Advanced Certification: Hospice Palliative Chaplain Certification – The National Association of Catholic

#hospice chaplain certification

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Advanced Certification:
Hospice Palliative Chaplain Certification

About Advanced Certification of Hospice Palliative Chaplaincy (ACHPC)

Palliative Medicine is a discipline that cultivates in each practitioner (nurse, physician, chaplain, social worker etc.) a servant’s heart and a sage’s mind. One’s effectiveness in this specialty can never be adequately assessed within a set of competencies and/or prescribed guidelines but rather in the human crucible of an integrated, interdisciplinary practice that draws equally from each one’s soulfulness as well as from each one’s skill and life experiences.

This specialty certification IS NOT about acquiring greater power or prestige, or mastering a particular set of skills/competencies or securing additional letters after one’s name, or delivering a stellar performance at the time of the interview.

This certification IS a special invitation for an individual candidate to go more deeply in one’s own spiritual life and to learn the way of the wounded healer – the way of authenticity, compassion, forgiveness, and healing. This disposition of mind and heart is cultivated from the inside out and flourishes in an environment where honesty, humility, and courage are in ample supply.

This certification process invites the candidate to befriend the blessing of paradox and begin to weave a tapestry of harmony within oneself (in solitude) and with others (in community). This process builds upon the foundational belief that “the patient and I are essentially the same” and in this actual ministering of one to the other (patient, family, staff, team members etc.) blest and broken, we become sacrament for each other and a living sign of God’s healing redemptive love in our world. Facilitation of this part of the certification assessment process will invite each candidate to draw from a living palette that evokes a blend of head and heart and is reflective of the human experience – both of the candidate and of those he/she serves.

The interview team will be interdisciplinary and will be specifically assessing the candidate for indications of ones’ personal integration and ongoing formation, as demonstrated by:

  • Major loss integration
  • Self-awareness understanding
  • Human to human availability
  • Understanding of relevant concepts
  • Team collaboration, leadership and education contributions

The interview team will discern together each applicant’s desire and capability to be a leader/innovator in recognizing and fostering an Interdisciplinary Team’s (IDT) continuing development in the areas of team respect, openness to new ideas and perspectives, and compassion for all involved in the palliative care/hospice arena. At the completion of the interview, the Interview Team votes to recommend or not to recommend the Applicant to the Certification Commission for certification. It is the decision of the Certification Commission to certify or not to certify.

PREREQUISITES

  • You must be a full member in good standing with the NACC.
  • You must be Board Certified as an NACC Chaplain or Supervisor.
  • You must have at least 500 hours of documented direct spiritual care ministry dedicated to palliative care or hospice (e.g. patient and family visits, ethics consultations, family conferences, medical record documentation).
  • You must have completed extensive education in the field of palliative care, hospice philosophy and/or thanatology.
  • You must have ten hours (not in succession) of direct clinical supervision or professional consultation regarding one’s personal and professional growth in palliative care or hospice ministry (conducted by the CPE supervisor or other member of the interdisciplinary team that provides supervision).

Upon contacting the office for you will receive:

  • The application for Advanced Certification as a Hospice Palliative Chaplain
  • The Checklist for Supportive Materials required for Advanced Certification as a Hospice Palliative Chaplain
  • NACC Certification Procedures Manual for Advanced Certification as Hospice Palliative Chaplain

The National Association of Catholic Chaplains advocates for the profession of spiritual care and educates, certifies, and supports chaplains, clinical pastoral educators, and all members who continue the healing ministry of Jesus in the name of the Church.





Perinatal Hospice – Catholic Stand: Catholic Stand #hospice #nurse

#perinatal hospice

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I first read about Perinatal Hospice in a newspaper article in about 2003; it was a new model of care that had been developed for families who were faced with life threatening diagnosis for their unborn babies and only a small handful of programs existed. It was first proposed by a (then) Army OB Physician who had to give his patients devastating news about their baby s health, but if the mom/parents chose not to abort, there wasn t really any support offered. A few really brave trailblazing parents set out alone on these paths, and we have a lot to thank them for.

My experience of Neonatal ICU, Hospice, and Pastoral Care prepared me well for the task. We had all the needed services, but weren t offering them to people until the day of delivery. Why not give people some lead time to consider and plan for their births?

I pitched the idea to my director in late 2004. We had our first patient in Dec 2005. When our program was added to the list of programs on perinatalhospice.org. it was only the 40th program in the world. Each case taught me so much and the quality of care evolved little by little.

In 2008, I was contacted by a woman who knew very early what her situation was and she was a planner. She and I had months to consider and plan her daughter s birth. Part of the plan was to have a professional photographer document the baby s life. The pictures were powerful and precious, and the family treasured them. I showed the photos to Nursing Students when they rotated through our unit, but I added a lot of verbal explanation. Then I wondered if I could ever create an educational video using text to explain the photos to help doctors and nurses see what that model of care might look like. After getting permission from the parents and photographer, I sat down on the 4th of July (I wasn t invited to any parties) and created this video in my kitchen. After A few tweaks and edits, I launched video on YouTube in July 2011.

I hoped that a lot of people would see it, but I m not sure what I defined as a lot back then.

One might think that the first language I would choose to translate the video into would be Spanish. However, I was first contacted by a Hospital in Poland who worked with me to create the Polish version then there were Czech, Japanese, Italian, Spanish and French versions. When I first learned that nurses were coming here from Japan to learn about the care, I cried with gratitude. It was shown at an International Japanese Midwifery conference in Tokyo, a gathering of 15,000 people in Ireland, and just last week to 225 doctors and nurses in Portugal. The 7 different versions have been seen over 70,000 times in 150 countries.

You would think that the video and program would have been criticized a great deal by abortion advocates. However, until recently, I only received criticism from prolifers who had developed the conspiracy theory that Perinatal Hospice was a stealth version of euthanasia (which it is not).

Yesterday, a link was posted on an article in The Irish Times (where it was wrongly and oddly credited to The American Perinatal Hospice Foundation that doesn t exist) and for the first time I saw it debated among abortion advocates who seemed to fear that people would be forced into using the program.

Which leads me to my point

I think that it is a good thing for people to know that this care is (or should be) available, because families and their babies who are sick and will likely die at birth need good, loving, competent, compassionate care. It s really that simple.

Those among us who are already disinclined to use abortion as a solution to illness in a preborn baby don t need any convincing. However, if we use a lot of polarizing, argumentative language around this topic, and advertise it as what prolifers do , we seriously risk alienating the people who come at this from a pre-existing place of uncertainty or aversion to the idea of maintaining a pregnancy when a baby is sick and those are the very people who need a gentle, respectful introduction to the topic.

