How to Become an Addiction Counselor #how #to #become #a #addiction #counselor


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How to Become an Addiction Counselor

By eHow Careers & Work Editor ; Updated July 05, 2017

How to Become an Addiction Counselor. Addictions counselors help people overcome dependencies with alcohol, drugs and gambling. Counselors work with individuals, groups or the families of addicts. They refer their clients to doctors, social services and support groups, and they may help their clients during legal proceedings. Here’s how to become an addiction counselor.

Complete the appropriate training in your state to become an addictions counselor. Requirements may include a bachelor’s degree in Human Resources, Psychology or Social Work; a certificate or associates degree in addictions counseling; completion of an internship; passing a state licensing exam and being free of drugs, alcohol and other addictions. Again, all of these requirements boil down to the state you live in–call a treatment center in the state you’re interested in working in–they (and your college guidance counselor) can give you an idea of the classes you’ll need to take.

Pursue the following electives in college, as they will help you as an addictions counselor: Therapy and Counseling; Psychology; Sociology and Anthropology; Customer and Personal Service; Education and Teaching; English Language; Philosophy and Theology; Administration and Management; and Law and Government. Of course, as mentioned in Step 1, every state has different requirements in order to become a state-certified counselor–double and triple check with your college guidance counselor every step of the way when choosing your classes.

Hone your skills in the following areas. Communication: You must express yourself clearly, listen to others and understand and ask questions. Reasoning and problem solving: You should notice when something is not right, identify potential problems, offer solutions and think of creative ways to solve problems. Working with people: Modify your approach based upon the way a person reacts to your counseling, always look for ways to help others, use persuasion to convince others to try different problem-solving techniques and solve problems by bringing others together to discuss their differences.

Tip

Unfortunately, problems such as alcoholism and drug addiction are not going away soon. The outlook for this career is positive. Some areas of the United States have seen double-digit increases in the need for addiction counselors.


Why Become a Professional Counselor? #how #to #become #a #rehabilitation #counselor


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Why Become a Professional Counselor?

What is Counseling?

Counseling is a professional relationship that empowers diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals.

This definition of counseling was developed by the 20/20 Delegates in March 2010.

Professional Counseling as a Career Choice

What is professional counseling? Counseling is a professional relationship that empowers diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals.

People have many different reasons for deciding they want to become a counselor. Some people choose this career because they once had a good experience with a counselor during a difficult time in their own life and they want to pay it forward. Another person may have done some volunteer work at a crisis hotline and realized that they enjoyed both the challenges and joys of working with clients facing difficult times. Yet another person may have been told that they are a good listener and they ought to consider working as a mental health professional.

I have always desired to become a counselor since I was five years old. I have always loved helping people A wonderful lady in our community who worked in the counseling field was instrumental in encouraging me to follow my dreams. -Barbara Mceuen

Whatever the reasons, individuals that choose to seek a career in counseling usually have one thing in common a desire to help people work through life s challenges. Some individuals want to work primarily with children or teens. Others prefer to work with adults. Some want to work in specific settings, such as K-12 schools or college campuses. Others prefer to work in a community setting such as a mental health center or private practice setting.

Counseling can offer the right individual a rewarding career path in a health profession that is growing. It requires a strong desire to interact with people, exceptional communication skills, and an ability to complete a graduate degree. Choosing to become a professional counselor is a commitment to yourself, to others, and to society as a whole.

But choosing to become a counselor is just one of the choices that prospective students must make. Student will need to consider all of the different specializations in counseling with their varying work environments. School counselors work in K-12 educational environments (schools), while clinical mental health counselors may work in private practice, a hospital setting, or some other community agency.

Follow these links to learn more about the field of Counseling and the job outlook for counselors.

If you are already a professional counselor, please share with us your reasons for becoming one. Follow the link to the Contact Us site and choose Why I became a counselor in the contact type. We will feature these on this section of the website in the future.


School Guidance Counselors: How They Help Students #online #guidance #counselor #programs


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School Counseling

School counseling takes place in public and private school settings in grades K-12. Counseling is designed to facilitate student achievement, improve student behavior and attendance, and help students develop socially. Mental health professionals with master s degrees or beyond, school counselors both provide counseling and serve an educational role in and around schools. Many schools have full-time counselors on staff in order to support students who are experiencing personal or academic challenges. help students choose careers and plan for college, and intervene when students face behavioral, physical, or mental health challenges.

History of School Counseling

In the early 20th century, as industrial centers grew throughout the United States, secondary schools began to increase their focus on courses that would help prepare students to enter the workforce. Some teachers doubled as vocational counselors in order to assist in these efforts.

  • 1917: Specific legislation is drafted to provide funding for vocational guidance programs. Following this, the school guidance counseling profession grows.
  • 1920s: New York becomes the first state to develop certification requirements for school counselors.
  • 1930s: Urban elementary schools begin to offer school counseling services.
  • 1950s: The humanistic psychology and person-centered psychology movements gaining traction lead the focus of school counseling to undergo a significant shift.
  • 1970s: School counseling incorporates wider goals of helping students develop socially, personally, and academically.
  • 1990s: A nationwide shift toward standards-based education and the adoption of legislation such as the No Child Left Behind Act make it necessary for school counselors to find increasingly innovative ways to serve students.

What Do School Counselors Do?

School counselors, also known as guidance counselors, were first primarily responsible for facilitating career development. Today, the role of the school counselor is multifaceted and may vary greatly, depending on the requirements of both the state and each individual school.

