Affordable Self Storage in Hampton, VA #affordable #self #storage, #reviews, #ratings, #recommendations,


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Affordable Self Storage

Information about this business (4 )

6 locations to serve you6 va locations to serve youavailable-boxes andceilings-truckscobbs creek shacklefordcontrolled unites-highgloucester matthews hampton poquoson safe-clean-climatethe friendlier morethe friendlier more affordable alternative 223910attr:climate controlledstorage household & commercial

Posted on May 08, 2015. Brought to you by localcom.

Affordable Storage Inc is located at the address 1635 W Pembroke Ave Ste A in Hampton, Virginia 23661. They can be contacted via phone at (757) 723-6551 for pricing, hours and directions.

Affordable Storage Inc has an annual sales volume of 0 – 500K. For more information contact Dan Bolkhel, Owner or go to www.affordablestorageva.com

Affordable Storage Inc provides Dry Storage Units, Self.

Posted on September 02, 2014. Brought to you by chamberofcommerce.

We offer self storage to keep your personal items safe while you are moving, haveing work done to the house, TDY, or just need a place to put your access items till you can make room for them. We are open 7 days a week and will stay later if needed to assist with your move in. We are the friendlier more affordable storage company.

Posted on July 20, 2014. Brought to you by facebook.

Posted by Anonymous on June 30, 2009. Brought to you by merchantcircle.

Average Rating 20

I rented a unit for one month back in July 2007. As of today, March 4, 2008, I have not received my $10.00 deposit. I have spoken to them several times. I will not stop until I get my money. Are there others who have not gotten their deposit?

Posted by jj9801 on March 03, 2008. Brought to you by localguides.

Business description (5) view all

Affordable Storage can be found at W Pembroke Ave 1635. The following is offered: Warehouse Storage. The entry is present with us since Sep 9, 2010 and was last updated on Nov 14, 2013. In Hampton there are 6 other Warehouse Storage. An overview can be found here.

Posted on September 20, 2015. Brought to you by opendius.

Business, Climate Controlled, Home, Packing Supplies, Personal

Posted on November 03, 2014. Brought to you by merchantcircle.


Alaska s permafrost is filling the air with carbon dioxide, worsening climate


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We all knew this was coming : Alaska s thawing soils are now pouring carbon dioxide into the air

Even as the Trump administration weighs withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate agreement, a new scientific paper has documented growing fluxes of greenhouse gases streaming into the air from the Alaskan tundra, a long-feared occurrence that could worsen climate change.

The new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that frozen northern soils — often called permafrost — are unleashing an increasing amount of carbon dioxide into the air as they thaw in summer or subsequently fail to refreeze as they once did, particularly in late fall and early winter.

“Over a large area, we’re seeing a substantial increase in the amount of CO2 that’s coming out in the fall,” said Roisin Commane, a Harvard atmospheric scientist who is the lead author of the study. The research was published by 19 authors from a variety of institutions, including NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The study, based on aircraft measurements of carbon dioxide and methane and tower measurements from Barrow, Alaska, found that from 2012 through 2014, the state emitted the equivalent of 220 million tons of carbon dioxide gas into the atmosphere from biological sources (the figure excludes fossil fuel burning and wildfires). That’s an amount comparable to all the emissions from the U.S. commercial sector in a single year.

The chief reason for the greater CO2 release was that as Alaska has warmed up, emissions from once frozen tundra in winter are increasing — presumably because the ground is not refreezing as quickly.

“The soils are warmer deeper, and as they freeze in the fall, the temperature of every soil depth has to come to zero before they hard freeze,” Commane said. “The temperature has to come to zero and equilibrate, for the soils to freeze hard through. And through that whole period you have emissions because the microbe are active.”

In particular, the research found that since 1975, there has been a 73.4 percent increase in the amount of carbon lost from the Alaskan tundra in the months of October through December as the climate warmed steadily.

The new study is “the first to show that a large region of the Arctic is a carbon source and that this change is driven by increased carbon emissions during the winter,” said Sue Natali, a permafrost researcher with the Woods Hole Research Center, who was not involved in the study. “Because the models aren’t capturing these cold-season processes, we’re very likely underestimating carbon losses from the Arctic under current and future climate scenarios.”

The fears about permafrost carbon losses are based on some simple chemistry. Unlike at warmer latitudes, where microorganisms in the soil constantly break down plant matter and return the carbon it contains to the atmosphere, Arctic soils have been cold enough to preserve the frozen remains of ancient plant life. But as the planet warms, soil microbes become able to break down more and more of this carbon, sending it back into the atmosphere and worsening global warming in a troubling feedback loop.

