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Dates and Deadlines

  • JANUARY 1, 2015 First date to submit FAFSA for 2015-16 school year
  • JANUARY 9 Registration deadline for February 7 ACT (not in NY)
  • JANUARY 24 SAT Subject Tests test date
  • FEBRUARY 7 ACT test date (not in NY)
  • FEBRUARY 13 Registration deadline for March 14 SAT
  • MARCH 13 Registration deadline for April 18 ACT
  • MARCH 14 SAT test date
  • APRIL 6 Registration deadline for May 2 SAT Subject Tests
  • APRIL 18 ACT test date
  • MAY 2 SAT Subject Tests test date
  • MAY 4-8 AP Exams
  • MAY 8

Registration deadline for June 6 SAT Subject Tests

Registration deadline for June 13 ACT

  • MAY 11-15 AP Exams
  • JUNE 6 SAT Subject Tests test date
  • JUNE 13 ACT test date
  • JUNE 30 Last date to submit FAFSA for federal aid for 2014-15 school year
  • AUGUST 7 Registration deadline for September 12 ACT
  • SEPTEMBER 3 Registration deadline for October 3 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • SEPTEMBER 12 ACT test date
  • SEPTEMBER 15 Last date to submit FAFSA corrections for federal aid for 2014-15 school year
  • SEPTEMBER 18 Registration deadline for October 24 ACT
  • OCTOBER 3 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • OCTOBER 9 Registration deadline for November 7 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • OCTOBER 14 PSAT test date
    (redesigned PSAT)
  • OCTOBER 24 ACT test date
  • OCTOBER 28 PSAT test date
  • NOVEMBER 5 Registration deadline for December 5 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • NOVEMBER 6 Registration deadline for December 12 ACT
  • NOVEMBER 7 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 5 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 12 ACT test date
  • DECEMBER 28 Registration deadline for January 23 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • JANUARY 1, 2016 First date to submit FAFSA for 2016-17 school year
  • JANUARY 8 Registration deadline for February 6 ACT
  • JANUARY 23 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • FEBRUARY 5, 2016 Registration deadline for March 5 SAT
  • FEBRUARY 6 ACT test date (not in NY)
  • MARCH 4, 2016 Registration deadline for April 9 ACT
  • MARCH 5 SAT test date
    (first test date for redesigned SAT)
  • APRIL 8, 2016 Registration deadline for May 7 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • APRIL 9 ACT test date
  • MAY 2-6, 2016 AP Exams
  • MAY 5 Registration deadline for June 4 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • MAY 6 Registration deadline for June 11 ACT
  • MAY 7 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • MAY 9-13 AP Exams
  • JUNE 4, 2016 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • JUNE 11 ACT test date
  • JUNE 30 Last date to submit FAFSA for federal aid for 2015-16 school year
  • AUGUST 7, 2016 Registration deadline for September 10 ACT
  • SEPTEMBER 1, 2016 Registration deadline for October 1 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • SEPTEMBER 10 ACT test date
  • SEPTEMBER 16 Registration deadline for October 22 ACT
  • SEPTEMBER 17 Last date to submit FAFSA corrections for federal aid for 2015-16 school year
  • OCTOBER 1, 2016 First date to submit FAFSA for 2017-18 school year
  • OCTOBER 1 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • OCTOBER 7 Registration deadline for November 5 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • OCTOBER 15 PSAT/NMSQT test date
    (check with your school)
  • OCTOBER 19 PSAT/NMSQT test date
    (check with your school)
  • OCTOBER 22 ACT test date
  • NOVEMBER 2, 2016 PSAT/NMSQT test date
    (check with your school)
  • NOVEMBER 3 Registration deadline for December 3 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • NOVEMBER 4 Registration deadline for December 10 ACT
  • NOVEMBER 5 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 3, 2016 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 10 ACT test date
  • DECEMBER 21 Registration deadline for January 21 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • JANUARY 13, 2017 Registration deadline for February 11 ACT
  • JANUARY 21 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • FEBRUARY 10, 2017 Registration deadline for March 11 SAT
  • FEBRUARY 11 ACT test date (not in NY)
  • MARCH 3, 2017 Registration deadline for April 8 ACT
  • MARCH 11 SAT test date
  • APRIL 7, 2017 Registration deadline for May 6 SAT
  • APRIL 8 ACT test date
  • MAY 1-5, 2017 AP Exams
  • MAY 5 Registration deadline for June 10 ACT
  • MAY 6 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • MAY 8-12 AP Exams
  • MAY 9 Registration deadline for June 3 SAT & SAT Subject Tests
  • JUNE 3, 2017 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • JUNE 10 ACT test date
  • JUNE 30 Last date to submit FAFSA for federal aid for 2016-17 school year
  • AUGUST 26, 2017 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • SEPTEMBER 9, 2017 ACT test date
  • SEPTEMBER 23 Last date to submit FAFSA corrections for federal aid for 2016-17 school year
  • OCTOBER 1, 2017 First date to submit FAFSA for 2018-19 school year
  • OCTOBER 7 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • OCTOBER 28 ACT test date
  • NOVEMBER 4, 2017 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 2, 2017 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 9 ACT test date
  • FEBRUARY 10, 2018 ACT test date (not in NY)
  • MARCH 10, 2018 SAT test date
  • APRIL 14, 2018 ACT test date
  • MAY 5, 2018 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • JUNE 2, 2018 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • JUNE 9 ACT test date
  • JUNE 30 Last date to submit FAFSA for federal aid for 2017-18 school year
  • AUGUST 25, 2018 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • OCTOBER 6, 2018 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • NOVEMBER 3, 2018 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • DECEMBER 1, 2018 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • MARCH 9, 2019 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • MAY 4, 2019 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
  • JUNE 1, 2019 SAT & SAT Subject Tests test date
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    Squirrel Facts – Squirrel Information #common #squirrel


