CORE-AT Electronic Medical Record #electronic #medical #record,pbrn,evidence #based #practice,clinical #outcomes,athletic #trainer


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CORE-AT Electronic Medical Record and
Injury Surveillance System

The CORE-AT electronic medical record (EMR) system is a web-based injury surveillance and EMR system for use by athletic trainers. The CORE-AT EMR was designed and developed by athletic trainers in partnership with Essentialtalk. an international technology communication company.

The CORE-AT EMR is compliant with the data acquisition, storage, and transmission standards set forth by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Health information obtained using the CORE-AT system are not stored locally on computers. Instead, data is uploaded in real-time and transmitted to secure, redundant servers.

System Capabilities

The CORE-AT EMR system consists of documentation capabilities including individual patient/athlete registration (e.g. sex, age, grade), injury demographics (e.g. sport, season, position), comprehensive patient evaluation (e.g. diagnosis, injured body part, side, mechanism of injury), and daily treatment, progress, and discharge (e.g. athletic training interventions, rehabilitation protocols, date of return-to-play) notes.

A necessary feature of the patient record is the ability to assign ICD-9 CM and CPT codes to patient diagnoses and treatments, respectively, to enable the characterization of secondary school athletic training practice and for creating cost-estimates for secondary school athletic training services.

Also included in the system are single and multi-item patient-oriented outcome measures, both generic and region specific. Outcome instruments are automatically generated and included as part of the patient evaluation process based on diagnosis and injury region. An automated system not only assures collection of appropriate patient information but also promotes the use of outcome instruments as part of standard athletic training practice.

Injury Surveillance

In addition to the capabilities of the CORE-AT system to collect patient outcomes, CORE-AT is also constructed to capture and integrate injury surveillance information specific to athlete injury and exposure (e.g. incidence, athlete-exposure, time loss/non time loss, sports participation).

With the surveillance component integrated directly into the medical record, information such as time loss/non-time loss, diagnosis, mechanism of injury, sport, and position are all collected and recorded during the initial evaluation, without the need for double entry. Data regarding athlete exposures are also captured and made available to the clinician.

Additional Information

If you are interested in seeing the CORE-AT EMR in action, request a guest account for trial access to the system.

Login to the CORE-AT Electronic Medical Record and Injury Surveillance System.

Preliminary training manual for the CORE-AT Electronic Medical Record. More indepth user manual coming soon.


APA-Approved Online Schools with Clinical Psychology Programs #clinical #psychology #masters #programs #nyc,


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APA-Approved Online Schools with Clinical Psychology Programs

At least 1 year as a full-time resident on campus

Students considering online APA-approved clinical psychology schools must make their decision based on several key factors. American Psychological Association (APA) approval is reserved for traditional, on-campus psychology programs, making fully online APA-approved clinical psychology programs unavailable. However, students can find some APA-approved institutions that offer a few courses online. It’s important to note that, as of 2016, the APA did not approve any fully online clinical psychology programs. A few universities and online colleges do, however, provide some online coursework.

APA Approval Requirements

The APA only approves doctoral degrees, internships and residencies, and the conditions for program approval prohibit fully online degree programs from gaining APA acceptance. In order to earn APA approval, students must complete two out of the three years at the institution granting the degree and at least one year as a full-time resident. This means that for APA approval to be granted, degrees must be completed at least partially in a traditional format.

Program Availability

Although fully online programs cannot be APA-approved, the APA has no regulations against the inclusion of some online coursework within an approved program. This is still uncommon, but prospective students may want to check the curricula for the schools they’re considering to see if online options are available for any courses. The APA maintains a list of accredited clinical psychology programs on its website to assist students in researching and choosing a school.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Behavioral Sciences, General
  • Biopsychology
  • Clinical Psychology, General
  • Cognitive Psychology and Psycholinguistics
  • Cognitive Science
  • Community Psychology
  • Comparitive Psychology
  • Counseling Psychology, General
  • Environmental Psychology
  • Experimental Psychology
  • Family Psychology
  • Forensic Psychology, General
  • Industrial and Organizational Psychology
  • Medical Psychology
  • Personality Psychology
  • Physiological Psychology
  • Psychology, General
  • Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology

Although this program requires a lot of face-to-face clinical training, some APA-approved programs offer foundational courses in the science and theory of psychology in an online format. Since foundational courses are intended to help students acquire a base of knowledge rather than to advance their practical skills, it’s easier to adapt these core classes into an online format.

At some schools, courses might be offered in a hybrid format, incorporating distance-learning technology to make an on-campus course more flexible and accessible. For example, some multi-campus schools use features like video conferencing and online course management systems to synchronously teach students enrolled at different campuses.

Even in programs with online components, students should expect to complete most of their APA-approved clinical psychology training in a traditional, on-campus setting. Examples of class topics that may be offered online include:

  • Social bases of behavior
  • History of psychology
  • Ethics
  • Cognition
  • Teaching methods

Though the American Psychology Association doesn’t accredit any wholly online programs, students who want to study clinical psychology can look for universities that offer some foundational courses online. The APA only accredits doctoral programs and requires students to spend two or three years on campus and complete a full-time residency.

Next: View Schools

  • Doctorate
      • Ph.D. in General Psychology – Performance Psychology
      • Ph.D. in General Psychology – Cognition and Instruction
      • Ph.D. in General Psychology – Industrial and Organizational Psychology
  • Master
      • M.S. in Psychology with an Emphasis in Health Psychology
      • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Grief and Bereavement
      • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Prevention
      • M.S. Psychology with an Emphasis in Gerontology
      • M.S. in Psychology with an Emphasis in Human Factors
      • MS in Psychology: General Psychology
  • Bachelor
      • BS in Psychology
      • B.S. in Psychology with an Emphasis in Performance and Sports Psychology
      • Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Science with an Emphasis in Trauma
  • Non-Degree
      • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Health Psychology
      • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Human Factors Psychology
      • Graduate Certificate of Completion in GeroPsychology
      • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Industrial and Organizational Psychology
      • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Forensic Psychology
      • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Life Coaching

Get Started with Grand Canyon University

3 Ashford University

Minimum eligibility requirements:
  • Must be 22 years of age or older
  • Programs offered by Ashford and listed below may not be related to the topic covered by the above article.