  • Providing instruction on psychological and social issues. School counselors might teach sex education classes, provide information to students about bullying. or offer seminars on study skills.
  • Vocational guidance. Many school counselors help students prepare for college or select careers.
  • Counseling. School counselors often help students mediate conflicts with their peers, teachers, or parents. Many school counselors also provide therapy and counseling services to students during school hours.
  • Early intervention. School counselors receive training about learning difficulties and psychological concerns that commonly manifest in children and adolescents. They may also provide referrals, recommendations, and education to parents about mental health concerns.
  • Special needs services. Counselors often help special needs students integrate into classrooms and may oversee programs that address requirements for students with special needs or learning difficulties.

Further, counselors often help students:

  • Maintain academic standards and set goals for academic success.
  • Develop skills to improve organization, study habits, and time management.
  • Work through personal problems that may affect academics or relationships.
  • Improve social skills.
  • Cope with school or community-related violence, accidents, and trauma .
  • Identify interests, strengths, and aptitudes through assessment.

School counselors offer individual counseling to help students resolve personal or interpersonal problems. They may also offer small group counseling to help students enhance listening and social skills, learn to empathize with others, and find social support through healthy peer relationships. For students who are otherwise unable to access mental health services, school counselors provide support at no cost. School counselors also provide support to school staff by assisting with classroom management techniques and the development of programs to improve mental health or school safety. When necessary, counselors may also intervene in a disrupted learning environment.

Required Training for School Counselors

School counselors must complete a master s degree, at minimum, in school counseling, psychology, or social work and obtain the relevant state certification, endorsement, or licensure to gain employment. This may involve taking a comprehensive exam and logging hours in a supervised counseling setting. In many cases, counselors will need to complete an internship or practicum, and some states also require previous teaching experience.

School counselors are required to renew their licensure every three to five years. This timeline depends on the requirements of the state in which they are employed. In order to renew licensure, continuing education classes or professional development courses are generally necessary.

Many states require public schools to provide school counseling services, and these programs are funded at the state or local level. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) recommends a student-to-school-counselor ratio of 250:1, although the average ratio is currently 471:1.

Do School Counselors Diagnose Mental Health Concerns?

Serious diagnosable mental health conditions affect 21% of U.S. children between the ages of 9 and 17, but only 20% of these children obtain a diagnosis and receive treatment in any given year. While school counselors may suspect the presence of learning difficulties or other conditions such as ADHD. they are not licensed to diagnose or prescribe medication. Some schools do have school psychiatrists, however, and these professionals are able to prescribe medication to students, though parental permission is typically necessary.

When a school counselor suspects the presence of a learning, behavioral, or mental health concern, they will typically provide a referral to a specialist in the community. Learning difficulties can be diagnosed by school or educational psychologists or neuropsychologists. and ADHD is generally diagnosed by psychiatrists, physicians, or clinical psychologists in private practice.

  1. American School Counselor Association. (n.d.). Student-to-School-Counselor Ratio 2010 2011. Retrieved from http://www.schoolcounselor.org/asca/media/asca/home/Ratios10-11.pdf
  2. Careers/Roles (n.d.). American School Counselor Association. Retrieved from http://www.schoolcounselor.org/content.asp?contentid=133
  3. Colman, A. M. (2006). Oxford dictionary of psychology. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  4. National Alliance on Mental Illness. (n.d.). Child and Adolescent Action Center: Facts on Children s Mental Health in America. Retrieved from http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=federal_and_state_policy_legislation template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm ContentID=43804.
  5. Ross-Kidder, Kathleen, PhD. (n.d.). Who Can Diagnose LD and/or ADHD? CalPoly Disability Resource Center. Retrieved from http://drc.calpoly.edu/content/eligibility/whoCanDiagnose
  6. Wright, Robert J. (2011). School Counseling, an Evolving Profession. Introduction to School Counseling. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Last Update: 12-02-2015

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IMHS Metaphysics Institute – Premier Metaphysical University, Metaphysical Studies, Metaphysics PhD Degrees


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I always knew I wanted my degree, but the traditional setup of college was a drag to me and every semester there was always an additional class that was required or an increase in tuition or both. I feel as if this program is designed for people like me who want to expand their thinking and be challenged without feeling dumb or getting into debt. I am extremely grateful for a degree program that allows me to simply think and to be myself. —Britney Bryant, USA

IMHS is Fresh, Innovative, and Contemporary: [ Read More ]

Metaphysics is about more than just the abstract; it is also about a successful life. The abstract will certainly stimulate your thinking and can lead to great spiritual development, but for spiritual development to be effective and meaningful, it must be activated by practical life-skills; powerful everyday tools that will enable you to have better relationships, better communication skills, better critical thinking skills, and more. IMHS gives you both the spiritual development and the practical life-skills you need for a balanced, successful life!

IMHS is Powerful and Cutting-Edge: [ Read More ]

The IMHS curriculum is based on the Life Leadership Paragon TM. an exclusive and elegant model for success that has changed countless lives for the better. It is only taught at our schools. For more than a decade, this model has been carefully crafted and developed into a powerful, cutting-edge system for personal growth and spiritual enlightenment. The Life Leadership Paragon TM also serves as the foundation for Life Leadership Coaching TM. a blend of life coaching and transpersonal spiritual counseling which is also only taught at our schools. Students specializing in Holistic Life Coaching or Spiritual Counseling will really appreciate this creative and highly effective approach to helping others!

IMHS Gives You the Training and Skills You Need: [ Read More ]

In addition to spiritual development and practical life-skills, IMHS actually gives students the skills they need to be successful in their chosen areas of specialization (major). Many of our students take additional courses in their areas of interest beyond the ones required for graduation because they have come to know that our courses are comprehensive and beneficial to their personal and professional development. IMHS graduates are well-equipped to go out and make a positive difference in the world!

