Budget hotel – definition of Budget hotel by The Free Dictionary #motels

#budget hotel

#

hotel

References in periodicals archive ?

US-based private equity group Starwood Capital is seeking buyers for its international budget hotel operator Louvre Hotels Group (LHG), according to French media reports, with the sale expected to raise E1.

There was, for example, the taxi driver who picked us up at the Athens airport late at night and drove us around the city for nearly two hours, allegedly searching for the budget hotel where we had reservations.

Microtel Inn Suites is a budget hotel chain with more than 250 locations worldwide.

In the coming weeks, Hank Freid’s dream to invigorate the budget hotel category with an edgier flair will be realized as the Marrakech reopens with a multi-million dollar face-lift.

The leisure group wants to double the size of its Costa Coffee chain to 2,000 and boost the budget hotel business Premier Inn by 50 per cent.

3m on refurbishing the hotel and transforming it into a budget hotel that offers rooms from pounds 29.

Travelodge, which was acquired by Dubai International Capital from Permira in 2006, was the first budget hotel to launch in the UK in 1985 when it opened its first outlet at Burton under Needwood in Staffordshire.

A survey from budget hotel chain Travelodge claims regional retail therapy breaks could keep thousands of British shoppers away from New York and European cities, because it makes sense to save money for gifts instead.

The report claimed that the revelations come, as the budget hotel sector seems to be bucking the downward trend in the hotel market amid the economic downturn.

It seems that many are jumping on the budget hotel bandwagon that is sweeping through the GCC.

It is Dubai’s first 1-star hotel that offers a clean room equipped with basic amenities and also the first budget hotel with a Gold Leed (Leadership in Energy Environmental Design) certification, a widely accepted benchmark for high-performance green buildings, said a senior official.

This, budget hotel owners said, had led to losses in their business.





Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary,

#hospice aide job description

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Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary, Employment – Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

Training/Educational Requirements: High school diploma preferred

Median Salary: $9.34 per hour

Job Prospects: Excellent

Job Description

A hospice care aide helps individuals unable of helping themselves. These aides travel to the patient s home and help them perform activities required for daily life. Hospice care aides are often associated with the elderly or disabled who are unable to take care of themselves, so they perform all required functions specific to the patient.

Most of the time, a hospice aide is the first position an individual may take at the beginning of their career. Alternatively, an individual may seek such a career if they are interested in the nursing field, but do not have the required education or training. Most functions performed are rather fundamental in nature, and do not require much training.

Hospice aides usually work within a hospice environment or travel to the patient s home. They help the individual eat, get up out of bed, or help them with the bathroom or a bedpan. The number of duties involved depends on the nature and the status of the patient, since they are expected to help the patient function as normally as possible. If working within a hospice environment, they work with individual patients to make their final days as comfortable as possible. If working in a home environment, they spend time sitting with or caring for an elderly or disabled patient who requires extra care.

Many times, families of patients in either a home or hospice environment can t commit to 24 hour care, so they hire a hospice aide to help during the times they are absent. Hospice aides travel to the home and work in shifts providing round the clock supervision and care. They aren t usually a registered nurse or hold a license and cannot usually administer medication, so the responsibilities are typically fundamental.

Training/Educational Requirements

There is no educational or training requirement for this position. A hospice aide learns from on-the-job training with a registered nurse or a nurse s aide. They learn the proper way to do things such as help a patient out of bed or assist with a bedpan by observing other nurses and by practicing. Oftentimes the family of the patient has a particular way they want things done, so the best training comes from working directly on the job.

The National Association for Home Care and Hospice ( NAHC ) offers certification for personal and home care aides throughout the country. This certification is not mandatory although individuals may opt to gain it to demonstrate they have met established industry standards. It can be a simple certification and lend way to further development within this role. Those individuals wishing to gain their certification must complete a 75-hour course, observe and document work in up to 17 different skills signed off by a registered nurse. In addition, they must successfully pass a final exam. Although this isn t a requirement, it can certainly lend way to more opportunities for advancement.

There are some high school courses that prepare for this role. At the early stages, an individual can do a co-op job to better prepare themselves for becoming a hospice aide. There are some standalone classes an individual can take in patient care which prepares them for the real thing. Individuals interested in a career as a hospice aide receive basic training from the company they work for before they are sent to a patient s home.

When working in a hospice environment, the facility will provide some training not only in how to care for a patient but also in how to make them comfortable as they prepare for death. There are certain personality traits such as patience and compassion that are required for such a role since most patients are elderly, disabled, or dying.

How to Get Hired

Most individuals wishing to get a job as a hospice aide look for employment with a home health care services company. This is usually the best way to get hired because the patients and their families go to such a company to hire this type of individual. It helps to take training classes or work through a high school co-op to prepare for this role. In turn, this also helps to get hired much faster.

For the hospice aide wishing to get hired into a hospice environment, it helps to apply to the facility directly. Usually these facilities are looking for background and experience since patients who come in here require a certain type of personality. It is also helpful to have experience working with a dying patient.

Although there is no specific educational requirement for this position, experience helps to get hired. It is especially true for families who are hiring someone to come to their home and care for their loved one.

Job Prospects, Employment Outlook, and Career Development

There is expected to be a better than average increase in the hiring of hospice aides. This role is expected to grow as families continue to look for individuals to care for their loved ones in a home or hospice environment. Since this is an entry-level position, the requirements for hiring are much lower. Therefore, it appeals to those who may not have a college education. There is a high potential for growth since people oftentimes don t want to work within an entry-level role.

As more hospice centers become a popular environment, the need for hospice aides will increase. So, too, will the need to keep aging or disabled family members in their home rather than sending them to a nursing home. This means there will be an increased need for individuals in this role, and within the home health care services business.

Working Environment

Depending on the type of facility a hospice aide wishes to work within, the environment may be slightly different. If focused within home health care, the individual will often travel to patient s homes. The assignment may last for a short time or may become a regular job. Individuals in this role care for more than one patient in their home or sometimes travel between a variety of different patient s homes. It all depends on the patients, the workload and the hours required. However, if focused within the home health care niche, hospice aides can expect the working environment to be an actual home. If focused within the hospice niche, it is expected to work within such a facility or institution. These facilities strive to create a cozy environment for their patients so they can be comfortable before they die. This work environment is more like an actual medical facility, but feels cozier.

Salary and Benefits

As of 2006, the average earnings for a hospice aide was about $9.34 an hour. The range averaged anywhere from $7.99 all the way up to $13 per hour depending on the facility. In some instances, a home health care company pays slightly higher depending on the environment and patient s needs. The more experience an individual has, the more they can expect to earn per hour.

Since these are hourly positions, most of the time hospice aides work without any true benefits. Any travel expenses incurred are the individuals responsibility and are often not reimbursed. Instead, a flat hourly rate is given to hospice aides. For those working within a hospice environment, they can expect some benefits if they are hired by the facility directly.

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What does palliative mean? definition, meaning and pronunciation (Free English Language Dictionary)

#what does palliative care mean

#

PALLIATIVE

Dictionary entry overview: What does palliative mean?