  • Ph.D. in General Psychology – Performance Psychology
  • Ph.D. in General Psychology – Cognition and Instruction
  • Ph.D. in General Psychology – Industrial and Organizational Psychology
  • M.S. in Psychology with an Emphasis in Health Psychology
  • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Grief and Bereavement
  • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Prevention
  • M.S. Psychology with an Emphasis in Gerontology
  • M.S. in Psychology with an Emphasis in Human Factors
  • MS in Psychology: General Psychology
  • BS in Psychology
  • B.S. in Psychology with an Emphasis in Performance and Sports Psychology
  • Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Science with an Emphasis in Trauma
  • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Health Psychology
  • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Human Factors Psychology
  • Graduate Certificate of Completion in GeroPsychology
  • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Industrial and Organizational Psychology
  • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Forensic Psychology
  • Graduate Certificate of Completion in Life Coaching
  • View more

  • NIH Clinical Center: Graduate Medical Education (GME): National Institutes of Health Hospice

    #capital hospice

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    Graduate Medical Education (GME): National Institutes of Health Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship

    Fellowship Program Director:
    Ann Berger, MSN, MD ; Chief of Pain and Palliative Care Service, NIH Clinical Center

    Associate Program Director:
    M. Jennifer Cheng, MD, Senior Attending Physician

    Overview
    This fellowship program is designed for candidates who have academic and clinical career goals in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Fellows gain hospice and palliative medicine expertise as they provide consultations for medical, psychological, and spiritual concerns and coordinate team-based, holistic integrative approaches. Palliative care services are provided to adults and children through multiple settings, including inpatient wards, outpatient clinics, and day-hospital clinics. Trainees encounter patients with common and rare diseases from all walks of life, and in both research and community settings. Candidates must have:

    • a MD or DO degree from an ACGME-accredited medical school
    • satisfactorily completed three postgraduate years of training at the time of appointment
    • ABMS board eligibility or certification in one of the following specialties: internal medicine, family practice, pediatrics, psychiatry, neurology, oncology, anesthesiology, surgery, or radiation oncology
    • unrestricted state medical licenses and the ability to be licensed in Washington DC and Maryland by the beginning of training.

    Program Structure
    This one year fellowship program offers training that leads to board eligibility in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Fellows receive broad, practical experience in palliative medicine and hospice care through inpatient and outpatient palliative medicine rotations at the NIH Clinical Center (approximately half the academic year), inpatient palliative medicine rotations at community Suburban Hospital (12 weeks), and home hospice (4 weeks), inpatient hospice (6 weeks), and long-term-care hospice (4 weeks) rotations at Washington Home and Community hospices. The fellowship includes a four-week elective rotation.
    Additional program highlights:

    • Fellows are expected to demonstrate academic proficiency through literature review, a peer-review quality journal article, a book chapter, or other professional writing project, or a limited and closely-mentored research project
    • Fellows are exposed to and learn about complementary therapies such as acupuncture, relaxation therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, guided imagery, Reiki, and art therapy
    • Longitudinal self-care activities through confidential, individual meetings with social worker and chaplain
    • Longitudinal educational and clinical collaboration with NIMH Psychiatry Consult Liaison Service

    Application Information
    This program participates in the ERAS system and all applications to this fellowship should be completed through ERAS. The completed application must include three letters of recommendation. The program also participates in the National Resident Match Program (NRMP). Additional information about the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship application cycle and deadlines can be obtained directly from the ERAS website.

    Currently we do not sponsor J-1 Visa. Fellows receive a stipend based on the salary guidelines of the National Institutes of Health PGY4 level salary.





    Clinical psychology program #ubc #psychology, #ubc #psych, #psychology #ubc, #university #of #british


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    Clinical

    UBC s Graduate Program in Clinical Psychology s broad mission is to advance clinical science. We view clinical science as composed of research efforts and practice directed toward:

    1. The promotion of adaptive functioning
    2. Assessment, understanding, amelioration, and prevention of human problems in behaviour, affect, cognition or health
    3. The application of knowledge in ways consistent with scientific evidence

    The program s emphasis on the term science underscores its commitment to empirical approaches to evaluating the validity and utility of testable hypotheses and to advancing knowledge and practice by this method.

    The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association. If you are interested in more information about our accreditation status, contact the Director of Clinical Training (Lynn Alden ) or:

    Initial accreditation 1986-87
    Next site visit due 2015-16

    As of 2012, CPA and APA signed the First Street Accord which is a mutual recognition agreement on accreditation. It demonstrates that the APA views the accreditation standards and principles of the CPA as equivalent to the Commission on Accreditation guidelines and principles. View the statement .

    This webpage presents an overview of important information about the clinical program. To fully understand the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology at UBC, please read the material in all the links on this page and in the Graduate Student Handbook.


    Florida Board of Nursing – Education and Training Programs – Licensing, Renewals


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    The Florida Board of Nursing (Board) approves new pre-licensure nursing education programs that meet the application requirements specified in Section 464.019, Florida Statutes. This Section of Florida law also defines the Board s regulatory authority over established nursing education programs.

    Nursing education programs in Florida that hold specialized nursing accreditation by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) or by the Collegiate Commission on Nursing Education (CCNE) are not regulated by the Florida Board of Nursing. Consumers are advised that the Board is not authorized to conduct site visits, and oversight of approved nursing education program quality measures is limited by Florida law.

    All concerns or complaints pertaining to approved nursing education programs in Florida should be directed to the Consumer Services Unit of the Department of Health s Division of Medical Quality Assurance.


    What are the Roles and Responsibilities of a Forensic Psychologist? #forensic #psychologist,forensic


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    What are the Roles and Responsibilities of a Forensic Psychologist?

    Forensic psychology can be conceptualized as encompassing both sides of the justice system (criminal and civil) as well as two broad aspects of psychology (clinical and experimental). Forensic psychologists may be trained as either clinical psychologists or experimental psychologists and engage in a variety of roles within each of these two broad areas. The wide variety of roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists are described in this article.

    Role and Responsibilities of Forensic Psychologists

    The roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists are many and varied. There is no one particular path to becoming a forensic psychologist and forensic psychologists may be employed in a wide variety of settings. In general, a forensic psychologist will take on one primary role but may engage in additional roles depending on his or her interests and training. The various roles that a forensic psychologist may take on include, but are not limited to: trial consultant, expert witness, evaluator, treatment provider, researcher, academic, and correctional psychologist. Each of these roles will be described in a little more detail below.

    Trial Consultant

    Trial consultants (or jury consultants) work with legal professionals to assist in various aspects of case preparation, including jury selection, development of case strategy, and witness preparation. Many trial consultants rely on their research training to develop and execute research that will assist attorneys in preparing a case. Research and data collection strategies might include community surveys, focus groups, jury simulations, shadow juries, and mock trials. Trial consultants (or jury consultants) may be involved in both civil and criminal cases and may assist at any (or all) stage(s) of the proceedings—in preparation for trial, during trial, or after trial. Typically, trial consultants have advanced degrees in one of the behavioral sciences, such as psychology (clinical or experimental) or criminology.