IMHS is Objective and Grounded: [ Read More ]

Rather than obscure, fringy, and highly esoteric concepts, IMHS approaches metaphysics in an objective, grounded, and real-world manner while still keeping the door open to the great mysteries of consciousness and our Universe. As humanity evolves, many people are leaving the confines of old religious and social notions and seeking new paradigms that focus on the value and worth of the individual. This is why IMHS teaches a human-centered spiritual philosophy which does not surrender one’s power to anyone or anything else. It empowers, encourages, and builds people up. It refreshes the mind, spirit, and soul!

Genuine, Bona-Fide, and Legal Degrees: [ Read More ]

Our degrees are absolutely genuine, legal, and “real.” IMHS is not a diploma mill. Our degrees are non-secular (religiously-based) in nature and require effort on the student’s part. Non-secular degrees are neither better nor worse than traditional degrees; they are simply used for different purposes. Therefore, students can rest assured that the degree they earn is completely legal and “real,” and the title of “Doctor” can be used in front of their names. This applies to nearly every country in the free world–especially countries that protect religious freedom.

Metaphysics for the 21st Century: [ Read More ]

With the many demands of life in this day and age, most adults simply do not have the time to spend several years getting a degree. Nevertheless, many busy adults would like a degree to enhance their lives and careers. Therefore, we have simplified and streamlined our Metaphysics PhD program by offering Bachelor’s, Master’s, and Doctoral degrees in an accelerated format that takes less time to complete thus allowing students to begin using their degrees sooner. And the best part is that our degree program provides an excellent learning platform that is concentrated, comprehensive, and affordable. We think you’ll find this 21st Century approach to getting your Metaphysics PhD degree a refreshing change from the past century!


Master of Education in Guidance and Counseling #guidance #counselor #degree


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Master of Education in Guidance
and Counseling

The M.Ed. in Guidance and Counseling degree is designed for candidates interested in careers as public school counselors, college and university counselors and other positions in counseling.

*Texas School Counselor Certification Option

This program also prepares the student to apply to the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) to seek certification as a Texas school counselor. As part of the *certification requirements. applicants must hold a Texas Teacher Certificate and two years teaching experience in an accredited public school. This is required prior to applying for state certification at the end of the program. A copy of the public school teacher’s service record serves as documentation.

*Students may complete this degree without certification.

***Out of state candidates may complete this degree, however, it is up to the candidate to contact their state’s education department to see what is required to be certified in their state.***

Our certification programs are state (Texas Education Agency) and nationally (NCATE) accredited.

Degree Requirements

Semester Credit Hours (SCH)

If pursuing a School Counselor Certification with the degree, the candidate must complete EDG 6331 Role of the School Counselor and EDG 6325 Practicum in School Counseling as electives.

In addition to coursework, students must complete a Comprehensive Program Review (CPR). Prospective graduates must apply for the Comprehensive Program Review (CPR) no later than the first day of the last semester of coursework.

Additional Post Master’s Certificate

For candidates that all ready have a Master’s Degree, please see our School Counselor Certification information page.

Students pursuing a professional certificate on a certification plan may use previous graduate course work completed at Angelo State University to fulfill certification requirements. All work must be completed within a period of six years from the earliest credit to be counted on the certification plan. Under certain circumstances, a time extension of up to four years may be granted on a course-by-course basis.

Admission Requirements

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited university.
  • Undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or better.
  • GRE scores are not required.

*When applying, use the 5X8 DG Degree Seeking application.

Need More Information?


CASA of Livingston County, Inc #alcohol #and #substance #abuse #counselor


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CASA of Livingston County is a not-for-profit organization that helps individuals overcome challenges and lead more productive, healthy lives. We are a community based treatment center for chemically dependent men, women, adolescents and their families, providing outpatient and specialized treatment programs. Through preventative community work, CASA of Livingston County confronts chemical dependency issues at all stages, by providing education, creating awareness, and investing in the future of our community.

Local Meetings

There are many occasions throughout recovery, where extra help and support may be needed. Please use the following links to find a meeting that suits your location and availability. Not every meeting is for every person, try them out, and find support that is right for you. (If currently in treatment, contact your counselor for more information)

Learn More

If you are concerned for a loved one, have questions about the treatment process, would like to inquire about job openings, or find out more about our prevention programming, please send us a department message on our Contact Us page.

Online Meetings

In The Rooms, is an independent website that offers assistance, support, and resources to those struggling with alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and much more. This website offers access to meetings, video meetings, motivational speeches, and even groups for family members. Anonymity is protected by allowing users to enter chats as a ‘Guest.’ Learn more at: www.intherooms.com

Additional Information

Contact Information

Geneseo Office
4612 Millennium Drive
Geneseo, New York 14454
Phone: (585) 991-5012
Fax: (585) 991-5013

Dansville Office
141-143 Main Street
Dansville, NY 14437
Phone: (585) 335-5052


Termination Guidelines, by Jeffrey Barnett, Psy #termination, #psychotherapy, #counseling, #abrupt, #treatment #plan,