PALLIATIVE (noun)
The noun PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

1. remedy that alleviates pain without curing

Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as a noun is very rare.

PALLIATIVE (adjective)
The adjective PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

1. moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as an adjective is very rare.

Dictionary entry details

PALLIATIVE (noun)

palliative [BACK TO TOP]

Remedy that alleviates pain without curing

Nouns denoting man-made objects

Hypernyms ( palliative is a kind of. ):

PALLIATIVE (adjective)

palliative [BACK TO TOP]

Moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

moderating (lessening in intensity or strength)

Learn English with. Proverbs of the week

Beer before liquor, you’ll never be sicker, but liquor before beer and you’re in the clear. (English proverb)

Complete idiot who can keep silent, to a wise man is similar (Breton proverb)

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Where there’s a will, there is a way. (Dutch proverb)

PALLIATIVE: related words searches

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Example of solution #solution, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #solution #definition, #define #solution,


#

solution

Examples from the News

  • But his solution to this metastasizing threat is, in some ways, counterintuitive.

ISIS Fight Has a Spy Shortage, Intel Chair Says

  • After almost five months without a solution, the lack of initiative is starting to embarrass the Lebanese government.
    A Sunni-Shia Love Story Imperiled by al Qaeda
  • And that solution came from a homemade brew Branch and her sister created together.
    Goodbye To A Natural Hair Guru: Miss Jessie s Cofounder Titi Branch Dead At 45
  • All of these strategies need to include young men, so that they are part of the solution.
    The Hidden Link Between Women and War
  • You and I disagree about the solution to this problem, of course, but we agree that there is a problem.

    Dear Evangelicals: You’re Being Had

  • Examples

    • That the problem is here crying aloud for solution is apparent.

    Charles Francis Adams

    Tis Sixty Years Since

  • In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem.
    United States Presidents Inaugural Speeches
  • Today we can declare: Government is not the problem, and government is not the solution.
    United States Presidents Inaugural Speeches
  • So we are very happy at the solution, and to-morrow we are off.

    Robert W. Service

    Ballads of a Bohemian

  • Langen has commented on it at some length,125 but offers no solution.

    Wilton Wallace Blancke

    The Dramatic Values in Plautus


  • Tariff Definition – Example #tariff #definition


    #

    Tariff

    A tariff is a tax on imports or exports. Money collected under a tariff is called a duty or customs duty. Tariffs are used by governments to generate revenue or to protect domestic industries from competition.

    How it works (Example):

    There are generally two types of tariffs. Ad valorem tariffs are calculated as a fixed percentage of the value of the imported good. When the international price of a good rises or falls, so does the tariff. A specific tariff is a fixed amount of money that does not vary with the price of the good. In some cases, both the ad valorem and specific tariffs are levied on the same product.

    For example, Company XYZ produces cheese in Scotland and exports the cheese, which costs $100 per pound, to the United States. A 20% ad valorem tariff would require Company XYZ to pay the U.S. government $20 to export the cheese. A specific tax would involve charging $30 dollars per pound of cheese whether cheese sold for $100 or $200 per pound.

    Why it Matters:

    Import and export taxes make it more expensive for users of foreign goods, causing a decline in imports, a decline in the supply of the good, and a resulting increase in the price of the good. The price increase usually motivates domestic producers to increase their output of the product.

    Some economists argue that the resulting higher consumer prices, higher producer revenues and profits, and higher government revenues make tariff s a way to effectively transfer money from consumers to government treasuries. Some economists also argue that tariffs interfere with free market ideals by diverting resources to domestic industries that are less efficient than foreign producers.

    InvestingAnswers is the only financial reference guide you’ll ever need. Our in-depth tools give millions of people across the globe highly detailed and thoroughly explained answers to their most important financial questions.

    We provide the most comprehensive and highest quality financial dictionary on the planet, plus thousands of articles, handy calculators, and answers to common financial questions — all 100% free of charge.

    Each month, more than 1 million visitors in 223 countries across the globe turn to InvestingAnswers.com as a trusted source of valuable information.


    What is connection pool? Webopedia Definition #connection #pool #definition, #connection #pool, #define,


    #

    connection pool

    Related Terms

    A cache of database connections maintained in the database’s memory so that the connections can be reused when the database receives future requests for data.

    Connection pools are used to enhance the performance of executing commands on a database. Opening and maintaining a database connection for each user, especially requests made to a dynamic database-driven Web application. is costly and wastes resources. In connection pooling, after a connection is created, it is placed in the pool and it is used over again so that a new connection does not have to be established. If all the connections are being used, a new connection is made and is added to the pool. Connection pooling also cuts down on the amount of time a user must wait to establish a connection to the database.

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    Definition of palliative care #cosmopolitan #hotel

    #definition of palliative care

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Archetype – definition of archetype by The Free Dictionary #definition #of #refinance


    #

    archetype

    ar·che·type

    1. An original model or type after which other similar things are patterned; a prototype: “‘Frankenstein’. ‘Dracula’. ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’. the archetypes that have influenced all subsequent horror stories” (New York Times).

    2. An ideal example of a type; quintessence: an archetype of the successful entrepreneur.

    3. In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

    [Latin archetypum. from Greek arkhetupon. from neuter of arkhetupos. original. arkhe-, arkhi-. archi- + tupos. model, stamp .]

    ar che·typ al (-t p l). ar che·typ ic (-t p k). ar che·typ i·caladj.

    Usage Note: The ch in archetype, and in many other English words of Greek origin such as architect and chorus, represents a transliteration of Greek X (chi), and its standard pronunciation is (k). The pronunciation of ch in these words as (ch) is generally considered incorrect. Notable exceptions in which the ch is in fact pronounced (ch) include words formed by adding the prefix arch- to an existing English word, as in archenemy or archrival, and also words such as archbishop and archdeacon that date back to Old English, having been borrowed directly from Late Latin and Late Greek.

    archetype

    architype

    1. a perfect or typical specimen

    2. an original model or pattern; prototype

    3. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal one of the inherited mental images postulated by Jung as the content of the collective unconscious

    4. (Art Terms) a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, etc

    5. (Literary Literary Critical Terms) a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, etc

    [C17: from Latin archetypum an original, from Greek arkhetupon, from arkhetupos first-moulded; see arch-, type]

    ar che type

    1. the original pattern or model from which all things of the same kind are copied or on which they are based; prototype.

    2. (in Jungian psychology) an inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc. universally present in individual psyches.

    [1595 1605; Latin archetypum Greek archétypon, neuter of archétypos molded first, archetypal]

    ar`che typ al (- ta p l) ar`che typ i cal (- t p k l) adj.

    ar`che typ al ly, ar`che typ i cal ly,adv.

    archetype

    Jung used this term to refer to such universal concepts as the here, which he saw as part of the collective unconscious that part of the mind inherited from the experience of previous generations and common to us all.