Some scientists, however, held out hope that there would be a key offsetting process: As the Arctic warms, it might also stow away more carbon as it becomes greener and supports the additional plant life, particularly in tundra regions. This “Arctic greening ” is indeed occurring, but the new research suggests that the permafrost losses in early winter are more than enough to offset that.

“There is greening going on, but it seems like you run out of the sunlight so far north, so it doesn’t matter how much greening there is, eventually, the plants just run out of light,” Commane said. “It appears now that the microbes are winning.”

The new study contrasts with a 2016 study by the U.S. Geological Survey, which had found that Alaska was acting as a net carbon “sink” at the moment — removing more carbon from the air than it is emitting — and that this should continue and expand over the course of the century as plant growth increases.

One of the lead authors of that research, Dave McGuire of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks and USGS, said the new study is “not the final word, but it is a significant step forward.” McGuire pointed out that the new study looks at the years 2012 to 2014, whereas the 2016 USGS study looked at earlier years and ended in 2009, making an “apples to apples” comparison difficult.

Alaska is only one area of the Arctic where permafrost soils could be emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Permafrost regions in Canada and Siberia are even vaster. But the new study’s lessons could also apply to those areas, researchers say.

The study “shows that the Alaska region, which may be representative of large swaths of boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes elsewhere, appear to be releasing net carbon to the atmosphere, in particular with stimulated emissions in the fall/early winter period,” said Ted Schuur, an ecologist at Northern Arizona University, who was not involved in the research.

“We all knew this was coming, but I’m surprised that we can even see it now,” Commane said.


Access: Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching: Nature #nature, #science, #science #news, #biology,


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Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching

Victoria Gomez-Roldan 1. Soraya Fermas 2. Philip B. Brewer 3. Virginie Puech-Pag s 1. Elizabeth A. Dun 3. Jean-Paul Pillot 2. Fabien Letisse 4. Radoslava Matusova 5. Saida Danoun 1. Jean-Charles Portais 4. Harro Bouwmeester 5. 6. Guillaume B card 1. Christine A. Beveridge 3. 7. 8. Catherine Rameau 2. 8 Soizic F. Rochange 1. 8

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence that carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 shoot branching mutants of pea are strigolactone deficient and that strigolactone application restores the wild-type branching phenotype to ccd8 mutants. Moreover, we show that other branching mutants previously characterized as lacking a response to the branching inhibition signal also lack strigolactone response, and are not deficient in strigolactones. These responses are conserved in Arabidopsis. In agreement with the expected properties of the hormonal signal, exogenous strigolactone can be transported in shoots and act at low concentrations. We suggest that endogenous strigolactones or related compounds inhibit shoot branching in plants. Furthermore, ccd8 mutants demonstrate the diverse effects of strigolactones in shoot branching, mycorrhizal symbiosis and parasitic weed interaction.

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

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Planning underway for Mendenhall Glacier visitor center improvements #climate #change,cruise #ship,emission,glacier,greenhouse #gas,intergovernmental


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Planning underway for Mendenhall Glacier visitor improvements

View of the staging lot for waiting buses at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)

Managers of Juneau s most popular tourist attraction say they’re planning for a more sustainable facility, even as the very object of many a visitors fascination continues retreating at a faster rate because of climate change.

Most of the $415,000 dollars for drafting a master plan for the U.S. Forest Service s Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center comes from the Federal Highway Administration. The plan may address everything from Glacier Spur Road access to improving parking, culverts, trails and other outdoor areas, and even heat loss from the large, inefficient windows at the Visitor Center.

Visitor Center Director John Neary briefly explained the plan during a press conference Tuesday about potential impacts to the Alaska tourism industry from climate change.

It seems like a no-brainer to me, Neary said.

We have people coming on cruise ships that are belching emissions that are contributing (to climate change), and they get on diesel buses that are belching emissions, and they land at the glacier, and get off, and they see this glacier, and they’re not making the connection between everything they’ve just done and what they’re seeing before them.

Neary went into more detail during an interview with KTOO immediately after the teleconferenced presentation. He’s open to ideas such as reconstruction of a Nugget Creek hydroelectric project that served miners a century ago, closing off the end of Glacier Spur Road and using an electric circulator or tram to transport visitors from a parking lot to the Center, and offering incentives for tour companies to electrify their bus fleet.

Passengers board a bus at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center on Tuesday. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)

Such as, if we were to provide plug in stations for those buses with electricity at competitive rates, and with those stations offering the best parking spot that is available.

Neary points out that the Mendenhall Glacier is the most popular tourism destination with 450,000 visitors, or almost half of the total number of cruise ship passengers that visit Juneau each year. Of that number, about 10,000 visitors to the glacier are locals. He also said companies can’t sell trips to other destinations in Juneau (like the DIPAC hatchery, for example) unless the Mendenhall Glacier is included in the package.