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Termination Guidelines

  • Clarify expectations and obligations from the outset. The Office Policies are the best way to articulate and discuss such expectations and obligations. (Zur Institute’s Clinical Forms .)
  • Be familiar with the relevant guidelines and standards in your professions’ Codes of Ethics with regards to termination and abandonment issues. Summary of the different Codes of Ethics on Termination Psychotherapy and Counseling
  • Some terminations are short and swift, while others may be long and protracted. Then termination can have different meanings and be just an end of a phase in intermittent-long-term therapy. The form and type of termination depends on the client, setting of therapy, therapeutic orientation, quality and type of therapist-client relationship and the therapist.
  • If necessary, review with patients their insurance coverage, limits to managed care contracts, and how utilization review may impact on termination. Set up arrangements for addressing patient treatment needs if continued authorization is denied.
  • Make adequate arrangements for coverage during any periods of planned or unplanned absences.
  • Provide patients with referrals to other treatment sources, if needed, and work to assist them in their transition to other health care providers.
  • Be cautious in regard to termination of patients who are in crisis. Try to avoid terminating clients who are in acute or temporary crisis due to payment issues.
  • The average number of visits among U.S. patients receiving psychotherapy in 2007 was 8 sessions, according to a study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
  • 41 percent of patients in the U.S. quit psychotherapy “prematurely,” according to a 2010 study in the journal Psychotherapy Theory, Research, Practice, Training.
  • Many clients unilaterally decide to drop out of therapy. They may do that with a phone message or by simply not showing up to their next scheduled appointment. You must remember that it is the client’s prerogative and choice whether to continue in therapy or not. Except in extreme situations, such as when the client poses a danger to self or others, you need to respect their choice. Do not tacitly condone patients dropping out of treatment when your clinical judgment indicates continued care is needed. When clinically and otherwise appropriate, notify the patient of your assessment and recommendations. There is no ethical, clinical or legal mandate to send a registered letter to client. Different clients and situations may require different actions and, at times, lack of action.
  • The question of whether therapists need to send a letter to clients who unilaterally dropped out (i.e. pre-mature termination) was recently addressed by Davis & Younggren in a 2009 PPRP article, where they clearly stated “In ordinary circumstances, however, letters are typically unnecessary and potentially counterproductive to the natural dissolution of the relationship (Davis, 2008). For instance, the client might feel embarrassed or scolded for his or her oblique termination and be less inclined to return. The client might perceive the psychotherapist’s actions as controlling and unnecessarily intrusive. It might seem that the psychotherapist is trying to break up with the client or get rid of him or her with such a formal action. Routine letters of closure not only present an unrealistic administrative burden on the provider, they add to the risk of negative client reactions.” (p. 575)
  • It is not unusual for therapy to break down rather than go through a smooth, clear or distinct termination process with patients with personality disorders (i.e. BPD) or those who were diagnosed with severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia or Bi-Polar disorders. Termination with these clients can be very abrupt or very long, painful, confusing and tumultuous. Obviously, each case should be handled according to the specific context of therapy. The context of therapy includes client, setting, therapy and therapist factors.
  • You can terminate treatment with clients (or another person with whom the client has a relationship) who threaten or stalk you, your family member or your employees via phone, email, online, in-person or other means. You can also terminate treatment with clients who intrude into your private life via the Internet or in “real” life. You are allowed to protect your privacy and secure your own, your family members’ and employee’s sense of privacy and safety. (Document, document and document.)
  • You must terminate therapy when it becomes reasonably clear that the patient no longer needs the service, is not likely to benefit, or is being harmed by continued service. For those patients who have ongoing treatment needs, when appropriate, one should offer to provide them with assistance with referrals to other appropriately trained and accessible professionals (except when we are being threatened, assaulted, stalked, or other relevant situations).
  • Document discussions of termination issues, agreements reached, decisions made and their rationale, and, when relevant, document the recommendations and follow-ups. Purchase a Termination Summary form
  • Termination of treatment is not always a permanent ending of the professional relationship. Termination is often not relevant during, or an end of phase in, intermittent-long-term psychotherapy. These forms of therapy may continue throughout the life span of individuals and families.
  • Termination is a phase of each patient’s treatment. If possible and appropriate, plan for it, prepare for it, process it. Additionally, each clinician should consider termination in light of their theoretical orientation and treatment approach, each patient’s/client’s diagnosis and treatment needs, and any relevant diversity factors that might impact the process.

  • Drug Counselor Training Program Information #drug #counselor #school, #drug #counselor #training


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    Drug Counselor Training Program Information

    Essential Information

    Training requirements for drug counselors vary by state, so individuals need to confirm the level of education needed to work in this field in their state. Certification requirements vary by state as well. Coursework may touch on the criminal justice system, co-dependency and abnormal psychology. Graduation requirements usually involve internships and/or written projects.

    Prerequisites for certificate and undergraduate programs include a high school diploma or equivalent, with master’s degree programs requiring a bachelor’s degree. Depending on degree level, these programs can last anywhere from six months to four years.

    Drug and Alcohol Counseling Certificate

    In some states, drug and alcohol counselors need as little as a high school diploma and certification, often issued by the International Certification Reciprocity Consortium (IC RC), in order to practice. Certification requires at least some education and practical experience, which often can be gained through a certificate program in alcohol and drug counseling. These programs usually are offered through 2-year colleges or extension departments at 4-year colleges. Generally, coursework typically takes at least six months to complete and includes theories of counseling, treatment planning and crisis intervention, as well as a supervised internship. Certificate programs usually require a minimum of a high school diploma or GED. Some common course topics include:

    • Personal adjustment
    • Introduction to chemical addiction
    • Disease models of addiction
    • Addicts and the criminal justice system
    • Addiction assessment methods
    • Relapse and recovery

    Bachelor of Science in Alcohol and Drug Counseling

    Earning an undergraduate degree in alcohol and drug counseling might make it easier to meet IC RC work experience standards, which allow for substitution of 2,000 hours of work with a bachelor’s degree in a behavioral science. Bachelor’s degree courses in alcohol and drug counseling typically delve more deeply into the psychological, physical and social implications of addiction. Bachelor’s degree programs typically require two years worth of general education classes, followed by 60 career-specific credits taken over an additional two years. In general, applicants to bachelor’s degree programs in alcohol and drug counseling must submit transcripts from any secondary and post-secondary schools that they’ve attended. Some programs also require a statement of purpose or letters of recommendation. Some common course topics include:

    • Drug studies
    • Alcohol dependence
    • Interpersonal skills for the helping professions
    • Co-dependency
    • Addiction and the family
    • Addiction and the law

    Master of Science in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling

    Master’s programs in drug and alcohol counseling often include 40 hours of graduate classes, in addition to passage of a comprehensive exam and completion of a research paper or master’s thesis. Students also might be required to participate in supervised clinical work. These 2-year programs might allow for specialization in areas such as evidence-based counseling techniques or cultural sensitivity. Admission to graduate school requires a 4-year college degree, a Graduate Record Exam score, and transcripts of college work. Some common course topics include:

    • Abnormal psychology
    • Mental health and illness
    • Personality theory
    • Drug abuse theory
    • American drug policy
    • Cultural views of substance abuse

    Find schools that offer these popular programs

    • Clinical Pastoral Counseling
    • Community Health Services
    • Genetic Counseling
    • Marriage and Family Counseling
    • Medical Social Work
    • Mental Health Counseling
    • Mental Health Services Technician
    • Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis
    • Substance Abuse Counseling

    Postgraduate Certificate in Addiction Studies

    Several colleges and universities offer postgraduate certificate programs in addiction studies, which are intended for clinicians already working as counselors. These programs keep current drug and alcohol counselors abreast of developments in the field, in addition to preparing counselors from other fields for a move to substance abuse counseling. A master’s degree typically is required for admission to a postgraduate certificate program. Postgraduate certificate programs in addiction studies typically include around 18 credit hours of courses. Some common course topics include:

    • Advanced group studies
    • Physiology of addiction
    • Approaches to reducing harm
    • Pharmacology update
    • Ethics and boundaries
    • Addictions and violence

    Employment Outlook and Salary Info

    Drug counselors–also known as substance abuse counselors, rehabilitation counselors or addictions professionals–help people who are addicted to alcohol, illegal drugs, prescription medicines, and other substances to become free of the physical and psychological effects of chemical dependency. Job prospects for substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors were expected to grow by 22% in the decade spanning 2014-2024, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov ). As of May 2015, median annual earnings for substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors were $39,980.

    Continuing Education

    The IC RC has set minimum drug and alcohol counselor certification standards, which are referenced by its member boards, including 44 states. Credentials granted by the IC RC include Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Counselor (AODA), which requires at least 270 hours of education, 6,000 hours of work experience under professional supervision and passage of the AODA exam. Additionally, certification as an Advanced Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Counselor (AAODA) can be achieved with a minimum of a master’s degree in behavioral sciences, 2,000 hours of supervised work experience and passage of the AAODA exam.

    Requirements for practicing drug counselors vary by state, with degree programs offering training available at the certificate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels. These programs study the psychology of drug addiction from a multitude of angles, often incorporating internships that help students gain the practical experience usually required to begin practicing as drug counselors.

    Next: View Schools


    Substance Abuse Counselor Salary #certified #substance #abuse #counselor #nc


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    Substance Abuse Counselor Salary

    Job Description for Substance Abuse Counselor

    Substance abuse counselors provide therapy to individuals struggling with issues related to alcohol and/or drug use. They may lead group counseling and support groups, as well as conduct one-on-one sessions with patients; employers may include nonprofit and for-profit healthcare providers, government entities and nonprofit organizations that provide counseling services. These counselors must have an excellent understanding of how to work with individuals dealing with substance abuse issues, including common issues for this population and established therapeutic techniques. It is important for the counselor to be able to work with people who come from a variety of age groups and cultures.

    Generally, substance abuse counselors perform evaluations for patients and develop a personalized plan for recovery; over the course of counseling, this plan may change depending on the patient’s needs and progress. The counselor should have a large network of connections to things such as community services and medical providers so that clients can be referred to these services as necessary. It may also be essential to work with the patient’s medical providers with the patient’s permission. All activities performed with patients should be well documented and in compliance with patient confidentiality laws.

    A master’s degree in social work, counseling or a related field is often needed for substance abuse counselor positions. Previous experience is often required or preferred as well. Usually, the substance abuse counselor is required to be certified, possessing one or more certifications such as licensed clinical addiction counselor, licensed mental health counselor and licensed clinical social worker.

    Substance Abuse Counselor Tasks

    • Manage caseload and documentation
    • Perform substance abuse or other disorder evaluations for patients
    • Develop individual intervention, treatment and recovery plans
    • Facilitate and lead group and education sessions
    • Gather information about patients using interviews, case histories, observations and assessments

    Common Career Paths for Substance Abuse Counselor

    Plan your career path. Drag job titles to investigate a particular path and click on a link to see where particular career can lead.

    It’s not very common for Substance Abuse Counselors to move on to become Clinical Directors. Average pay for a Clinical Director is $72K annually. Becoming a Certified Drug and Alcohol Addiction Counselor is, more often than not, the most common role that Substance Abuse Counselors move into when they’re ready for the next step in their career. A median salary for a Certified Drug and Alcohol Addiction Counselor is $35K. Another frequent advance is for Substance Abuse Counselors to assume a Mental Health Counselor role; in this role, workers often take home $38K.

    Substance Abuse Counselor Job Listings

    Popular Employer Salaries for Substance Abuse Counselor

    Colonial Management Group, LLC, CRC Health Group Corporation, Gateway Foundation, Inc. Behavioral Health Group, and Mental Health Systems, Inc. are among the top companies that take on many Substance Abuse Counselors. Heading up the field in terms of compensation, The Salvation Army offers the most; Substance Abuse Counselors earn $44K on average there. Substance Abuse Counselors can also look forward to large paychecks at Catholic Charities ($41K), Hina Mauka ($37K), and The Phoenix House ($35K).