    Thesaurus Antonyms Related Words Synonyms Legend:

    References in classic literature ?

    Tourists in Normandy, Brittany, Maine, and Anjou must all have seen in the capitals of those provinces many houses which resemble more or less that of the Cormons; for it is, in its way, an archetype of the burgher houses in that region of France, and it deserves a place in this history because it serves to explain manners and customs, and represents ideas.

    If we suppose that the ancient progenitor, the archetype as it may be called, of all mammals, had its limbs constructed on the existing general pattern, for whatever purpose they served, we can at once perceive the plain signification of the homologous construction of the limbs throughout the whole class.

    What appears once in the atmosphere may appear often, and it was undoubtedly the archetype of that familiar ornament.

    It reaffirms that our brand has real appeal, and that our personalized toolbar – which curates content according to your archetype – gives readers a fresh new way to zero in on the kinds of inspiring articles that are most relevant, useful and appealing to them.

    The Year’s Most Noteworthy Movies Performances Awarded by Archetype

    Okri’s Astonishing the Gods and In Arcadia, using the Journey Archetype. foreground the use of myth as prophecy because they present symbolic plots which offer imaginative insights into the things to come.

    com)– Archetype Group, a leading multi-disciplinary construction consultancy in Asia, announced today their appointment as Project and Construction Manager for the new prestigious and iconic MahaNakhon Tower in Bangkok.

    5 million, non-recourse loan from Archetype Mortgage Capital for the refinance of a 200,000 s/f self-storage facility in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.

    From Girl to Goddess is an attempt to remedy this lack in Campbell’s study by providing a template for the woman’s hero journey through a broad-ranging study of female-centered myths, stories, folktales, and the occasional historic archetype .

    Jung expresses his concept of an archetype in a variety of ways, which includes a comparison with Plato’s pure forms ( Archetypes 75).

    The archetype of the high performing financial advisor is that of the achiever.

    Politicians exploit a perceived desire to find an archetype of the most-common American.


    Palliative Care Treatment Definition and Information #mountain #valley #hospice

    #palliative care

    #

    Palliative Care Center

    What is palliative care?

    It is hard to live with a serious illness. You may feel lonely, angry, scared, or sad. You may feel that your treatment is doing more harm than good. You may have pain or other disturbing symptoms. Palliative care can help you and your loved ones cope with all of these things.

    Palliative care is a kind of care for people who have serious illnesses. It is different from care to cure your illness, called curative treatment. Palliative care focuses on improving your quality of life-not just in your body, but also in your mind and spirit. Sometimes palliative care is combined with curative treatment.

    The kind of care you get depends on what you need. Your goals guide your care. Palliative care can help reduce pain or treatment side effects. Palliative care may help you and your loved ones better understand your illness, talk more openly about your feelings, or decide what treatment you want or do not want. It can also help with communication among your doctors, nurses, and loved ones.

    Why would I want palliative care?

    Palliative care providers are interested in what is bothering you and what is important to you. They want to know how you and your loved ones are doing day-to-day. They understand that your illness affects not just you, but also those you love.

    Your palliative care providers will ask questions about how your illness affects your emotions and spirit. Then they will try to make sure that your medical care meets your goals for your body, mind, and spirit. They will also help you make future plans around your health and medical care.

    You might see a palliative care provider just once or maybe more often. He or she will work with your other doctors to give you the best care possible.

    Who is involved in palliative care?

    Palliative care actively involves you and your loved ones. Together you will work with health care providers in your doctor’s office or your home, or in a hospital, nursing home, or hospice. If you are interested in palliative care, talk with your doctor. He or she may be able to manage your palliative care needs or may refer you to someone who is trained in palliative care.





    Definition of hospice #hospice #end #of #life

    #definition of hospice

    #

    hospice

    a house of shelter or rest for pilgrims, strangers, etc. especially one kept by a religious order.

    Medicine/Medical.

    1. a health-care facility for the terminally ill that emphasizes pain control and emotional support for the patient and family, typically refraining from taking extraordinary measures to prolong life.
    2. a similar program of care and support for the terminally ill at home.

    Origin of hospice Expand

    Dictionary.com Unabridged
    Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
    Cite This Source

    Examples from the Web for hospice Expand

    We signed him up for hospice care, knowing that we still had limited time with him.

    Leukaemia patient Zakwan Anuar, 15, died two weeks after they visited his hospice in Kualar Lumpur, Malaysia, last month.

    The next evening, Romero was saying mass in the chapel at the hospice where he lived in a tiny room near the infirm and the dying.

    He has also demonstrated compassion for AIDS victims, washing and kissing the feet of 12 patients in a hospice in 2001.

    Your loved one cannot be cured in an acute-care hospital but is not ready for hospice.

    The pass of Great St. Bernard is celebrated for its hospice.

    M. Julien, will you run for the doctor, and send him down to the hospice at once?

    He built in fact later the hospice and church of Jesu-Nazareno—in compliance with this vow.

    He, himself, was billeted with a French family, just around the corner from the hospice.

    This hospice is said to have been first founded in the year 962, by Bernard, a Piedmontese nobleman.

    British Dictionary definitions for hospice Expand

    hospice

    noun ( pl ) hospices

    a nursing home that specializes in caring for the terminally ill

    ( archaic ) Also called hospitium ( hɒˈspɪtɪəm ), ( pl ) hospitia ( hɒˈspɪtɪə ). a place of shelter for travellers, esp one kept by a monastic order

    C19: from French, from Latin hospitium hospitality, from hospes guest, host 1

    Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
    © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
    Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
    Cite This Source

    Word Origin and History for hospice Expand

    1818, “rest house for travelers,” from French hospice (13c.), from Latin hospitium “guest house, hospitality,” from hospes (genitive hospitis ) “guest, host” (see host (n.1)). Sense of “home for the aged and terminally ill ” is from 1893; hospice movement first attested 1979.

    Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
    Cite This Source

    hospice in Medicine Expand

    hospice hos·pice (hŏs’pĭs)
    n.
    A program or facility that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional, spiritual, social, and financial needs of terminally ill patients at a facility or at a patient’s home.

    The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary
    Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Cite This Source

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  • What is oscilloscope? Definition from #saving #rate #definition


    #

    oscilloscope

    An oscilloscope is a laboratory instrument commonly used to display and analyze the waveform of electronic signals. In effect, the device draws a graph of the instantaneous signal voltage as a function of time.

    A typical oscilloscope can display alternating current (AC ) or pulsating direct current (DC) waveforms having a frequency as low as approximately 1 hertz (Hz ) or as high as several megahertz (MHz ). High-end oscilloscopes can display signals having frequencies up to several hundred gigahertz (GHz ). The display is broken up into so-called horizontal divisions (hor div) and vertical divisions (vert div). Time is displayed from left to right on the horizontal scale. Instantaneous voltage appears on the vertical scale, with positive values going upward and negative values going downward.

