Man Jumps to Death From Roof of Standard Hotel in Downtown L

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The Hollywood Reporter

Man Jumps to Death From Roof of Standard Hotel in Downtown L.A.

Nikolas Koenig/Courtesy of The Standard

“Because there’s no criminal investigation involved it has been deemed a suicide,” an LAPD spokesperson says

The 24-hour party vibe of the Standard Hotel in downtown Los Angeles ground to a halt Monday afternoon when a man leaped 12 floors to his death from the hotel s rooftop lounge.

The incident occurred as guests crowded the rooftop pool, seeking to cool off during a mid-September heat wave in which temperatures hit the mid-90s.

A Los Angeles Police Department spokesperson confirms to The Hollywood Reporter that a call was placed at 3:49 p.m. alerting them to a male victim who jumped from the roof.

The man landed on the sidewalk outside the hotel on the 500 block of South Flower Street. His name and age have not been released by police.

Because there s no criminal investigation involved it has been deemed a suicide, the spokesperson said. It s now in the hands of the Coroner s Office.

A spokesperson with the L.A. c oroner s office said no further details were yet available. A woman who responded to a call placed to the Standard s front desk said the hotel had no comment on the matter.

Owned by hotelier Andre Balazs. the downtown outpost of the Standard opened in 2002 in what was the Superior Oil Company Building, a steel-and-marble modernist structure originally built in 1956. The building was added in 2003 to the National Register of Historic Places.

The hotel s debauched rooftop space replete with DJs, bars, a pool and intimate waterbed pods that encouraged commingling among guests instantly became a hot draw among Hollywood scene seekers.

In the years since, Balazs has opened another Standard in Miami Beach and two more in New York City.

It was in one of the latter a tower straddling lower Manhattan s elevated walkway known as the High Line that Jay Z famously got into an elevator tussle with sister-in-law Solange Knowles as wife Beyonce looked on.

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Hospice of the Valley – Bereavement Grief Support Care Compassion Illness Death

#hospice of the valley phoenix

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The Community Bereavement Center

Hospice of the Valley’s Community Bereavement Center exists to offer practical support for those grieving the loss of a loved one. As a hospice benefit, the Center provides ongoing bereavement support. As a community goodwill service, we offer educational resources, short term grief counseling sessions, and ongoing support groups to anyone in need. We offer peer support groups for children, adolescents, and adults. Bereavement support is also available for schools, businesses, churches, and other organizations struggling with unexpected or traumatic loss. For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at (256) 350-5585. Brad holds a Master in Divinity degree.

Hospice Bereavement Care

Bereavement services are provided to help patients, families and caregivers cope with the grief that occurs during the illness and eventual death of the patient. Bereavement services are provided through Hospice of the Valley’s Bereavement Center and include individual grief counseling, support groups and other services.

Wish List

There is never a charge for bereavement services, therefore we are always appreciative of donated items. Monetary donations for memory making supplies and resources is also a way of supporting The Community Bereavement Center programs.

Snacks:

  • Soft drinks juice boxes (individual cans/pouches only)
  • Pretzels, chips, crackers, etc.

General Supplies:

  • Blank journals
  • Stickers
  • Board games
  • Sculpting clay Play Dough
  • Jewelry art supplies
  • Stamp pads – washable
  • Unused/old phone books
  • Crayola crayons, colored pencils, markers
  • Sand art
  • Acrylic paints
  • Paint brushes

The Community Bereavement Center





Researchers Identify 8 Signs of Impending Death – WebMD #motels #6

#hospice signs of impending death

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Cancer Health Center

Findings could help families prepare and aid in end-of-life care choices

WebMD News from HealthDay

This content has not been reviewed within the past year and may not represent WebMD’s most up-to-date information.

To find the most current information, please enter your topic of interest into our search box.

“>WebMD News Archive

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) — Researchers say they have identified eight specific physical signs that strongly indicate that someone with advanced cancer is entering the last days of life.

The investigators focused on telltale signs that a patient has, at most, just three days to live. The hope is that this information will help family members and other caregivers better handle an impending death, as well as be more prepared for choices that may have to be made during end-of-life care.

“I think the bottom line is that our study identified several classical signs that can be observed by the bedside by doctors, nurses and even family caregivers, which may help them to determine with confidence that the patient has entered the final days of life,” said study lead author Dr. David Hui. He is an assistant professor in the department of palliative care and rehabilitation medicine at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

He also said that “we believe these signs may apply to both cancer and even non-cancer patients, because these signs occur as part of the natural process of dying.”

Hui and his colleagues reported their findings in the Feb. 9 online edition of Cancer .

To compile their list, the researchers monitored physical changes that occurred just prior to death among more than 350 advanced-stage cancer patients. They were being treated at one of two cancer centers: one in the United States and one in Brazil. All of the patients were in an acute palliative (end-of-life) care unit.

Physical changes were noted twice daily, according to the study.

During the study time frame, more than half (57 percent) of the patients died. And in the end, the authors settled on eight indicators that seemed to most accurately predict imminent death.

Those included: an inability to close the eyelids; diminishing ability to react to visual stimulation; a reduced ability to react to sounds and words; facial drooping; non-reactive pupils; hyperextension of the neck (this causes the head to tilt further back when lying down); vocal cord grunting; and bleeding in the upper digestive tract.





San Jose Personal Injury Attorneys #santa #clara #personal #injury #attorneys, #san #jose


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San Jose Personal Injury Attorneys

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To learn more about how we can assist you in getting the compensation you deserve for your accident, contact us at 408-289-1417 to schedule a free consultation. One of our experienced attorneys will meet with you to discuss your case and your legal options. Our firm handles cases throughout Santa Clara County and Monterey County including San Francisco Bay Area, Central Valley, San Jose, Santa Cruz, Sunnyvale, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Monterey, Carmel and the surrounding areas of Northern California.

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Hospice, Morphine and Preparing for Traditional Catholic Death #motels #in #las #vegas

#catholic hospice

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The first Hospice was started by the Catholic Sisters of Charity in London England in 1905 to help people who did not have a place to die. It was called St. Joseph s hospice because St. Joseph is the patron of the dying. I think the sisters who founded it came from Ireland where there was a similar place. So it is wonderful to have help with terminally ill patients in their last days.

Hospice offers support to people who would like to die at home or die at one of their homes. They give medical advice and a visiting nurse comes once a week. You can call them 24 hours a day to get advice. But you still have to do almost all of the taking care of the sick person in all the day to day activities. Many think Hospice will do everything which is not true.

If you die at home and are signed up with Hospice, you just call them when the person has died and they do the pronouncement of death. This avoids the need to call the paramedics, who are obliged by law in many places, to do CPR on any person who dies at home. It also avoids having to have an autopsy with the coroner (sheriff Department). If someone dies suddenly at home you usually need an autopsy to rule out the possibility of any foul play.

All this said, Hospice has helped a lot of people. But recently it is changing to become an accomplice with Euthanasia. I say this because of the many many people I have done the funerals for and of whom I have visited in their homes under the supervision of Hospice.

An example of this is when we get the clergy record with the funeral, the cause of death put down is Alzheimer. Alzheimer does not kill anyone. Or we will see pneumonia. If you have pneumonia, you need to go to the hospital to get antibiotics, not put on hospice to die.

What happens many times is that the family is told that the patient should not drink or eat because they will aspirate. That means, food or liquids will go into their lungs and cause pneumonia. Well that is a danger, but besides dying from pneumonia, you can die from no water or food.

The Catholic Church s teaching is that you are to give ordinary things to a terminally ill person like medicine, water and food. You do not need to put in a feeding tube, unless it is advantage for the recovery of the sick person. You do not to be put on the breathing machine either or resuscitated. These are extraordinary means to keep people alive.

But people who are terminally ill and still have many months to live can not used things that will hasten their death just because some day it will arrive.

Two extremely important principles to remember are 1) Life is precious and should be sustained if at all possible and 2) Always do what the terminally ill patient wants as long as it is consistent with Catholic teaching. For example, if the terminally ill patient wants to be resuscitated after heart failure, or be intubated on a breathing machine, there is nothing wrong with that because Life is precious and the persons wishes should be respected.

Now the problem I and other priests have observed is that when people are on Hospice care, they push morphine to much. A healthy old man, whom I was visiting on a regular basis, was put on Hospice. He was agitated and out of his mind. But was not terminally ill. The hospice people got mad at the family for not giving him the morphine he refused to take. So often they tell the family that the person is in pain. I have asked many if they are in pain and they respond no. Yet Hospice insists on giving them morphine on the basis that more than likely they are in pain and not expressing it.

This is very dangerous, because the family taking care of the sick person or old person who is crazy with Alzheimer, get very tired. And when they are told by a medical authority, like Hospice, that they should give them morphine, people tend to give in and obey even when the patient is not terminally ill.

We traditional Catholics do not want to see terminally ill persons in pain. God has given us the gift of morphine to help relieve pain. It is a good. But the danger comes when it is used to put people in a drugged state, who are not dying, and then they can no longer pray, eat or drink.

Over and over again I try to hear confessions of people who have not gone to confession in years and want to confess as they lie dying. But because of the morphine, can not stay awake to confess. I shake them, I holler at them, anything I can do to get them to make a good confession. But it is very hard, because they keep falling asleep. Please call the priest before they are on morphine.

So if you are dying anyway from a terminal disease, it is fine to use pain killers to relieve the pain even it it might speed up the natural process. But it should only be used to relieve pain and not to control people with Alzheimer or other normal health conditions that come from old age.

All of us will be dying some day. Do we want to be put on morphine and drugged out of our state of consciousness? I do not think so. We need to have this very clear with all those who love us and will be caring for us in our old age.

All the saints dreaded being fooled by the devil at the last part of their holy lives by the devil. We who are by no means saints, should have more dread of being drugged out when that decisive moment happens as we approach death.

It is so important to have health care directives written out for your family to follow.

To summarize: we want to live as long as we can and until God calls us. We want to be alert and conscious as much as possible to pray as we make our final journey to God. We do not need extra ordinary means (machines or resuscitation). But food, water and medicine are ordinary means of keeping alive. We can take pain killers if they are needed, but need to balance this with our desire to be alert to pray and repent of our sins.

No related posts.





Facing Death #homecare #agencies

#end of life

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How far would you go to sustain the life of someone you love, or your own? When the moment comes, and you’re confronted with the prospect of “pulling the plug,” do you know how you’ll respond?

In Facing Death. FRONTLINE gains extraordinary access to The Mount Sinai Medical Center, one of New York’s biggest hospitals, to take a closer measure of today’s complicated end-of-life decisions. In this intimate, groundbreaking film, doctors, patients and families speak with remarkable candor about the increasingly difficult choices people are making at the end of life: when to remove a breathing tube in the ICU; when to continue treatment for patients with aggressive blood cancers; when to perform a surgery; and when to call for hospice. (read more )

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Readers’ comments that include profanity, obscenity, personal attacks, harassment, or are defamatory, sexist, racist, violate a third party’s right to privacy, or are otherwise inappropriate, will be removed. Entries that are unsigned or are “signed” by someone other than the actual author will be removed. We reserve the right to not post comments that are more than 400 words. We will take steps to block users who repeatedly violate our commenting rules, terms of use, or privacy policies. You are fully responsible for your comments.

Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and by Reva and David Logan. Additional funding is provided by the Park Foundation and by the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund. Major funding for FRONTLINE’s expanded broadcast season is provided by The Bill Melinda Gates Foundation.





Robert Kardashian – Kim, Khloe and Kourtney – s Father #robert #kardashian


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Robert Kardashian Kim, Khloe and Kourtney s Father

Robert Kardashian

Robert Kardashian is the father of Kim, Khloe, Kourtney and Robert Jr. He is most famous for being a lawyer on OJ Simpson’s big murder case in 1995. The trial actually caused a bit of a divide in the family because Nicole Simpson, OJ’s wife, was a good friend of the family. She was murdered and OJ was the prime suspect, so when Robert Kardashian defended him, Kris Jenner and some of the others were very upset. According to Daily Mail a big reason for Kris and Robert’s divorce was her “lavish spending” though Kris has admitted on Keeping Up With the Kardashians that she had an affair with a man named Todd Waterman when she was married to Robert Kardashian. It was this affair that broke up their marriage. While going through the divorce, Kris had stated that there was verbal abuse involved and said that daughter Kim was witness to it, explaining in the divorce petition that: As a result of (Robert) and my irreconcilable differences, there is a tremendous amount of discord at the family residence. On May 3, 1990 Kimberly found me crying after a brutal conversation with (Robert) and she became so upset I had a difficult time getting her to her carpool on time. Kimberly called my office twice that afternoon crying hysterically, begging me to come home. Robert Kardashian was reportedly very angry about the affair and then upset that Kris had moved on with Bruce (now Caitlyn) Jenner.

Robert Kardashian was born to Armenian parents, who ran the largest meat-packing business in southern California. Kardashian grew up to attain a degree in business and later in law. After divorcing Kris Jenner in 1991, he became engaged to Denice Shakarian Halicki, but later married Jan Ashley. This marriage ended in annulment and then he married Ellen Pierson just six weeks prior to his death. On Keeping Up With the Kardashians. we’ve heard Kardashian’s children talk about the bad relationship they had with Pierson and how there was no trust with her. Kardashian died of esophageal cancer at age 59 on September 30, 2003, just two months after being diagnosed with the illness. While some were suspicious as to why Kardashian and Pierson got married so close to his death, Pierson explained to In Touch : I was with Robert for almost five years total. I dated him for three years, and he proposed to me in 2001. We married two months prior to his passing in 2003 and planned a wedding — we didn’t just run right out and get married. In January 2013, Pierson released journals of Robert Kardashian’s that painted an unflattering picture of Kris Jenner. Immediately, the Kardashian brood fired back and called her a lying opportunist. Khloe Kardashian responded with this comment: How can such a piece of trash even mention my father’s name? You married him on his deathbed while he was not even aware of his surroundings. Kim Kardashian stated: This woman he married 4 2 wks before he died needs 2 get a job instead of trying 2 destroy families w fake stories. In response, Pierson told In Touch: I am simply stating the facts and the truth— their father’s truth. I simply delivered hand-written diaries from their father. They are my property at the disposal of whatever I so choose. Robert would have no problem with that. In court documents, Kim Kardashian talked about Pierson’s behavior in her father’s final days, explaining: She changed the locks on the doors when my dad was sick and told us to not come visit our dad, not come see him. We let that go for a few days, then finally we’re like, “That’s our dad, he is dying, we will come over there. Dad, open the door. We know she’s gone. We came back to the house and we got in there and we took a key. And we had to, like, force our way in the house. Pierson’s response was: At the moment Robert took his last breath, none of his children were by his side, opting instead to attend a party at Kourtney’s home.

