Flood Damage Prevention #audiences,catastrophes #(cat),consumers,floods,natural #disasters,properties,safety,topics,flood #damage,flood #damage #prevention


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Flood Damage Prevention

While fire may be a more common concern among homeowners, your home could in fact be as much as ten times more likely to be damaged by water than by fire.* Significant sources of water damage to one s property can come from weather-related moisture or flooding, including flooding from heavy rains, flash floods, dam and levee failures, tidal storm surges and mudflows. In addition, new construction of buildings, roads or bridges can alter the flow of water, increasing the potential for flooding.

Living in a high-risk flood zone can increase the likelihood of experiencing a flood, but being outside a high-risk zone does not mean homeowners are safe; flooding is always a possibility due to causes such as heavy rains, snowmelt and spring thaws.

Protecting Your Property Before, During and After a Flood

There are a number of things you can do to help minimize or prevent water damage to your property. Follow these tips to help prepare and recover from potentially costly flood damage.

Before the Flood:

  • Know your properties flood zone risk and evaluate your flood risk with this reference guide from IBHS.
  • Have your furnace, water heater and other permanent equipment elevated above the expected flood levels of your area.
  • Inspect sump pumps and drains regularly to ensure proper operation.
  • If you own a generator, have a licensed electrician provide a transfer switch to your sump pump so you can operate it in the event of flooding.
  • To help prevent sewage backup, have a licensed plumber install an interior or exterior backflow prevention valve.
  • Keep sandbags on hand to help divert unusually high water away from your foundation.
  • In snowy climates, flag drains to avoid plowing snow on top of them.
  • Learn the flood alert signals of your community.
  • Collect emergency building materials if you live in a frequently flooded area. These may include plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, nails, shovels and sandbags.
  • Plan and practice an evacuation route. Designate a place for family members to meet in the event they become separated.
  • Review with all family members how to shut off utilities in an emergency.
  • Plan a survival kit with important documents, including insurance documents, medications and critical items in the event you need to leave your home.

During the Flood:

  • Listen to a battery-operated radio or television for the latest storm information. If advised to evacuate, shut off all utilities and evacuate immediately.
  • Move to high ground, avoid rising waters and do not walk or drive through any floodwaters.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires.

After the Flood:

  • Listen to the radio and do not return home until authorities indicate it is safe to do so.
  • Once allowed back into your home, inspect it for damage. If your property has been damaged, promptly report the loss.
  • Be watchful of snakes that may have found their way into your home.
  • Throw away all food that has come in contact with floodwaters.
  • Remove standing water as quickly as possible, including from your basement. If your basement is flooded, pump out about 1/3 of the water per day to avoid structural damage.
  • Properly dry or remove soaked carpets, padding and upholstery within 24-48 hours after a flood to prevent mold growth. Discard anything that cannot be properly dried.
  • Wash and disinfect all areas that have been flooded. This includes walls, floors, closets and shelves, as well as heating and air-conditioning systems. Do not energize electrical or electronic equipment that may have suffered water damage without first having a qualified electrician inspect and/or test it.
*FloodSmart.gov,https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/residential_coverage/rc_overview.jsp

InfyTalk: Mobility and the Enterprise #forrester, #building #tomorrow’s #enterprise, #mobility,flypp, #cloud,cornelius #vanderbilt,


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Planet Earth has yet to pass the 7 billion mark when it comes to human beings alive on its surface. Yet it recently passed the 7.3 billion threshold for mobile devices. That there are more mobile telephones than people in the world is one thing. But when you factor out the many humans that are barely out of diapers, or very old, that ratio becomes even more extraordinary.

The folks at Forrester Research recently published a study that points to a startling phenomenon: that although there are a lot of mobile devices out there, true mobility is difficult for organizations both to attain and, later, to maintain. (Coleridge comes to mind: “Water, water, every where, nor any drop to drink!” )

According to Forrester, ready-to-go mobile solutions that are both horizontal and industry-specific are now de rigeuer. That’s why the leading providers of enterprise mobility services are all flocking to make their apps what shift-on-the-fly did for off-road driving three decades ago. “More than just reusable assets, these are full-blown solutions — both cross-industry or ready for specific industries,” the Forrester report stated. Enterprise mobility has become a “go strong or go home” market arena. Yes, it’s a crowded space. But sheer numbers of entrants don’t mean nearly as much as the fact that the space is changing dramatically. oh, every five minutes or so. The popularity of the Cloud and the ever-increasing demands of consumers to be everywhere at the same time (and in real time) means providers of mobility solutions have to work innovatively and tirelessly to stay ahead of their competitors with product offerings that impress.

Speaking of outsmarting the competition, I’m reminded of one of the most extraordinary businessmen of the 19th century, Cornelius Vanderbilt. When he first saw the potential market for people who needed to be ferried back and forth across New York Harbor, he assembled a fleet of sailboats. While his competitors were building their own fleets of wind-powered boats, he was already thinking about a steam-powered operation. And when his competitors jettisoned wind for steam power themselves, he redefined travel altogether – he was investing in railroads! Vanderbilt was a business leader because his vision and abilities had both breadth and depth of focus. So must providers of solutions be when it comes to modern-day enterprise mobility.

Those of us who are dedicated to building tomorrow’s enterprise today might not be surprised at all. We continue to make deep investment into future areas. What makes us stand apart is that we know fully well that such areas have vast potential. And as we lead the field in user experience, process consulting, development, and end-to-end capacity to support our clients across a broad spectrum of their mobility needs – we are delighted that we are already the standard by which other companies are gauging themselves.