    The oldest form of oscilloscope, still used in some labs today, is known as the cathode-ray oscilloscope. It produces an image by causing a focused electron beam to travel, or sweep, in patterns across the face of a cathode ray tube (CRT ). More modern oscilloscopes electronically replicate the action of the CRT using a liquid crystal display (liquid crystal display ) similar to those found on notebook computers. The most sophisticated oscilloscopes employ computers to process and display waveforms. These computers can use any type of display, including CRT, LCD, and gas plasma.

    In any oscilloscope, the horizontal sweep is measured in seconds per division (s/div), milliseconds per division (ms/div), microseconds per division (s/div), or nanoseconds per division (ns/div). The vertical deflection is measured in volts per division (V/div), millivolts per division (mV/div), or microvolts per division (?V/div). Virtually all oscilloscopes have adjustable horizontal sweep and vertical deflection settings.

    The illustration shows two common waveforms as they might appear when displayed on an oscilloscope screen. The signal on the top is a sine wave ; the signal on the bottom is a ramp wave. It is apparent from this display that both signals have the same, or nearly the same, frequency. They also have approximately the same peak-to-peak amplitude. Suppose the horizontal sweep rate in this instance is 1 s/div. Then these waves both complete a full cycle every 2 s, so their frequencies are both approximately 0.5 MHz or 500 kilohertz (kHz ). If the vertical deflection is set for, say, 0.5 mV/div, then these waves both have peak-to-peak amplitudes of approximately 2 mV.

    These days, typical high-end oscilloscopes are digital devices. They connect to personal computers and use their displays. Although these machines no longer employ scanning electron beams to generate images of waveforms in the manner of the old cathode-ray scope, the basic principle is the same. Software controls the sweep rate, vertical deflection, and a host of other features which can include:

    • Storage of waveforms for future reference and comparison
    • Display of several waveforms simultaneously
    • Spectral analysis
    • Portability
    • Battery power option
    • Usability with all popular operating platforms
    • Zoom-in and zoom-out
    • Multi-color displays

    This was last updated in September 2005

    Continue Reading About oscilloscope

    Related Terms

    fiber optics (optical fiber) Fiber optics, or optical fiber, refers to the medium and the technology associated with the transmission of information as light. See complete definition infrared radiation (IR) Infrared radiation (IR), sometimes referred to simply as infrared, is a region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum where. See complete definition microcontroller A microcontroller is a compact integrated circuit designed to govern a specific operation in an embedded system. See complete definition


    Definition of Hospice care #local #motels

    #hospice definition

    #

    Our Hospice Main Article provides a comprehensive look at the who, what, when and how of Hospice

    Definition of Hospice care

    Hospice care: Care designed to give supportive care to people in the final phase of a terminal illness and focus on comfort and quality of life, rather than cure. The goal is to enable patients to be comfortable and free of pain, so that they live each day as fully as possible. Aggressive methods of pain control may be used. Hospice programs generally are home-based, but they sometimes provide services away from home — in freestanding facilities, in nursing homes, or within hospitals. The philosophy of hospice is to provide support for the patient’s emotional, social, and spiritual needs as well as medical symptoms as part of treating the whole person.

    Hospice programs generally use a multidisciplinary team approach, including the services of a nurse, doctor, social worker and clergy in providing care. Additional services provided include drugs to control pain and manage other symptoms; physical, occupational, and speech therapy; medical supplies and equipment; medical social services; dietary and other counseling; continuous home care at times of crisis; and bereavement services. Although hospice care does not aim for cure of the terminal illness, it may treat potentially curable conditions such as pneumonia and bladder infections, with brief hospital stays if necessary. Hospice programs also offer respite care workers, people who are usually trained volunteers, who take over the patient’s care so that the family or other primary caregivers can leave the house for a few hours. Volunteer care is part of hospice philosophy.

    The word “hospice” comes from the Latin “hospitium” meaning guesthouse. It was originally described a place of shelter for weary and sick travelers returning from religious pilgrimages. During the 1960’s, Dr. Cicely Saunders began the modern hospice movement by establishing St. Christopher’s Hospice near London. St. Christopher’s organized a team approach to professional caregiving. and was the first program to use modern pain management techniques to compassionately care for the dying. The first hospice in the United States was established in New Haven, Connecticut in 1974.

    Last Editorial Review: 5/13/2016





    What is Enterprise Collaboration Systems ECS? Webopedia Definition #enterprise #collaboration #systems #ecs


    #

    Enterprise Collaboration Systems ECS

    Related Terms

    Abbreviated as ECS, E nterprise C ollaboration S ystems is a type of information system (IS ). ECS is a combination of groupware. tools, Internet. extranets and other networks needed to support enterprise -wide communications, such as the sharing of documents and knowledge to specific teams and individuals within the enterprise. Some examples of enterprise communication tools include e-mail. videoconferencing. collaborative document sharing, project management tools and others. The objective of an ECS is to provide each user with the tools for managing communications, documents and other information that individuals need to manage their own tasks efficiently in their departments.

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    Set up online store #set, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #set #definition, #define


    #

    before 900; (v.) Middle English setten, Old English settan; cognate with Old Norse setja, German setzen, Gothic satjan, all 1 ; (noun) (in senses denoting the action of setting or the state of being set) Middle English set, set(t)e, derivative of the v. and its past participle; (in senses denoting a group) Middle English sette Expand

    interset, verb (used with object), interset, intersetting.

    misset, verb, misset, missetting.

    Can be confused Expand

    set, sit (see usage note at the current entry)

    1. position, locate, situate, plant. 11. estimate, appraise, evaluate, price, rate. 13. establish. 55. solidify, congeal, harden. 70. clique. 72. attitude. 73. posture. 94. predetermined. 98. stubborn, obstinate.

    Synonym Study Expand

    Usage note Expand

    The verbs set and sit 1 are similar in form and meaning but different in grammatical use. Set is chiefly transitive and takes an object: Set the dish on the shelf. Its past tense and past participle are also set. Yesterday he set three posts for the fence. The judge has set the date for the trial. Set also has some standard intransitive uses, as “to pass below the horizon” ( The sun sets late in the northern latitudes during the summer ) and “to become firm, solid, etc.” ( This glue sets quickly ). The use of set for sit, “to be seated,” is nonstandard: Pull up a chair and set by me.
    Sit is chiefly intransitive and does not take an object: Let’s sit here in the shade. Its past tense and past participle are sat. They sat at the table for nearly two hours. Have they sat down yet? Transitive uses of sit include “to cause to sit” ( Pull up a chair and sit yourself down ) and “to provide seating for” ( The waiter sat us near the window ).

