. (It’s important to know that hospice care is available for all ages, though.) For patients and families, electing hospice care means extra help for the family, and occasionally the provision of helpful equipment. We bring up hospice care when we believe the patient or family will benefit from these extra services.

    Sometimes it’s a touchy subject. I’ve been angrily yelled at by family who want the patient to keep trying for cure, to keep taking chemotherapy, to try more radiation, to go for more surgery or to some other country for some unproven therapy. We frequently think these family members are either uninformed or in denial. We sometimes wish they could feel their loved one’s nausea, weakness and confusion from hopeless chemotherapy, or their desperate struggle for air in advanced lung disease.

    Sometimes the cost of hospice is a concern. Medicare and most insurance companies cover hospice care. Hospice is covered under Medicare Part A. There is no deductible, and copayments are very low. The restriction is that care must be coordinated by the hospice team.

    Hospice care is defined fairly clearly by Medicare and other insurers. “Palliative care” seems more ambiguous – there is no standard definition – and is often less understood than hospice care. Palliative care is focused on making patients as comfortable as possible with an emphasis on maximizing the quality of daily life. It is provided in different ways. In our Palliative Care Consult Service, we provide suggestions to the regular treating physician and to the family, usually about pain and other symptoms. Our consult service often includes a social worker and a faith community representative.

    Bitter disagreements about end of life care come not only from family members but also from providers. About 15 years ago, when I was with the National Institute on Aging, I had a discussion with an oncologist who represented a professional society. He argued that there should be no limit on chemotherapy, up to the point of death. We discussed a new therapy that would add one month of life expectancy to a geriatric patient. His position was that regardless of the intense side effects it caused, it should be prescribed and encouraged. My position was it should be discussed with the patient, and if it is declined, that decision should be respected. Now years later, that controversy persists, not just among oncologists. Terminal care is also provided by pulmonologists, cardiologists, and generalists, for example, some of whom advocate intensive care to the end, while others respect the patient’s request for limited care.

    This basic primer is like a map. “There is North America, and there is Europe.” They are separated by an ocean, yet they have much in common. North America is like hospice, with clear boundaries. Palliative care may be more like Europe, which merges into Asia (which may be like “usual care”). Where one stops and the other begins is mostly a political decision, just like the separation of palliative vs. usual care.

    End of life care can be challenging, and the options may seem murky. In order to find their way, patients, family members and physicians might benefit from “GPS” systems, including helpful road side assistance to help them navigate these complex health care decisions. Definitions and primers are just the start of customizing this final journey.

    James Cooper is Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Care, George Washington University. He blogs on the Prepared Patient Forum .

    I apologize, but I m still a bit confused about the difference. Are the two types of care mutually exclusive? Or would hospices provide palliative care in addition to other services? If the latter, what additional services would a hospice provide?

    Or, if palliative care is just focused on alleviating symptoms, is it appropriate for people not facing the end of their lives?

    There are differences in the benefits you get with hospice vs palliative care. With hospice, the patient can receive help with home care (shopping, cleaning, laundry, etc.) without a skilled nursing need. With palliative care, that s not available unless there s a skilled nursing need (wound care, dressing changes, osteomy care, PT, OT, etc.) With hospice a physician must certify that in his/her opinion the life expectancy likely won t exceed 6 months (though there can be extensions). So, yes, hospice care does provide palliative care in addition to other services. The hospice approach is holistic and team based (as is palliative care). And home hospice refers to all of these services provided in the patient s home.

    Do you think that hospice care has resulted from the futility of certain medical treatments? do you believe that hospice care offers a non- medicalized dying process? Under what conditions would hospice care merge with paliative care? Do you think that the crucial factor would be the state of disease of the patient? What if the person is merely physically disabled?