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    Specializing in Hands-On
    Squirrel Removal Control

    Squirrel Facts Squirrel Information

    Two species of squirrel found on the West Coast are the native Douglas Squirrel (or Red Squirrel family) and the Eastern Grey Squirrel. The grey squirrel is the most common of the two species found locally in the Lower Mainland. The grey squirrel is originally from eastern North America and was introduced into Stanley Park in 1912. The grey squirrel population remained relatively contained until the late 1980’s. That is when they spread like wildfire throughout the entire Lower Mainland into the Fraser Valley due to trapping and relocation practices of many homeowners and pest control companies. The following are some more squirrel facts for Vancouver homeowners:

    Habitat

    Urban: Although the grey squirrel is found in parks and woodland areas, they adapt quite easily to urban environments, taking up residence in and around buildings. They become very accustomed to utilizing attics and chimneys for nesting sites.

    Breeding

    Twice per year: Female squirrels can mate only twice a year, but males can mate at any time. Often, several males will attempt to mate with the same female. They try to attract her attention by slapping the bark of trees with their paws and chattering loudly. After the mating the males play no part in the rearing of the young. Birth occurs six weeks after mating.

    Litter size: Female squirrels produce litters between 1 and 7 offspring (typically 5 or 6).

    Rearing: The naked, blind and deaf young are fed every two to four hours for several weeks. At seven – eight weeks, they start to follow their mother around within the den site. The young squirrels gradually begin to eat solid food and are weaned at ten – eleven weeks of age. A month later, they start to leave the den. If there are not too many squirrels in the area, the young will build nests nearby. Otherwise, they will be chased away to less crowded feeding areas. Typically some of the squirrels will remain actively using the birthing den.

    Sexual maturity: Squirrels are sexually mature and able to reproduce at 11 months.

    Food and Feeding

    Frequency: The Grey Squirrel feeds every day, even in the winter. It does not hibernate and is unable to conserve enough energy to survive for long periods without food.

    Time of day: It is most active at dawn and dusk, when it searches for whatever fruits, shoots, and seeds that are in season. Small thumbs on it’s front paws allow it to hold food securely as it feeds.

    Diet: The squirrel’s diet varies according to season. It eats mainly tree bark and fungi in the winter and buds in the summer. In September it eats nuts and acorns. A hungry grey squirrel will also raid a bird’s nest for eggs, steal food from bird feeders and dig up plants. In urban environments the grey squirrels also come across free handouts from people (namely peanuts in the shell). The squirrel buries extra food just below the soils surface, which it later locates by smell.

    Morphology and Lifestyle

    • Body length: 9-12 in
    • Tail length: 7-10 in
    • Weight: 12-28 oz
    • Habitat: Above ground (attics and chimneys), but spends much of it’s time on the ground
    • Call: Chattering and piercing scream
    • Lifespan: 3-4 years

    Did You Know?

    • Squirrel fact: The squirrel’s front teeth continue to grow throughout it’s life, so they must continue to gnaw to wear them down.
    • Squirrel fact: A male squirrel can smell a female that is ready to mate.
    • Squirrel fact: The grey squirrel can leap more than 20 feet.
    • Squirrel fact: Although usually frightened of people, a mother squirrel can be quite aggressive if she perceives danger or is separated from her babies. Squirrels are very swift and can move or attack quickly if threatened.
    • Squirrel fact: There can be 25 or more squirrels per square kilometre in urban areas with mature trees.
    • Squirrel fact: Squirrels are more adaptable than you might think. They can fit through a hole the size of a baseball (black/grey squirrels) or a golf ball (red squirrels). And smaller holes can easily be chewed open.