    Set

    a number of objects or people grouped or belonging together, often forming a unit or having certain features or characteristics in common: a set of coins, John is in the top set for maths

    a group of people who associate together, esp a clique: he’s part of the jet set

    ( maths. logic )

    1. Also called class. a collection of numbers, objects, etc, that is treated as an entity: 3, the moon is the set the two members of which are the number 3 and the moon
    2. (in some formulations) a class that can itself be a member of other classes

    any apparatus that receives or transmits television or radio signals

    ( tennis. squash. badminton ) one of the units of a match, in tennis one in which one player or pair of players must win at least six games: Graf lost the first set

    1. the number of couples required for a formation dance
    2. a series of figures that make up a formation dance
    1. a band’s or performer’s concert repertoire on a given occasion: the set included no new numbers
    2. a continuous performance: the Who played two sets

    verb sets, setting, set

    ( intransitive ) (in square dancing and country dancing) to perform a sequence of steps while facing towards another dancer: set to your partners

    ( usually transitive ) to divide into sets: in this school we set our older pupils for English

    C14 (in the obsolete sense: a religious sect): from Old French sette, from Latin secta sect ; later sense development influenced by the verb set 1

    Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
    © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
    Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
    Cite This Source

    Word Origin and History for set Expand

    Old English settan (transitive) “cause to sit, put in some place, fix firmly; build, found; appoint, assign,” from Proto-Germanic *(bi)satjan “to cause to sit, set” (cf. Old Norse setja. Swedish sätta. Old Saxon settian. Old Frisian setta. Dutch zetten. German setzen. Gothic satjan ), causative form of PIE *sod-. variant of *sed- “to sit” (see sit (v.)). Also cf. set (n.2).

    Intransitive sense from c.1200, “be seated.” Used in many disparate senses by Middle English; sense of “make or cause to do, act, or be; start” and that of “mount a gemstone” attested by mid-13c. Confused with sit since early 14c. Of the sun, moon, etc. “to go down,” recorded from c.1300, perhaps from similar use of the cognates in Scandinavian languages. To set (something) on “incite to attack” (c.1300) originally was in reference to hounds and game.

    “fixed,” c.1200, sett. past participle of setten “to set” (see set (v.)). Meaning “ready, prepared” first recorded 1844.

    “collection of things,” mid-15c. from Old French sette “sequence,” variant of secte “religious community,” from Medieval Latin secta “retinue,” from Latin secta “a following” (see sect ). “[I]n subsequent developments of meaning influenced by SET v .1 and apprehended as equivalent to ‘number set together'” [OED]. The noun set was in Middle English, but only in the sense of “religious sect” (late 14c.), which likely is the direct source of some modern meanings, e.g. “group of persons with shared status, habits, etc.” (1680s).

    Meaning “complete collection of pieces” is from 1680s. Meaning “group of pieces musicians perform at a club during 45 minutes” (more or less) is from c.1925, though it is found in a similar sense in 1580s. Set piece is from 1846 as “grouping of people in a work of visual art;” from 1932 in reference to literary works.

    “act of setting; condition of being set” (of a heavenly body), mid-14c. from set (v.) or its identical past participle. Many disparate senses collect under this word because of the far-flung meanings assigned to the verb:

    “Action of hardening,” 1837; also “manner or position in which something is set” (1530s), hence “general movement, direction, tendency” (1560s); “build, form” (1610s), hence “bearing, carriage” (1855); “action of fixing the hair in a particular style” (1933).

    “Something that has been set” (1510s), hence the use in tennis (1570s) and the theatrical meaning “scenery for an individual scene in a play, etc.,” recorded from 1859. Other meanings OED groups under “miscellaneous technical senses” include “piece of electrical apparatus” (1891, first in telegraphy); “burrow of a badger” (1898). Old English had set “seat,” in plural “camp; stable,” but OED finds it “doubtful whether this survived beyond OE.” Cf. set (n.1).

    Set (n.1) and set (n.2) are not always distinguished in dictionaries; OED has them as two entries, Century Dictionary as one. The difference of opinion seems to be whether the set meaning “group, grouping” (here (n.2)) is a borrowing of the unrelated French word that sounds like the native English one, or a borrowing of the sense only, which was absorbed into the English word.


    Reverso: dictionary for mobile #insurance #quote #definition


    #

    accident insurance
    n insurance providing compensation for accidental injury or death

    fire insurance
    n insurance covering damage or loss caused by fire or lightning

    group insurance
    n (Chiefly U.S. and Canadian) insurance relating to life, health, or accident and covering several persons, esp. the employees of a firm, under a single contract at reduced premiums

    life insurance
    nanother name for life assurance

    marine insurance
    n insurance covering damage to or loss of ship, passengers, or cargo caused by the sea

    mutual insurance
    n a system of insurance by which all policyholders become company members under contract to pay premiums into a common fund out of which claims are paid
    See also mutual 3

    national insurance
    n (in Britain) state insurance based on weekly contributions from employees and employers and providing payments to the unemployed, the sick, the retired, etc. as well as medical services
    See also social security

    participating insurance
    n a system of insurance by which policyholders receive dividends from the company’s profit or surplus

    permanent health insurance
    n a form of insurance that provides up to 75 per cent of a person’s salary, until retirement, in case of prolonged illness or disability

    private health insurance
    n insurance against the need for medical treatment as a private patient

    public-liability insurance
    n (in Britain) a form of insurance, compulsory for any business in contact with the public, which pays compensation to a member of the public suffering injury or damage as a result of the policyholder or his employees failing to take reasonable care

    self-insurance
    n the practice of insuring oneself or one’s property by accumulating a reserve out of one’s income or funds rather than by purchase of an insurance policy

    social insurance
    n government insurance providing coverage for the unemployed, the injured, the old, etc. usually financed by contributions from employers and employees, as well as general government revenue
    See also social security national insurance social assistance

    term insurance
    n life assurance, usually low in cost and offering no cash value, that provides for the payment of a specified sum of money only if the insured dies within a stipulated period of time

    Alphabetical index

    Welcome to English-Definition Collins dictionary. Type the word that you look for in the search box above. The results will include words and phrases from the general dictionary as well as entries from the collaborative one.


    Reverso: dictionary for mobile #insurance #definition


    #

    accident insurance
    n insurance providing compensation for accidental injury or death

    fire insurance
    n insurance covering damage or loss caused by fire or lightning

    group insurance
    n (Chiefly U.S. and Canadian) insurance relating to life, health, or accident and covering several persons, esp. the employees of a firm, under a single contract at reduced premiums

    life insurance
    nanother name for life assurance

    marine insurance
    n insurance covering damage to or loss of ship, passengers, or cargo caused by the sea

    mutual insurance
    n a system of insurance by which all policyholders become company members under contract to pay premiums into a common fund out of which claims are paid
    See also mutual 3

    national insurance
    n (in Britain) state insurance based on weekly contributions from employees and employers and providing payments to the unemployed, the sick, the retired, etc. as well as medical services
    See also social security

    participating insurance
    n a system of insurance by which policyholders receive dividends from the company’s profit or surplus

    permanent health insurance
    n a form of insurance that provides up to 75 per cent of a person’s salary, until retirement, in case of prolonged illness or disability

    private health insurance
    n insurance against the need for medical treatment as a private patient

    public-liability insurance
    n (in Britain) a form of insurance, compulsory for any business in contact with the public, which pays compensation to a member of the public suffering injury or damage as a result of the policyholder or his employees failing to take reasonable care

    self-insurance
    n the practice of insuring oneself or one’s property by accumulating a reserve out of one’s income or funds rather than by purchase of an insurance policy

    social insurance
    n government insurance providing coverage for the unemployed, the injured, the old, etc. usually financed by contributions from employers and employees, as well as general government revenue
    See also social security national insurance social assistance

    term insurance
    n life assurance, usually low in cost and offering no cash value, that provides for the payment of a specified sum of money only if the insured dies within a stipulated period of time