In an interview with Giuliana Rancic, Kris Jenner opened up about her ex-husband Robert, who she was married to from 1978 until 1991. Kris stated: It was so surreal, the knowledge he had cancer was one thing, but to think it would actually take his life, I never in a million years thought that would happen to him. As for the demise of her marriage, Kris said that she basically wasn’t mature enough to understand the hard work that goes into marriage. Bruce (Caitlyn) Jenner (Kris’ other ex-husband) stated on an episode of KUWTK that when Robert Kardashian was dying, Bruce promised to always take care of his kids. For more information on Robert Kardashian, click through our gallery of his best photos. (Instagram)

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He s not the father of Khloe

So from reading they re nobody special and love money. Trashy immoral fakes. Why people follow anybody in entertainment I don t consider reality TV entertainment. But I only love my children and fee good friends. This mess here is hearsay and what your being told to say and so petty. Money that s all. Money makes people selfish and fake shallow. No real true empathy or compassion. They have no response for life because they along with a lot just buy their feelings. Oh well. God bless em all

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Almanac of Policy Issues: Criminal Justice #criminal #justice #policies #list, #public #policy


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Criminal Justice

Crime in the United States has declined substantially in recent years. Homicide, robbery, rape, and assault have all dropped sharply since highs in the early 1990s. Substance abuse has declined less sharply, however, and drug-related arrests have actually increased steadily, reaching record highs over the past few years. The number of people under some form of correctional supervision, meanwhile, has also continued to reach new highs. In 1996, over 5.5 million Americans (or about 2 percent) were in prison, jail, on probation or parole.

While criminologists (and, indeed, most Americans) agree that more needs to be done to lower the national crime rate, there are sharp differences over how this should be accomplished. Some believe that tougher enforcement policies should be pursued, including increased spending on law enforcement and prison facilities, longer sentences for offenders, and stepped up use of the death penalty for the worst crimes. Others argue that more money needs to be spent on prevention, including social services and education, to provide hope and opportunity for potential offenders.

This section examines all of these issue in depth.

RELATED SITES, ISSUES ARTICLES

  • Political Magazines. The Almanac’s links to political and public policy magazine sites.
  • Public Policy Jobs. Sites listing public policy, lobbying, and media jobs in government and at major national organizations.
  • Questia. Search over 400,000 books and journals at Questia online.

Directories

  • American Bar Association. Voluntary professional association of US attorneys.
  • Cato Institute – Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement. Promoting an American public policy based on individual liberty, limited government, free markets and peaceful international relations. Extensive library of studies, articles and monographs available
  • Center for Court Innovation. Information about problemsolving courts, such as drug courts, community courts and mental health courts, which seek to improve case outcomes for communities and litigants.
  • Equal Justice USA. Seeks to bring into clear focus the racial, economic and political biases active in U.S. courts, prisons, jails and policing agencies, and to expand public opposition to the death penalty.
  • Heritage Foundation – Crime
  • Impact of a Criminal Record. Information about the effects of a criminal record on such matters as voting rights, employment, pensions, and ability to obtain a license.
  • Miranda Rights. News and resources on the history and fate of the warnings given while being arrested.
  • National Consortium for Justice Information Statistics
  • National Criminal Justice Reference Service. Lists publications and links on corrections, courts, crime, drugs, international crime, juvenile justice, law enforcement, research, statistics, crime victims.
  • National Institute of Corrections
  • Progressive Policy Institute – Crime & Public Safety
  • Supreme Court Decisions. FindLaw for Legal Professionals is a free resource for attorneys that includes online case law, free state codes, free federal codes, free legal forms, and a directory of products and services for lawyers. This online legal Web site also includes a legal career center.
  • Urban Institute – Justice

Articles

  • Check and Credit Card Fraud (US Department of Justice: September 30, 2003) — PDF File
  • Family Violence (National Criminal Justice Reference Service: Added August 7, 2003)
  • Criminal Victimization: 2002 (US Bureau of Justice Statistics: August, 2003)
  • Crime Control: The Federal Response (Congressional Research Service: September 12, 2002)
  • Identity Theft: Growing Prevalence and Cost (General Accounting Office: February 14, 2002)
  • Domestic Violence (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: April, 2000)
  • Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics (U.S. Department of Justice: provided through State University of New York at Albany)

Does Death Exist? New Theory Says – No #science,mind.body.soul,brain,biocentrism,physics,albert #einstein,death,death # #amp;


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Does Death Exist? New Theory Says ‘No’

Many of us fear death. We believe in death because we have been told we will die. We associate ourselves with the body, and we know that bodies die. But a new scientific theory suggests that death is not the terminal event we think.

One well-known aspect of quantum physics is that certain observations cannot be predicted absolutely. Instead, there is a range of possible observations each with a different probability. One mainstream explanation, the “many-worlds” interpretation, states that each of these possible observations corresponds to a different universe (the ‘multiverse’). A new scientific theory – called biocentrism – refines these ideas. There are an infinite number of universes, and everything that could possibly happen occurs in some universe. Death does not exist in any real sense in these scenarios. All possible universes exist simultaneously, regardless of what happens in any of them. Although individual bodies are destined to self-destruct, the alive feeling – the ‘Who am I?’- is just a 20-watt fountain of energy operating in the brain. But this energy doesn’t go away at death. One of the surest axioms of science is that energy never dies; it can neither be created nor destroyed. But does this energy transcend from one world to the other?

Consider an experiment that was recently published in the journal Science showing that scientists could retroactively change something that had happened in the past. Particles had to decide how to behave when they hit a beam splitter. Later on, the experimenter could turn a second switch on or off. It turns out that what the observer decided at that point, determined what the particle did in the past. Regardless of the choice you, the observer, make, it is you who will experience the outcomes that will result. The linkages between these various histories and universes transcend our ordinary classical ideas of space and time. Think of the 20-watts of energy as simply holo-projecting either this or that result onto a screen. Whether you turn the second beam splitter on or off, it’s still the same battery or agent responsible for the projection.

According to Biocentrism, space and time are not the hard objects we think. Wave your hand through the air – if you take everything away, what’s left? Nothing. The same thing applies for time. You can’t see anything through the bone that surrounds your brain. Everything you see and experience right now is a whirl of information occurring in your mind. Space and time are simply the tools for putting everything together.

Death does not exist in a timeless, spaceless world. In the end, even Einstein admitted, “Now Besso” (an old friend) “has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me. That means nothing. People like us. know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.” Immortality doesn’t mean a perpetual existence in time without end, but rather resides outside of time altogether.

This was clear with the death of my sister Christine. After viewing her body at the hospital, I went out to speak with family members. Christine’s husband – Ed – started to sob uncontrollably. For a few moments I felt like I was transcending the provincialism of time. I thought about the 20-watts of energy, and about experiments that show a single particle can pass through two holes at the same time. I could not dismiss the conclusion: Christine was both alive and dead, outside of time.

Christine had had a hard life. She had finally found a man that she loved very much. My younger sister couldn’t make it to her wedding because she had a card game that had been scheduled for several weeks. My mother also couldn’t make the wedding due to an important engagement she had at the Elks Club. The wedding was one of the most important days in Christine’s life. Since no one else from our side of the family showed, Christine asked me to walk her down the aisle to give her away.

Soon after the wedding, Christine and Ed were driving to the dream house they had just bought when their car hit a patch of black ice. She was thrown from the car and landed in a banking of snow.

“Ed,” she said “I can’t feel my leg.”

She never knew that her liver had been ripped in half and blood was rushing into her peritoneum.

After the death of his son, Emerson wrote “Our life is not so much threatened as our perception. I grieve that grief can teach me nothing, nor carry me one step into real nature.”

Whether it’s flipping the switch for the Science experiment, or turning the driving wheel ever so slightly this way or that way on black-ice, it’s the 20-watts of energy that will experience the result. In some cases the car will swerve off the road, but in other cases the car will continue on its way to my sister’s dream house.

Christine had recently lost 100 pounds, and Ed had bought her a surprise pair of diamond earrings. It’s going to be hard to wait, but I know Christine is going to look fabulous in them the next time I see her.

Robert Lanza, MD is considered one of the leading scientists in the world. He is the author of “Biocentrism,” a book that lays out his theory of everything.


Best Orlando, FL Wrongful Death Attorneys #wrongful #death #lawyer #orlando


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Top Rated Wrongful Death Lawyers in Orlando, FL

Wrongful Death Law

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Arizona Personal Injury Attorneys #personal #injury #lawyer, #injury #lawyer, #accident #lawyer, #accident


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Zanes Law

Tucson Phoenix Personal Injury Lawyers

The Zanes Law injury lawyers have helped clients recover tens of millions of dollars on their personal injury claims. Over the years, we have helped thousands of clients on everything from normal everyday car accident claims to extremely complex wrongful death claims. We take an aggressive approach to how we represent our clients because we care deeply about them and understand that we are here to fight for them. Our personal injury lawyers are some of the best in Arizona and have helped clients on a variety of injury cases, which include car accidents, truck accidents, bicycle accidents, motorcycle accidents, wrongful death claims, and more. We are personal injury attorneys and car accident lawyers with years of experience.

SERVING TUCSON, PHOENIX MORE

We are an Arizona personal injury law firm with offices in Tucson and Phoenix, but we help clients nationally. So regardless of your location, we can help you on your personal injury or car accident case. Our Tucson and Phoenix personal injury lawyers are here to help you, regardless of where you live.

TUCSON PHOENIX CAR ACCIDENT LAWYERS

If you drive a car, unfortunately sooner or later you will be involved in a car accident. At least that is what the statistics show. If and when that happens, Please call a Zanes Law Phoenix car accident lawyer or Tucson personal injury attorney so that we can help you. This is important. It is important that you have a Phoenix personal injury attorney or a Tucson car accident lawyer who has the experience to get you the compensation that you deserve. Hiring the right personal injury lawyer will help to ensure that you get the highest compensation possible. Although there are many car accident law firms and personal injury lawyers to choose from, it is the Arizona car accident lawyers at Zanes Law who have a proven track record of success. Our personal injury lawyers strive to provide our clients with the best possible representation and our car accident lawyers have successfully helped thousands of clients.

4 WAYS WE CAN HELP YOU AFTER YOUR ACCIDENT

The attorneys at Zanes Law have helped thousands of injured people make smarter, more confident legal decisions so that they are made whole after an accident. Today it’s your turn.

Do you have questions or concerns about health insruance, providers, and covering medical costs?

Medical Bills

Medical bills caused by an auto accident are a cost that should be covered by your injury settlement. If you have health insurance, you should present your insurance card to all medical providers so they will bill your health insurance. If you do not have health insurance, you will need to find a medical provider that will treat you on a lien. This is something that Zanes Law can help you with.

*Treating on a lien: This means that you will not be charged any up-front costs for treatment and the provider will be compensated upon your settlement. This provider would require payment for their services before you receive your proceeds from the claim.

Property Damage Insurance

Car rentals: If you have rental car coverage through your insurance carrier, you should request your car rental through them. It’s usually an easy process and your insurance will be reimbursed if liability is accepted by the adverse party. When you do not have rental coverage, you will have to wait until liability is established with the other driver’s insurance.

Property damage: Open a property damage claim with your insurance company (even if the accident is not your fault). If you have collision coverage on your insurance, your insurance company will fix your car and will work with the other car’s insurance to ensure they cover the costs. Please note, you may be required to pay your deductible up-front if liability has not yet been established. Once it is, your insurance company will be able to get your deductible back and reimburse you. Click here for information about property damage after a car accident.

Bodily injury: Injury claims are completely different than property damage claims. If you are injured due to a car accident, we recommend you consult with a personal injury lawyer or accident lawyer to open your bodily injury claim for you. If you were injured in the accident, you need to seek medical care immediately and you need to speak with a personal injury attorney as soon as possible. If you are injured and choose to speak with the insurance adjuster on your own, you must make it clear to the adjuster that you are in fact injured. However, our advice is that you seek the assistance of a personal injury attorney and that you limit the conversations that you have with the insurance adjuster. Let your personal injury attorney handle all of these conversations on your behalf.

Lost Wages Compensation

Lost wages: If your accident has caused you to miss time from work, you are entitled to some type of compensation through your injury claim. You should document all time you took off and keep all doctor’s notes that justify your time off.

Pain and Suffering: This is a term used in the legal industry that refers to emotional and physical stress, as well as the actual physical pain, caused by a car accident. Injury victims are entitled to compensation for pain and suffering.

Overall compensation: Settlement amounts are directly correlated to the facts of a particular case. Some factors that determine a settlement amount are: types of injuries sustained, how long the individual sought medical treatment, total amount of medical bills, future medical bills, and many other factors. We recommend that you contact the personal injury attorneys at Zanes Law in order to find out what the actual value of your claim is.

Everything

Bills, property damage, medical treatment, insurance, lost wages, and compensation.

If all of the above are concerning you right now, we recommend you speak to a personal injury attorney to answer your specific questions. Yes, a personal injury attorney. Not a general attorney who practices all case types. A personal injury attorney works on these cases all day, everyday and is more experienced when it comes to injury claims. An accident attorney can assist with motorcycle accidents, trucking accidents, construction accidents, premise accidents, bicycle accidents, mass torts, burn injury and class action lawsuits to name a few.