For the most part, I really don t spend any of my time arguing about abortion and hospice care I simply offer good care, because it s good and it speaks for itself. When the topic of deciding comes up, what I normally say is I m an advocate for letting the babies tell their story regardless if their story is long or short. If you choose to share the video on any social media, I encourage you to let the message speak for itself and not do any grandstanding about the alternative.

I feel very thankful that I had this opportunity to share this idea with the world, an idea where love abounds and kindness is central, and people are cared for in a way that allows their torn and sad selves to heal. I see now that God spent years preparing me with a strange and varied set of skills and experiences in order to be able to put all the pieces together in the right place and at the right time.

I almost never cry in the middle of cases. Yet, when I think of babies that are cared for well and parents given safe places to parent their sweet babies, I cry at the thought that for some of the cases, God allowed me have a small part in their journey.

[video_lightbox_youtube video_id= tY7mq1g9pGk width= 640 height= 480 auto_thumb= 1 ]

Note: Respectfully, please refrain from using this video to pose arguments on the program or its mission as it relates to your position on Sanctity of Life issues. Thank you.

Tammy, this program that you facilitate and promote is perhaps the most beautiful love story ever written. God bless you, and those who join you, in all that you do to respect life with such dignity. Simply inspiring!

Thank you Diane.

When I meet with parents, there are preliminary things we talk about but at some point the crux of the situation is If you had one hour with your baby, what do you want to do with that hour? (and how can I advocate for you to make it possible?)

Recently I had a family where the dad was scared to participate int he birth and the doctor was new to the care. At the last minute the dad asked to go into the Operating Room and eventually we got his dying daughter into his arms. I told the doctor The reason he feels safe doing that is because we are here supporting him, he knows he can look up and ask for help and were there, we know what to do next so he can hold her now and be with her.

The grief from these cases is huge but I have found in life that regret is worse than grief. Helping them parent in that precious hour helps them walk away knowing that they parented valiantly and in being proud of that, they can heal easier.

In about 60 cases, we have had 2 surprise survivors they really weren t as sick as we expected and they are alive today. Without this as a care option and ongoing support, I doubt the parents would have felt safe continuing the pregnancies and they would have never known that their babies would have survived BUT I don t encourage people to consider this only for that reason the other 58 died as expected and they were loved and prayed for too. We have Intensive Care staff ready to step in and give care and treatments if the baby s condition turns out to be treatable, so planning Perinatal Hospice care doesn t prevent or preclude life saving therapies if it turns out that the baby might benefit from them.





Hospice, Morphine and Preparing for Traditional Catholic Death #motels #in #las #vegas

#catholic hospice

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The first Hospice was started by the Catholic Sisters of Charity in London England in 1905 to help people who did not have a place to die. It was called St. Joseph s hospice because St. Joseph is the patron of the dying. I think the sisters who founded it came from Ireland where there was a similar place. So it is wonderful to have help with terminally ill patients in their last days.

Hospice offers support to people who would like to die at home or die at one of their homes. They give medical advice and a visiting nurse comes once a week. You can call them 24 hours a day to get advice. But you still have to do almost all of the taking care of the sick person in all the day to day activities. Many think Hospice will do everything which is not true.

If you die at home and are signed up with Hospice, you just call them when the person has died and they do the pronouncement of death. This avoids the need to call the paramedics, who are obliged by law in many places, to do CPR on any person who dies at home. It also avoids having to have an autopsy with the coroner (sheriff Department). If someone dies suddenly at home you usually need an autopsy to rule out the possibility of any foul play.

All this said, Hospice has helped a lot of people. But recently it is changing to become an accomplice with Euthanasia. I say this because of the many many people I have done the funerals for and of whom I have visited in their homes under the supervision of Hospice.

An example of this is when we get the clergy record with the funeral, the cause of death put down is Alzheimer. Alzheimer does not kill anyone. Or we will see pneumonia. If you have pneumonia, you need to go to the hospital to get antibiotics, not put on hospice to die.

What happens many times is that the family is told that the patient should not drink or eat because they will aspirate. That means, food or liquids will go into their lungs and cause pneumonia. Well that is a danger, but besides dying from pneumonia, you can die from no water or food.

The Catholic Church s teaching is that you are to give ordinary things to a terminally ill person like medicine, water and food. You do not need to put in a feeding tube, unless it is advantage for the recovery of the sick person. You do not to be put on the breathing machine either or resuscitated. These are extraordinary means to keep people alive.

But people who are terminally ill and still have many months to live can not used things that will hasten their death just because some day it will arrive.

Two extremely important principles to remember are 1) Life is precious and should be sustained if at all possible and 2) Always do what the terminally ill patient wants as long as it is consistent with Catholic teaching. For example, if the terminally ill patient wants to be resuscitated after heart failure, or be intubated on a breathing machine, there is nothing wrong with that because Life is precious and the persons wishes should be respected.

Now the problem I and other priests have observed is that when people are on Hospice care, they push morphine to much. A healthy old man, whom I was visiting on a regular basis, was put on Hospice. He was agitated and out of his mind. But was not terminally ill. The hospice people got mad at the family for not giving him the morphine he refused to take. So often they tell the family that the person is in pain. I have asked many if they are in pain and they respond no. Yet Hospice insists on giving them morphine on the basis that more than likely they are in pain and not expressing it.

This is very dangerous, because the family taking care of the sick person or old person who is crazy with Alzheimer, get very tired. And when they are told by a medical authority, like Hospice, that they should give them morphine, people tend to give in and obey even when the patient is not terminally ill.

We traditional Catholics do not want to see terminally ill persons in pain. God has given us the gift of morphine to help relieve pain. It is a good. But the danger comes when it is used to put people in a drugged state, who are not dying, and then they can no longer pray, eat or drink.

Over and over again I try to hear confessions of people who have not gone to confession in years and want to confess as they lie dying. But because of the morphine, can not stay awake to confess. I shake them, I holler at them, anything I can do to get them to make a good confession. But it is very hard, because they keep falling asleep. Please call the priest before they are on morphine.

So if you are dying anyway from a terminal disease, it is fine to use pain killers to relieve the pain even it it might speed up the natural process. But it should only be used to relieve pain and not to control people with Alzheimer or other normal health conditions that come from old age.

All of us will be dying some day. Do we want to be put on morphine and drugged out of our state of consciousness? I do not think so. We need to have this very clear with all those who love us and will be caring for us in our old age.

All the saints dreaded being fooled by the devil at the last part of their holy lives by the devil. We who are by no means saints, should have more dread of being drugged out when that decisive moment happens as we approach death.

It is so important to have health care directives written out for your family to follow.