    Expert Witness

    An expert witness is someone who testifies in court about specialized knowledge that he or she possesses. Forensic psychologists are often called upon to testify regarding matters of mental health (clinical forensic psychologist) or general theory and research in psychology and law (clinical or experimental forensic psychologist). Generally, clinical forensic psychologists are involved as expert witnesses after having evaluated a defendant and thus are called to testify regarding that defendant’s mental state and how it relates to the legal issue at hand (such as insanity, competency, dangerousness, civil commitment, etc). It is possible, however, for forensic psychologists to serve as general expert witnesses where, instead of testifying regarding specialized knowledge about a particular defendant/complainant, they may be called to testify regarding broader psychological principles in which they have specialized knowledge or expertise. This role is usually performed in conjunction with another role, such as that of researcher, academic, or evaluator and thus is not generally the only (or even the primary) role in which a forensic psychologist engages. Forensic psychologists in the expert witness role may participate in both criminal and civil proceedings and are usually trained either in general psychology or in a particular psychological specialty such as clinical psychology.

    Evaluator

    Many forensic psychologists take the role of evaluators. In general, this refers to the evaluation of criminal defendants or parties to civil litigation with respect to mental health issues that relate to the legal issue at hand; however, this may also refer to the evaluation of service delivery or treatment programs. In the criminal realm, forensic psychologists may be called upon to evaluate defendants with respect to their competency to stand trial, their me

    ntal state at the time of the offense (insanity), their risk for future dangerousness, or other such issues. In the civil realm, forensic psychologists may be called upon to evaluate an individual’s psychological state after having been injured or in an accident or may evaluate families involved in custody and access disputes. The evaluator role usually goes hand-in-hand with the expert witness role as many evaluators are called into court to testify about the opinions they formed during their evaluations. Forensic psychologists who take on the role of an evaluator are employed in a wide variety of settings, including forensic hospitals, state psychiatric hospitals, community mental health centers, and private practice. Forensic psychologists who evaluate defendants or parties to civil litigation usually have been trained as clinical psychologists and have some specialization in forensic psychology and are usually required to be licensed as psychologists.

    Treatment Provider

    Treatment providers provide psychological intervention or treatment to individuals requiring or desiring these services. Forensic psychologists who are treatment providers work in a wide variety of settings, including: forensic hospitals, state psychiatric hospitals, community mental health centers, and private practice. In addition, treatment providers may work with individuals (or groups) involved in both criminal and civil proceedings. In the criminal realm, treatment providers may be called upon to provide psychological interventions to individuals who have been determined by the courts to be incompetent to stand trial (and require treatment for the restoration of competency), insane at the time of the crime (and require treatment for their mental illness), or at a high risk to commit a violent offense (and require treatment to minimize the likelihood of acting violently in the future), as well as a number of other criminal law-related issues. Within the civil realm, forensic psychologists may be called upon to provide treatment to families who are going through divorce proceedings or to individuals who sustained psychological injuries as a result of some trauma that they endured or a host of other civil law-related issues. The same forensic psychologist may perform both treatment provider and evaluator roles, although ethical guidelines serve to limit the chances that both of these roles will be fulfilled with the same client or patient.

    Researcher

    Forensic psychologist researchers design and implement research on various issues relevant to forensic psychology or psychology and the law, both criminal and civil. In addition, these professionals may conduct research on mental health law and policy or program evaluation. These professionals may be employed in a number of settings including universities and colleges, but also at research institutes, government or private agencies, and psychiatric hospitals or other mental health agencies.

    Academic

    Forensic psychologist academics are involved in teaching, research, and a host of other education-related activities such as training and supervision of students. Psychologists who take on this role can be trained either generally in psychology or in one of the specialties such as clinical psychology. In addition, these professionals usually have an advanced degree in psychology, typically a PhD. It is often the case that academics will also take on one or more of the aforementioned roles in addition to the role of academic. In general, academics are employed by institutions of higher learning—colleges or universities.

    Correctional Psychologist

    A correctional psychologist is a forensic psychologist who works in a correctional setting with inmates and offenders. These psychologists often engage in direct service delivery—both evaluation and treatment—of individuals who have been incarcerated or who are out on probation or parole. Thus, in addition to the roles of evaluator and treatment provider, correctional psychologists may also take on the role researcher or expert witness.

    Excerpted from: Roesch, R. Zapf, P. A. Hart, S. D. (2010). Forensic Psychology and law. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

    Photo courtesy of www.wiley.com


    Online Masters in Educational Technology #clinical #psychology #masters #programs #online


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    Online Masters in Educational Technology

    The Educational Technology M.Ed. program at Texas A M prepares students to work in the fast-growing field of learning technologies as:

    • Instructional designers
    • Learning and performance specialists
    • Course developers
    • Trainers
    • Instructional media developers
    • Technology coordinators
    • Evaluators

    Students develop a strong foundation in instructional design, learning theory, and innovative educational practices supported by technology. Graduates of our program can apply this knowledge to create more effective, efficient, and engaging instruction for a variety of settings, including:

    CURRICULUM

    The Educational Technology M.Ed. program is flexible to meet the needs of diverse students, including those who work full-time. It requires 36 hours of coursework only online.

    REQUIRED COURSES

    • EDTC 602: Educational Technology Field, Theory, and Profession
    • EDTC 654: Instructional Design
    • EPSY 602: Educational Psychology
    • EPSY 673: Learning Theories
    • EPSY 622 or EPSY 636: Measurement and Evaluation in Education or Techniques of Research

    ELECTIVE COURSES

    • EDTC 608: Online Course Design
    • EDTC 613: Integrating Technology in Learning Environments
    • EDTC 621: Graphic Communication and Interface Design
    • EDTC 631: Educational Video
    • EDTC 641: Educational Game Design
    • EDTC 642: Designing for Mobile Learning
    • EDTC 645: Emerging Technologies for Learning I
    • EDTC 646: Emerging Technologies for Learning II
    • EDTC 651: E-Learning Design and Development
    • EDTC 684: Internship
    • EDTC 689: Review of Research in Educational Technology
    • EPSY 624: Creative Thinking
    • EPSY 635: Educational Statistics
    • EPSY 646: Issues in Child and Adolescent Development
    • EPSY 679: Research on Teacher Effectiveness
    • EPSY 689: Program Planning and Grant Writing

    Students may include up to two courses not listed here in their degree program with advisor approval. Courses must be of graduate level standing.


    Social Work Vs #counseling #vs #clinical #psychology


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    Social Work Vs. Clinical Psychology

    Related Articles

    Although social workers and clinical psychologists are both in professions that try to help people deal with problems, there are considerable differences between the two. A social worker can work in direct services, helping people cope with problems related to poverty, legal issues or human rights. Or, they can work in the clinical field, where they diagnose and treat mental, behavioral or emotional health issues. Psychologists study human behavior and the ways in which the human mind works. The work of clinical social workers is more similar to that of a psychologist.