Arizona Law Offices

4222 E. Thomas Rd. #230
Phoenix, Arizona 85018
United States
Phone: 602.999.9999
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Taxus Stent Blood Clot Risk – Boston Scientific Stent Lawsuits #boston #wrongful


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Boston Scientific Taxus Stent Lawsuit

The Taxus stent is a cardiac drug-eluting stent manufactured by Boston Scientific. Recent studies have confirmed that Taxus medicated stents carry an increased risk of serious and potentially fatal blood clots.

Boston Scientific knew or had reason to know of the increased risk of clots (also known as stent thrombosis) they failed to properly warn users and did not provide instructions to reduce the risk of heart attacks and blood clots. As a result, several thousand individuals could have experienced a blood clot or heart attack which may have been preventable.

Taxus stent lawsuits are being reviewed nationwide by the lawyers at Saiontz Kirk, P.A. for individuals who have suffered a:

  • Heart Attack
  • Reclogging of the Artery
  • Death

There are no fees or expenses unless a recovery is obtained. Request a free consultation and claim evaluation .

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC TAXUS DRUG ELUTING STENTS

Taxus Stent Lawyers

The lawyers at Saiontz Kirk are investigating potential lawsuits throughout the United States for individuals who have experienced problems with Boston Scientific s Taxus Drug Eluting Stent.

The Boston Scientific Taxus stent is a paclitaxel-drug-eluting stent which was introduced in 2004. When stents were first introduced during the 1990s they were bare-metal devices.

The Taxus stent is one of two newer generation stents which contain a drug coating on the metal to prevent scar tissue inside the artery and reduce the risk of a new blockage. However, research has shown that the drug coating may actually increase the risk of potentially fatal blood clots, which is considered by many health experts to be a much more serious risk than the possibility of another blockage from scar tissue.

Cardiac stents gained widespread use during the 1990s, but in recent years the drug-coated stents have grown to account for nearly 90% of the heart stents used in procedures throughout the United States. The Taxus stent is one of two medicated heart stents on the market. The other is the Cypher stent. manufactured by Johnson and Johnson.

During the three years since the Taxus medicated stent was approved for sale in the United States, it has become one of Boston Scientific’s top-selling products. Approximately 6 million people world-wide have either the Taxus stent or Cypher stent with the drug coating. Sales for medicated stents have exceeded $5 billion a year.

TAXUS STENT PROBLEMS

The Taxus drug-coated stent has been shown to carry a significant risk of blood clots, or stent thrombosis. The danger of potentially fatal blood clots can extend for years after the stent is inserted into the artery. Cardiologists have expressed concerns regarding the safety of the Taxus stent and Cypher stent, but the manufacturers have continued to minimize the risk and provide inadequate warnings to consumers and the medical community.

Boston Scientific has recently confirmed that their own study indicates the Taxus heart stent carries a statistically increased risk of blood clots for patients when compared with older bare-metal stents that do not contain the drug coating. Similar risks have been found in the Johnson and Johnson Cypher medicated stents. The FDA and Cardiologists have focused a lot of attention recently on the safety of medicated stents and what precautions should be taken to protect consumers from the risk of blood clots and heart attacks.

TAXUS STENT CLASS ACTION LAWSUITS

The lawyers at Saiontz Kirk is investigating potential Taxus stent lawsuits for individuals who have had the drug coated cardiac stent implanted and suffered blood clots resulting in:

  • Heart attacks
  • Reclogging of the artery at the site of the stent, or
  • Death

If you, a friend or family member have the Boston Scientific Taxus Heart Stent and believe you may have suffered an injury, request a free consultation and lawsuit evaluation. Our Taxus stent lawyers can review the circumstances surrounding your injury to determine if you may be entitled to compensation.

There are no fees or expenses unless a recovery is obtained. Our lawyers have the experience and resources to fight large corporations and obtain compensation for injuries caused by dangerous medical products.


Signs of Impending Death a Few Hours Before Death #royal #marine #hotel

#hospice signs of impending death

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What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death?

What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death? Emma’s Story Part 5 will take you there.

Death is getting close. Hours close. All the signs of impending death are there. This is the final stretch. We are nearly there. Nearly there. Let’s follow Emma and her dying.

Emma’s Story Part 5:
A Few Hours Before Death

By now Emma’s daughter Jane had decided to spend the night in the spare bedroom. She had promised her mom that she would be there. Would be there to see her mother and best friend die.

Jane had the monitor to give Arthur a good night’s sleep. A monitor to hear Emma while being in another room. All through the night Jane would wake up and listen. She would make sure that she still heard Emma breathing.

Ever so often she would get up and look. Emma’s eyes were closed. No movement. She was unresponsive. As if in a deep sleep.

Early in the morning Emma’s breathing changed. She would take a breath in and then stop. Stop for as long as 20 or 30 seconds. No breath.

Then slowly her body would start reaching for the next breath. Finally the next breath came. Then the breath stopped again. For another 20 to 30 seconds.

This went on for a few hours. It felt kind of eerie as it was so easy to think: “Oh, this is her last breath.” But it wasn’t yet. Not yet.

I am available as an inspirational speaker
about all aspects of death
including the luminous side of dying
for both US and international events.
Click here to find out more about my talks
and click here to contact me
.

This close to death, as in hours away, our bodies are giving us more signs to look for. More symptoms of dying as mile markers on the final journey home. More ways to know that death is near. Very near.

Emma’s breath, as described above, is called “Cheyne-Stokes” breathing. That kind of breathing consists of inbreaths followed by periods of no breath. Another inbreath. Another pause. Another inbreath. Another pause.

This kind of breathing can last for many hours. Or just for a short while.

Here is a list of your typical signs of impending death:

  • Our breathing is becoming more irregular and often slows down.
  • Our eyes might be closed. Or they might be open or half closed, but without actually focusing on anything.

  • Lips and nail beds can look purple or bluish.

  • Fluids may gather at the back of the throat, resulting in what sometimes is called the “death rattle”. It does not appear to disturb us when we are dying. But it can sound awkward for those sitting close by.

  • Our hands and feet may look blotchy and purplish (mottled). This mottling can slowly move up the arms and legs.

  • Our hearing seems to be the last sense to go. So talk to us. Tell us that all is well. That we are going home. That you love us. That it is all right for us to die. That it is OK for us to finally go home.
  • And again a reminder: not all signs of impending death show up for all who are dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death Continued

    By this time Emma was surrounded by her husband Arthur and her daughter Jane. One sitting on each side of the hospital bed. They took turns holding her hands.

    They had lit a candle. There were flowers some good friends had brought over on a night stand. The curtains were closed to keep the bright summer sunshine out.

    Every couple of hours one of them would get up to give Emma her next dose of liquid morphine. No need to swallow. The insides of Emma’s mouth just absorbed it. Her face looked easy and relaxed under the circumstances.

    There was a pillow under her knees. Her head was still on her favorite pillow and propped up with the help of the raised head piece of the hospital bed.

    Emma was as comfortable as she could be in these last hours.

    The Gifts of These Last Hours

    These last hours filled with signs of impending death can feel very special. They can be like a moment of hushed silence in the middle of a busy street. Like the sense of wonder just before a sunrise on the ocean. Like a holy moment in church full of imagined angels singing. Like a long prayer deeply soothing us.

    They have a similar quality to the time right after a baby is born. That same feeling. That same sense of wonder.

    As if they are like gateways. Gates to the other side. Gates to our souls.

    As if the veils keeping us here on this earth get lifted around death. As if we can reach across to the other side together with our loved ones who are dying.

    We only visit for a short time. They are the ones going there for good.

    Can you sense the sounds
    touching your heart?

    Are you feeling the call
    reaching for you?

    Do you know the voices
    singing your name in light?

    You are so close
    Dear One
    You are so close





    Siben – Siben Long Island Injury Lawyers #long #island #car #accident #lawyer,long


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    Every day, many people are injured as a result of another person or entity’s negligence. This can happen in a vehicular accident, a slip and fall occurrence, injuries on the job, medical malpractice, wrongful death or other. While it is not mandatory to hire the skills of an attorney, pursuing restitution and compensation through an insurance carrier or a lawsuit can be challenging. Because of that, many choose to hire a skilled Suffolk County personal injury lawyer to handle their case.

    The state laws, procedures, statutes and legal processes concerning personal injury are extensive. In fact, there is a statute of limitation on the length of time you have the file for compensation from an injury suffered at the hands of another’s negligence. To ensure that you receive fair compensation, you need to consider hiring an experienced Suffolk County Personal Injury Lawyer . They will work on your behalf to protect your rights throughout the entire process.

    Whether you are looking for a Long Island Medical Malpractice Lawyer . a Suffolk County Car Accident Lawyer . a Long Island Real Estate Lawyer . or a Long Island Bankruptcy Lawyer . Siben Siben has the expertise and experience to meet your most demanding legal needs.

    Siben Siben was founded in 1934 and has been the leading personal injury law firm on Long Island and the surrounding areas for many decades. Many other firms are simply “referral mills”. At Siben Siben, the client is provided with the personal and professional service he or she needs to recover damages or get through trying legal times. We pride ourselves in being the firm that cares for our clients and have been around for nearly eight decades to prove it.

    Call us TOLL FREE NOW

    Click on MAIN CONTACT on our top menu and send us an email.


    Interstitial Lung Disease Arthritis #interstitial #lung #disease #rheumatoid #arthritis, #ild, #ra, #ild


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    RA and Lung Disease: What You Need to Know

    Besides the joints, the inflammatory process that underlies rheumatoid arthritis (RA) also affects other parts of the body, including lungs, skin, eyes, digestive system, heart and blood vessels. RA-related lung complications are the most common extra-articular ( outside of the joints ) manifestations of RA and include pulmonary nodules (small growths in the lungs); pleural effusion (a buildup of fluid between the lung and chest wall); bronchiectasis (damage to the airways); and interstitial lung disease (ILD).

    In fact, it is estimated that 1 in 10 people with rheumatoid arthritis will develop ILD over the course of their disease, making it as deadly among people with RA as congestive heart failure.

    What Is Interstitial Lung Disease?

    Interstitial lung disease refers to a group of disorders characterized by inflammation and scarring of the lung tissue. In the case of RA-associated ILD, the scarring is caused when the over-active immune system attacks the lungs. When the scarring builds up over time, breathing becomes difficult, and patients may need lung transplants to regain function.

    Risk Factors for Interstitial Lung Disease

    The risk of developing lung disease is eight times higher in people with RA than in the general population. However, most people with RA are not affected. Risk factors for ILD include:

    • Smoking. People with RA who smoke are more likely to develop ILD.

    Higher RA disease activity. High levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (antiCCP) antibodies substances that are indicative of more active disease increase the risk for development of ILD.

    Older age at diagnosis. People who are diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis after age 60 are more likely to develop ILD.

    Male Gender. Men with RA have a two-to-three times higher risk of developing ILD than women.

    Treatment with methotrexate and other DMARDs. Several DMARDs, including methotrexate, leflunomide and azathioprine, as well as biologics, particularly tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, have been associated with RA-ILD, according to a literature review published in the April 2014 issue of Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. But Dr. Teng Moua, a pulmonologist specializing in ILD at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. says the risk of methotrexate-induced lung injury is less than 1 percent and is reversible once the drug is stopped. According to Dr. Moua, the benefits of methotrexate far outweigh its risks. However, methotrexate is not recommended for people with existing ILD or RA-ILD by the American College of Rheumatology in their 2012 guidelines.

    Diagnosis of Interstitial Lung Disease

    It is challenging to catch ILD early because it doesn t cause any specific symptoms. Once shortness of breath and dry cough develop, the disease has probably already progressed.

    The diagnostic process includes a comprehensive clinical exam, X-rays and lung function tests. If there are risk factors for ILD or abnormal X-ray findings, your doctor will likely perform a high resolution CT.

    Treatment of Interstitial Lung Disease

    Interstitial lung disease is hard to treat and has a high mortality rate. According to a 2010 study published in the journal Arthritis Rheumatism. once ILD was diagnosed, the average survival in patients with RA was 2.6 years.

    People diagnosed with ILD in its early stages can be helped with medication such as corticosteroids and immunosuppressants and put on the waiting list for a lung transplant sooner. However, these treatments don t work for everyone. The best approach is to treat the underlying RA, although ILD may get worse despite well controlled arthritis.

    Future Direction in Interstitial Lung Disease

    Researchers say an important task for the medical community is to understand the mechanisms behind the development of ILD in people with RA. More detailed knowledge of these processes may one day open doors to better treatments.

    Also needed are comprehensive guidelines for screening and diagnosing ILD in at-risk patients so they can be found and treated earlier.

    How Can You Protect Your Lungs?

    Don t smoke. Get flu and pneumonia vaccines (but always check with your doctor before getting any vaccinations). If you re taking immunosuppressant medications for your RA, you may be at a higher risk for illnesses like the flu and pneumonia, which may cause further lung-related complications. Have regular check-ups, so your doctor can monitor your lungs regularly. Tell your doctor if you have shortness of breath or dry cough right away.

    Updated May 2015

    Want to read more? Subscribe Now to Arthritis Today !


    Santa Clarita Car Accident Attorneys – Call (661) 414-7100 – Santa Clarita,


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    What you do after an accident may affect your claim.

    You may be very unsure of how to proceed. However, what you do after an accident may affect your ability to bring a claim. That is why it’s important to involve legal professionals who can help you through the maze of insurance company processes and potentially help you obtain fair compensation for your injury. If you don’t handle things correctly, your claim can easily lose steam, fall apart, or fail to come together entirely. This website focuses on victims of car accidents in the Santa Clarita, CA area. Car accident injuries fall under the larger umbrella of “personal injury law” and having someone give you straight facts can be invaluable to your case.

    You may be wondering:

    How should I get medical care?
    Should I hire a lawyer?
    How should I deal with the insurance companies?
    Should I give a recorded statement?
    What kind of compensation can I get?
    Do I have a case worth pursuing?
    Who is going to fix my car?
    What about lost earnings?

    It’s wise to consult with an experienced attorney.

    Some people are reluctant to involve a lawyer at the outset – they figure they will handle things on their own and later involve a lawyer “if it is necessary.” However, this is like calling a doctor during your surgery, after you’ve already done too much damage. That’s not to imply that every case needs a lawyer, but if you are involved in an accident where you’ve been injured, you are usually better off getting advice from the beginning. That doesn’t mean you have to hire the lawyer. You can just get advice.