    • Electronic Money o. eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically for good and services via cyber digital device.
    • Electronic Money n. eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device.
    • have money to burn v. used for saying that you think someone is spending too much money on things they do not need
    • pure gravy exp. easily gained money
    • be right on the money v. be exactly right
    • Wirk v. A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
    • crackwhore n. A prostitute who exchanges sexual favors for crack cocaine instead of money.
    • compensation n. money paid to someone because they have suffered injury or loss, or because what they own has been damaged
    • Compensation n. money that is paid because someone suffered from a loss of what they own (such as injury)

    Alphabetical index

    Welcome to English-Definition Collins dictionary. Type the word that you look for in the search box above. The results will include words and phrases from the general dictionary as well as entries from the collaborative one.


    Budget hotel – definition of Budget hotel by The Free Dictionary #boondall

    #budget hotel

    #

    hotel

    References in periodicals archive ?

    US-based private equity group Starwood Capital is seeking buyers for its international budget hotel operator Louvre Hotels Group (LHG), according to French media reports, with the sale expected to raise E1.

    There was, for example, the taxi driver who picked us up at the Athens airport late at night and drove us around the city for nearly two hours, allegedly searching for the budget hotel where we had reservations.

    Microtel Inn Suites is a budget hotel chain with more than 250 locations worldwide.

    In the coming weeks, Hank Freid’s dream to invigorate the budget hotel category with an edgier flair will be realized as the Marrakech reopens with a multi-million dollar face-lift.

    The leisure group wants to double the size of its Costa Coffee chain to 2,000 and boost the budget hotel business Premier Inn by 50 per cent.

    3m on refurbishing the hotel and transforming it into a budget hotel that offers rooms from pounds 29.

    Travelodge, which was acquired by Dubai International Capital from Permira in 2006, was the first budget hotel to launch in the UK in 1985 when it opened its first outlet at Burton under Needwood in Staffordshire.

    A survey from budget hotel chain Travelodge claims regional retail therapy breaks could keep thousands of British shoppers away from New York and European cities, because it makes sense to save money for gifts instead.

    The report claimed that the revelations come, as the budget hotel sector seems to be bucking the downward trend in the hotel market amid the economic downturn.

    It seems that many are jumping on the budget hotel bandwagon that is sweeping through the GCC.

    It is Dubai’s first 1-star hotel that offers a clean room equipped with basic amenities and also the first budget hotel with a Gold Leed (Leadership in Energy Environmental Design) certification, a widely accepted benchmark for high-performance green buildings, said a senior official.

    This, budget hotel owners said, had led to losses in their business.





    Semester online #semester, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #semester #definition, #define #semester, #definition


    #

    semester

    Examples from the News

    • I had been studying abroad in London, and came back to finish the semester at Tufts.

    Everyone at This Dinner Party Has Lost Someone

  • The trick, in any case, was repeated semester after semester.
    Stonewall Jackson, VMI’s Most Embattled Professor
  • According to his suit, Carleton would rotate four new boys into his home every semester.
    Headmasters Behaving Badly
  • During his spring semester at Duke University, senior Lewis McLeod was expelled for committing a sexual assault.
    The College Bro’s Burden: Consent and Assault Cast a Shadow on Sexy Times
  • The exposure my client would have had in criminal court doesn t compare to a second semester senior getting expelled.

    Is UMass-Amherst Biased Against Male Students in Title IX Assault Cases?

  • Examples

    • But we had so many new girls this semester that I could not get around sooner.

    Elizabeth Hobart at Exeter Hall

  • The students of the present semester number fifteen hundred.
    Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror
  • There were enough paintings there to last till the end of the semester.

    Julia Augusta Schwartz

    Beatrice Leigh at College

  • I had other uses for the semester twenty marks, unless he absolutely needed them.
    My Life
  • One semester in this subject was usually considered sufficient.

  • What is Alcohol Abuse? Alcoholism #what #is #alcohol #abuse, #alcohol #abuse #definition,


    What is Alcohol Abuse?

    Just as with any drug, people ask, “what is alcohol abuse?” It can be difficult to tell the difference between social drinking, moderate drinking and alcohol abuse, but the alcohol abuse definition comes down to one key point: is drinking causing problems in the person’s life?

    When people start drinking, alcohol abuse is generally the furthest thing from their minds. Drinking is started recreationally, with friends and is associated with having a good time. This positive view of alcohol can be why it is so easy to slip into alcohol abuse. Often the thoughts of alcohol being a “good time” drug stop people from seeing the signs and symptoms of alcohol abuse.

    What is Alcohol Abuse? – Alcohol Abuse Definition

    The alcohol abuse definition is similar to alcoholism in that in both cases alcohol is causing harm to the drinker’s life and those around them. The difference is that those who abuse alcohol, but are not yet alcoholics, typically can put some limitations on their drinking and they have not yet become physically addicted to alcohol. The key to the alcohol abuse definition is not in the amount of alcohol consumed but on how it affects an individual. (See effects of alcohol )

    What is Alcohol Abuse? – Signs of Alcohol Abuse

    Because the alcohol abuse definition is general, the signs are unique for each person. Some of the signs will be similar to alcoholism but often to a lesser degree. Alcohol abuse is though, by definition, problem drinking. Signs that fit within the alcohol abuse definition include: iii

    • Repeatedly neglecting responsibilities due to drinking or hangover affects
    • Using alcohol in ways that are dangerous, for example, drinking and driving
    • Having repeated legal or financial trouble as a result of drinking
    • Continuing to drink in spite of its negative effects on relationships, work or other priorities
    • Drinking as a way to relax or de-stress
    • Drinking as a way to feel good, or simply not feel bad

    What is Alcohol Abuse? – Effects of Alcohol Abuse

    Long-term alcohol abuse can affect everything in a person’s life from their family, job and finances as well as almost every organ in the body. The most important part in understanding the alcohol abuse definition is determining whether it applies in your life so help for alcohol abuse can be sought as soon as possible.

    It is important to understand that while not everyone who abuses alcohol goes on to become an alcoholic, alcohol abuse is one of the biggest risk factors to becoming an alcoholic.

    More on Alcohol Abuse

    Support Group


    Health Insurance Definition #online #hotel

    #about health insurance

    #

    Health Insurance

    What is ‘Health Insurance’

    Health insurance is a type of insurance coverage that pays for medical and surgical expenses incurred by the insured. Health insurance can reimburse the insured for expenses incurred from illness or injury, or pay the care provider directly. It is often included in employer benefit packages as a means of enticing quality employees. The cost of health insurance premiums is deductible to the payer. and benefits received are tax-free.