    Psychologists’ Duties

    Psychologists observe, interpret and record how people and animals respond and relate to each other and their environments. A clinical psychologist may interview patients, perform diagnostic testing for emotional or mental disorders or provide psychotherapy. They may also design behavior modification programs or administer personality, intelligence or performance tests. Most clinical psychologists cannot prescribe medications, although two states, Louisiana and New Mexico, allow clinical psychologists to prescribe.

    Social Workers’ Duties

    Direct service social workers help clients develop plans to improve personal well-being and make referrals for services such as food stamps or health care. Clinical social workers, more commonly called licensed clinical social workers or LCSWs, also make referrals, but they are more likely to be to other mental health professionals or support groups. The LCSW develops a treatment plan and provides direct therapy to families, couples, groups or individuals. The LCSW also develops a care plan, usually in collaboration with other health-care professionals such as physicians or nurses, to promote the client s mental and emotional well-being.

    Education

    Educational requirements for social workers and psychologists differ. A clinical psychologist is required to obtain a Ph.D. or doctorate in psychology, and most clinical psychologists must also complete a one-year internship as part of the doctoral program. Licensure or certification is also required in most states. Social workers may have either a bachelor s or master s degree in social work, although a master s in social work is required for clinical social workers. The licensing requirements for direct-service social workers vary from state to state, but LCSWs must be licensed.

    Skills and Characteristics

    Social workers and clinical psychologists both need strong communication and people skills. Both need good problem-solving skills to find appropriate treatments for mental health problems or solutions to patients social issues. Compassion and trustworthiness are also important qualities; patients need emotional support and want to know that what they say will be kept confidential. Clinical social workers and psychologists must also be able to interpret behavior such as facial expressions or body positions in relation to therapeutic goals.

    Salaries and Job Outlook

    Salaries for social workers vary according to their area of specialization, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Child, family and school social workers earned an average salary of $44,410 in 2011, while health-care social workers earned $50,500, and mental health and substance abuse social workers earned $42,650. Most social workers in these groups are clinical social workers. All other social workers earned an average annual salary of $54,220, according to the BLS. Clinical, counseling and school psychologists earned an average salary of $73,090. The job outlook for both social work and psychology is good. In both cases, growth is expected to be above the average for most occupations.


    Health Informatics Online Graduate Certificate Program at UMass Lowell #online, #graduate, #informatics,


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    Online Graduate Certificate Program in Health Informatics

    Course Descriptions

    PUBH.5310 Health Informatics

    The course provides healthcare professionals with a conceptual and practical understanding of information and communication systems, and how they are used. It also addresses the systems analysis, development and implementation challenges in optimizing today’s complex healthcare systems designs to improve both use and clinical outcomes. Students learn the theory, techniques and systems used for transforming clinical data into information useful for decision-making. The current and future role of the health care informatics professional is discussed. 3 credits.

    PUBH.6070 Healthcare Information Systems

    This is the introductory, first-recommended course in health informatics. It provides a broad-ranging overview of the healthcare information systems industry, its history, recent developments and continuing challenges, and a practical understanding of healthcare information systems acquisition and implementation. Topics include meaningful use, EMR, CPOE, and health information exchange. 3 credits.

    PUBH.6320 Health Information System Planning

    A course examining contemporary healthcare information system requirements and focusing on the design, implementation, and modification of these systems. Actual or hypothetical health system related projects are used to support the theoretical framework. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSCE Graduate Restrictions

    PUBH.6330 Healthcare Database Design

    A practical approach to the design, and development of a relational database with an emphasis on healthcare. Analyzing the requirements of the database proceeds to the design of the structure of the relational database, which is then developed in a Relational Database Management System (RDBMS). Microsoft Access is used as the RDBMS platform. 3 credits.

    PUBH.6350 Healthcare Project Management

    A graduate level course providing a comprehensive foundation for project management as it applies to healthcare. Students will be introduced to the theory and concepts of project management, and the tools to manage projects with a specific focus on health information technology. 3 credits.

    PUBH.6380 Strategic Planning in Healthcare and HIT (Health Information Technology)

    A graduate-level course introducing healthcare professionals to strategic planning for the information systems organization. Skills learned in this course will enable the student to work effectively with and support the information systems planning effort and assure business alignment. 3 credits.

    PUBH.6390 Electronic Health Record Systems

    The course addresses Electronic Health Records (EHR) integration with patient care flow, clinical decision making and patient engagement, as well as clinical quality reporting. The students also learn core EHR functions. The course uses industry-leading EHR software as a learning tool to demonstrate how electronic health record technologies are used in a clinical setting. 3 credits.

    Certificate Requirements

    Students enrolled in graduate certificate programs through UMass Lowell must complete all courses indicated in the curriculum outline. Students may complete the certificate program at their own pace by registering for and successfully completing one or more courses each semester, depending upon his/her personal time constraints. Students are required to maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 with no more than one course grade below B to receive the certificate.

    Online courses meet 10 to 14 weeks each semester during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters (see Academic Calendar for details). Online students generally log into their online course website one or more times per week to retrieve lectures and assignments or to participate in a chat session. Online students should expect to spend 6 to 10 hours per week engaged in course-related activities for each course. For more information on online courses, visit our online program home page .

    Certificate Completion

    Once you have completed all courses in a graduate certificate program, please complete and submit via mail or fax the Graduate Certificate Clearance Form to the Registrar’s Office.

    Registration

    The Division of Online & Continuing Education offers courses during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Approximately two months prior to the start of each semester, we post the upcoming semester course schedule on our website. Once you know which course(s) you would like to take, current students can register using SIS Self-Service. while new students, who have not already applied and been accepted into a program, must use the Non-Degree Registration Form.

    You may take courses without being officially enrolled in a certificate or degree program, but you must meet the particular course prerequisites. Registrations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Class size is limited. We recommend that you register early to reserve your place in class.

    If you would like to be notified by email when we post our next semester’s course schedule, click here.

    Tuition

    Please refer to our tuition and fees page for up-to-date pricing information or refer to the Online & Continuing Education Course Bulletin that is published each semester.

    New Students

    If you have not already applied and been accepted to a program.

    Current Students

    If you have applied, been accepted and are currently enrolled in a program.

    Questions:

    Health Informatics (Cert) Program Support:
    Online Continuing Ed Support:

    Email our Student Support Center for assistance, or call 800-480-3190 and press 1 to speak with an advisor.

    Restrictions

    Please Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented within this website, the Division of Online & Continuing Education reserves the right to implement new rules and regulations and to make changes of any nature in its program, calendar, locations, tuition and fees. Whenever possible, appropriate notice of such changes will be given before they become effective. In applying for a degree program or registering for courses, each student assumes full responsibility for knowledge of and compliance with the definitions, regulations and procedures of UMass Lowell as set forth on our website. For additional information, please refer to the Graduate Program Policies found within the UMass Lowell Graduate Catalog.