    Talk to someone who can guide you.

    If you’ve had a serious injury from a car accident in Santa Clarita or surrounding communities, it is imperative to talk to someone who knows how the process works. Would you step into a raft down the Colorado River without an experienced guide? Of course not. You would take a guide with you. someone who’s been down the river and knows where all the twists and turns are. The same holds true for bringing a claim against the responsible party as the result of a serious car accident injury. An experienced attorney can help you make good decisions about your injury case (and whether bringing a claim is even a good idea).

    You don’t necessarily need a lawyer!

    Having worked as a defense lawyer for an insurance company, Robert brings a unique and realistic approach to his analysis of your case. In many cases, bringing a claim is not the best thing to do. By the same token, Robert will advise you if bringing a claim has some merit and what you might expect. Also, Robert will advise you if handling your case without a lawyer is advisable. You don’t always need a lawyer when it comes to personal injury cases. In fact, this website has some helpful videos and articles regarding handling your own case.

    During the process, he will consult with you at all the significant phases of your case. Robert will never file a lawsuit or take any significant action on your matter unless you are involved in the decision. Ultimately, the direction of your case is under your control, but Robert will help you by guiding you through the pros and cons. For example, there are economic dangers to bringing a claim that most late night personal injury commercials won’t tell you about. They only promise you “$2.1 million” and it’s easy to be lured into thinking there are no potential downsides to filing an accident claim.

    Understanding your options.

    Robert will help you weigh all your options and will advise you of all the potential downsides (and upsides of course). Having worked for the insurance companies, Robert knows how they will try to poke holes in your injury case. Together, Robert will work with you as you make your way down this “river” and help you manage the twists and turns of your personal injury claim. Your focus should be on getting better and seeking medical attention. not on the insurance adjuster and what he/she is asking of you.

    Therefore, if you are involved in a serious car accident and you suffer injuries due to the negligence of another driver, please contact Robert Mansour for a free consultation regarding your case. Robert serves Santa Clarita, Valencia, Saugus, Newhall, Stevenson Ranch, Castaic, Canyon Country and surrounding communities. If you want a friendly advocate who will explain things to you in a patient, understanding, manner, call Robert today at (661) 414-7100 or go to our “Contact” Page. Also, make sure to view the video library to learn more about your personal injury case .


    Weinstein Law #dallas #personal #injury #lawyer, #texas #car #accident, #jeff #weinstein, #wrongful


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    Jeff Weinstein Dallas Personal Injury Lawyer
    Handling car accident and personal injury cases, class action suits and wrongful death claims.

    For over 20 years, families across the state of Texas have chosen Jeff Weinstein to protect their legal rights and ensure they receive the compensation they deserve for their lawsuit. Our firm has consistently been successful in resolving personal injury claims involving car wrecks and car accidents, 18 wheeler and tractor trailer accidents, slip and fall cases, dog bites, recalled pharmaceutical drugs, and more.

    With an expert in personal injury law and a dedicated support staff, all of our clients can rest assured knowing that they will see any and all parties responsible for their injuries brought to justice.

    For our clients that are injured and unable to work, our firm can often help with cash advances and other arrangements.

    Our Areas of Practice:

    If you have been injured due to the negligence of another party and are seeking a personal injury attorney, we can help. Our experienced lawyers are ready to take on your case.

    If you feel as though you have any kind of personal injury claim, please contact our offices at 1-888-735-9860 or use the form on the right side of this page. Our case reviews are always FREE and we don t get paid unless you get paid.

    The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this or associated pages, documents, comments, answers, emails, or other communications should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information on this website is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing of this information does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. The Dallas, Texas law firm mentioned on this page handles cases throughout the Dallas metro area, as well as the east Texas area. Our Dallas personal injury lawyer is equipped to handle your claim.

    Address: Weinstein Law, 518 East Tyler Street, Athens, TX 75751.
    Toll-Free: 888-735-9860


    Hospices: Mary Potter Hospice – Death and dying – Te Ara Encyclopedia

    #mary potter hospice

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    Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

    Story: Death and dying

    Hospices: Mary Potter Hospice (2nd of 2)

    Dame Malvina Major, one of New Zealand’s most famous opera singers, entertains residents at the Mary Potter Hospice in Wellington just before Christmas in the mid-1990s. Mary Potter Hospice opened in 1979 at Calvary Hospital in Wellington – the first contemporary hospice in New Zealand. It was founded by the Little Company of Mary, a religious order whose mission was to care for dying people. The hospice was gifted to the people of Wellington in 1988 and operates as a non-sectarian charitable trust. As well as the hospice in Newtown, it has outpatient services around the Wellington region. Most of the people who use the hospice’s services have cancer, but it also provides free care for anyone with an incurable illness who is not expected to live for very long.

    About this item

    Alexander Turnbull Library. Evening Post Collection (PAColl-0614)
    Reference: EP/1995/4846
    Photograph by Craig Simcox

    Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

    How to cite this page:

    Ruth McManus and Rosemary Du Plessis, ‘Death and dying – Dying and bereavement’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/30370/hospices-mary-potter-hospice (accessed 8 September 2016)

    Full story by Ruth McManus and Rosemary Du Plessis, published 5 May 2011





    Life Before Death – Consultations with Death – The Last Word –

    #hospice quotes

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    While so many people avoid talking about death and dying like it is the plague, some of our finest philosophers, poets and scholars have waxed lyrical about it. From cynical to profound, reflective to encouraging, inspiring to downright funny… they try and make sense of the eventuality we all have to face.

    “Live as you would have wished to live when you are dying.”

    – Christian Furchtegott Gellert, German poet (1715 – 1769).

    “You matter because you are you, and you matter to the end of your life. We will do all we can not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die.”

    — Dame Cicely Saunders, nurse, physician and writer, and founder of hospice movement (1918 – 2005).

    “The nearer she came to death, the more, by some perversity of nature, did she enjoy living.”

    – Ellen Glasgow, American novelist (1873-1945).

    “Some people are so afraid to die that they never begin to live.”

    – Henry Van Dyke, American short-story writer, poet and essayist (1852 – 1933).

    “Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.”

    – Isaac Asimov, American science fiction novelist scholar (1920 – 1992).

    “Death helps us to see what is worth trusting and loving and what is a waste of time.”

    — J. Neville Ward, Methodist minister (1915 – 1992).

    “The question is not whether we will die, but how we will live.”

    – Dr Joan Borysenko, medical scientist and psychologist (b.1945).

    “As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well used brings happy death.”

    – Leonardo da Vinci, Italian polymath (1452 – 1519).

    “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”

    — Mahatma Gandhi, Indian philosopher (1869 – 1948).

    “The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

    – Mark Twain, American novelist and humorist (1835 – 1910).

    “Forgive yourself before you die. Then forgive others.”

    – Morrie Schwartz, American educator and writer (1916 – 1995).

    “When you learn how to die, you learn how to live.”

    – Morrie Schwartz, American educator and writer (1916 – 1995).

    “Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside us while we live.”

    – Norman Cousins, American political journalist, author, professor, and world peace advocate (1915 -1990).

    “Somebody should tell us, right at the start of our lives, that we are dying. Then we might live life to the limit, every minute of every day. Do it! I say. Whatever you want to do, do it now! There are only so many tomorrows.”

    – Pope Paul VI, Italian Pope (1897 – 1978).

    “. almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

    – Steve Jobs, American Entrepreneur, Apple co-Founder (b.1955).

    “Every man dies – Not every man really lives.”

    – William Ross Wallace, American poet (1819 – 1881).

    “Try as much as possible to be wholly alive, with all your might, and when you laugh, laugh like hell and when you get angry, get good and angry. Try to be alive. You will be dead soon enough.”

    – William Saroyan, American writer (1908 – 1981)

    “I am not afraid of death, I just don’t want to be there when it happens.”

    – Woody Allen, American screenwriter, film director, actor, comedian, writer, musician and playwright (b.1935).

    “For mortals vanished from the day’s sweet light. I shed no tear; rather I mourn for those who day and night live in death’s fear.”





    Famous quotes about death #hotels #reservation

    #hospice quotes

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    Famous quotes about death

    It’s not that I’m afraid to die, I just don’t want to be there when it happens.
    Woody Allen (1935 – ) film director, writer, actor

    Death is the wish of some, the relief of many, and the end of all.
    Lucius Annaeus Seneca (4 BC-65) Roman philosopher and playwright

    Death is no more than passing from one room into another. But there’s a difference for me, you know. Because in that other room I shall be able to see.
    Helen Keller (1880 – 1968 ) American author

    It is natural to die as to be born.
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626) British statesman and philosopher

    Our dead are never dead to us, until we have forgotten them.
    George Eliot (1819-1880) British writer

    Death is just nature’s way of telling you to slow down.
    Dick Sharples (1921 – ) British scriptwriter and author

    They say such nice things about people at their funerals that it makes me sad that I’m going to miss mine by just a few days.
    Garrison Keillor (1942 – ) American writer

    It is impossible that anything so natural, so necessary, and so universal as death, should ever have been designed by providence as an evil to mankind.
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) Irish-born English satirist

    A dying man needs to die, as a sleepy man needs to sleep, and there comes a time when it is wrong, as well as useless, to resist.
    Stewart Alsop(1914-1974) American journalist

    No one can confidently say that he will still be living tomorrow.
    Euripides(480 – 406 BC) Greek playwright

    It matters not how a man dies, but how he lives. The act of dying is not of importance, it lasts so short a time.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author

    How people die remains in the memory of those who live on
    Dame Cicely Saunders (1918 – 2005) founder of the modern hospice movement

    There is no cure for birth and death save to enjoy the interval. The dark background which death supplies brings out the tender colours of life in all their purity.
    George Santayana (1863-1952) American philosopher and poet

    I am ready to meet my maker, but whether my maker is prepared for the great ordeal of meeting me is another matter.
    Winston Churchill (1874-1965) British prime minister

    Many people die at twenty five and aren’t buried until they are seventy five.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) American statesman, scientist and philosopher

    Dying is a troublesome business: there is pain to be suffered, and it wrings one’s heart; but death is a splendid thing – a warfare accomplished, a beginning all over again, a triumph. You can always see that in their faces.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Irish writer

    After your death you will be what you were before your birth.
    Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) German philosopher

    Death may be the greatest of all human blessings.
    Socrates (BC 469-BC 399) Greek philosopher

    Death, they say, acquits us of all obligations.
    Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592) French philosopher and essayist

    At my age I do what Mark Twain did. I get my daily paper, look at the obituaries page and if I’m not there I carry on as usual.
    Patrick Moore (1923 – 2012) British astronomer and television presenter

    When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did

    – in his sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.
    Unknown Source

    All that live must die, passing through nature to eternity.
    William Shakespeare
    (1564 – 1616) English playwright and poet

    When you’ve told someone that you’ve left them a legacy the only decent thing to do is to die at once.
    Samuel Butler(1835 – 1902) British poet





    Chicago Wrongful Death Lawyers – Local Attorneys & Law Firms in Chicago,


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    Chicago Wrongful Death Lawyers, Attorneys and Law Firms – Illinois

    Need help with a Wrongful Death matter?

    You’ve come to the right place. If a family member died because of someone else’s negligence or misconduct consider hiring a wrongful death lawyer.

    A wrongful death claim can result from situations like: a car or airplane crash, exposure to hazardous conditions or substances, criminal behavior, or a supervised activity.

    Use FindLaw to hire a local wrongful death lawyer who can help you recover money and other damages for economic losses (lost wages), emotional distress, and loss of companionship.

    Need an attorney in Chicago, Illinois?

    FindLaw’s Lawyer Directory is the largest online directory of attorneys. Browse more than one million listings, covering everything from criminal defense to personal injury to estate planning.

    Detailed law firm profiles have information like the firm’s area of law, office location, office hours, and payment options. Attorney profiles include the biography, education and training, and client recommendations of an attorney to help you decide who to hire.

    Use the contact form on the profiles to connect with a Chicago, Illinois attorney for legal advice.

    How do I choose a lawyer?

    Consider the following:
    Comfort Level – Are you comfortable telling the lawyer personal information? Does the lawyer seem interested in solving your problem?
    Credentials – How long has the lawyer been in practice? Has the lawyer worked on other cases similar to yours?
    Cost – How are the lawyer’s fees structured – hourly or flat fee? Can the lawyer estimate the cost of your case?
    City – Is the lawyer’s office conveniently located?

    Not sure what questions to ask a lawyer?

    Here are a few to get you started:

    • How long have you been in practice?
    • How many cases like mine have you handled?
    • How often do you settle cases out of court?
    • What are your fees and costs?
    • What are the next steps?

    Want to check lawyer discipline?


    The Hitmen Termite – Pest Control #termite, #termites, #orange #oil, #exterminator, #pest


    #

    “I started using Hitmen Pest about a year ago when my previous pest control service told me there was nothing they could do about our carpenter ant problem. Hitmen Pest got rid of the carpenter ants and they also exterminated some rats. Any problem I come up with, they solve it. And their office staff is very accommodating and responsive as well.”
    Mary K. – Los Gatos, Ca.

    “The gentleman was kind, professional and fast. He explained about the chemicals they were spraying. I have a 17-month old son and was worried about the chemicals that could be sprayed inside and outside the house. I was pleased with their work. We will use Hitmen in the future.”
    Sally S. – San Mateo, Ca.

    “I discovered wood beetle infestation in wood under my laundry room and under the kitchen area of my house. Vince Reel conducted the inspection, drew up a service plan, then provided helpful advice on how to prevent this type of infestation in the future. The Hitmen provides excellent service in the area of termite, wood beetle, and other pest control.”
    Shirley F. – San Francisco, Ca.

    “They came out in a timely manner and took care of the pest issues I was having. I haven’t heard any more noises in the attic or seen any signs of droppings. I have already recommended their services to friends of mine.”
    Marilyn R. – Oakland, Ca.