    Ohio state insurance #ohio, #business #portal, #starting #a #business, #hiring, #training, #employees,


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    Bureau of Workers’ Compensation monthly employer webinars

    BWC is beginning a new series of brief, informative webinars on topics of interest to employers. Webinars will be offered twice a month and will be about 20-25 minutes. To kick things off, June webinars will cover policy year 2017 renewal, the 2-percent early pay discount and future dating of payments.

    Ohio Materials Marketplace

    The Ohio Materials Marketplace is a free online platform allowing businesses and organizations to connect and find reuse and recycling solutions for waste and by-product materials.

    Ohio Business Central

    File business documents online with Ohio Business Central. Available online forms include: articles of incorporation for domestic corporations, nonprofits, and professional associations; articles of organization for a domestic limited liability company; foreign for profit and nonprofit corporation application for license; foreign limited liability company registration; trade and fictitious name registration and renewal; and biennial reports for associations and limited liability partnerships, and more.

    view all Gateway topics


    When Does Cohabitation Become A Common Law Marriage? #common #law #marriage #divorce,divorce,common


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    When Does Cohabitation Become A Common Law Marriage?

    When live-in lovers decide to call it quits, the parties’ relationship is not always severed by a simple division of their furniture. If romantic partners have been cohabitating for a lengthy period of time and have commingled their assets and debts, their break-up in any jurisdiction may quickly give rise to disputes about the division of home equity, bank accounts and/or the payment of credit cards and other debts. However, when cohabitating parties end their relationship in a state which recognizes common law marriage, broken hearts are sometimes followed by a legal dispute which goes to the very heart of the matter. In divorce court, the parties’ case begins with their conflicting responses to the critical question, “Are you married?”

    Common law marriage is fully recognized in nine states and the District of Columbia. In seven additional states, common law marriage is only recognized for limited purposes or if the marriage arose prior to a certain date. Although the specific requirements of common law marriage vary between differing jurisdictions, a common law marriage is generally established when the parties: a) live together for an extended period of time; b) hold themselves out in a public manner as a married couple; and c) demonstrate an intention to be married. Accordingly, when one party asserts the existence of a common law marriage, he or she has the burden of proving an affirmative response to most of the following questions: 1) Did the parties’ file joint income tax returns? 2) Did the parties openly hold themselves out to be husband and wife in their interactions with neighbors and friends? 3) Did the parties maintain joint banking and/or credit card accounts or purchase property in joint names? 4) Did the woman begin using the man’s last name? (These days, this question is probably of lesser importance). 5) Did either party name the other as their spouse on their health insurance, life insurance policy or pension?

    The concept of common law marriage is somewhat analogous to the old adage that, “If it walks and talks like a duck. ” If you continue to act like you’re married in your dealings with friends, neighbors and the IRS, don’t act surprised if a judge finds that you actually are.

    The significance of common law marriage can hardly be overstated. For much the same reason that same-sex couples have fought for the right to marry, individuals who assert a common law marriage recognize that spouses enjoy considerably greater benefits than parties who have simply cohabitated with one another. Most often, common law marriage is asserted in a divorce case wherein one party is seeking alimony and a division of property which they could not otherwise obtain without the claim of a legal marriage. On occasion, common law marriage is asserted by an ex-husband who is seeking an end to his alimony payments on the basis that his ex-wife’s cohabitation is actually a common law remarriage to another man. In the criminal courts, common law marriage may be asserted by a defendant who seeks to quash their partner’s testimony by invoking a claim of spousal privilege. In civil or probate court, the claim of common law marriage is typically made by a party who is seeking either damages in a wrongful death suit or designation as an heir at law when the cohabitating partner, and alleged spouse, is now deceased.

    At a time when cohabitation in the United States has become more prevalent than ever, romantic roommates who are trying to mix and match their sofas and coffee tables should take a moment to learn their state’s law regarding common law marriage. If you’re cohabitating in a common law marriage state and you have no present intent to be married, be mindful of your state’s legal requirements for this concept so you can conduct your personal and business affairs accordingly. Be aware that common law marriage is not easily proved but even if you “win” in divorce court with a judicial determination that no marriage was created, you already lost by engaging in a course of conduct which allowed two attorneys to litigate this issue in the first place.

    As a matter of law, once a common law marriage has been established, there is no difference whatsoever between a common law marriage and a ceremonial one. This principle makes sense to family law attorneys, but how many brides would trade with the common law wife who missed out on the bridal shower, the dress and the diamond engagement ring?