    Employees at CRC Health Group Corporation, Pyramid Healthcare, Inc. and Gateway Foundation, Inc. can also expect below-average earnings of $30K, $31K, and $32K.

    Popular Skills for Substance Abuse Counselor

    This chart shows the most popular skills for this job and what effect each skill has on pay.

    Substance Abuse Counselors seem to require a rather large skill set. Most notably, skills in Clinical Supervision, Oral / Verbal Communication, Patient Counseling, and Writing Procedures & Documentation are correlated to pay that is above average, with boosts between 4 percent and 17 percent. Bilingual and Masters degree as skills, however, tend to be associated with significantly smaller paychecks. Most people who know Case Management also know Facilitator.

    Pay by Experience Level for Substance Abuse Counselor

    Pay by Experience for a Substance Abuse Counselor has a positive trend. An entry-level Substance Abuse Counselor with less than 5 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $34,000 based on 1,256 salaries provided by anonymous users. Average total compensation includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay. A Substance Abuse Counselor with mid-career experience which includes employees with 5 to 10 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $38,000 based on 454 salaries. An experienced Substance Abuse Counselor which includes employees with 10 to 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $41,000 based on 328 salaries. A Substance Abuse Counselor with late-career experience which includes employees with greater than 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $44,000 based on 103 salaries.

    Pay Difference by Location

    Surpassing the national average by 18 percent, Substance Abuse Counselors in Philadelphia receive some of the highest pay in the country. Substance Abuse Counselors can also look forward to large paychecks in cities like Phoenix (+11 percent), Atlanta (+9 percent), New York (+7 percent), and San Diego (+6 percent). Houston is home to the smallest salaries in the field, lagging the national average by 14 percent. Employers in Los Angeles and Raleigh also lean toward paying below-median salaries (10 percent less).

    Substance Abuse Counselor Reviews

    Q: What is it like working as a Substance Abuse Counselor?

    Substance Abuse Counselor in Indio:

    Pros: I enjoy helping addicts on their roar to recovery.

    Cons: Not enough time working with addicts, to much paper work.

    Substance Abuse Counselor in Paramus:

    Pros: Helping people is the best thing about the job. As well as the pay.

    Cons: The hospital is very understaffed when it comes to the counselors. Because of that most of us are extremely overworked. I work every weekend as well which I hate.

    Substance Abuse Counselor in Lompoc:

    It s unpredictable and challenging in more than one way.

    Pros: I like the freedom to be creative.

    Cons: Poor management leadership, stressfull job, dealing with difficult rude clients at times, doing Med call, and detox Med call.

    Substance Abuse Counselor in New Castle:

    Only if you have a heart for addiction.

    Pros: Helping people learn to change their lives. Working independently.

    Cons: Massive amounts of paperwork limit your therapeutic efficacy. High stress.

    Substance Abuse Counselor in Panama City:

    Pros: It is very satisfying to see clients gain skills and beliefs that enable them to live drug or alcohol free lives, with relationships restored and hope regained.

    Cons: There is a lot of emotional drama as clients come off their drug of choice and begin to learn to live and work with other women. There has also been a lot of drama with management as they learn the ropes.

    Substance Abuse Counselor in Panama City:

    Pros: It is a highly challenging position both in meeting clients needs and in teaching other staff about what is required. It can be very satisfying when client phases up, learns a new skill or insight, or graduates.

    Cons: There is constant drama with clients and management.

    Substance Abuse Counselor in El Centro:


    How to Become a School Counselor #school #counseling #career,school #counseling #careers,school #counseling


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    School Counselor Careers

    What Is School Counseling?

    A person’s school years are often very influential on the rest of his life. It is during these years that a child will grow into adolescence, then into his teenage years. During this time, a person will often further develop his personality, make and break friendships, and decide what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

    School, however, can also be a very stressful time in a person’s life. Students today have to worry about getting good test scores, completing copious amounts of homework on time, excelling in extracurricular activities, and getting along with their peers. Being pulled in so many directions and having this much on their plates can be very overwhelming for just about anyone, regardless of their age.

    Depending on his experiences, a person’s school years might be either the best years of his life, or the worst.

    School counseling, however, is a type of counseling that focuses on helping students make the best of their education. Professionals in this field are typically referred to as either school counselors or guidance counselors. They typically work with several different students over the course of a school year, and help them with a variety of different problems, from class scheduling to substance abuse.

    Today, school counselors are some of the most important and prominent members of a school’s faculty. They’re caring, compassionate, and genuinely concerned with the well being of the children they deal with. if you’re looking to make a difference in a child’s life and want to help him form his future, a school counseling career might be exactly what you’re looking for.

    How Do I Become a School Counselor?

    To become a school counselor you will need to go through a rather rigorous amount of schooling. This includes obtaining a Bachelor’s Degree. then a Master’s Degree. and finally entering into a Doctorate or PhD program. Visit our school counseling degree page to learn more about the educational pathway.

    Featured School Counselor Master’s Programs:

    Why Do We Need School Counselors?

    While in school, it can be very easy to feel lost, confused, alone, and overwhelmed. School counselors, though, exist to help students through the maze of academia.

    The main goal of a school counselor is to help mold today’s young minds into tomorrow’s productive members of society. These professionals work with students on a daily basis in order to help them make the right decisions, meet challenges, and move in the right direction. Without school counselors, a large number of students might slip through the cracks as they struggle with academics or make less than wise decisions.

    What Does a School Counselor Do?

    A school counselor has a number of different job duties and responsibilities; perhaps more responsibilities than any other member of a school faculty. On any given day, these professionals will usually work closely with students, teachers, parents, and school administrators.