    “The Hitmen came out to inspect for free. I scheduled an appointment to have them come out and do termite control. The person who came out to do the job was on-time and professional. I’m extremely pleased with the service provided.”
    Scott M. – Concord, Ca.


    Wrongful Death Lawsuits in California #attorneys #for #wrongful #death


    #

    Wrongful Death Lawsuits in California

    In this article, we’ll look at wrongful death laws in California, including what California’s wrongful death statute has to say about who can can file this kind of lawsuit, and what damages are available. We’ll also cover the time limits for bringing a wrongful death claim in California. Read on for the details.

    What is Wrongful Death?

    In California, a “wrongful death claim ” arises when one person dies as the result of the wrongful act or negligence of another person or entity. A wrongful death claim is a civil lawsuit. It is brought to court directly by the survivors of the deceased person, or by the personal representative of the deceased person’s estate, and fault is expressed solely in terms of money damages, which the court orders the defendant to pay to the decedent’s survivors (assuming the lawsuit is successful).

    In these ways, a wrongful death claim differs from a criminal case for homicide, which is brought by the state and in which guilt is penalized with jail or prison time, probation, and other methods. A family in California may bring a civil wrongful death claim to court even if a criminal case is already going forward.

    Who May File a Wrongful Death Claim in California?

    Only certain people are allowed to file a wrongful death lawsuit in California. The relevant statute specifically allows the following parties to bring a wrongful death claim:

    • the deceased person’s surviving spouse
    • the deceased person’s domestic partner
    • the deceased person’ s surviving children
    • if there is no surviving person in the deceased person’s line of descent, then a wrongful death lawsuit may be brought by anyone “who would be entitled to the property of the decedent by intestate succession”; that can include the deceased person’s parents, or the deceased person’s siblings, depending on who is living at the time of the deceased person’s death,

    And, if they can show they were financially dependent on the deceased person, the following people can also bring a wrongful death lawsuit in California:

    • the deceased person’s “putative spouse” and children of the putative spouse
    • the deceased person’s stepchildren, and
    • the deceased person’s parents.

    You can read the full text of the California wrongful death statute at California Code of Civil Procedure section 337.60, et seq .

    What Damages are Available in a Wrongful Death Claim?

    A number of different varieties of personal injury damages are available in a wrongful death claim in California. The specific amounts involved will depend on the facts of an individual case.

    Damages are typically divided according to whether they compensate the estate for losses associated with the death, or the surviving family members for the personal losses they suffered as a result of the death. Losses that are typically attributed to the estate include:

    • funeral and burial expenses
    • medical and hospital bills for the deceased person’s final illness or injury, and
    • lost income, including potential income the deceased person would reasonably have been expected to earn in the future had he or she lived.

    Losses that are typically attributed to the surviving family members include:

    • the value of household services
    • loss of anticipated financial support, and
    • loss of love, community, attention, affection, moral support, and guidance.

    How Long Does a Family Have to File a Wrongful Death Claim?

    Like personal injury claims, wrongful death claims in California must be filed within a specific time period (which is known as a statute of limitations in legalese). California law requires a wrongful death claim to be filed within two years of the date of the decendent’s death. If the case is not filed in the state’s civil court system within two years, the family will almost certainly lose the right to file it at all.

    Talk to a Wrongful Death attorney.


    Interstitial Lung Disease Arthritis #interstitial #lung #disease #rheumatoid #arthritis, #ild, #ra, #ild


    #

    RA and Lung Disease: What You Need to Know

    Besides the joints, the inflammatory process that underlies rheumatoid arthritis (RA) also affects other parts of the body, including lungs, skin, eyes, digestive system, heart and blood vessels. RA-related lung complications are the most common extra-articular ( outside of the joints ) manifestations of RA and include pulmonary nodules (small growths in the lungs); pleural effusion (a buildup of fluid between the lung and chest wall); bronchiectasis (damage to the airways); and interstitial lung disease (ILD).

    In fact, it is estimated that 1 in 10 people with rheumatoid arthritis will develop ILD over the course of their disease, making it as deadly among people with RA as congestive heart failure.

    What Is Interstitial Lung Disease?

    Interstitial lung disease refers to a group of disorders characterized by inflammation and scarring of the lung tissue. In the case of RA-associated ILD, the scarring is caused when the over-active immune system attacks the lungs. When the scarring builds up over time, breathing becomes difficult, and patients may need lung transplants to regain function.

    Risk Factors for Interstitial Lung Disease

    The risk of developing lung disease is eight times higher in people with RA than in the general population. However, most people with RA are not affected. Risk factors for ILD include:

    • Smoking. People with RA who smoke are more likely to develop ILD.

    Higher RA disease activity. High levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (antiCCP) antibodies substances that are indicative of more active disease increase the risk for development of ILD.

    Older age at diagnosis. People who are diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis after age 60 are more likely to develop ILD.

    Male Gender. Men with RA have a two-to-three times higher risk of developing ILD than women.

    Treatment with methotrexate and other DMARDs. Several DMARDs, including methotrexate, leflunomide and azathioprine, as well as biologics, particularly tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, have been associated with RA-ILD, according to a literature review published in the April 2014 issue of Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. But Dr. Teng Moua, a pulmonologist specializing in ILD at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. says the risk of methotrexate-induced lung injury is less than 1 percent and is reversible once the drug is stopped. According to Dr. Moua, the benefits of methotrexate far outweigh its risks. However, methotrexate is not recommended for people with existing ILD or RA-ILD by the American College of Rheumatology in their 2012 guidelines.

    Diagnosis of Interstitial Lung Disease

    It is challenging to catch ILD early because it doesn t cause any specific symptoms. Once shortness of breath and dry cough develop, the disease has probably already progressed.

    The diagnostic process includes a comprehensive clinical exam, X-rays and lung function tests. If there are risk factors for ILD or abnormal X-ray findings, your doctor will likely perform a high resolution CT.

    Treatment of Interstitial Lung Disease

    Interstitial lung disease is hard to treat and has a high mortality rate. According to a 2010 study published in the journal Arthritis Rheumatism. once ILD was diagnosed, the average survival in patients with RA was 2.6 years.

    People diagnosed with ILD in its early stages can be helped with medication such as corticosteroids and immunosuppressants and put on the waiting list for a lung transplant sooner. However, these treatments don t work for everyone. The best approach is to treat the underlying RA, although ILD may get worse despite well controlled arthritis.

    Future Direction in Interstitial Lung Disease

    Researchers say an important task for the medical community is to understand the mechanisms behind the development of ILD in people with RA. More detailed knowledge of these processes may one day open doors to better treatments.

    Also needed are comprehensive guidelines for screening and diagnosing ILD in at-risk patients so they can be found and treated earlier.

    How Can You Protect Your Lungs?

    Don t smoke. Get flu and pneumonia vaccines (but always check with your doctor before getting any vaccinations). If you re taking immunosuppressant medications for your RA, you may be at a higher risk for illnesses like the flu and pneumonia, which may cause further lung-related complications. Have regular check-ups, so your doctor can monitor your lungs regularly. Tell your doctor if you have shortness of breath or dry cough right away.

    Updated May 2015

    Want to read more? Subscribe Now to Arthritis Today !


    Death and denial on the cancer ward: Refusing to accept reality can

    #care of terminally ill patient

    #

    Death and denial on the cancer ward: Refusing to accept reality can be shattering to family, study finds

    Tom Blackwell
    Friday, Sept. 14, 2012

    Naomi Kogan, a social worker at Montreal’s Jewish General Hospital, speaks with a patient undergoing chemotherapy at the hospital. Terminally ill patients who refuse to acknowledge their prognosis can cause their loved ones anxiety, depression and even rage, Kogan and two co-authors found in a newly published study. Christinne Muschi for National Post

    The single parent had been in hospital for months, suffering from terminal cancer but refusing to accept that death was near.

    Even the person’s two young children were unaware of the dire prognosis, recalls Naomi Kogan, a social worker at Montreal’s Jewish General Hospital who cared for the patient. Finally, last month, a teenage daughter arrived at the hospital to learn that her only parent would not be coming home — minutes before the person died.

    “The impact has been devastating, to have only an hour to say goodbye,” said the social worker. “The child is having major difficulties.”

    Related

    Yet such entrenched denial of terminal disease is a surprisingly common occurrence on the cancer ward, said Ms. Kogan, and a new study she and colleagues have just published suggests it can have a shattering impact on the family members who care for those patients.

    Relatives struggling to play along with the alternate reality sometimes have to turn a blind eye as the patient pretends to ignore dangerous symptoms, and are unable to share their own emotional turmoil over the illness, the researchers found. Sometimes, children are left completely in the dark.

    Ms. Kogan suggests that health-care workers dealing with those people face similar angst.

    It’s been such a difficult element in my work for all these years, so challenging and causing so much frustration

    “These [patients in denial] are people who until the end are carrying this protective mechanism like a tortoise shell,” she said in an interview. “It’s been such a difficult element in my work for all these years, so challenging and causing so much frustration.”

    The patients at the heart of her study, co-authored by Robin Cohen, a McGill University oncology professor, and Michelle Dumas, an Ottawa General Hospital nurse, acknowledge that they have cancer, but tend to minimize the seriousness of the condition that appears destined to kill them.

    Despite what would seem like unequivocal evidence to the contrary, one woman in the study remained convinced she would recover, and married her common-law partner — inside the palliative-care ward.

    Christinne Muschi for National Post Entrenched denial of terminal disease is a surprisingly common occurrence on the cancer ward, says social worker Naomi Kogan, seen talking with a chemotherapy patient at Montreal s Jewish General Hospital.

    When Ms. Kogan started her career 24 years ago, the psychiatry department would be summoned in an effort to help such patients face reality, but health-care workers no longer try to disavow them of their beliefs, now considered a coping mechanism that is useful to the patient, at least.

    A Montreal woman, who asked not to be named, said she and her family have been dealing with such a situation for several weeks. A close relative has stage-four cancer and likely has less than a year to live, yet until recently has cheerfully avoided the grim truth of her prognosis. She even talked from her hospital bed about running a half-marathon next year.

    She would act as though everything was just fine. It was impossible to even acknowledge she was sick. It was very frustrating and isolating

    “She would act as though everything was just fine,” said the relative. “It was impossible to even acknowledge she was sick. It was very frustrating and isolating.”

    For the study published in the journal Palliative and Supportive Care. Ms. Kogan’s team identified dying patients at the Segal Cancer Centre who were in denial, and arranged interviews with family caregivers of 16 of them.

    All said they felt it necessary to maintain their loved ones’ sense of denial, but that keeping up the pretence of normalcy took a toll in terms of anxiety, depression and even “feeling enraged.” Some said they were forbidden to dig up more information about the disease or ask probing questions of medical staff, or felt they could not make arrangements for funerals or future finances.

    More than half the patients went so far as to not get the care they needed, masking symptoms that might have prevented them from receiving more of the chemotherapy they considered life-saving, or that would drive home the dire state of their health, the study said.

    One patient refused to disclose such problems as severe diarrhea that should have prevented him from getting chemotherapy, went ahead with the treatment and almost died, prematurely, as a result. Another actually hid weights in his clothes so he would reach the minimum requirement to continue chemo, as patients who are too emaciated are not eligible, said Ms. Kogan.

    He’s been crying for the past three days. He’s got pain in the neck, pain in the back, and he doesn’t want me to talk about it

    Others would not acknowledge escalating pain, or refused to step up their medication levels in response. “He’s been crying for the past three days. He’s got pain in the neck, pain in the back, and he doesn’t want me to talk about it,” one caregiver told the researchers.

    Ms. Kogan said there is not a lot that health-care and social workers can do in the face of such denial, though sometimes they can counsel the family members about their own anguish over the situation, and try to help make practical arrangements.

    She said she was able to convince the single-parent patient, after much prodding, to prepare a will, without actually saying the person was dying. The will was a crucial tool for the family as the children started a new life with relatives.

    Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, an advance-practice nurse specializing in pain management at the B.C. Cancer Agency, said she also encounters patients in denial, an experience that can be stressful and “hard to watch,” especially when young children are involved. In one case, two teenagers were so troubled by their inability to talk frankly to their fatally ill mother, they began acting out at school, she said.

    Like the Montreal researchers, Ms. Beddard-Huber noted that such patients will hang on desperately to the hope of chemotherapy, decline pain medication and other palliative care, and occasionally look elsewhere when conventional medical treatment reaches a dead end.

    “Sometimes it gets to a point where they have to spend quite a bit of money to seek extra treatment and go to Mexico or to China or to the States for special treatment,” said Ms. Beddard-Huber. “They’re looking for that miracle.”





    Physical Signs of Approaching Death #hospice #organizations

    #hospice signs of impending death

    #

    Physical Signs of Approaching Death

    REDUCED FOOD FLUID INTAKE: Loss of appetite and decrease in thirst are common. The body is beginning to shut down and does not need nourishment. People commonly feel it is necessary to encourage the person to eat in the hope of sustaining life; however, food and fluid may cause discomfort. The person may ask for ice chips, popsicles, ice cream or some other food choice. Do not be surprised if only a mouthful or two is taken. When swallowing is no longer possible, mouth care provides moisture and comfort. Do not offer a fluid if swallowing is not possible.

    ELIMINATION: Output of urine and stool will decrease as the food and fluid intake decreases. Urine and stool may also change colour, be passed less frequently and in smaller amounts. Other factors such as immobility and medication may contribute to this.

    Your loved one may lose control of bladder or bowel function as the muscles begin to relax. In this instance it may be necessary to use an incontinence brief.

    Ask the health care professional about the management of these symptoms. It is important to provide skin care and cleansing on a routine basis.

    SLEEPING: Sleeping an increased amount of time is common. It may become more difficult to waken the person. As death nears, the person may slip into a coma and become unresponsive.

    RESTLESSNESS AND DISORIENTATION: Confusion as to time, place and recognition of people, even family members and close friends is common.

    At times your loved one may become restless. For example, he/she may reach out to unseen objects, pull at bedclothes or try to get out of bed. This can occur for many reasons such as lack of oxygen circulation to the brain or changes in condition or medications. It would be helpful to discuss these changes with a health care professional.