To summarize: we want to live as long as we can and until God calls us. We want to be alert and conscious as much as possible to pray as we make our final journey to God. We do not need extra ordinary means (machines or resuscitation). But food, water and medicine are ordinary means of keeping alive. We can take pain killers if they are needed, but need to balance this with our desire to be alert to pray and repent of our sins.

No related posts.





CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Hospice #breaffy #house #hotel

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Hospice

During the early centuries of Christianity the hospice was a shelter for the sick, the poor. the orphans. the old, the travellers and the needy of every kind. It dates back to reign of Constantine. Originally all hospices were under the supervision of the bishops who designated priests to administer the spiritual and temporal affairs of these charitable institutions. The fourteenth statute of the so called Fourth Council of Carthage. held about 436, enjoins upon the bishops to have hospices in connection with their churches ; “ut episcopus non longe ab ecclesi hospitiolum habeat” (Manai III, 952″). In course of time these hospices of general character ceased, and special establishments were erected for the particular needs of the people. The term hospice began to be applied only to institutions in which travellers were harboured. Such hospices were erected in impassable and uninhabited regions and on mountain passes. They were generally in charge of hermits or monks. Their number greatly increased when it became customary to make pilgrimages to the Holy Land, to Rome. Compostela. Amalfi and other sacred places. They were supported either by pious foundations or the liberality of the people, and gave food and shelter gratuitously, for a limited period of time. In many cities hospices were erected for the entertainment of pilgrims of particular nations. The most famous hospice in the world is that of the great St. Bernard of Switzerland. which was founded by St. Bernard of Menthon in 962. It is situated on the summit of the mountain of the same name, 8110 ft above the level of the sea, and harbours gratuitously 20,000-25,000 travellers every year. It is in charge of Canons Regular of St. Augustine. who are generally known as the monks of St. Bernard. At present it is occupied by 18 monks. eight being priests. On all the neighboring mountains they have erected small huts, which are connected to the hospice by telephone or electric bells. At the risk of their lives these monks. accompanied by their famous dogs, tour the mountains, which during nine months of the year are covered with deep snow, and search for travellers who may have lost their way or otherwise stand in need. Two canons regular, Contard and Glassey lost their lives on one of these tours on 19 November, 1874. The hospice that Napoleon founded on Mount Simplon in 1805 is also in charge of the monks of the Great St. Bernard. The hospice on the Little St. Bernard is since 1752 in charge of Italian monks.

Comments

Sources

RATEINGER, Geschichte der kirchlichten Armenpflege (Frieburg in Br. 1884), 139-146; LUQUET, Etudes historiques sue l’etablissement hosp, du Grand St. Bernard (Paris, 1857); DURAND, Le vrai conquerant des Alpes D. Bernard (Paris 1905).

About this page

APA citation. Ott, M. (1910). Hospice. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07475b.htm

MLA citation. Ott, Michael. “Hospice.” The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07475b.htm .

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by C.A. Montgomery.

Ecclesiastical approbation.Nihil Obstat. June 1, 1910. Remy Lafort, S.T.D. Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

Contact information. The editor of New Advent is Kevin Knight. My email address is webmaster at newadvent.org. Regrettably, I can’t reply to every letter, but I greatly appreciate your feedback especially notifications about typographical errors and inappropriate ads.

Copyright 2012 by Kevin Knight. Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.





NCAA College Football Fight Songs Music Index #fight #song, #music, #songs #college,


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FBS: FOOTBALL BOWL SUBDIVISION
(BCS & Other Division I Football Index Page)


Get the Best Fight Songs (HQ Stereo) on 20 Different Music CD’s. Please Help Support This Site.

Welcome to the “LARGEST” College Football Fight Song web site in the universe, where all the songs are now in MP3 format. I have always been a fan of college football and especially the Nittany Lions of Penn State. All the MP3’s on this site have been compressed 11 to 1 in size and reformatted in mono, all to help save webspace. It has been a rough ride these past 2-3 years as interest seems to hae waned a bit and it is more costly to keep the site up for FREE! And now certain schools like Miami (FL), Washington and Utah forced me to remove the school’s songs from the website, even though they are free to download and isn’t this kind of like FREE advertisement for those schools? And all those millions of dollars the football programs bring and to top that with the price of tuition, you would think they would want to share the songs with their alumni, current students and fans of those schools. If anyone can help, please do to get those songs back up and available on this site. I am also in the process of adding as many or all of the football schools from the FCS (Football Championship Subdivision). After completion, there will be well over 1,000 total songs for you FREE to download. I will also be reformatting all the music CD’s, moving teams to the correct conference CD and adding all the new schools, even the FCS schools.

Also, you will still be able to purchase your favorite school songs via email for $5 or less per school or per conference. Especially the FCS conferences, where 1-2 schools songs will be prevailant throughout. You will want the higher quality songs for your ringtone(s) on your cellphone and iPhones. But please don’t forget about the CD’s, they also help in the funding for this site or shopping at one of the sponsors on this site. And if you are not considering a purchase at this time, please consider a friendly donation of $10 or $20 or any value at that to make sure this website stays up and running for many years to come and into the future. Thank you very much for your continued support.

“Click” On Any Conference Logo To Visit That Page

Throw Me An Email

College Football Fight Music CD’s (21 Volumes)

My College Football Fight Music CD/MP3 Store has changed many times over the years as the NCAA Football Conference realignment is a never ending process as money dictates which schools play in the
(5) major BCS conferences and who play in the other FBS mid-major football conferences. My collection now contains 21 different CD’s, with Volumes 1 & 13 focus on all five of the power five conferences (ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, PAC-12, SEC and Notre Dame). These same conferences are also focused on: Volumes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 19, 20 and 14 (alma maters). The mid-major conferences, which now include the AAC, CONF-USA, MAC, MWC an the SUNBELT are representive on Volumes 9, 10, 11, 12 and 15 (alma maters). I also now have different fight music CD’s (Volumes 16, 17 and 18 (alma maters) focusing on the schools from the FCS (Football Championship Subdivision). Of course it is impossible to include all the songs on the CD’s, thats for both the FCS and FBS CD’s, so you can also purchase the individual songs from each college for only $1-$5 each depending on the number of songs I have available. And if you already purchased in the past, at least a donation would be of great help to me. To send a donation, just click on the PayPal banner just below. Thank you very much.

Greatest Original Oldies Music Ever Of All-Time

Your Chance To Purchase Unique Music Nowhere Else Available


Mercy Hospital of Buffalo – Buffalo, NY – Catholic Health #last #min

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Mercy Hospital of Buffalo

One of the Largest Hospitals in Western New York

Mercy Hospital of Buffalo, part of Catholic Health, is one of the largest hospitals in Western New York with the region s busiest emergency room (ER); our new $32 million ER is triple the size of our previous facility.