Neary admits that achieving zero-net energy and zero-net waste at the Visitor Center, or entirely eliminating carbon emissions would be extremely difficult, if not impossible. But that’s not the ultimate goal anyway. He said their job as interpreters is about making that link, or connecting people to the landscape in a way that they never had thought about before.

We’re not making the fact that ‘You are the cause of the retreating glacier. You and everyone else.’ We all collectively need to address this. And a starting point would be right here at this Visitor Center.

He hopes that visitors will then go home, start a discussion, and take action in their own community.

Neary said they’ll finish the plan and have priorities identified by next spring. Implementation of the plan, however, may take years and a lot more funding.

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  • Missouri Laws On Wrongful Death and Survival #public #health #law, #medical #law,


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    Missouri Laws On Wrongful Death and Survival

    537.080. Action for wrongful death–who may sue–limitation

    1. Whenever the death of a person results from any act, conduct, occurrence, transaction, or circumstance which, if death had not ensued, would have entitled such person to recover damages in respect thereof, the person or party who, or the corporation which, would have been liable if death had not ensued shall be liable in an action for damages, notwithstanding the death of the person injured, which damages may be sued for:

    (1) By the spouse or children or the surviving lineal descendants of any deceased children, natural or adopted, legitimate or illegitimate, or by the father or mother of the deceased, natural or adoptive;

    (2) If there be no persons in class (1) entitled to bring the action, then by the brother or sister of the deceased, or their descendants, who can establish his or her right to those damages set out in section 537.090 because of the death;

    (3) If there be no persons in class (1) or (2) entitled to bring the action, then by a plaintiff ad litem. Such plaintiff ad litem shall be appointed by the court having jurisdiction over the action for damages provided in this section upon application of some person entitled to share in the proceeds of such action. Such plaintiff ad litem shall be some suitable person competent to prosecute such action and whose appointment is requested on behalf of those persons entitled to share in the proceeds of such action. Such court may, in its discretion, require that such plaintiff ad litem give bond for the faithful performance of his duties.

    2. Only one action may be brought under this section against any one defendant for the death of any one person.

    537.090. Damages to be determined by jury–factors to be considered

    In every action brought under section 537.080, the trier of the facts may give to the party or parties entitled thereto such damages as the trier of the facts may deem fair and just for the death and loss thus occasioned, having regard to the pecuniary losses suffered by reason of the death, funeral expenses, and the reasonable value of the services, consortium, companionship, comfort, instruction, guidance, counsel, training, and support of which those on whose behalf suit may be brought have been deprived by reason of such death and without limiting such damages to those which would be sustained prior to attaining the age of majority by the deceased or by the person suffering any such loss.

    In addition, the trier of the facts may award such damages as the deceased may have suffered between the time of injury and the time of death and for the recovery of which the deceased might have maintained an action had death not ensued. The mitigating or aggravating circumstances attending the death may be considered by the trier of the facts, but damages for grief and bereavement by reason of the death shall not be recoverable.

    537.010. Action for damages to property to survive regardless of death of either party

    Actions for wrongs done to property or interests therein may be brought against the wrongdoer by the person whose property or interest therein is injured. If the person whose property or interest therein is injured is dead, the action survives and may be brought against the wrongdoer by the person appointed as fiduciary for the estate of the deceased person. If the wrongdoer is dead, the action also survives and may be brought and maintained in the manner set forth in section 537.021. Such actions shall be brought and maintained in the same manner and with like effect in all respects as actions founded upon contracts.

    537.020. Action for personal injury or death to survive regardless of death of either party

    1. Causes of action for personal injuries, other than those resulting in death, whether such injuries be to the health or to the person of the injured party, shall not abate by reason of his death, nor by reason of the death of the person against whom such cause of action shall have accrued; but in case of the death of either or both such parties, such cause of action shall survive to the personal representative of such injured party, and against the person, receiver or corporation liable for such injuries and his legal representatives, and the liability and the measure of damages shall be the same as if such death or deaths had not occurred. Causes of action for death shall not abate by reason of the death of any party to any such cause of action, but shall survive to the personal representative of such party bringing such cause of action and against the person, receiver or corporation liable for such death and his or its legal representatives.

    2. The right of action for death or the right of action for personal injury that does not result in the death shall be sufficient to authorize and to require the appointment of a personal representative by the probate division of the circuit court upon the written application therefor by one or more of the beneficiaries of the deceased. The existence of the right of action for death or personal injury that does not result in death shall be sufficient to authorize and to require the appointment of a personal representative for the person liable for such death or injury by the court having probate jurisdiction upon his death upon the written application of any person interested in such right of action for death or injury.

    537.030. Section 537.010 not to extend to what action

    Sections 537.010 and 537.020 shall not extend to actions for slander, libel, assault and battery or false imprisonment.

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