    Applying into an Online Graduate Certificate Program

    UMass Lowell Graduate Certificate Programs provide knowledge and expertise that are vital in today’s rapidly changing workplace. In many cases, graduate certificate courses may be applied toward a master’s degree at UMass Lowell. Most graduate certificates consist of four courses, for a total of 12 graduate credits. This is a great way to earn a graduate-level credential on the way to earning your master’s.

    WHO CAN APPLY?

    Holders of an appropriate bachelor’s degree

    HOW TO APPLY?

    Application Fee is $50.00 for all applicants. NO Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required for graduate certificate programs. Credits earned from a graduate certificate may be used toward a related graduate degree with the approval of the graduate program coordinator. Students who complete a graduate certificate with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better in a UMass Lowell graduate certificate program may be able to waive the GRE when applying to a related master’s degree. Graduate Certificate Programs must be completed within a five-year period with a minimum 3.0 grade point average and with not more than two courses with a grade below B. Courses completed for one certificate may not be used for other certificates. Once you have completed all of the courses required for your certificate, please complete and submit the Graduate Certificate Clearance Form.

    Graduate Program Admissions Requirements

    Admission to all graduate programs at UMass Lowell is contingent upon successful completion of a bachelor’s degree. In many cases, applicants may register for a course before they have formally applied into the program; however, students requiring financial aid may want to wait until they have been formally accepted into the program to ensure that their course(s) will be covered. Please see our How to Apply tab for additional information and contact UMass Lowell’s Office of Graduate Admissions if you have questions about the application process.

    Questions Regarding Your Graduate Application?

    For General Assistance:

    Call the Division of Online & Continuing Education at 800-480-3190 if you have general questions about registering for your online courses, or to find out who the advisor is for your graduate program. Our team of Student Support Specialists are here to help!

    Already Applied?

    Fees

    There is a $50 application fee when you apply into this graduate degree program. Please see the Student Financial Services website for more information.

    Restrictions


    Clinical-Child and School Psychology Graduate Program @ SIUE #master #degree #in #child


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    Master of Science in Clinical Child and School Psychology

    Why Study Clinical Child and School Psychology at SIUE?

    This program is highly unique as it is one of only a handful of combined clinical child and school psychology programs in the nation. It anticipated many developments in both school and clinical child psychology as it emphasizes prevention, the ecological/systems approach, and the consultative role of the psychologist. Further, the program focuses on evidence based practices, such as behavioral and cognitive interventions. Finally, practica experiences are seen as a critical and ongoing adjunct to the academic component of the program, with students engaging in practica every semester.

    The program includes two tracks: the Clinical Child track and School Psychology track. These tracks are designed to serve the needs of two groups of students. Students in the Clinical Child track will be prepared to work with children, adolescents, and their families in the health system and other community agencies, under the supervision of licensed healthcare providers. Clinical child psychology students are also well-prepared to pursue doctoral education at other universities following completion of their Master’s degrees. Some clinical child students are interested in becoming licensed; for that reason, we provide a web page about licensure .

    The School Psychology track prepares students with knowledge and skills necessary for further education and training in the specialist degree program in school psychology. Students pursuing certification in school psychology are admitted to the master’s degree program with the expectation that they will go on to complete the specialist degree program in school psychology. Students in the School Psychology Track who continue on for the specialist degree after completing the master’s degree are eligible for certification as school psychologists in Illinois.

    Curriculum across both tracks is equivalent during the first four semesters of training; practicum experiences are provided across various types of settings. Coursework and training experiences during the second year of the program, and particularly the latter part, are increasingly focused on either Clinical Child or School psychology.

    Unique Strengths of the SIUE Master s in Clinical Child and School Psychology

    The program has a number of unique strengths that allow it to stand out as a premier program in the nation, which include:

    • One of only a few combined programs in the nation
    • Practica begins immediately, during students first semester, and continues every following semester.
    • Ongoing partnerships with local school districts, Head Start. juvenile detention, and other local agencies
    • Breadth of training, including courses in prevention, psychotherapy, and crisis intervention
    • One of less than ten school psychology programs in the nation to include a course on autism assessment and intervention
    • Hosts two clinics unique to the St. Louis region, which are the Attention Behavior Clinic (ABC) and the Comprehensive Autism Spectrum Evaluation (CASE) site
    • Program was established in 1970 and the Specialist Program in School Psychology has been continuously fully accredited by NASP since 1999
    • Students work closely with faculty to develop their own thesis or research project
    • Students commonly present research at the annual conferences of the National Association of School Psychologists, Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, American Psychological Association, and other national organizations.
    • Students commonly coauthor research publications with program faculty.
    • Most importantly, you will learn from award-winning faculty!
    • Dr. Stephen Hupp received the SIUE Teaching Recognition Award in 2011.
    • Dr. Jeremy Jewell received the Mental Health Hero 2015 award from Wellspring Resources as well as the Vaughn Vandegrift Research Mentor award for the fall of 2012.
    • Dr. Elizabeth McKenney received the Extra Effort Award from Edwardsville School District 7 in 2014 and in 2013 received the Early Career Scholarship from the Trainers of School Psychologists.
    • In an analysis of publication productivity among school psychology faculty in all NASP-accredited, specialist-level programs (Laurent Runia, 2016 ), Drs. Jewell and Hupp were ranked the 24 th and 25 th most productive researchers in the U.S.A.
    • In the same analysis (Laurent Runia, 2016 ), SIUE’s school psychology graduate program was ranked seventh in the nation in scholarly productivity.

    Due to a national shortage of school psychologists, job prospects are outstanding for students who complete the school specialist degree. Prospects for students in the clinical child track are also very good. After the completion of their Master’s degree, clinical child track students find employment in a variety of clinical and community agencies under the supervision of a licensed professional. Students in the clinical child track are also highly successful at getting accepted into doctoral programs if they choose to apply.

    Please visit the application information page for admission requirements and procedures.


    Clinical Medicine #hospice #care #plan

    #end of life care issues

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    Ethical and legal issues in end-of-life care

    Key Points

    Doctors are required to develop the skills to manage end-of-life decision making

    Choice, though a popular approach, should be distinguished from autonomous decision making

    Truth telling and effective communication skills are central to respecting a patient’s autonomy

    Decisions should be applied only to that individual. There is no place for a blanket approach or for tradition to replace clinical decision making

    The use of opioids and sedatives in end-of-life care should rarely require the justification of the doctrine of double effect. Any doctor feeling the need to employ this doctrine to justify their action should contact specialist palliative care services for advice

    Doctors are all too often under the public spotlight for the ethical and legal dilemmas they face in end-of-life care. The demands on the doctor (Table 1 ) are to:

    keep up-to-date with changes in legislation

    steer the best moral path through the political rhetoric

    develop the skills necessary to manage these situations effectively.