We are accredited by the Joint Commission, illustrating that we meet the highest quality and safety standards in our field.

Smoke-Free Campus

Please note that smoking is not permitted anywhere on Mercy Hospital property or its off-site locations. This smoke-free policy includes all buildings, parking areas, cars parked on hospital property, grounds and adjacent sidewalks.

I came to the Emergency room with severe chest pains. It turns out that I was in the midst of a heart attack.

I was immediately taken in and given excellent care from the ER staff, and I was then put into a room. The cardiologist and staff did a superb job. I had an angioplasty and a stent put in before I knew what was happening. I can tell you that the instant it was done, I felt the difference physically.

Having a heart attack at age 47 is a scary thing, but I truly felt that I was given the best care in Western New York.

Louis Croce





Online Catholic Schools Growing in Popularity #catholic #online #schools


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Online Catholic Schools Growing in Popularity

Catholic higher education has been provided online since 2010 by the Ignatius-Angelicum Liberal Studies Program (LSP). Rachel Daly, writing for Catholic Education Daily. draws from an interview with The Catholic World Report (CWR), during which program president Patrick Carmack, J.D. shared his thoughts on why online education is becoming more popular.

He explained that the LSP is an online, Catholic, generalist/liberal education. using the Great Books as primary texts combined with a deeper, more systematic concentration on the Catholic Faith .

Developed by Ignatius Press and the Angelicum Academy Home-School Program, it consists of eight six-credit classes in the Great Books, conducted in the Socratic style, and four three-credit classes taught through lectures and selected readings. The 60 credits are transferable to the college of the student s choice. They will be applied to the student s chosen degree and have been recommended for acceptance by the American Council on Education to its 1,600 affiliated colleges and universities.

As to the character of the program, Carmack was put off by the “dehumanizing element of technology that disembodies us to some degree, but admitted that in many cases it is the best option.

A few years ago some of us were meeting in Rome with Cardinal Grocholewski, Prefect of the Congregation for Catholic Education, and he related how numerous requests were made to the Congregation for Catholic institutions of higher education to be established in poorer countries, even Muslim ones such as Indonesia, but that the Congregation had no resources to respond to this need, and so that opportunity for evangelization was being missed. Online education can address this need at minimal cost, worldwide, and we are already engaged in that apostolate. I think this is a situation in which one can reasonably conclude that the dangers of modern technology are secondary to its obvious advantages.

Carmack brought up the numerous studies over the last decade which have shown that online education is equal to or better than an on-campus education, at least in terms of of measurable elements like grades. He also acknowledged that their online courses in theology were taught by Fr. Joseph Fessio, a student of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI.

For those who ask, Why the Great Books? , Carmack deferred to Dr. Mortimer Adler, a former philosophical adviser to the program.

“Dr. [Mortimer] Adler maintained that unless one were acquainted with such great, influential works one simply could not be considered well educated, nor understand the foundations of our society, its past, present or likely future.” He added that “the use of original texts is an antidote for survey courses and fifth-rate textbooks; and it constitutes, by itself, if properly conducted, the backbone of a liberal education.”

Carmack, in the original interview for the Catholic World Report. added that his ambivalence towards technology is best explained through something St. Thomas observed. While considered simply, one thing may be better than another, yet relatively, that may be reversed by circumstances.

Writing for the Catholic Review. George P. Matysek, Jr. reports on the Archdiocese of Baltimore s deep roots in Catholic education. This month a gathering at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Homeland, was a kickoff for the start of the school year and an opportunity to meet the first schools chancellor for Baltimore s Catholic schools. James Sellinger. His pledge is to visit schools, learn their challenges, and develop methods for making Catholic education stronger.

His job description includes marketing, enrollment, and seeing to the fiscal health of about 50 Catholic schools. Archbishop William E. Lori said that Catholic schools excel not because they have an abundance of money, but because they promote a learning environment marked by the truths, virtues, and values of the kingdom of the Beatitudes .

Popular News


Best Interest Rate on Senior Citizens Bank Fixed Deposits- July 2017 #fd


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Best Interest Rate on Senior Citizens Bank Fixed Deposits July 2017

Highest Interest Rate on Bank Fixed Deposits for Senior Citizens July 2017

The post lists down the rate of interest on Bank fixed deposits for Senior Citizens as of July 4, 2017.

You might want to bookmark this page as the FD interest rates would be updated every month. Would help you in better decision making.

Fixed Deposit Highlights:

  • Most banks offer FDs for tenure of 7 Days to 10 Years.
  • The Ratnakar Bank IDBI Bank do offer fixed deposits up to 20 years too .
  • For very short Term Deposits the interest rate is similar to that of Savings Account and so you should not worry about FD. Also Interest up to Rs 10,000 in Saving Account is Tax free .
  • Most banks compound interest quarterly
  • Banks offer Loan/Overdraft against the amount available in Fixed Deposit. The interest is generally 0.5% to 1% more than that offered to FD.
  • TDS (Tax deduction at source) at the rate of 10% is deducted, if the interest income is more than Rs 10,000 in financial year per bank. You can fill Form15G/H
  • You can fill Form15G/H if you want to avoid TDS .
  • There might be penalty for pre-mature withdrawal of Fixed Deposits

Fixed Deposit Interest Rates:

The highest interest rate is offered by The Deutsche Bank at 8.25% for 1 to 2 years Fixed Deposit.

For comparing the best interest rates on fixed deposits over different duration of investment, we have it divided into following 5 slabs:

  • FD for Less than 1 Year
  • FD for 1 to 2 years
  • FD for 2 to 5 Years
  • FD for 5 to 10 years
  • FD for More than 10 years

We show the highest interest rates on fixed deposits for the above duration buckets. We have also compared the best interest rates on offer by that being offered by State Bank of India (SBI), ICICI Bank and Post Offices.

Interest Rate (Senior Citizens) for FD Less than 1 Year:

The highest interest rate is offered by The Ratnakar Bank (241 days to 364 days) at 7.60% .

Shankar Iyer says:

I suppose there has to be an extensive study before stats are pur out esp. with reference to Ratnakar Bank. If you could check Varacha Bank, Surat Peoples Bank, Sutex Bank, Sarvoday Coop Bank ( all coop banks in Surrat) whose financials are available and NPAs are available for view. These give better returns than Ratnakar. Also, see Gujarat Rajya Karmachari Coop Bank. Investments upto Rs. 1 lac is insured. Also, the investor needs to be educated on the maneouveing of applicant names while opening accounts with coop banks, so that only the benefit of sr citizen is obtained, but the deposits are also insured.