    BREAKING DOWN ‘Health Insurance’

    Managed care insurance plans require policy holders to receive care from a network of designated health care providers for the highest level of coverage. If patients seek care outside the network, they must pay a higher percentage of the cost. In some cases, the insurance company may even refuse payment outright for services obtained out of network. Many managed care plans require patients to choose a primary care physician who oversees the patient’s care and makes recommendations about treatment. Insurance companies may also deny coverage for services that were obtained without preauthorization. In addition, insurers may refuse payment for name brand drugs if a generic version or comparable medication is available at a lower cost.

    Insurance plans with higher out-of-pocket costs generally have smaller monthly premiums than plans with low deductibles. When shopping for plans, individuals must weigh the benefits of lower monthly costs against the potential risk of large out-of-pocket expenses in the case of a major illness or accident. Health insurance has many cousins, such as disability insurance. critical (catastrophic) illness insurance and long-term care (LTC) insurance.

    Affordable Care Act

    In 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law. It prohibits insurance companies from denying coverage to patients with pre-existing conditions. and allows children to remain on their parents’ insurance plan until they reach the age of 26. In participating states, the act also expanded Medicaid. a government program that provides medical care for individuals with very low incomes. In addition to these changes, the ACA established the federal Healthcare Marketplace. The marketplace helps individuals and businesses shop for quality insurance plans at affordable rates. Low-income individuals who sign up for insurance through the marketplace may qualify for subsidies to help bring down costs.

    Americans are required to carry medical insurance that meets federally designated minimum standards or face a tax penalty. In certain cases, taxpayers may qualify for an exemption from the penalty if they were unable to obtain insurance due to financial hardship or other situations. Two public health insurance plans, Medicare and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, target older individuals and children, respectively. Medicare also serves people with certain disabilities. The program is available to anyone age 65 or older. The CHIP plan has income limits and covers babies and children up to the age of 18.





    Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary,

    #hospice aide job description

    #

    Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary, Employment – Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

    Training/Educational Requirements: High school diploma preferred

    Median Salary: $9.34 per hour

    Job Prospects: Excellent

    Job Description

    A hospice care aide helps individuals unable of helping themselves. These aides travel to the patient s home and help them perform activities required for daily life. Hospice care aides are often associated with the elderly or disabled who are unable to take care of themselves, so they perform all required functions specific to the patient.

    Most of the time, a hospice aide is the first position an individual may take at the beginning of their career. Alternatively, an individual may seek such a career if they are interested in the nursing field, but do not have the required education or training. Most functions performed are rather fundamental in nature, and do not require much training.

    Hospice aides usually work within a hospice environment or travel to the patient s home. They help the individual eat, get up out of bed, or help them with the bathroom or a bedpan. The number of duties involved depends on the nature and the status of the patient, since they are expected to help the patient function as normally as possible. If working within a hospice environment, they work with individual patients to make their final days as comfortable as possible. If working in a home environment, they spend time sitting with or caring for an elderly or disabled patient who requires extra care.

    Many times, families of patients in either a home or hospice environment can t commit to 24 hour care, so they hire a hospice aide to help during the times they are absent. Hospice aides travel to the home and work in shifts providing round the clock supervision and care. They aren t usually a registered nurse or hold a license and cannot usually administer medication, so the responsibilities are typically fundamental.

    Training/Educational Requirements

    There is no educational or training requirement for this position. A hospice aide learns from on-the-job training with a registered nurse or a nurse s aide. They learn the proper way to do things such as help a patient out of bed or assist with a bedpan by observing other nurses and by practicing. Oftentimes the family of the patient has a particular way they want things done, so the best training comes from working directly on the job.

    The National Association for Home Care and Hospice ( NAHC ) offers certification for personal and home care aides throughout the country. This certification is not mandatory although individuals may opt to gain it to demonstrate they have met established industry standards. It can be a simple certification and lend way to further development within this role. Those individuals wishing to gain their certification must complete a 75-hour course, observe and document work in up to 17 different skills signed off by a registered nurse. In addition, they must successfully pass a final exam. Although this isn t a requirement, it can certainly lend way to more opportunities for advancement.

    There are some high school courses that prepare for this role. At the early stages, an individual can do a co-op job to better prepare themselves for becoming a hospice aide. There are some standalone classes an individual can take in patient care which prepares them for the real thing. Individuals interested in a career as a hospice aide receive basic training from the company they work for before they are sent to a patient s home.

    When working in a hospice environment, the facility will provide some training not only in how to care for a patient but also in how to make them comfortable as they prepare for death. There are certain personality traits such as patience and compassion that are required for such a role since most patients are elderly, disabled, or dying.

    How to Get Hired

    Most individuals wishing to get a job as a hospice aide look for employment with a home health care services company. This is usually the best way to get hired because the patients and their families go to such a company to hire this type of individual. It helps to take training classes or work through a high school co-op to prepare for this role. In turn, this also helps to get hired much faster.

    For the hospice aide wishing to get hired into a hospice environment, it helps to apply to the facility directly. Usually these facilities are looking for background and experience since patients who come in here require a certain type of personality. It is also helpful to have experience working with a dying patient.

    Although there is no specific educational requirement for this position, experience helps to get hired. It is especially true for families who are hiring someone to come to their home and care for their loved one.

    Job Prospects, Employment Outlook, and Career Development

    There is expected to be a better than average increase in the hiring of hospice aides. This role is expected to grow as families continue to look for individuals to care for their loved ones in a home or hospice environment. Since this is an entry-level position, the requirements for hiring are much lower. Therefore, it appeals to those who may not have a college education. There is a high potential for growth since people oftentimes don t want to work within an entry-level role.

    As more hospice centers become a popular environment, the need for hospice aides will increase. So, too, will the need to keep aging or disabled family members in their home rather than sending them to a nursing home. This means there will be an increased need for individuals in this role, and within the home health care services business.

    Working Environment

    Depending on the type of facility a hospice aide wishes to work within, the environment may be slightly different. If focused within home health care, the individual will often travel to patient s homes. The assignment may last for a short time or may become a regular job. Individuals in this role care for more than one patient in their home or sometimes travel between a variety of different patient s homes. It all depends on the patients, the workload and the hours required. However, if focused within the home health care niche, hospice aides can expect the working environment to be an actual home. If focused within the hospice niche, it is expected to work within such a facility or institution. These facilities strive to create a cozy environment for their patients so they can be comfortable before they die. This work environment is more like an actual medical facility, but feels cozier.

    Salary and Benefits

    As of 2006, the average earnings for a hospice aide was about $9.34 an hour. The range averaged anywhere from $7.99 all the way up to $13 per hour depending on the facility. In some instances, a home health care company pays slightly higher depending on the environment and patient s needs. The more experience an individual has, the more they can expect to earn per hour.

    Since these are hourly positions, most of the time hospice aides work without any true benefits. Any travel expenses incurred are the individuals responsibility and are often not reimbursed. Instead, a flat hourly rate is given to hospice aides. For those working within a hospice environment, they can expect some benefits if they are hired by the facility directly.