    CHANGES IN BREATHING: Regular breathing patterns may change. Breathing may stop for 10 to 30 second periods or there may be periods of rapid, shallow panting. These breathing patterns are normal and indicate the natural progression towards death.

    A moaning sound occurs as the breath passes over the relaxed vocal cords.

    CONGESTION: Gurgling sounds, often loud, occur when a person is unable to cough up normal secretions. This does not normally cause pain or discomfort. It may be helpful to turn the person to one side and gently wipe away secretions with a moist cloth. As secretions build up, keeping the head of the bed elevated (by using pillows) will make breathing easier. Sometimes medications can be ordered to help dry up secretions.

    Oral suctioning may be done, however, this usually causes an increase in secretion production.

    SKIN: You may notice the skin begin to change colour and become cooler to touch.

    The face may be pale and the feet and legs a purple-blue mottled colour. The circulation of the blood is slowing down.

    Although your loved one is cool to touch, he/she is usually comfortable. Offer a warm blanket but avoid using an electric blanket to prevent the risk of skin burns.





    Signs of Impending Death a Few Hours Before Death #hospice #and #palliative

    #hospice signs of impending death

    #

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death?

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death? Emma’s Story Part 5 will take you there.

    Death is getting close. Hours close. All the signs of impending death are there. This is the final stretch. We are nearly there. Nearly there. Let’s follow Emma and her dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5:
    A Few Hours Before Death

    By now Emma’s daughter Jane had decided to spend the night in the spare bedroom. She had promised her mom that she would be there. Would be there to see her mother and best friend die.

    Jane had the monitor to give Arthur a good night’s sleep. A monitor to hear Emma while being in another room. All through the night Jane would wake up and listen. She would make sure that she still heard Emma breathing.

    Ever so often she would get up and look. Emma’s eyes were closed. No movement. She was unresponsive. As if in a deep sleep.

    Early in the morning Emma’s breathing changed. She would take a breath in and then stop. Stop for as long as 20 or 30 seconds. No breath.

    Then slowly her body would start reaching for the next breath. Finally the next breath came. Then the breath stopped again. For another 20 to 30 seconds.

    This went on for a few hours. It felt kind of eerie as it was so easy to think: “Oh, this is her last breath.” But it wasn’t yet. Not yet.

    I am available as an inspirational speaker
    about all aspects of death
    including the luminous side of dying
    for both US and international events.
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    .

    This close to death, as in hours away, our bodies are giving us more signs to look for. More symptoms of dying as mile markers on the final journey home. More ways to know that death is near. Very near.

    Emma’s breath, as described above, is called “Cheyne-Stokes” breathing. That kind of breathing consists of inbreaths followed by periods of no breath. Another inbreath. Another pause. Another inbreath. Another pause.

    This kind of breathing can last for many hours. Or just for a short while.

    Here is a list of your typical signs of impending death:

    • Our breathing is becoming more irregular and often slows down.
  • Our eyes might be closed. Or they might be open or half closed, but without actually focusing on anything.

  • Lips and nail beds can look purple or bluish.

  • Fluids may gather at the back of the throat, resulting in what sometimes is called the “death rattle”. It does not appear to disturb us when we are dying. But it can sound awkward for those sitting close by.

  • Our hands and feet may look blotchy and purplish (mottled). This mottling can slowly move up the arms and legs.

  • Our hearing seems to be the last sense to go. So talk to us. Tell us that all is well. That we are going home. That you love us. That it is all right for us to die. That it is OK for us to finally go home.
  • And again a reminder: not all signs of impending death show up for all who are dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death Continued

    By this time Emma was surrounded by her husband Arthur and her daughter Jane. One sitting on each side of the hospital bed. They took turns holding her hands.

    They had lit a candle. There were flowers some good friends had brought over on a night stand. The curtains were closed to keep the bright summer sunshine out.

    Every couple of hours one of them would get up to give Emma her next dose of liquid morphine. No need to swallow. The insides of Emma’s mouth just absorbed it. Her face looked easy and relaxed under the circumstances.

    There was a pillow under her knees. Her head was still on her favorite pillow and propped up with the help of the raised head piece of the hospital bed.

    Emma was as comfortable as she could be in these last hours.

    The Gifts of These Last Hours

    These last hours filled with signs of impending death can feel very special. They can be like a moment of hushed silence in the middle of a busy street. Like the sense of wonder just before a sunrise on the ocean. Like a holy moment in church full of imagined angels singing. Like a long prayer deeply soothing us.

    They have a similar quality to the time right after a baby is born. That same feeling. That same sense of wonder.

    As if they are like gateways. Gates to the other side. Gates to our souls.

    As if the veils keeping us here on this earth get lifted around death. As if we can reach across to the other side together with our loved ones who are dying.

    We only visit for a short time. They are the ones going there for good.

    Can you sense the sounds
    touching your heart?

    Are you feeling the call
    reaching for you?

    Do you know the voices
    singing your name in light?

    You are so close
    Dear One
    You are so close





    Hospice, Morphine and Preparing for Traditional Catholic Death #palliative #care #uk

    #catholic hospice

    #

    The first Hospice was started by the Catholic Sisters of Charity in London England in 1905 to help people who did not have a place to die. It was called St. Joseph s hospice because St. Joseph is the patron of the dying. I think the sisters who founded it came from Ireland where there was a similar place. So it is wonderful to have help with terminally ill patients in their last days.

    Hospice offers support to people who would like to die at home or die at one of their homes. They give medical advice and a visiting nurse comes once a week. You can call them 24 hours a day to get advice. But you still have to do almost all of the taking care of the sick person in all the day to day activities. Many think Hospice will do everything which is not true.

    If you die at home and are signed up with Hospice, you just call them when the person has died and they do the pronouncement of death. This avoids the need to call the paramedics, who are obliged by law in many places, to do CPR on any person who dies at home. It also avoids having to have an autopsy with the coroner (sheriff Department). If someone dies suddenly at home you usually need an autopsy to rule out the possibility of any foul play.

    All this said, Hospice has helped a lot of people. But recently it is changing to become an accomplice with Euthanasia. I say this because of the many many people I have done the funerals for and of whom I have visited in their homes under the supervision of Hospice.

    An example of this is when we get the clergy record with the funeral, the cause of death put down is Alzheimer. Alzheimer does not kill anyone. Or we will see pneumonia. If you have pneumonia, you need to go to the hospital to get antibiotics, not put on hospice to die.

    What happens many times is that the family is told that the patient should not drink or eat because they will aspirate. That means, food or liquids will go into their lungs and cause pneumonia. Well that is a danger, but besides dying from pneumonia, you can die from no water or food.

    The Catholic Church s teaching is that you are to give ordinary things to a terminally ill person like medicine, water and food. You do not need to put in a feeding tube, unless it is advantage for the recovery of the sick person. You do not to be put on the breathing machine either or resuscitated. These are extraordinary means to keep people alive.

    But people who are terminally ill and still have many months to live can not used things that will hasten their death just because some day it will arrive.

    Two extremely important principles to remember are 1) Life is precious and should be sustained if at all possible and 2) Always do what the terminally ill patient wants as long as it is consistent with Catholic teaching. For example, if the terminally ill patient wants to be resuscitated after heart failure, or be intubated on a breathing machine, there is nothing wrong with that because Life is precious and the persons wishes should be respected.

    Now the problem I and other priests have observed is that when people are on Hospice care, they push morphine to much. A healthy old man, whom I was visiting on a regular basis, was put on Hospice. He was agitated and out of his mind. But was not terminally ill. The hospice people got mad at the family for not giving him the morphine he refused to take. So often they tell the family that the person is in pain. I have asked many if they are in pain and they respond no. Yet Hospice insists on giving them morphine on the basis that more than likely they are in pain and not expressing it.

    This is very dangerous, because the family taking care of the sick person or old person who is crazy with Alzheimer, get very tired. And when they are told by a medical authority, like Hospice, that they should give them morphine, people tend to give in and obey even when the patient is not terminally ill.

    We traditional Catholics do not want to see terminally ill persons in pain. God has given us the gift of morphine to help relieve pain. It is a good. But the danger comes when it is used to put people in a drugged state, who are not dying, and then they can no longer pray, eat or drink.

    Over and over again I try to hear confessions of people who have not gone to confession in years and want to confess as they lie dying. But because of the morphine, can not stay awake to confess. I shake them, I holler at them, anything I can do to get them to make a good confession. But it is very hard, because they keep falling asleep. Please call the priest before they are on morphine.

    So if you are dying anyway from a terminal disease, it is fine to use pain killers to relieve the pain even it it might speed up the natural process. But it should only be used to relieve pain and not to control people with Alzheimer or other normal health conditions that come from old age.

    All of us will be dying some day. Do we want to be put on morphine and drugged out of our state of consciousness? I do not think so. We need to have this very clear with all those who love us and will be caring for us in our old age.

    All the saints dreaded being fooled by the devil at the last part of their holy lives by the devil. We who are by no means saints, should have more dread of being drugged out when that decisive moment happens as we approach death.

    It is so important to have health care directives written out for your family to follow.

    To summarize: we want to live as long as we can and until God calls us. We want to be alert and conscious as much as possible to pray as we make our final journey to God. We do not need extra ordinary means (machines or resuscitation). But food, water and medicine are ordinary means of keeping alive. We can take pain killers if they are needed, but need to balance this with our desire to be alert to pray and repent of our sins.

    No related posts.





    Signs of Approaching Death a Few Days Before Death #how #to #start

    #hospice signs of dying

    #

    What signs of approaching death can we expect
    a few days before death?

    Read about the signs of approaching death a few days before death occurs by following Emma’s Story Part 4.

    Our journey into dying is moving closer to its final destination. There are more signs of approaching death. We are down to a few days.

    Just a few more days to be in this particular body at this particular time. Nothing more to do. Just letting go. Just letting go.

    Emma’s Story Part 4: A Few Days Before Death

    One afternoon close to sunset Emma woke up out her slumber. First she looked at Arthur with her big blue eyes. Then she looked out of the window of her living room.

    She asked whether Arthur would help her go outside. She wanted to sit on her lovely deck, look out at her back yard and enjoy the warm summer breeze. It was June and all her pots were in bloom.

    Emma and Arthur sat out there for while. Not saying much.

    Arthur told her about the friends who had brought over her favorite pot roast dinner. And some home grown raspberries. Freshly picked that morning.

    Small things. Things that are part of the fabric of life between two married people. Married for a long time.

    After about an hour Emma was ready to go back to bed.

    That was the last time Emma left the house and her bed.

    I am available as an inspirational speaker
    about all aspects of death
    including the luminous side of dying
    for both US and international events.
    Click here to find out more about my talks
    and click here to contact me
    .

    A few weeks before death one day might be very different. Different in terms of all the other days. It will stand out, for sure. It has a definite place among the signs of approaching death.

    When we are dying we might be deeply lost in our inner world. Not wanting to see anyone. Or talk to anyone. Not even to our closest friends or family members.

    All days are the same. Look the same. Not much happening.

    One day is different.

    We might want to go for drive to see the colorful fall leaves. We might ask for some food from our favorite restaurant. A whole meal. We might want to take a roll in our wheel chair through the neighborhood.

    This different day is called a Golden Day or Golden Moment.

    As if our life force flares up one more time. In brilliant colors. In a spectacular display of one more day of life. One more hour of life. One more moment of life.

    Just one more time.

    And then – time to go now. Time to let the body do its thing. Time to move a step closer to death. We passed another sign of approaching death.

    Emma’s Story Part 4: A Few Days Before Death Continued

    After Emma’s one more Golden Afternoon with Arthur she went back to bed and back to sleeping. Her sleep was getting deeper. She was harder to rouse. She would not talk anymore. Even if we asked her a question. There was no response.

    By that time she was neither eating nor drinking anymore. She was not moving her body on her own anymore. She just lay there in her bed. Her head raised up. Resting peacefully. On her way home.

    A Few Physical Signs of Approaching Death

    At this point most of the signs that death is getting close, are physical signs. These are signs of our bodies shutting down dying. Just shutting down. Slowly but surely for some. Rapidly and all at once for others.

    My friend Allison was caring for an 85 year old gentleman, called Bill. She had been with him for 2 years. A few days ago he had been admitted to hospice as he was going down fast.

    It was a Sunday afternoon. Bill was dozing in his favorite chair. Allison had just turned around to put away some towels.

    When she looked back at Bill he had died. Just like that. No build up. No waiting for him to take his last breath. He just died.

    The following changes in our bodies can be clearly observed when we look closely. When we allow ourselves to get close to this loved one dying. Our loved one dying.

    Here are a few typical symptoms of our bodies shutting down while dying:

    • Our bodies are too weak to stand up or even sit up anymore.
  • We may be sweating more.

  • Our body temperature can be lower by a degree or more.

  • Our pulse may become irregular and may either slow down or speed up.

  • Our blood pressure can be lower.

  • We are unable to swallow fluids anymore. Even those muscles are too weak.

  • Our stomachs cannot digest food anymore. Not enough stomach acid is being produced.

  • No more bowel movements without suppositories. Our bowels have stopped moving food along.

  • Very little to no urine output. As there is no liquid going in, there is very little or no liquid coming out.

  • Our skin color may change as circulation becomes diminished.
  • As you can see from this list, a number of processes in our bodies are slowing down or stop altogether. As preparation for our dying.

    Just another miraculous thing our bodies know how to do without us telling them.

    Dying is so much part of being human. As much a part as living is. As much a part as being born is.

    Emma’s Story Part 4: A Few Days Before Death Continued

    By the next morning Emma was not looking so peaceful anymore. There was a frown on her face. Especially between her eyebrows.

    Ever so often she was moving her head back and forth. She was even moaning a bit.

    Emma was definitely not feeling comfortable. Something was irritating her. This was hard to watch.

    Sometimes we can feel uncomfortable when our bodies are breaking down. It can be like one big irritation.

    One of the signs of approaching death is called “terminal agitation”. It is most visible in our faces. But we can feel it all over our bodies.

    We might have a frown between our eyebrows. We might moan and groan. We might move our heads back and forth.