I agree with your views and you can use various combinations of names of account holders to get benefit of deposit insurance. Historically co-operative banks have been riskier and so they offer higher interest rate. Also claiming insurance in case of default is not easy and it may take time. So it s individuals call weather to take risk for slightly higher interest rates.


CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Hospice #cheap #hotels #in #london

#catholic hospice

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Hospice

During the early centuries of Christianity the hospice was a shelter for the sick, the poor. the orphans. the old, the travellers and the needy of every kind. It dates back to reign of Constantine. Originally all hospices were under the supervision of the bishops who designated priests to administer the spiritual and temporal affairs of these charitable institutions. The fourteenth statute of the so called Fourth Council of Carthage. held about 436, enjoins upon the bishops to have hospices in connection with their churches ; “ut episcopus non longe ab ecclesi hospitiolum habeat” (Manai III, 952″). In course of time these hospices of general character ceased, and special establishments were erected for the particular needs of the people. The term hospice began to be applied only to institutions in which travellers were harboured. Such hospices were erected in impassable and uninhabited regions and on mountain passes. They were generally in charge of hermits or monks. Their number greatly increased when it became customary to make pilgrimages to the Holy Land, to Rome. Compostela. Amalfi and other sacred places. They were supported either by pious foundations or the liberality of the people, and gave food and shelter gratuitously, for a limited period of time. In many cities hospices were erected for the entertainment of pilgrims of particular nations. The most famous hospice in the world is that of the great St. Bernard of Switzerland. which was founded by St. Bernard of Menthon in 962. It is situated on the summit of the mountain of the same name, 8110 ft above the level of the sea, and harbours gratuitously 20,000-25,000 travellers every year. It is in charge of Canons Regular of St. Augustine. who are generally known as the monks of St. Bernard. At present it is occupied by 18 monks. eight being priests. On all the neighboring mountains they have erected small huts, which are connected to the hospice by telephone or electric bells. At the risk of their lives these monks. accompanied by their famous dogs, tour the mountains, which during nine months of the year are covered with deep snow, and search for travellers who may have lost their way or otherwise stand in need. Two canons regular, Contard and Glassey lost their lives on one of these tours on 19 November, 1874. The hospice that Napoleon founded on Mount Simplon in 1805 is also in charge of the monks of the Great St. Bernard. The hospice on the Little St. Bernard is since 1752 in charge of Italian monks.

Comments

Sources

RATEINGER, Geschichte der kirchlichten Armenpflege (Frieburg in Br. 1884), 139-146; LUQUET, Etudes historiques sue l’etablissement hosp, du Grand St. Bernard (Paris, 1857); DURAND, Le vrai conquerant des Alpes D. Bernard (Paris 1905).

About this page

APA citation. Ott, M. (1910). Hospice. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07475b.htm

MLA citation. Ott, Michael. “Hospice.” The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07475b.htm .

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by C.A. Montgomery.

Ecclesiastical approbation.Nihil Obstat. June 1, 1910. Remy Lafort, S.T.D. Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

Contact information. The editor of New Advent is Kevin Knight. My email address is webmaster at newadvent.org. Regrettably, I can’t reply to every letter, but I greatly appreciate your feedback especially notifications about typographical errors and inappropriate ads.

Copyright 2012 by Kevin Knight. Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.





Catholic hospice #palliative #care #nurse

#catholic hospice

#

Catholic Hospice

CONTACT INFO

Catholic Hospice is a not-for-profit health care organization providing end-of-life care to terminally ill patients and their families throughout Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe counties.

Catholic Hospice, a ministry of the Archdiocese of Miami is affiliated with Catholic Health Services and is dedicated to the preservation of the quality of life of people facing end of life issues.

They serve over 500 patients a day and provide spiritual and psychological support to over 1400 bereaved families regardless of race, religion, age, gender, ethnic background, handicap, diagnosis or financial resources.

Catholic Hospice also sponsors programs such as the L’chaim Jewish Hospice Program, Stars Program a Hospice Care for children and Camp Hope: A bereavement camp for children and other bereavement support groups.

Bereavement Support Groups

Bereavement Support Group Line: 305-351-7025

Bereavement Support Group for Adults – Spanish

St. Catherine’s West Rehabilitation Hospital
8850 North West 122nd Street, Hialeah Gardens, FL 33018
(Lobby � Conference Room)
Every Wednesday from 5:30 � 7:00 pm

Breast Cancer Survivor Support Group

St. Catherine’s Rehabilitation Hospital
8850 North West 122nd Street, Hialeah Gardens, FL 33018
(Lobby � Conference Room)
Every 3rd Monday of the month from 5:30 � 7:00 pm

Educational Support Group

Miami Springs Community Center
343 Payne Drive, Miami Springs, FL 33166
Every Two Months

Bereavement Support Group for Adults – Spanish

Prince of Peace Catholic Church
12800 North West 6th Street, Miami, Florida 33182
Every Thursday from 6:00 – 7:30 pm

Open Forum on Age-Related Issues

William Dickinson Community Center
1601 North Krome Avenue, Homestead, Florida 33030
2nd Tuesday of Every Month from 10:00 – 11:00 am

Bereavement Support Group

William Dickinson Community Center
1601 North Krome Avenue, Homestead, Florida 33030
3rd Tuesday of every month from 10:00 – 11:00 am

Caregiver Support Group for Adults � English

Mercy Hospital
3663 South Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33133
(6 Carroll, Room 6104)
Every Wednesday from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Adult Services/Cultural Arts

David Posnack Jewish Community Center
5850 S. Pine Island Rd, Davie, Florida 33328
Every Tuesday from 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Spousal Support Group – English

Holy Cross Hospital
Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center
1951 North East 47th Street, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308
1st Floor Conference Room
Every Thursday from 6:00 � 7:30 pm

Developing Coping Skills for Children

Hope Outreach Center
4700 South West 64th Avenue, Suite A, Davie, Florida 33314
Every Monday from 4:00 � 5:00 pm

Pet Loss Support Group

St. Catherine’s West Rehabilitation Hospital
8850 North West 122nd Street, Hialeah, Gardens, FL 33018
4th Thursday of the month from 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Please always call the Bereavement Support Group Line and leave a message before attending any support group for the first time. We will return your call to confirm and provide information. Thank you.

Offices & Ministries

Contact

Links

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Muslims Outnumber Christians in More than 30 Church Schools #british #muslims, #catholic


#

Muslims Outnumber Christians in More than 30 Church Schools

Muslims outnumber Christian pupils in more than 30 church schools nationwide, including one which proudly proclaims to have a “100 per cent Muslim population”.