    After almost 40 years as a respiratory therapist it has been my experience and those of many of my coworkers that the vast majority of family members are acting because of their own needs-frequently guilt or money. They think about how they feel, not how the patient feels. Even what the patient has specifically filled out a DNR order their family overrides it and the patient is subjected to days, weeks and sometimes even months of painful procedures that does not prolong life, it only prolongs death. Whoever wrote Americans think death is optional was so right

    Leslie, I believe fear is the biggest factor as many people want to do something to help and change the situation or turn the clock back. The hospice team can help to manage the difficulties that families have. While many make decisions that are in line with what they want, we can t fault them for the suffering that they are enduring while witnessing the decline and loss of someone in their lives. The navigating of the dynamics that help the loved ones are the true skills of the hospice team in addition to the relief of suffering through good pain and symptom management.

    I agree that people don t want this situation. I also agree that hospice people are wonderful and incredibly strong to do the stressful work that they do every day. I had hospice for my mother. I think that the physicians need to be more proactive in suggesting hospice. I think they need to eliminate the ideas that keeping a patient a full code will change the outcome. I m not saying that it is not difficult. I m saying that frequently it is difficult for the wrong reasons.





    Welcome to Our Home Health Care Agencies – Parrish Home Healthcare –

    #home healthcare nurse

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    Welcome to Our Home Health Care Agencies

    Parrish Home Healthcare (Parrish) is a network of home health care agencies including Parrish Home Healthcare . Our agencies are owned and operated by two nurses whose family name is Parrish and have over 33 years of expertise in home health care. Parrish knows the value of community home health care and its impact on the overall long-term effects to the patient’s disease management. Parrish is also acutely aware of home health care’s vital contribution in cost containment in relations to the total health care picture.

    Parrish strives to maintain the highest level of integrity in the delivery of home health care to your patients. Our standards dictate a thorough needs-analysis will be performed, as well as prompt reports and strict adherence to established care plans. The case manager or referring staff can be assured of prompt response, accurate evaluation, and thorough follow-up consistent with the physician s and family s expectations. Parrish guarantees our patients the highest quality of care, in accordance with the standard of practices developed by Medicare.

    Our Services include:

    • Skilled Nursing
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Medical Social Worker
    • Nutritionist
    • Speech Therapy
    • Certified Home Health Aide

    We Accept the Following Insurances:

    Michigan

    We look forward to serving you with professionalism and integrity.

    Parrish Home Health Care

    3500 W. Eleven Mile Rd Suite B
    Berkley, MI 48072
    Phone: 248-547-5778
    Fax: 248-547-6077

    Servicing Metro Detroit. Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Monroe, St. Clair, and Washtenaw Counties

    Servicing Western Michigan. Kalamazoo, Jackson and Calhoun Counties

    Contact Us

    © 2011-2015 Parrish Home Health Care
    LEGAL AND CIVIL RIGHTS COMPLIANT
    Our compliance is with Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504;
    Rehabilitation Act of 1973; Age Discrimination Act of 1975;
    American with Disabilities Act of 1990.

    Website Developed by Rezurected, LLC





    About health care #pediatric #hospice

    #about health care

    #

    6 September 2016 – Every 40 seconds someone dies by suicide. For each of one of those people, WHO estimates that at least another 20 attempt to take their own life. However, suicides are preventable. World Suicide Prevention Day, on 10 September, is an opportunity to find out what each of us can do to help prevent suicide.

    6 September 2016 – The interim guidance on prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus has been updated with new evidence and advice. The primary transmission route of Zika virus is via the Aedes mosquito, however mounting evidence shows that sexual transmission of Zika virus is possible and more common than previously assumed. This is of concern due to an association between the Zika virus and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    2 September 2016 — The fourth meeting of the Emergency Committee on Zika and microcephaly convened by the Director-General under the International Health Regulations (2005) regarding microcephaly, other neurological disorders and Zika virus was on 1 September 2016. The Committee agreed that Zika virus infection and its associated congenital and other neurological disorders continues to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

    30 August 2016 – In response to the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, WHO has issued new treatment guidelines for 3 common sexually transmitted infections: chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis. All 3 are generally curable with antibiotics, however they are becoming more difficult to treat, as some antibiotics are now failing due to misuse and overuse. The new recommendations are based on the latest available evidence.

    31 August 2016 — The Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations concerning yellow fever met today. It decided that the yellow fever outbreak in Angola and DRC does not constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Despite considerable progress, the outbreak remains a serious public health event that warrants continued action and international support.