    Students are typically a school counselor’s first priority. In general, these professionals are trained to keep the best interests of each and every student in mind.

    A school counselor will often start by evaluating a student’s skills, strengths, weaknesses,career goals, and interests. From there, the counselor can then help the student choose which classes to take. The counselor is also usually responsible for creating each student’s class schedule, which needs to include all of the necessary classes that are required for graduation.

    Career counseling is also another important responsibility of a school counselor. These professionals can help students who are unsure of their career goals choose some possible careers that are right for them. They can also help students take courses and participate in activities that will help them get into good colleges or career programs after graduation.

    Social, behavioral, mental, and emotional problems are also often addressed by school counselors as well. For instance, school counselors will often help students who are struggling academically; being bullied by peers; abuse drugs or alcohol; or experiencing abuse or other problems at home. School counselors might also help students who are dealing with issues such as low self-esteem and time management.

    School counselors will also usually stay in close contact with the parents of each student. Parents are usually informed of any problems that students may be having in school, for example. School counselors may also send parents periodic progress reports and give them advice on how to help their children succeed in school and in life.

    Teachers may enlist the help of school counselors at times as well. They may ask for help with a problem student, for instance, or work with a school counselor to help a student with a particular problem. School counselors may also be asked to help with ho to discipline students as well.

    The advice and concerns of a school counselors are also usually taken into consideration when school administrators are creating or reorganizing school policies.

    Where Do School Counselors Work?

    As their title suggests, school counselors work in educational institutes of all types. They are employed at both public and private schools, from the elementary levels to college levels.

    What Are the Education Requirements to Become a School Counselor?

    In general, most school counselors begin their careers with a bachelor’s degree in areas such as counseling, education, or psychology. When pursuing a school counseling career, you’ll most likely also be required to earn at least a master’s degree in school counseling or education psychology.

    Before becoming licensed, an aspiring school counselor will also usually need to complete a certain number of hours of supervised on the job training.

    What Is the Median Annual Salary of a School Counselor?

    According to the Bureau of labor Statistics, the median salary of all school and career counselors was $53,380 in 2011. Salaries vary by location and are often dictated by the budget of your school system.

    Related Articles

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    Research Careers

    Finding a Program

    Explore Degree Paths

    Work Experience

    Educational Path

    Licensing Resources


    How To Save Marriage, Marriage Problems, Help, Conseling, Stop Divorce #divorce, #sex


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    Long before it was in vogue or politically correct to question the sanity of rampant divorce, Michele Weiner-Davis . M.S.W. best-selling author and marriage therapist, took a stand. She believes that the vast majority of divorces in our country are absolutely unnecessary because most relationship problems are solvable. Read More >

    Are you having marriage problems? If so, you’ve come to the right place. We believe in saving marriages from divorce and are convinced that most marriage problems are solvable. even if your husband or wife doesn’t agree!

    We specialize in helping people stop divorce and get their marriage back on track.

    It’s never too late to save your marriage. Call our office to speak to an experienced Divorce Busting telephone coach. 800-664-2435 If you’d prefer, email us for information. Call us to find out how a marriage sex coach. telephone coach or an intensive marriage counseling session with Michele can save your marriage.
    Read More

    Is your marriage sex starved? Click here to find out.

    Learn the skills you need to solve marriage problems and get your marriage back on track. Michele’s best-selling books, DVD’s CD’s will change your life.


    Miami Counseling – Resource Center #therapy, #therapist, #therapists, #psychologist, #psychological, #counselor, #counseling,


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    We Provide The Help You Need.

    Check Out Our New Group Therapy Workshops!

    Miami Counseling Resource Center is a full-service mental health treatment center providing psychological services and therapy to children, teenagers, and adults for a wide range of mental health, emotional, behavioral and relationship issues.

    Miami Counseling Resource Center:

    The Miami Counseling Resource Center is a multidisciplinary mental health treatment center staffed by psychologists, child psychologists, marriage and family therapists, licensed professional counselors, social workers, nutritionists, and both adult and child psychiatrists.

    Psychological Testing is Available:

    Psychological testing conducted by our child psychologist is available to children and adults for a variety of presenting problems, including intelligence and gifted placement, learning disabilities, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), personality testing, and diagnosis of other emotional and behavioral problems.

    Individual Family Therapy:

    Individual and Family therapy are the predominant modes of therapy / counseling offered at our convenient Miami South Florida offices located in the heart of downtown Coral Gables. Group therapy is provided in the areas of assertiveness, eating disorders, depression, anxiety, divorce, parenting, grief and loss, children s issues, self-esteem, stress management, and other relationship issues.

    Psychopharmacological Management

    Psychopharmacological Management of psychiatric symptoms by our talented child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrists are offered in conjunction with our other mental health treatment services.


    Childhood Development Psychology Programs, Schools, Degrees – Psychology Degrees Online #online #childhood


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    Childhood Psychology

    Home Careers Childhood Psychology

    Help Children Grow Up Strong & Emotionally Healthy

    Child psychologists focus on the mental health and behavior of children and adolescents as they grow up. Child psychologists can help children with issues like emotional health, mental disorders, issues with family and school, learning disabilities, cognitive impairment, or abuse. A Psychology degree in Childhood Development can prepare you to work with children in several different capacities.

    Child psychologists can pursue work in several industries, including:

    Aside from working as psychologists and counselors, child psychologists can advise governmental organizations about child-related policy, develop new tools for child evaluation, or conduct research about the mental health and wellbeing of children.

    What Will I Learn In A Childhood Development Program?