    Approaches to decision making at the end of life

    Principles and decision-making framework

    A person’s right to self determination is the starting point to many ethical dilemmas. Respecting autonomy has limits, brought into focus by the Mental Capacity Act 2005 1 and the increased emphasis on patient choice. The doctor needs to recognise these limits, being mindful of the other responsibilities: to benefit and not harm the patient, and to use resources justly.

    Truth telling

    Truth telling is fundamental to respecting autonomy. Most patients wish to have full information, although this may decrease as they approach the end of their lives. 2. 3 A doctor should have the skills to identify the patient’s preferences and give the information honestly yet sensitively. Paternalistic withholding of a life-threatening diagnosis from a patient has no place in current healthcare, unless this is the patient’s informed preference or they lack capacity to understand and use the information.

    Prognosis, potential complications and future progression of disease will often remain uncertain. The clinician cannot provide clarity for all these issues but, through discussion with the patient and their families, can work with them to manage these uncertainties.

    Respect for autonomy and choice

    Respecting autonomy does not equate to choice. To ask ‘Would you like to die at home?’ offers choice. To explain all the implications of such a decision, ensuring the patient has capacity and has appreciated all the important consequences, demonstrates respect for autonomy. 4 The doctor has a responsibility to ensure decisions are based on autonomous action, requiring full information, freedom from coercion and with the necessary capacity rather than simple choice. With choice being such a popular drive behind healthcare policy today, this distinction is key in end-of-life decision making.

    Specific challenges in end-of-life care

    Withholding and withdrawing treatment

    Ethical dilemmas approaching the end of life commonly revolve around decisions to withhold or withdraw interventions or treatment. 5 When the patient and doctor agree there is no benefit in carrying on or starting a new intervention the right action is clear, though skill is required on the doctor’s part to manage these discussions sensitively.

    Respecting the autonomy of a patient who is requesting to continue or initiate a treatment needs to be challenged when it would result in overwhelming harm, an unnecessary and unequal distribution of resources or an action that requires the doctor to act against a professional code or the law. The legal position is clear that a patient cannot demand a treatment that is not in their best interests and that doctors need not strive to preserve life at all costs. However, when there is doubt the presumption must be in favour of preserving life. 6. 7

    The doctor may be justified in withholding or withdrawing an intervention which as a result allows death to occur in the following situations:

    it is the patient’s autonomous decision to withhold consent for a life-saving intervention

    the harms of a treatment outweigh any potential lengthening of life

    the potential treatment is ‘futile’ – it will not achieve its specified aim (although, strictly speaking, a truly futile treatment would not, by definition, influence outcomes).

    Ethical approach to such decisions. All doctors should be able to describe an ethical approach to decisions to withhold or withdraw therapy that takes into consideration the law, guidance from official bodies, the evidence base and the resources available. They must be aware of the patient, their capacity, beliefs and preferences as well as their clinical condition and outlook. The doctor must then formulate clearly the ethical question being asked, ensuring that their own perspective is not influencing the way it is put. This enables the options available to be established, including the moral justifications and practical solutions (Table 2 ). Skills in communication and coordination are required to put this into practice. This approach will now be applied to common end-of-life decisions.

    A layered approach to decision making when withholding or withdrawing treatment and interventions.

    Clinically assisted nutrition and hydration

    The provision of hydration and nutrition is an essential part of human flourishing. Families and professionals struggle with any thought of withdrawing clinically assisted hydration and nutrition up to and including the last hours or days of life. When nutrition and hydration become clinically assisted they are classed as a treatment rather than basic care. Therefore, when they cease to offer overall benefit, they can be withdrawn. 6. 7

    Recent systematic reviews highlight the lack of robust evidence to support decision making in these areas. 8. 9 Traditional thinking in palliative care has held that the harms from providing clinically assisted hydration and nutrition in the last days or hours of life outweigh any benefits. The patient is not dying from a lack of hydration, but is dying and so does not require it. 10. 11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are unlikely to be successful in restarting the heart as patients approach the end of their lives or, if they are, may result in a short period of significantly impaired quality of life. 12. 13 Agreement should be reached among the multidisciplinary team that this is the situation and a decision carefully recorded. 14

    Morally, there are few arguments that favour attempting CPR in the last days or weeks of life. There are significantly more practical challenges, especially with regard to the unrealistic expectations of both public and professionals.

    When CPR is considered a futile intervention, to discuss it with the patient would appear only to bring unnecessary distress. Discussion is, however, required about the patient’s understanding of their general situation and outlook. An explanation that they are now dying may make further discussion about CPR itself irrelevant. A chance to air fears or concerns and make plans for their death would seem far more useful discussions to have, but the needs of patients who want to know more detail should also be met. For patients dying at home it is likely that more explicit discussion of CPR is required for them and their relatives to ensure emergency services are not called inappropriately.

    Decisions not to attempt CPR refer only to CPR and should not influence other areas of decision making. Each potential intervention may be considered on its own merit as part of advance care planning.

    Double effect and the use of opioids and sedation

    Opioids and sedatives provide effective relief for the frequently distressing symptoms of pain, dyspnoea and agitation as the end of life approaches. The frequent misconception among professionals is that the life of the patient may be shortened by increasing doses of these drugs in line with accepted clinical practice – a belief often shared by patients and their families. The doctrine of double effect (DDE) provides justification for such a consequence, but raises concern that it may protect dangerous practice.

    The DDE states that an action (such as an increase in opioid dose) that the professional foresees may shorten life – but does not intend to have that result – is justified provided that the intention is to benefit the patient and not shorten their life. In the classic interpretation, a patient is in pain, a higher dose of opioid is given to relieve that pain, but at the same time in the belief that this may shorten life. This traditional argument has come under increasing challenge (Tables 3 and 4 ). 15 – 17 Opioids and sedatives when used in line with best practice rarely require such high doses as to risk shortening life.

    Association for Palliative Medicine (APM) position on the doctrine of double effect in end-of-life care.





    How to Become A Clinical Psychologist #masters #degree #in #clinical #psychology, #clinical


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    Clinical Psychologist Careers, Education Requirements, Salary, Information

    What Is Clinical Psychology?

    Everyone has off days when they just don’t feel like themselves. For the majority of people, these feelings are normal, and they don’t last long at all. For some, however, these feelings are more serious, and they could indicate a mental or emotional problem.

    Clinical psychology is a broad branch of psychology that focuses on diagnosing and treating mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Some of the more common disorders that might be treated include learning disabilities, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and eating disorders.

    The field of psychology became more recognized during the second half of the 19th century, although clinical psychology wasn’t recognized until the end of the 19th century. It was around this time that Lightner Witmer first helped treat a boy with a learning disability. In 1896, Witmer opened the first psychology clinic, which catered to children with disabilities. In 1907, he coined the phrase “clinical psychology” in his new psychology journal, called The Psychology Clinic .