The Church of England has estimated that around 20 of its schools have more Muslim than Christian background pupils, while according to the Catholic Education Service, about 15 Catholic schools said the same.

St. Thomas in Werneth, Oldham, has no Christian pupils according to its website, although the Rev Nick Andrewes, who chairs the school’s governors says that figure is “a little out of date”. While 98 per cent of pupils attending Staincliffe C of E Junior School in Batley, West Yorkshire, “come from a Muslim background”, according to its most recent religious inspection report in 2015.

The Rev Nigel Genders, the Church of England’s chief education officer, has told The Times that at Bishop Bridgeman C of E Primary School in Bolton, 90 per cent of pupils were Muslim.

He added: “Yet it feels like a Church of England school.”

He said: “It goes back to the principle that we are not faith schools serving a Christian population but church schools serving the local community.”

Although it is a requirement for both Catholic and CofE schools, which receive government funding, to have a daily act of collective worship that is recognisably Christian, many of the schools appear to be accommodating both Christian and Muslim practices.

Some have incorporated Islamic prayers into their worship acts and allow girls to wear headscarves as part of the official uniform.

All Saints Church of England Primary in Bradford sells hijabs to its pupils.

The website for St. Thomas’ school notes that the school observes “both Christian and Muslim festivals”, while Staincliffe holds shared assembly services with an imam and a parish priest, referred to as the “men in black”, each term.

Their Remembrance Day service includes Islamic as well as Christian prayers, and the school schedules staff training days to coincide with the Islamic festival Eid to improve its attendance ratings, because most Muslim pupils would expect not to attend on those days.

Staincliffe’s website gives its motto as “one team together”, and says it is proud to be “cohesive, inclusive and caring” and “a church school serving a majority Muslim community”.

Education experts have suggested that the schools be turned into secular schools to avoid pupils becoming confused.

Professor Alan Smithers, director of the centre for education at the University of Buckingham, said: “The Church of England has traditionally provided education in this country but now that risks being an uncomfortable experience for the Muslim pupils that fill many of these schools.

“It must also be very confusing for the handful of Christian pupils in some of them. It would seem logical these schools become secular institutions.”

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Hospice Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – Catholic Hospice Pittsburgh #virginia #beach #hotels

#catholic hospice

#

Our Prayer

Dear Heavenly Father, As we offer ourselves to do Your will, We desire our hands to touch in gentleness. Our eyes to see with love. Our hearts to beat with compassion. And our lips to speak peace and comfort To those who are entrusted to our care. And whether great or small, Help us to minister to those who Are on their final journey Home to You Amen

Personal Attention, You Have a Choice!

This time of life is an invaluable time for living! A time for both personal and spiritual growth spent with loved ones family and friends.

At Catholic Hospice Palliative Services, we never lose sight of the person behind the illness. We help individuals feel that they matter, that they are cared for, and that even with illness they can still make a valuable contribution to the lives of their families and loved ones.

Unlike the majority of hospices serving the Pittsburgh area, Catholic Hospice Palliative Services is a not-for-profit hospice program. This allows Catholic Hospice Palliative Services team members the opportunity to focus on the patient, and not the bottom line. Catholic Hospice Palliative Services serves people of all faiths, embracing the whole person – body, mind and soul.

Founded by hospice professionals who truly understand the sacred journey of their patients, Catholic Hospice Palliative Services believes that, much like the care we receive as newborns when entering this world, we deserve the same love, care and comfort at end of life. It’s about focusing on the quality of life each and every day.

Message from our founder

When Dame Cicely Saunders, mother of the modern day hospice movement
read more





Hospice, Morphine and Preparing for Traditional Catholic Death #palliative #care #uk

#catholic hospice

#

The first Hospice was started by the Catholic Sisters of Charity in London England in 1905 to help people who did not have a place to die. It was called St. Joseph s hospice because St. Joseph is the patron of the dying. I think the sisters who founded it came from Ireland where there was a similar place. So it is wonderful to have help with terminally ill patients in their last days.

Hospice offers support to people who would like to die at home or die at one of their homes. They give medical advice and a visiting nurse comes once a week. You can call them 24 hours a day to get advice. But you still have to do almost all of the taking care of the sick person in all the day to day activities. Many think Hospice will do everything which is not true.

If you die at home and are signed up with Hospice, you just call them when the person has died and they do the pronouncement of death. This avoids the need to call the paramedics, who are obliged by law in many places, to do CPR on any person who dies at home. It also avoids having to have an autopsy with the coroner (sheriff Department). If someone dies suddenly at home you usually need an autopsy to rule out the possibility of any foul play.

All this said, Hospice has helped a lot of people. But recently it is changing to become an accomplice with Euthanasia. I say this because of the many many people I have done the funerals for and of whom I have visited in their homes under the supervision of Hospice.

An example of this is when we get the clergy record with the funeral, the cause of death put down is Alzheimer. Alzheimer does not kill anyone. Or we will see pneumonia. If you have pneumonia, you need to go to the hospital to get antibiotics, not put on hospice to die.

What happens many times is that the family is told that the patient should not drink or eat because they will aspirate. That means, food or liquids will go into their lungs and cause pneumonia. Well that is a danger, but besides dying from pneumonia, you can die from no water or food.

The Catholic Church s teaching is that you are to give ordinary things to a terminally ill person like medicine, water and food. You do not need to put in a feeding tube, unless it is advantage for the recovery of the sick person. You do not to be put on the breathing machine either or resuscitated. These are extraordinary means to keep people alive.

But people who are terminally ill and still have many months to live can not used things that will hasten their death just because some day it will arrive.

Two extremely important principles to remember are 1) Life is precious and should be sustained if at all possible and 2) Always do what the terminally ill patient wants as long as it is consistent with Catholic teaching. For example, if the terminally ill patient wants to be resuscitated after heart failure, or be intubated on a breathing machine, there is nothing wrong with that because Life is precious and the persons wishes should be respected.

Now the problem I and other priests have observed is that when people are on Hospice care, they push morphine to much. A healthy old man, whom I was visiting on a regular basis, was put on Hospice. He was agitated and out of his mind. But was not terminally ill. The hospice people got mad at the family for not giving him the morphine he refused to take. So often they tell the family that the person is in pain. I have asked many if they are in pain and they respond no. Yet Hospice insists on giving them morphine on the basis that more than likely they are in pain and not expressing it.

This is very dangerous, because the family taking care of the sick person or old person who is crazy with Alzheimer, get very tired. And when they are told by a medical authority, like Hospice, that they should give them morphine, people tend to give in and obey even when the patient is not terminally ill.