    This phase can be intense for the one dying as we are not used to seeing a body breaking down. A body stopping all its normal functions. At this point in our journey modern pain medication definitely can make a difference.

    Imagine being in a body where you cannot move your limbs anymore. You are too weak. You cannot say anything. Your mouth is too dry. You are only half awake. But you are feeling very uncomfortable.

    To me this would be hell. Feeling in pain and not being able to do anything about it. Or even say anything about it.

    When this happens, it really helps to have been admitted to hospice (at least in the USA). Or to get admitted. Even at that late stage.

    By being on hospice a trained nurse will stop by daily to prescribe and often deliver any pain medication that would be helpful. The hospice nurse is also able to help us decipher some of the signs of approaching death. Plus a nurse is on call 24/7 in case additional help or medication is needed.

    A Word About Knowing When Death Might Occur

    Caregivers, nurses and doctors are often asked: “How much longer till my loved one will die?”. To be honest, no one can accurately predict, when our loved ones will actually die. There are too many factors involved which determine the time of death.

    Jerrye Wright, the director of Ashland Hospice, shared with me an interesting observation: What we can do, when we are around someone who is dying, is to simply watch for any changes occurring.

    If the changes occur every few weeks, we or our loved ones have weeks to live. Changes like loss of appetite or emotional releases.

    If the changes occur within days, we or our loved ones have days to live. Changes like being unable to swallow fluids.

    If the changes occur within hours, we or our loved ones have hours to live. Changes like terminal agitation.

    I liked this way of looking at dying as it empowers us to watch for these changes and then make our own rough estimates.

    Click here to read Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death

    Return from Signs of Approaching Death to Emma’s Story Part 1

    Return from Signs of Approaching Death to A Good Dying Home

    In loving and celebrating our letting go into death’s arms
    We are graced with being birthed breathtakingly into more living

    I give permission to copy and redistribute this content as long as full credit is given and it is distributed freely. © 2013 A-Good-Dying.com
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    What Signs Indicate Death is Near? #hotels #reservation

    #hospice signs of death

    #

    What signs indicate death is near?

    The following provides an overview of the signs and symptoms indicating death is near. Please remember each patient’s experience is unique, and these may vary.

    Patients meet the medical guidelines for hospice care if they have a prognosis of six months or less. If you see these signs of decline, please contact us for more information about starting hospice services.

    Three to Six Months Prior to Death

    • Recurrent infections
    • Continued weight loss
    • Swallowing difficulties
    • Shortness of breath
    • Nausea/vomiting that does not respond well to medications
    • Increased pain
    • Increased edema or ascites
    • Progressive weakness/fatigue
    • Change in level of consciousness
    • Increased confusion
    • Increased ER visits/hospitalizations
    • Decrease in ability to perform ADLs
    • Increased skin fragility

    One to Three months Prior to Death

    • May withdraw from friends and family
    • Spends more time sleeping
    • Gradual decrease in eating and fluid intake

    One to Two Weeks Prior to Death

    • Sleeping most of the time, but can be roused
    • Changes in skin color
    • Decrease in blood pressure
    • Changes in breathing
    • Continued decrease in food and fluids

    One to Two Days Prior to Death

    • Difficulty or inability to swallow
    • Decrease in blood pressure
    • Changes in breathing
    • Congestion or respiratory secretions
    • Restlessness
    • Sleeping most of the time
    • Mottling—blotchiness to skin
    • Surge of energy or alertness
    • Fluctuating body temperature
    • May or may not have pain

    Hospice care provides relief from pain and symptoms at the end of life. Learn how to refer a patient to hospice care.

    We can provide answers to the common questions you might have:





    Hospice Patients Alliance – Signs of Approaching Death #home #healthcare

    #hospice stages of dying

    #

    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF APPROACHING DEATH

    When confronted with approaching death, many of us wonder when exactly will death occur. Many of us ask the question, How much time is left? This can often be a difficult question to answer. The dying do not always cooperate with the predictions of the doctors, nurses or others who tell family members or patients how much time is left.

    Hospice staff have frequently observed that even the predictions by physicians about the length of time from the original diagnosis till death is often inaccurate. Many families report that the doctor told us he [the patient] only had so much time left, and he’s lived much longer than that. . or a similar story. Statistical averages do not tell us exactly how long a particular patient has to live; they can only serve as a general guideline or point of reference.

    Although statistical averages do not help much in an individual case, there are specific signs of approaching death which may be observed, and which do indicate that death is approaching nearer. Each individual patient is different. Not all individuals will show all of these signs, nor are all of the signs of approaching death always present in every case.

    Depending on the type of terminal illness and the metabolic condition of the patient, different signs and symptoms arise. An experienced physician or hospice nurse can often explain these signs and symptoms to you. If you have questions about changes in your loved one’s condition, ask your hospice nurse for an explanation, that is one of the reasons she is serving you.

    There are two phases which arise prior to the actual time of death: the pre-active phase of dying, and the active phase of dying. On average, the preactive phase of dying may last approximately two weeks, while on average, the active phase of dying lasts about three days.

    We say on average because there are often exceptions to the rule. Some patients have exhibited signs of the preactive phase of dying for a month or longer, while some patients exhibit signs of the active phase of dying for two weeks. Many hospice staff have been fooled into thinking that death was about to occur, when the patient had unusually low blood pressure or longer periods of pausing in the breathing rhythym. However, some patients with these symptoms can suddenly recover and live a week, a month or even longer. Low blood pressure alone or long periods of pausing in the breathing (apnea) are not reliable indicators of imminent death in all cases. God alone knows for sure when death will occur.

    Signs of the preactive phase of dying:

    increased restlessness, confusion, agitation, inability to stay content in one position and insisting on changing positions frequently (exhausting family and caregivers)

    withdrawal from active participation in social activities

    increased periods of sleep, lethargy

    decreased intake of food and liquids

    beginning to show periods of pausing in the breathing (apnea) whether awake or sleeping

    patient reports seeing persons who had already died

    patient states that he or she is dying

    patient requests family visit to settle unfinished business and tie up loose ends

    inability to heal or recover from wounds or infections

    increased swelling (edema) of either the extremities or the entire body

    Signs of the Active Phase of Dying

    inability to arouse patient at all (coma) or, ability to only arouse patient with great effort but patient quickly returns to severely unresponsive state (semi-coma)

    severe agitation in patient, hallucinations, acting crazy and not in patient’s normal manner or personality

    much longer periods of pausing in the breathing (apnea)

    dramatic changes in the breathing pattern including apnea, but also including very rapid breathing or cyclic changes in the patterns of breathing (such as slow progressing to very fast and then slow again, or shallow progressing to very deep breathing while also changing rate of breathing to very fast and then slow)

    other very abnormal breathing patterns

    severely increased respiratory congestion or fluid buildup in lungs

    inability to swallow any fluids at all (not taking any food by mouth voluntarily as well)

    patient states that he or she is going to die

    patient breathing through wide open mouth continuously and no longer can speak even if awake

    urinary or bowel incontinence in a patient who was not incontinent before

    marked decrease in urine output and darkening color of urine or very abnormal colors (such as red or brown)

    blood pressure dropping dramatically from patient’s normal blood pressure range (more than a 20 or 30 point drop)

    systolic blood pressure below 70, diastolic blood pressure below 50

    patient’s extremities (such as hands, arms, feet and legs) feel very cold to touch

    patient complains that his or her legs/feet are numb and cannot be felt at all

    cyanosis, or a bluish or purple coloring to the patients arms and legs, especially the feet, knees, and hands)

    patient’s body is held in rigid unchanging position

    jaw drop; the patient’s jaw is no longer held straight and may drop to the side their head is lying towards

    Although all patients do not show all of these signs, many of these signs will be seen in some patients. The reason for the tradition of keeping a vigil when someone is dying is that we really don’t know exactly when death will occur until it is obviously happening. If you wish to be there with your loved one when death occurs, keeping a vigil at the bedside is part of the process.

    Always remember that your loved one can often hear you even up till the very end, even though he or she cannot respond by speaking. Your loving presence at the bedside can be a great expression of your love for your loved one and help him to feel calmer and more at peace at the time of death.

    If you have questions about any of the changing signs or symptoms appearing in your loved one, ask your hospice nurse to explain them to you.





    Death and denial on the cancer ward: Refusing to accept reality can

    #care of terminally ill patient

    #

    Death and denial on the cancer ward: Refusing to accept reality can be shattering to family, study finds

    Tom Blackwell
    Friday, Sept. 14, 2012

    Naomi Kogan, a social worker at Montreal’s Jewish General Hospital, speaks with a patient undergoing chemotherapy at the hospital. Terminally ill patients who refuse to acknowledge their prognosis can cause their loved ones anxiety, depression and even rage, Kogan and two co-authors found in a newly published study. Christinne Muschi for National Post

    The single parent had been in hospital for months, suffering from terminal cancer but refusing to accept that death was near.

    Even the person’s two young children were unaware of the dire prognosis, recalls Naomi Kogan, a social worker at Montreal’s Jewish General Hospital who cared for the patient. Finally, last month, a teenage daughter arrived at the hospital to learn that her only parent would not be coming home — minutes before the person died.

    “The impact has been devastating, to have only an hour to say goodbye,” said the social worker. “The child is having major difficulties.”

    Related

    Yet such entrenched denial of terminal disease is a surprisingly common occurrence on the cancer ward, said Ms. Kogan, and a new study she and colleagues have just published suggests it can have a shattering impact on the family members who care for those patients.

    Relatives struggling to play along with the alternate reality sometimes have to turn a blind eye as the patient pretends to ignore dangerous symptoms, and are unable to share their own emotional turmoil over the illness, the researchers found. Sometimes, children are left completely in the dark.

    Ms. Kogan suggests that health-care workers dealing with those people face similar angst.

    It’s been such a difficult element in my work for all these years, so challenging and causing so much frustration

    “These [patients in denial] are people who until the end are carrying this protective mechanism like a tortoise shell,” she said in an interview. “It’s been such a difficult element in my work for all these years, so challenging and causing so much frustration.”

    The patients at the heart of her study, co-authored by Robin Cohen, a McGill University oncology professor, and Michelle Dumas, an Ottawa General Hospital nurse, acknowledge that they have cancer, but tend to minimize the seriousness of the condition that appears destined to kill them.

    Despite what would seem like unequivocal evidence to the contrary, one woman in the study remained convinced she would recover, and married her common-law partner — inside the palliative-care ward.

    Christinne Muschi for National Post Entrenched denial of terminal disease is a surprisingly common occurrence on the cancer ward, says social worker Naomi Kogan, seen talking with a chemotherapy patient at Montreal s Jewish General Hospital.

    When Ms. Kogan started her career 24 years ago, the psychiatry department would be summoned in an effort to help such patients face reality, but health-care workers no longer try to disavow them of their beliefs, now considered a coping mechanism that is useful to the patient, at least.

    A Montreal woman, who asked not to be named, said she and her family have been dealing with such a situation for several weeks. A close relative has stage-four cancer and likely has less than a year to live, yet until recently has cheerfully avoided the grim truth of her prognosis. She even talked from her hospital bed about running a half-marathon next year.

    She would act as though everything was just fine. It was impossible to even acknowledge she was sick. It was very frustrating and isolating

    “She would act as though everything was just fine,” said the relative. “It was impossible to even acknowledge she was sick. It was very frustrating and isolating.”

    For the study published in the journal Palliative and Supportive Care. Ms. Kogan’s team identified dying patients at the Segal Cancer Centre who were in denial, and arranged interviews with family caregivers of 16 of them.

    All said they felt it necessary to maintain their loved ones’ sense of denial, but that keeping up the pretence of normalcy took a toll in terms of anxiety, depression and even “feeling enraged.” Some said they were forbidden to dig up more information about the disease or ask probing questions of medical staff, or felt they could not make arrangements for funerals or future finances.

    More than half the patients went so far as to not get the care they needed, masking symptoms that might have prevented them from receiving more of the chemotherapy they considered life-saving, or that would drive home the dire state of their health, the study said.

    One patient refused to disclose such problems as severe diarrhea that should have prevented him from getting chemotherapy, went ahead with the treatment and almost died, prematurely, as a result. Another actually hid weights in his clothes so he would reach the minimum requirement to continue chemo, as patients who are too emaciated are not eligible, said Ms. Kogan.

    He’s been crying for the past three days. He’s got pain in the neck, pain in the back, and he doesn’t want me to talk about it

    Others would not acknowledge escalating pain, or refused to step up their medication levels in response. “He’s been crying for the past three days. He’s got pain in the neck, pain in the back, and he doesn’t want me to talk about it,” one caregiver told the researchers.

    Ms. Kogan said there is not a lot that health-care and social workers can do in the face of such denial, though sometimes they can counsel the family members about their own anguish over the situation, and try to help make practical arrangements.

    She said she was able to convince the single-parent patient, after much prodding, to prepare a will, without actually saying the person was dying. The will was a crucial tool for the family as the children started a new life with relatives.

    Elizabeth Beddard-Huber, an advance-practice nurse specializing in pain management at the B.C. Cancer Agency, said she also encounters patients in denial, an experience that can be stressful and “hard to watch,” especially when young children are involved. In one case, two teenagers were so troubled by their inability to talk frankly to their fatally ill mother, they began acting out at school, she said.

    Like the Montreal researchers, Ms. Beddard-Huber noted that such patients will hang on desperately to the hope of chemotherapy, decline pain medication and other palliative care, and occasionally look elsewhere when conventional medical treatment reaches a dead end.

    “Sometimes it gets to a point where they have to spend quite a bit of money to seek extra treatment and go to Mexico or to China or to the States for special treatment,” said Ms. Beddard-Huber. “They’re looking for that miracle.”





    Terminally ill – death with dignity – advocate dies #city #palms #motel

    #what is terminally ill

    #

    YahooNews

    Terminally ill death with dignity advocate dies

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A terminally ill woman who renewed a nationwide debate about physician-assisted suicide has ended her young life with the lethal drugs available under Oregon’s Death With Dignity Law. Brittany Maynard was 29.

    Maynard, who had brain cancer, died peacefully in her bedroom Saturday “in the arms of her loved ones,” said Sean Crowley, a spokesman for the advocacy group Compassion Choices.