    As a Childhood Development student, you will have the opportunity to investigate a broad-array of core topics as they relate to the physical and psychological development of children. You will have the chance to study the remarkable physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of the brain. Your classes may cover subjects like:

    • Early Childhood Development
    • Child Growth and Development
    • Child Psychology
    • Infant and Toddler Care
    • Children with Special Needs
    • Child Communication
    • Health, Safety & Nutrition

    Your Future in Childhood Development Starts Here

    Earn your degree in Childhood Development! Online psychology programs are allowing more and more students to further their education, while they work—from traditional college students, to working parents and professionals.

    Due to the nature of this work, careers in the psychology field require at least a Bachelor’s degree and graduate-level degrees are recommended for individuals who want to become child psychologists and excel in the field.

    A Bachelor’s degree in child psychology may qualify you to assist psychologists and other professionals in community mental health centers, rehabilitation offices, and schools. A graduate degree in child psychology may qualify you to practice as a psychologist and will generally require at least 2 years of full-time graduate study.

    If you’re looking for more flexibility and convenience, some online colleges offer accelerated psychology programs that you can complete in less time, while you continue to work!

    We can help get you started. Simply fill out the form at the right and we’ll match you to Childhood Development programs that meet your unique needs in seconds. A school enrollment counselor will contact you to answer all of your questions about online classes, tuition, financial aid and more.

    Recommended Psychology Schools:

    Click on a school for more information!


    How to Become a School Counselor #school #counseling #career,school #counseling #careers,school #counseling


    #

    School Counselor Careers

    What Is School Counseling?

    A person’s school years are often very influential on the rest of his life. It is during these years that a child will grow into adolescence, then into his teenage years. During this time, a person will often further develop his personality, make and break friendships, and decide what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

    School, however, can also be a very stressful time in a person’s life. Students today have to worry about getting good test scores, completing copious amounts of homework on time, excelling in extracurricular activities, and getting along with their peers. Being pulled in so many directions and having this much on their plates can be very overwhelming for just about anyone, regardless of their age.

    Depending on his experiences, a person’s school years might be either the best years of his life, or the worst.

    School counseling, however, is a type of counseling that focuses on helping students make the best of their education. Professionals in this field are typically referred to as either school counselors or guidance counselors. They typically work with several different students over the course of a school year, and help them with a variety of different problems, from class scheduling to substance abuse.

    Today, school counselors are some of the most important and prominent members of a school’s faculty. They’re caring, compassionate, and genuinely concerned with the well being of the children they deal with. if you’re looking to make a difference in a child’s life and want to help him form his future, a school counseling career might be exactly what you’re looking for.

    How Do I Become a School Counselor?

    To become a school counselor you will need to go through a rather rigorous amount of schooling. This includes obtaining a Bachelor’s Degree. then a Master’s Degree. and finally entering into a Doctorate or PhD program. Visit our school counseling degree page to learn more about the educational pathway.

    Featured School Counselor Master’s Programs:

    Why Do We Need School Counselors?

    While in school, it can be very easy to feel lost, confused, alone, and overwhelmed. School counselors, though, exist to help students through the maze of academia.

    The main goal of a school counselor is to help mold today’s young minds into tomorrow’s productive members of society. These professionals work with students on a daily basis in order to help them make the right decisions, meet challenges, and move in the right direction. Without school counselors, a large number of students might slip through the cracks as they struggle with academics or make less than wise decisions.

    What Does a School Counselor Do?

    A school counselor has a number of different job duties and responsibilities; perhaps more responsibilities than any other member of a school faculty. On any given day, these professionals will usually work closely with students, teachers, parents, and school administrators.

    Students are typically a school counselor’s first priority. In general, these professionals are trained to keep the best interests of each and every student in mind.

    A school counselor will often start by evaluating a student’s skills, strengths, weaknesses,career goals, and interests. From there, the counselor can then help the student choose which classes to take. The counselor is also usually responsible for creating each student’s class schedule, which needs to include all of the necessary classes that are required for graduation.

    Career counseling is also another important responsibility of a school counselor. These professionals can help students who are unsure of their career goals choose some possible careers that are right for them. They can also help students take courses and participate in activities that will help them get into good colleges or career programs after graduation.

    Social, behavioral, mental, and emotional problems are also often addressed by school counselors as well. For instance, school counselors will often help students who are struggling academically; being bullied by peers; abuse drugs or alcohol; or experiencing abuse or other problems at home. School counselors might also help students who are dealing with issues such as low self-esteem and time management.

    School counselors will also usually stay in close contact with the parents of each student. Parents are usually informed of any problems that students may be having in school, for example. School counselors may also send parents periodic progress reports and give them advice on how to help their children succeed in school and in life.

    Teachers may enlist the help of school counselors at times as well. They may ask for help with a problem student, for instance, or work with a school counselor to help a student with a particular problem. School counselors may also be asked to help with ho to discipline students as well.

    The advice and concerns of a school counselors are also usually taken into consideration when school administrators are creating or reorganizing school policies.

    Where Do School Counselors Work?

    As their title suggests, school counselors work in educational institutes of all types. They are employed at both public and private schools, from the elementary levels to college levels.

    What Are the Education Requirements to Become a School Counselor?

    In general, most school counselors begin their careers with a bachelor’s degree in areas such as counseling, education, or psychology. When pursuing a school counseling career, you’ll most likely also be required to earn at least a master’s degree in school counseling or education psychology.

    Before becoming licensed, an aspiring school counselor will also usually need to complete a certain number of hours of supervised on the job training.

    What Is the Median Annual Salary of a School Counselor?

    According to the Bureau of labor Statistics, the median salary of all school and career counselors was $53,380 in 2011. Salaries vary by location and are often dictated by the budget of your school system.

    Related Articles

    Related Careers

    Research Careers

    Finding a Program

    Explore Degree Paths

    Work Experience

    Educational Path

    Licensing Resources