We traditional Catholics do not want to see terminally ill persons in pain. God has given us the gift of morphine to help relieve pain. It is a good. But the danger comes when it is used to put people in a drugged state, who are not dying, and then they can no longer pray, eat or drink.

Over and over again I try to hear confessions of people who have not gone to confession in years and want to confess as they lie dying. But because of the morphine, can not stay awake to confess. I shake them, I holler at them, anything I can do to get them to make a good confession. But it is very hard, because they keep falling asleep. Please call the priest before they are on morphine.

So if you are dying anyway from a terminal disease, it is fine to use pain killers to relieve the pain even it it might speed up the natural process. But it should only be used to relieve pain and not to control people with Alzheimer or other normal health conditions that come from old age.

All of us will be dying some day. Do we want to be put on morphine and drugged out of our state of consciousness? I do not think so. We need to have this very clear with all those who love us and will be caring for us in our old age.

All the saints dreaded being fooled by the devil at the last part of their holy lives by the devil. We who are by no means saints, should have more dread of being drugged out when that decisive moment happens as we approach death.

It is so important to have health care directives written out for your family to follow.

To summarize: we want to live as long as we can and until God calls us. We want to be alert and conscious as much as possible to pray as we make our final journey to God. We do not need extra ordinary means (machines or resuscitation). But food, water and medicine are ordinary means of keeping alive. We can take pain killers if they are needed, but need to balance this with our desire to be alert to pray and repent of our sins.

No related posts.





Advanced Certification: Hospice Palliative Chaplain Certification – The National Association of Catholic

#hospice chaplain certification

#

Advanced Certification:
Hospice Palliative Chaplain Certification

About Advanced Certification of Hospice Palliative Chaplaincy (ACHPC)

Palliative Medicine is a discipline that cultivates in each practitioner (nurse, physician, chaplain, social worker etc.) a servant’s heart and a sage’s mind. One’s effectiveness in this specialty can never be adequately assessed within a set of competencies and/or prescribed guidelines but rather in the human crucible of an integrated, interdisciplinary practice that draws equally from each one’s soulfulness as well as from each one’s skill and life experiences.

This specialty certification IS NOT about acquiring greater power or prestige, or mastering a particular set of skills/competencies or securing additional letters after one’s name, or delivering a stellar performance at the time of the interview.

This certification IS a special invitation for an individual candidate to go more deeply in one’s own spiritual life and to learn the way of the wounded healer – the way of authenticity, compassion, forgiveness, and healing. This disposition of mind and heart is cultivated from the inside out and flourishes in an environment where honesty, humility, and courage are in ample supply.

This certification process invites the candidate to befriend the blessing of paradox and begin to weave a tapestry of harmony within oneself (in solitude) and with others (in community). This process builds upon the foundational belief that “the patient and I are essentially the same” and in this actual ministering of one to the other (patient, family, staff, team members etc.) blest and broken, we become sacrament for each other and a living sign of God’s healing redemptive love in our world. Facilitation of this part of the certification assessment process will invite each candidate to draw from a living palette that evokes a blend of head and heart and is reflective of the human experience – both of the candidate and of those he/she serves.

The interview team will be interdisciplinary and will be specifically assessing the candidate for indications of ones’ personal integration and ongoing formation, as demonstrated by:

  • Major loss integration
  • Self-awareness understanding
  • Human to human availability
  • Understanding of relevant concepts
  • Team collaboration, leadership and education contributions

The interview team will discern together each applicant’s desire and capability to be a leader/innovator in recognizing and fostering an Interdisciplinary Team’s (IDT) continuing development in the areas of team respect, openness to new ideas and perspectives, and compassion for all involved in the palliative care/hospice arena. At the completion of the interview, the Interview Team votes to recommend or not to recommend the Applicant to the Certification Commission for certification. It is the decision of the Certification Commission to certify or not to certify.

PREREQUISITES

  • You must be a full member in good standing with the NACC.
  • You must be Board Certified as an NACC Chaplain or Supervisor.
  • You must have at least 500 hours of documented direct spiritual care ministry dedicated to palliative care or hospice (e.g. patient and family visits, ethics consultations, family conferences, medical record documentation).
  • You must have completed extensive education in the field of palliative care, hospice philosophy and/or thanatology.
  • You must have ten hours (not in succession) of direct clinical supervision or professional consultation regarding one’s personal and professional growth in palliative care or hospice ministry (conducted by the CPE supervisor or other member of the interdisciplinary team that provides supervision).

Upon contacting the office for you will receive:

  • The application for Advanced Certification as a Hospice Palliative Chaplain
  • The Checklist for Supportive Materials required for Advanced Certification as a Hospice Palliative Chaplain
  • NACC Certification Procedures Manual for Advanced Certification as Hospice Palliative Chaplain

The National Association of Catholic Chaplains advocates for the profession of spiritual care and educates, certifies, and supports chaplains, clinical pastoral educators, and all members who continue the healing ministry of Jesus in the name of the Church.





Most Holy Redeemer Catholic Church – The All Inclusive Catholic Church in

#holy redeemer hospice

#

Our Mission Statement at Most Holy Redeemer

Most Holy Redeemer Parish is a Christian Community in the Roman Catholic tradition. The parish draws people from isolation to community, from searching to awakening, from indifference to concern, from selfishness to meaningful service, from fear in the midst of adversity to faith and hope in God.

The community of Most Holy Redeemer shares God s compassionate love with all people. The parish offers a spiritual home to all: senior citizens and youth; single people and families; those who are straight, gay, lesbian, and transgendered; the healthy and the sick, particularly persons with HIV disease.

As a parish community, we celebrate God s loving presence in our lives. In worship and sacrament, especially the Eucharist, we are nurtured and challenged to extend God s kingdom of justice, truth, love and peace by growing in the spirit of Jesus, the Most Holy Redeemer.

Most Holy Redeemer is teaming up with International Rescue Committee to collect household and other items for refugee welcome boxes. We will be collecting donated items at the weekend Masses beginning September 10th and 11th. These welcoming boxes can make a refugee family s house feel like a home. Please click on the flyer to see what items we will be collecting.






RCIA Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults begins with inquiry September 7th and 14th by appointmetn and session begins September 28th at 7pm in the rectory.

Saturday, September 10th: Free Women s Vocal Workshop conducted by our own Sabrina Romero-Wilson 11am to 1:30pm in the church Workshop is open to the public and all are welcome.

Saturday, September 11th: The annual MHR Parish BBQ in the Garden after the 10am Mass.

Saturday, September 24th: Liturgical Ministers Workshop 9am to 1pm in Ellard Hall This workshop is for Most Holy Redeemer Acolyte, Eucharistic Minister, Hospitality and Lector Ministries.