    Although his ideas were somewhat slow to catch on, Witmer is now credited with being one of the founding fathers of clinical psychology. His progress in treating that one child helped pave the way for the future of clinical psychology.

    What Are the Education Requirements to Become a Clinical Psychologist?

    Every state in the country requires that anyone who earns licensure and wishes to call themselves a clinical psychologist must first have a graduate degree (almost always a Master’s degree) in some form of clinical psychology. The majority of psychologists have a doctorate in clinical psychology, though some jobs are available for those with a Master’s. To qualify for most graduate programs, students need to have a Bachelor’s degree in psychology. There are two doctorates available.

    • A PhD in Psychology, or a Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology, which focuses on science and research
    • A PsyD, or Doctor of Psychology, which focuses on clinical work.

    Getting a doctorate takes five to seven years, plus a one-year internship in most cases. Continuing education is required. Many choose to become board-certified .

    Spotlight Clinical Psychology Degree Offerings

    What Does a Clinical Psychologist Do?

    Clinical psychologists work in many areas, depending on the population they choose to treat. A psychologist can specialize in chronic illness like diabetes or obesity, mental problems like depression and anxiety, and psychological problems like bipolar or schizophrenia. They work with children and adults with ADD or Asperger’s Syndrome.

    In a school setting, they can help children with learning disabilities. At a university, they can help students make career decisions, stay emotionally healthy and achieve success academically. In community-based facilities, they can help culturally diverse and economically disadvantaged populations. As the country ages, many are working with seniors.

    Others do research into mental health issues, policies and training, represented by the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology.

    Here is a look at a few of the areas where clinical psychologists can be found:

    • Research at a university
    • School psychology
    • Health service psychology
    • Physical health psychology
    • Work with the elderly
    • Work with children and university students

    Where Does a Clinical Psychologist Work?

    Individuals pursuing clinical psychology careers will often find that they will be able to secure employment in a number of different healthcare facilities, such as hospitals and mental health facilities.

    Depending on their specialties, clinical psychologists might also be able to find employment with a number of other private and government run organizations. Universities often employ clinical psychologists, for example, to perform research and help steer eager young minds toward clinical psychology careers. Schools, police departments, and military branches are also usually in need of professional psychologists as well.

    Many clinical psychologists also choose to open their own private practices and work for no other boss but themselves. Opening a private psychology practice can often be expensive and difficult but can also be very rewarding and lucrative as well.

    What Is the Annual Average Salary of a Clinical Psychologist?

    As with many other psychology careers. the salaries of clinical psychologists vary depending on a number of factors including location, experience, popularity, etc.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics the annual average salary for clinical psychologists was $76,040 in May of 2015. Elementary schools, hospitals and private practices are the primary employers of clinical psychologists and the annual average pay at those places ranges from $74,130 to $84,020.

    Influential Clinical Psychologists

    1. Sigmund Freud is often credited for “inventing” talk therapy and modern psychoanalysis.
    2. Albert Ellis founded Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) and several cognitive behavioral therapies, which are often the most popular types of treatment in clinical psychology today.
    3. Lightner Witmer was the first psychologist to use and coin the term clinical psychology.

    Additional Resources and Further Reading


    NIH Clinical Center: Graduate Medical Education (GME): National Institutes of Health Hospice

    #capital hospice

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    Graduate Medical Education (GME): National Institutes of Health Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship

    Fellowship Program Director:
    Ann Berger, MSN, MD ; Chief of Pain and Palliative Care Service, NIH Clinical Center

    Associate Program Director:
    M. Jennifer Cheng, MD, Senior Attending Physician

    Overview
    This fellowship program is designed for candidates who have academic and clinical career goals in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Fellows gain hospice and palliative medicine expertise as they provide consultations for medical, psychological, and spiritual concerns and coordinate team-based, holistic integrative approaches. Palliative care services are provided to adults and children through multiple settings, including inpatient wards, outpatient clinics, and day-hospital clinics. Trainees encounter patients with common and rare diseases from all walks of life, and in both research and community settings. Candidates must have:

    • a MD or DO degree from an ACGME-accredited medical school
    • satisfactorily completed three postgraduate years of training at the time of appointment
    • ABMS board eligibility or certification in one of the following specialties: internal medicine, family practice, pediatrics, psychiatry, neurology, oncology, anesthesiology, surgery, or radiation oncology
    • unrestricted state medical licenses and the ability to be licensed in Washington DC and Maryland by the beginning of training.

    Program Structure
    This one year fellowship program offers training that leads to board eligibility in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Fellows receive broad, practical experience in palliative medicine and hospice care through inpatient and outpatient palliative medicine rotations at the NIH Clinical Center (approximately half the academic year), inpatient palliative medicine rotations at community Suburban Hospital (12 weeks), and home hospice (4 weeks), inpatient hospice (6 weeks), and long-term-care hospice (4 weeks) rotations at Washington Home and Community hospices. The fellowship includes a four-week elective rotation.
    Additional program highlights:

    • Fellows are expected to demonstrate academic proficiency through literature review, a peer-review quality journal article, a book chapter, or other professional writing project, or a limited and closely-mentored research project
    • Fellows are exposed to and learn about complementary therapies such as acupuncture, relaxation therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, guided imagery, Reiki, and art therapy
    • Longitudinal self-care activities through confidential, individual meetings with social worker and chaplain
    • Longitudinal educational and clinical collaboration with NIMH Psychiatry Consult Liaison Service

    Application Information
    This program participates in the ERAS system and all applications to this fellowship should be completed through ERAS. The completed application must include three letters of recommendation. The program also participates in the National Resident Match Program (NRMP). Additional information about the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship application cycle and deadlines can be obtained directly from the ERAS website.

    Currently we do not sponsor J-1 Visa. Fellows receive a stipend based on the salary guidelines of the National Institutes of Health PGY4 level salary.





    Electronic Data Capture – Clinical Trial Management Software #electronic #data #capture #software,


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    Electronic Data Capture (EDC) and data management for Clinical Trials and other research studies.

    • Advanced, flexible with powerful features
    • Capture data from any device
    • Customization components, wide range of data entry options
    • Integration with any other software through ODM standards
    • Create your own professional questionnaires
    • Complete control over your studies with query management and custom reporting

    More info

    Dacima’s Clinical Trial and Epidemiological Research data management software offers innovative solutions designed to streamline data collection, enhance your data management and improve data quality.

    Dacima Clinical Suite is the most advanced and flexible Electronic Data Capture system. Our user-friendly and flexible web Electronic Data Capture (EDC) software application allows you to easily tailor the clinical database and interface to meet the requirements of your research study, making it ideal for a wide range of medical research study designs, including clinical trials, patient registries, observational study designs, web surveys, electronic Patient Reported Outcomes (ePRO), post-marketing studies and administrative databases.