    Weeks ago, Maynard had said she might use the lethal drugs Nov. 1, just a couple weeks short of her 30th birthday. Last week, she said she might delay the day. But she went ahead with her original plan.

    Crowley said Maynard “suffered increasingly frequent and longer seizures, severe head and neck pain, and stroke-like symptoms. As symptoms grew more severe, she chose to abbreviate the dying process by taking the aid-in-dying medication she had received months ago.”

    Before dying, Maynard tried to live life as fully as she could. She and her husband, Dan Diaz, took a trip to the Grand Canyon last month — fulfilling a wish on Maynard’s “bucket list.”

    Maynard has been in the national spotlight for a month since publicizing that she and her husband had moved to Oregon from California so that she could take advantage of this state’s Death With Dignity Law. The law allows terminally ill patients to end their lives with lethal drugs prescribed by a doctor.

    The debate over physician-assisted suicide is not new, but Maynard’s youth and vitality before she became ill brought the discussion to a younger generation.

    Working with Compassion Choices, Maynard used her story to speak out for the right of terminally ill people like herself to end their lives on their own terms.

    Maynard’s choice to end her life has not been without controversy. Some religious groups and others opposed to physician-assisted suicide have voiced objections.

    Janet Morana, executive director of the group Priests for Life, said in a statement after hearing of Maynard’s death: “We are saddened by the fact that this young woman gave up hope, and now our concern is for other people with terminal illnesses who may contemplate following her example. Our prayer is that these people will find the courage to live every day to the fullest until God calls them home. Brittany’s death was not a victory for a political cause. It was a tragedy, hastened by despair and aided by the culture of death invading our country.”

    Maynard told The Associated Press last month that she and her husband and other relatives accepted her choice.

    “I think in the beginning my family members wanted a miracle; they wanted a cure for my cancer.” she said. “When we all sat down and looked at the facts, there isn’t a single person that loves me that wishes me more pain and more suffering.”

    Oregon was the first U.S. state to make it legal for a doctor to prescribe a life-ending drug to a terminally ill patient of sound mind who makes the request. The patient must swallow the drug without help; it is illegal for a doctor to administer it.

    More than 750 people in Oregon used the law to die as of Dec. 31, 2013. The median age of the deceased is 71. Only six were younger than 35.

    The state does not track how many terminally ill people move to Oregon to die. A patient must prove to a doctor that they are living in Oregon. Some examples of documentation include a rental agreement, a voter registration card or a driver’s license.

    Oregon voters approved the Death with Dignity Act in 1994, then reaffirmed it with 60 percent of the vote in 1997.

    Four other states — Washington, Montana, Vermont and New Mexico — allow patients to seek aid in dying.

    Maynard was born Nov. 19, 1984. She received an undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s in education from UC Irvine.

    Maynard had an adventuresome spirit. She taught at orphanages in Nepal and also spent time in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Costa Rica. She climbed Kilimanjaro a month before marrying Diaz in September 2012.

    She was diagnosed with brain cancer on New Year’s Day of this year and was told she had six months to live.

    Follow Steven DuBois at http://twitter.com/pdxdub .





    Signs of Impending Death a Few Hours Before Death #the #lowry #hotel

    #hospice signs of impending death

    #

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death?

    What are the signs of impending death a few hours before death? Emma’s Story Part 5 will take you there.

    Death is getting close. Hours close. All the signs of impending death are there. This is the final stretch. We are nearly there. Nearly there. Let’s follow Emma and her dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5:
    A Few Hours Before Death

    By now Emma’s daughter Jane had decided to spend the night in the spare bedroom. She had promised her mom that she would be there. Would be there to see her mother and best friend die.

    Jane had the monitor to give Arthur a good night’s sleep. A monitor to hear Emma while being in another room. All through the night Jane would wake up and listen. She would make sure that she still heard Emma breathing.

    Ever so often she would get up and look. Emma’s eyes were closed. No movement. She was unresponsive. As if in a deep sleep.

    Early in the morning Emma’s breathing changed. She would take a breath in and then stop. Stop for as long as 20 or 30 seconds. No breath.

    Then slowly her body would start reaching for the next breath. Finally the next breath came. Then the breath stopped again. For another 20 to 30 seconds.

    This went on for a few hours. It felt kind of eerie as it was so easy to think: “Oh, this is her last breath.” But it wasn’t yet. Not yet.

    I am available as an inspirational speaker
    about all aspects of death
    including the luminous side of dying
    for both US and international events.
    Click here to find out more about my talks
    and click here to contact me
    .

    This close to death, as in hours away, our bodies are giving us more signs to look for. More symptoms of dying as mile markers on the final journey home. More ways to know that death is near. Very near.

    Emma’s breath, as described above, is called “Cheyne-Stokes” breathing. That kind of breathing consists of inbreaths followed by periods of no breath. Another inbreath. Another pause. Another inbreath. Another pause.

    This kind of breathing can last for many hours. Or just for a short while.

    Here is a list of your typical signs of impending death:

    • Our breathing is becoming more irregular and often slows down.
  • Our eyes might be closed. Or they might be open or half closed, but without actually focusing on anything.

  • Lips and nail beds can look purple or bluish.

  • Fluids may gather at the back of the throat, resulting in what sometimes is called the “death rattle”. It does not appear to disturb us when we are dying. But it can sound awkward for those sitting close by.

  • Our hands and feet may look blotchy and purplish (mottled). This mottling can slowly move up the arms and legs.

  • Our hearing seems to be the last sense to go. So talk to us. Tell us that all is well. That we are going home. That you love us. That it is all right for us to die. That it is OK for us to finally go home.
  • And again a reminder: not all signs of impending death show up for all who are dying.

    Emma’s Story Part 5: A Few Hours Before Death Continued

    By this time Emma was surrounded by her husband Arthur and her daughter Jane. One sitting on each side of the hospital bed. They took turns holding her hands.

    They had lit a candle. There were flowers some good friends had brought over on a night stand. The curtains were closed to keep the bright summer sunshine out.

    Every couple of hours one of them would get up to give Emma her next dose of liquid morphine. No need to swallow. The insides of Emma’s mouth just absorbed it. Her face looked easy and relaxed under the circumstances.

    There was a pillow under her knees. Her head was still on her favorite pillow and propped up with the help of the raised head piece of the hospital bed.

    Emma was as comfortable as she could be in these last hours.

    The Gifts of These Last Hours

    These last hours filled with signs of impending death can feel very special. They can be like a moment of hushed silence in the middle of a busy street. Like the sense of wonder just before a sunrise on the ocean. Like a holy moment in church full of imagined angels singing. Like a long prayer deeply soothing us.

    They have a similar quality to the time right after a baby is born. That same feeling. That same sense of wonder.

    As if they are like gateways. Gates to the other side. Gates to our souls.

    As if the veils keeping us here on this earth get lifted around death. As if we can reach across to the other side together with our loved ones who are dying.

    We only visit for a short time. They are the ones going there for good.

    Can you sense the sounds
    touching your heart?

    Are you feeling the call
    reaching for you?

    Do you know the voices
    singing your name in light?

    You are so close
    Dear One
    You are so close





    Physical Signs of Approaching Death #hotels #direct

    #hospice signs of impending death

    #

    Physical Signs of Approaching Death

    REDUCED FOOD FLUID INTAKE: Loss of appetite and decrease in thirst are common. The body is beginning to shut down and does not need nourishment. People commonly feel it is necessary to encourage the person to eat in the hope of sustaining life; however, food and fluid may cause discomfort. The person may ask for ice chips, popsicles, ice cream or some other food choice. Do not be surprised if only a mouthful or two is taken. When swallowing is no longer possible, mouth care provides moisture and comfort. Do not offer a fluid if swallowing is not possible.

    ELIMINATION: Output of urine and stool will decrease as the food and fluid intake decreases. Urine and stool may also change colour, be passed less frequently and in smaller amounts. Other factors such as immobility and medication may contribute to this.

    Your loved one may lose control of bladder or bowel function as the muscles begin to relax. In this instance it may be necessary to use an incontinence brief.

    Ask the health care professional about the management of these symptoms. It is important to provide skin care and cleansing on a routine basis.

    SLEEPING: Sleeping an increased amount of time is common. It may become more difficult to waken the person. As death nears, the person may slip into a coma and become unresponsive.

    RESTLESSNESS AND DISORIENTATION: Confusion as to time, place and recognition of people, even family members and close friends is common.

    At times your loved one may become restless. For example, he/she may reach out to unseen objects, pull at bedclothes or try to get out of bed. This can occur for many reasons such as lack of oxygen circulation to the brain or changes in condition or medications. It would be helpful to discuss these changes with a health care professional.

    CHANGES IN BREATHING: Regular breathing patterns may change. Breathing may stop for 10 to 30 second periods or there may be periods of rapid, shallow panting. These breathing patterns are normal and indicate the natural progression towards death.

    A moaning sound occurs as the breath passes over the relaxed vocal cords.

    CONGESTION: Gurgling sounds, often loud, occur when a person is unable to cough up normal secretions. This does not normally cause pain or discomfort. It may be helpful to turn the person to one side and gently wipe away secretions with a moist cloth. As secretions build up, keeping the head of the bed elevated (by using pillows) will make breathing easier. Sometimes medications can be ordered to help dry up secretions.

    Oral suctioning may be done, however, this usually causes an increase in secretion production.

    SKIN: You may notice the skin begin to change colour and become cooler to touch.

    The face may be pale and the feet and legs a purple-blue mottled colour. The circulation of the blood is slowing down.

    Although your loved one is cool to touch, he/she is usually comfortable. Offer a warm blanket but avoid using an electric blanket to prevent the risk of skin burns.





    Hospice, Morphine and Preparing for Traditional Catholic Death #low #price #hotel

    #catholic hospice

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    The first Hospice was started by the Catholic Sisters of Charity in London England in 1905 to help people who did not have a place to die. It was called St. Joseph s hospice because St. Joseph is the patron of the dying. I think the sisters who founded it came from Ireland where there was a similar place. So it is wonderful to have help with terminally ill patients in their last days.

    Hospice offers support to people who would like to die at home or die at one of their homes. They give medical advice and a visiting nurse comes once a week. You can call them 24 hours a day to get advice. But you still have to do almost all of the taking care of the sick person in all the day to day activities. Many think Hospice will do everything which is not true.

    If you die at home and are signed up with Hospice, you just call them when the person has died and they do the pronouncement of death. This avoids the need to call the paramedics, who are obliged by law in many places, to do CPR on any person who dies at home. It also avoids having to have an autopsy with the coroner (sheriff Department). If someone dies suddenly at home you usually need an autopsy to rule out the possibility of any foul play.

    All this said, Hospice has helped a lot of people. But recently it is changing to become an accomplice with Euthanasia. I say this because of the many many people I have done the funerals for and of whom I have visited in their homes under the supervision of Hospice.

    An example of this is when we get the clergy record with the funeral, the cause of death put down is Alzheimer. Alzheimer does not kill anyone. Or we will see pneumonia. If you have pneumonia, you need to go to the hospital to get antibiotics, not put on hospice to die.

    What happens many times is that the family is told that the patient should not drink or eat because they will aspirate. That means, food or liquids will go into their lungs and cause pneumonia. Well that is a danger, but besides dying from pneumonia, you can die from no water or food.

    The Catholic Church s teaching is that you are to give ordinary things to a terminally ill person like medicine, water and food. You do not need to put in a feeding tube, unless it is advantage for the recovery of the sick person. You do not to be put on the breathing machine either or resuscitated. These are extraordinary means to keep people alive.

    But people who are terminally ill and still have many months to live can not used things that will hasten their death just because some day it will arrive.

    Two extremely important principles to remember are 1) Life is precious and should be sustained if at all possible and 2) Always do what the terminally ill patient wants as long as it is consistent with Catholic teaching. For example, if the terminally ill patient wants to be resuscitated after heart failure, or be intubated on a breathing machine, there is nothing wrong with that because Life is precious and the persons wishes should be respected.

    Now the problem I and other priests have observed is that when people are on Hospice care, they push morphine to much. A healthy old man, whom I was visiting on a regular basis, was put on Hospice. He was agitated and out of his mind. But was not terminally ill. The hospice people got mad at the family for not giving him the morphine he refused to take. So often they tell the family that the person is in pain. I have asked many if they are in pain and they respond no. Yet Hospice insists on giving them morphine on the basis that more than likely they are in pain and not expressing it.

    This is very dangerous, because the family taking care of the sick person or old person who is crazy with Alzheimer, get very tired. And when they are told by a medical authority, like Hospice, that they should give them morphine, people tend to give in and obey even when the patient is not terminally ill.

    We traditional Catholics do not want to see terminally ill persons in pain. God has given us the gift of morphine to help relieve pain. It is a good. But the danger comes when it is used to put people in a drugged state, who are not dying, and then they can no longer pray, eat or drink.

    Over and over again I try to hear confessions of people who have not gone to confession in years and want to confess as they lie dying. But because of the morphine, can not stay awake to confess. I shake them, I holler at them, anything I can do to get them to make a good confession. But it is very hard, because they keep falling asleep. Please call the priest before they are on morphine.

    So if you are dying anyway from a terminal disease, it is fine to use pain killers to relieve the pain even it it might speed up the natural process. But it should only be used to relieve pain and not to control people with Alzheimer or other normal health conditions that come from old age.

    All of us will be dying some day. Do we want to be put on morphine and drugged out of our state of consciousness? I do not think so. We need to have this very clear with all those who love us and will be caring for us in our old age.

    All the saints dreaded being fooled by the devil at the last part of their holy lives by the devil. We who are by no means saints, should have more dread of being drugged out when that decisive moment happens as we approach death.

    It is so important to have health care directives written out for your family to follow.

    To summarize: we want to live as long as we can and until God calls us. We want to be alert and conscious as much as possible to pray as we make our final journey to God. We do not need extra ordinary means (machines or resuscitation). But food, water and medicine are ordinary means of keeping alive. We can take pain killers if they are needed, but need to balance this with our desire to be alert to pray and repent of our sins.

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