Hospice, Morphine and Preparing for Traditional Catholic Death #low #price #hotel

#catholic hospice

#

The first Hospice was started by the Catholic Sisters of Charity in London England in 1905 to help people who did not have a place to die. It was called St. Joseph s hospice because St. Joseph is the patron of the dying. I think the sisters who founded it came from Ireland where there was a similar place. So it is wonderful to have help with terminally ill patients in their last days.

Hospice offers support to people who would like to die at home or die at one of their homes. They give medical advice and a visiting nurse comes once a week. You can call them 24 hours a day to get advice. But you still have to do almost all of the taking care of the sick person in all the day to day activities. Many think Hospice will do everything which is not true.

If you die at home and are signed up with Hospice, you just call them when the person has died and they do the pronouncement of death. This avoids the need to call the paramedics, who are obliged by law in many places, to do CPR on any person who dies at home. It also avoids having to have an autopsy with the coroner (sheriff Department). If someone dies suddenly at home you usually need an autopsy to rule out the possibility of any foul play.

All this said, Hospice has helped a lot of people. But recently it is changing to become an accomplice with Euthanasia. I say this because of the many many people I have done the funerals for and of whom I have visited in their homes under the supervision of Hospice.

An example of this is when we get the clergy record with the funeral, the cause of death put down is Alzheimer. Alzheimer does not kill anyone. Or we will see pneumonia. If you have pneumonia, you need to go to the hospital to get antibiotics, not put on hospice to die.

What happens many times is that the family is told that the patient should not drink or eat because they will aspirate. That means, food or liquids will go into their lungs and cause pneumonia. Well that is a danger, but besides dying from pneumonia, you can die from no water or food.

The Catholic Church s teaching is that you are to give ordinary things to a terminally ill person like medicine, water and food. You do not need to put in a feeding tube, unless it is advantage for the recovery of the sick person. You do not to be put on the breathing machine either or resuscitated. These are extraordinary means to keep people alive.

But people who are terminally ill and still have many months to live can not used things that will hasten their death just because some day it will arrive.

Two extremely important principles to remember are 1) Life is precious and should be sustained if at all possible and 2) Always do what the terminally ill patient wants as long as it is consistent with Catholic teaching. For example, if the terminally ill patient wants to be resuscitated after heart failure, or be intubated on a breathing machine, there is nothing wrong with that because Life is precious and the persons wishes should be respected.

Now the problem I and other priests have observed is that when people are on Hospice care, they push morphine to much. A healthy old man, whom I was visiting on a regular basis, was put on Hospice. He was agitated and out of his mind. But was not terminally ill. The hospice people got mad at the family for not giving him the morphine he refused to take. So often they tell the family that the person is in pain. I have asked many if they are in pain and they respond no. Yet Hospice insists on giving them morphine on the basis that more than likely they are in pain and not expressing it.

This is very dangerous, because the family taking care of the sick person or old person who is crazy with Alzheimer, get very tired. And when they are told by a medical authority, like Hospice, that they should give them morphine, people tend to give in and obey even when the patient is not terminally ill.

We traditional Catholics do not want to see terminally ill persons in pain. God has given us the gift of morphine to help relieve pain. It is a good. But the danger comes when it is used to put people in a drugged state, who are not dying, and then they can no longer pray, eat or drink.

Over and over again I try to hear confessions of people who have not gone to confession in years and want to confess as they lie dying. But because of the morphine, can not stay awake to confess. I shake them, I holler at them, anything I can do to get them to make a good confession. But it is very hard, because they keep falling asleep. Please call the priest before they are on morphine.

So if you are dying anyway from a terminal disease, it is fine to use pain killers to relieve the pain even it it might speed up the natural process. But it should only be used to relieve pain and not to control people with Alzheimer or other normal health conditions that come from old age.

All of us will be dying some day. Do we want to be put on morphine and drugged out of our state of consciousness? I do not think so. We need to have this very clear with all those who love us and will be caring for us in our old age.

All the saints dreaded being fooled by the devil at the last part of their holy lives by the devil. We who are by no means saints, should have more dread of being drugged out when that decisive moment happens as we approach death.

It is so important to have health care directives written out for your family to follow.

To summarize: we want to live as long as we can and until God calls us. We want to be alert and conscious as much as possible to pray as we make our final journey to God. We do not need extra ordinary means (machines or resuscitation). But food, water and medicine are ordinary means of keeping alive. We can take pain killers if they are needed, but need to balance this with our desire to be alert to pray and repent of our sins.

No related posts.





Catholic Considerations – Americare Hospice AZ #hotel #click

#catholic hospice

#

Catholic Considerations

As the first Catholic Hospice in the Diocese of Phoenix, we are equipped to provide the ministry that Catholics need as they face a life-limiting illness. The support is extended to the families and caregivers as they struggle to cope with their loved ones decline. As a hospice organization locally owned and operated by practicing Catholics, we understand the spiritual services our Catholic patients seek in end-of-life care.

Our Catholic Priest, Fr. Michael Reinhardt, visits patients to offer the Sacraments of Penance, Anointing of the Sick, and the Eucharist. As a Hospice Chaplain, Fr. Reinhardt provides spiritual counseling and support, bringing the healing presence of Jesus to the bedside. Fr. Reinhardt is also available to celebrate funeral masses, officiate memorial services, and provide guidance on proper Catholic burial.

To aide in spiritual comfort, our Catholic patients receive Sacred Support bags containing blessed sacramentals such as a Crucifix, Rosary, and the Brown Scapular of our Lady of Mount Carmel. As we encourage patients and their loved ones to pray, the Sacred Support bag also includes the guide to praying the Rosary and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy.

Our Catholic Mission Coordinator, Bobi Martinez, serves as a liaison between patients and their local parishes. If a patient wishes to receive Holy Communion regularly, Bobi diligently makes the arrangement with Pastoral Care of the local parish. She is also available to visit and pray with patients, as well as answer any questions regarding Catholic Hospice and our services.

As Catholics, we believe in the importance and the power of the Sacraments and sacramentals in bringing us reconciliation and comfort. During this critical period, we pray to be instruments used by the Lord to bring about a peaceful death.

We are closest to heaven when we re with the dying, because that s when Jesus and Mary are coming down to pick up the soul. Blessed Mother Teresa

The Villa Inpatient Unit



Americare Hospice & Palliative Care

1212 N. Spencer St, Suite
Mesa. AZ 85203

Phone: (480) 726-7773
Fax: (480) 726-7790

Americare Hospice & Palliative Care is a Phoenix Diocese-approved Catholic organization dedicated to serving people of all faiths.

© 2016 Americare Hospice & Palliative Care