    With its many features and capabilities and an easy-to-use designer interface you can create database without the need for programming expertise. Dacima offers the most powerful, flexible and user-friendly EDC software on the market.

    Dacima Software offered us a solution tailored to our unique needs Université de Montréal

    Dacima Software provided us with a cost-effective and easy to use data management platform for our clinical trials Jewish General Hospital

    Control, ease of use and cost — DACIMA provided a one-stop solution for our clinical data collection BioIntegral Surgical

    Look what clients are saying about us and our software!

    Large probability for errors

    EDC With Dacima

    Traditional E DC

    Easy-to-use but limited capabilities

    Limited edit checks

    Focus on Clinical Trials

    EDC Without Dacima

    Dacima Clinical Suite

    Save time and money now!

    Intuitive design and advanced features

    Customizable to your needs!

    Real-time edit checks


    Hospice Clinical Charting #hospice #las #vegas

    #hospice charting

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    Hospice Clinical Charting

    Hospicesoft provides a “Living Plan of Care.” This allows clinicians to not only do their standard assessments during a visit, but also document their care planning on the exact same form. This centralizes your visits around the patient’s Care Plan, and ensures your staff are always working with the most up-to-date Issues, Goals, and Interventions.

    With customizable dropdowns hospices can use common care planning items, or they can enter their own customized item based off of the patient’s current situation. This ensures that your care plans are personalized and specific to the patient’s or family’s needs.

    Every form in the hospice software has the ability to be customized by your hospice. Administrators can control which questions are required, and which questions are not. With our visual indicator system, anyone can immediately see when there is a missing question, or if they are able to keep moving forward. They also have the ability to control how questions can pre-populate form to form. This provides a unique opportunity to truly cater the hospice software to your hospice’s needs.

    Clinician’s also have the ability to specify their visit notes with which sections were addressed and not addressed on any given visit. This allows hospices to differentiate between a full head-to-toe visit, and something as simple as a follow-up visit.

    Clinical Charting for Every Discipline – Bereavement, Aide Documentation, Volunteer Documentation, SW, Nurse -long narratives, dictation, spell check

    Hospicesoft is a comprehensive suite designed for all aspects of hospice care. In addition to nurse, social worker, and chaplain forms, we also provide for volunteer, aide, and bereavement documentation.

    Our hospice clinical charting software is designed to represent a physical chart’s layout. Every tab has a specific purpose. This offers a much smoother transition for staff members who are used to physical, paper charting. Each tab is color-coded, allowing easy identification and saving you time.

    Also included in your forms are multiple text boxes for narratives to be recorded. While the boxes may look small, each box allows for nearly 40 pages of information! Additionally, Hospicesoft utilizes your browser’s built-in spell checking tool to help you quickly identify and eliminate any errors in your notes. Finally, each of these text boxes supports dictation. So if your device provides you a dictation tool, you can dictate your notes into the hospice software.

    We realize how important it is for your team to stay up to date on everything going on with their patients and families. That is why we provide hospices with multiple ways to get real-time updates on anything happening with a patient they’re assigned to.

    With our patient Bulletin Boards, your team members can send messages to anyone else on that patient’s clinical team. These can be created in the general patient record, or you can even send these messages from within your visit notes! In addition to the messaging tool built into Hospicesoft, your team members can also receive these messages by email or by text message. Due to HIPAA Regulations, only the patient Medical Record Number will be sent in emails or text messages generated by the system.

    In addition to manual messages, the hospice software can also send you real-time updates for any key event that happens with a patient assigned to you. Whether it’s an on-call event, pain event, medication change or more, you will know exactly what’s going on at all times.

    Patient Graphs Compliance Tools

    Hospicesoft gives your team instant access to patient graphs that get automatically generated from previous assessments. So whether there is a question of decline, or you simply want to spot-check your patient records, you have priceless tools at your disposal.

    We pride ourselves on helping our clients stay compliant. Within the hospice software, there are numerous tools and safeguards designed to support you in those efforts. One key feature allows hospices to create customized process lists for any key process in hospice care, such as admissions, visits, discharges, etc. This not only ensures your staff are following those guidelines, but also lets you see when anything was missed.





    Clinical Training #qualifications #for #hospice #care

    #hospice care training

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    Clinical Training

    Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship Training

    A fellowship is the period of subspecialty training that a physician may undertake after completing a residency. Like many other subspecialties, fellowship training is mandatory in hospice and palliative medicine through American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) or American Osteopathic Association (AOA) certification .

    In February 2014, ACGME and AOA announced that the accrediting organization is moving to a single accreditation system for graduate medical education. This transition period is in effect until June 30, 2020 as AOA-accredited programs apply for and receive ACGME recognition and accreditation. This switch to a single accreditation system allows graduates from both allopathic and osteopathic medical schools to complete their residency and fellowship training in ACGME-accredited programs and demonstrate achievement of common milestones and competencies.

    Learn more about hospice and palliative medicine fellowship training from ACGME and AOA .

    Hospice and palliative medicine is participating in the National Resident Match Program (NRMP) Medical Specialties Matching Program. This match service is specific to ACGME-accredited fellowship programs. Learn more by reading the ACGME-Accredited Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program Applicants Frequently Asked Questions .

    Fellowship Program Directory

    Fellowship programs in hospice and palliative medicine provide practitioners the opportunity to advance their knowledge of the field. Programs are available for allopathic and osteopathic professionals in internal medicine, family medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation, psychiatry and neurology. In addition, programs are available for allopathic professionals in anesthesiology, surgery, pediatrics, emergency medicine, radiology, and obstetrics and gynecology. Some programs include an additional track in pediatrics, geriatrics, research or public health.

    A listing of fellowship programs can be found on the ACGME and AOA websites.

    If you are searching for a pediatric-focused training program, please consult the AAHPM Pediatric SIG’s list of pediatric-specific training sites .

    Open HPM Fellowship Positions
    Hospice and palliative medicine participates in the NRMP Match. Immediately following Match Day, AAHPM offers programs an opportunity to post open HPM fellowship positions. Check out the AAHPM Job Mart to search for and post open HPM fellowship positions. Programs: select ‘post a job’; Candidates: select ‘job search’, ‘advanced search’, ‘type – fellowship’.

    Alternative/Complimentary Pathway

    If you are interested in becoming certified in hospice and palliative medicine but are unable to or uninterested in completing a 12-month hospice and palliative medicine fellowship, which is now required for ACGME and AOA subspecialty certification, you may want to consider pursuing HMD certification through the Hospice Medical Director Certification Board (HMDCB). HMDCB’s certification can serve as an alternative or complementary pathway for HPM physicians who currently practice or intend to practice in a hospice setting and seek to gain additional certification for the unique skills required of hospice medical directors.

    AAHPM Elevate

    A collection of supplemental web-based, on-demand programs offered through AAPL at a special rate for AAHPM members.