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    My definition of sales enablement – Heinz Marketing #marketing #leads #definition


    #

    My definition of sales enablement

    Posted: May 21, 2013 By Matt Heinz

    We can get far more granular, of course, and talk about creating content for sales that maps to each stage of both the buyer s journey and their documented sales process. We can talk about going beyond simply passing along sales qualified leads, to also providing sales with messaging, follow-up tools and other support to increase lead responsiveness and conversion.

    But that s getting tactical. It s doing the fishing, vs. teaching he organization how to fish.

    The fundamentals of fishing, and sales enablement specifically in this example, is rooted in revenue responsibility. Get that part right and the rest often falls into place.

    So what does that mean? Depending on your company and culture, it might mean tying marketing s bonus structure to pipeline contribution and/or closed business. It might mean making sales-qualified leads and/or pipeline contribution the #1 measure of marketing effectiveness.

    It might also mean taking a hard look at the distribution of responsibilities across marketing. What would happen if you took just one head focused on demand generation, and instead focused that person on sales enablement strategy tactics? Would lead volume really go down? And if pipeline contribution actually went up, would you really care?

    Fundamentally, you could easily argue that generating sales-qualified leads is itself sales enablement. Good leads are certainly more efficient than random cold-calling.

    But we all know it goes well beyond that. And a tactical definition of sales enablement that fits all companies – sizes, industries, cultures – would be next to impossible.

    So instead, I think the right definition of sales enablement is more accurately a guiding principle.

    Revenue responsibility means a melding blurring of the line between sales marketing. It means new, seminal books such as The Challenger Sale are textbooks for not just sales, but marketing as well.

    It means a focus not on internal execution but customer-cetric alignment. The tactics of sales enablement are delivered internally, but the value is 100% realized in the field and with your prospects.

    This also doesn t mean sales enablement needs to be a department, or even an individual role. Sales enablement is everyone s responsibility. How does this effort impact our prospects? How will our sales team translate this to our prospects? How will prospects react, and how should our organization respond in kind?

    These are the questions that, in part, will define how your organization executes successful sales enablement.

    Great post. I especially like the point Sales enablement is everyone’s responsibility which is critical to the overall success of the organization adopting and powering sales enablement. As they say there is power in numbers and if there is a belief that you are either in sales or enabling sales the organization can reach new levels of revenue performance while reacting to changing markets.

    Great post Matt, I couldn t agree with you more on many of your assertions!

    Sales enablement is the ongoing process of optimizing your revenue generation capabilities. Trying to define it in cliché, anachronistic terms is offensive to real world practitioners. Such an example would be enterprise
    technology sales teams responsible for producing a huge revenue number, or they lose their jobs.

    There are many complexities and layers involved. Is it a brand new market that you are trying to build? Are you a challenger with established market leaders? Creating a definition that uses a just in time reference (e.g. IDC) is analogous to comparing a simple game of checkers to the three-dimensional game of chess that Spock played so brilliantly on the Star Trek TV series. They are completely different and not everyone is capable of playing them well with the same training.

    Start by considering the business context. Why is sales enablement such a hot topic these days? The simple answer is because the buyer-seller dynamic has gone through wholesale changes courtesy of the Internet and availability of information. The seller can no longer dictate a sales process to the buyer. The buyer is in complete control of the process.

    What are the business implications of this? Win rates are falling. The number of sales reps achieving quota are at historical lows. Sales cycles are getting longer: too many deals are stalling or resulting in no decisions. It takes too long to ramp up new sales team members. Sales team attrition rates are too high.

    Great sales teams understand this and are constantly arming, educating and developing their sales teams with the capabilities they need to optimize their revenue generation capabilities.

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    Ad hoc #ad #hoc, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #ad #hoc #definition, #define


    ad hoc

    ad hoc in Culture Expand

    ad hoc [(ad hok. ad hohk )]

    A phrase describing something created especially for a particular occasion: “We need an ad hoc committee to handle this new problem immediately.” From Latin. meaning “toward this (matter).”

    The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
    Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
    Cite This Source

    Idioms and Phrases with ad hoc Expand

    ad hoc

    For the special purpose or end at hand; also, by extension, improvised or impromptu. The term, Latin for “to this,” is most often used for committees established for a specific purpose, as in The committee was formed ad hoc to address health insurance problems. The term is also used as an adjective ( An ad hoc committee was formed ), and has given rise to the noun adhocism for the tendency to use temporary, provisional, or improvised methods to deal with a particular problem. [ Early 1600s ]

    The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
    Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Cite This Source


    Definition of degrees #definition #of #degrees


    #

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: unit of measurement

    Synonyms: amount, amplitude, caliber, dimension, division, expanse, extent, gauge, gradation, grade, height, intensity, interval, length, limit, line, link, mark, notch, period, plane, point, proportion, quality, quantity, range, rate, ratio, reach, rung, scale, scope, severity, shade, size, space, stage, stair, standard, step, stint, strength, tenor, term, tier

    Main Entry: degree

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: recognition of achievement; rank or grade of position

    Synonyms: approbation, approval, baccalaureate, caliber, class, compass, credentials, credit, dignification, dignity, distinction, eminence, grade, height, honor, level, magnitude, order, pitch, point, position, potency, qualification, quality, quantity, range, rank, reach, scope, sheepskin, shingle, sort, stage, standard, standing, station, status, strength, testimonial, testimony

    Main Entry: caste

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: social class

    Synonyms: cultural level, degree, estate, grade, lineage, order, position, race, rank, social order, species, sphere, standing, station, status, stratum

    Main Entry: circumstances

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: state of affairs in one’s life

    Synonyms: assets, capital, chances, class, command, degree, dowry, financial status, footing, income, lifestyle, lot, means, net worth, outlook, position, precedence, prestige, property, prospects, prosperity, rank, rating, resources, situation, sphere, standing, state, station, status, substance, times, way of life, worldly goods

    Main Entry: class

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: kind, sort, category

    Synonyms: branch, brand, breed, cast, caste, character, classification, collection, color, degree, denomination, department, description, designation, distinction, division, domain, estate, family, feather, frame, genre, genus, grade, grain, grouping, hierarchy, humor, ilk, kidney, league, make, mold, name, nature, order, origin, property, province, quality, range, rank, rate, school, sect, section, selection, set, source, species, sphere, standing, status, stripe, style, suit, temperament, value, variety

    Main Entry: class

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: societal group, background

    Synonyms: ancestry, birth, bourgeoisie, breed, caliber, caste, circle, clan, clique, club, company, condition, connection, coterie, cultural level, degree, derivation, descent, estate, extraction, family, genealogy, grade, hierarchy, influence, intelligentsia, league, lineage, moiety, nobility, origin, pecking order, pedigree, pigeonhole, place, position, prestige, quality, sect, social rank, source, sphere, standing, state, station, status, stock, strain, stratum, the right stuff, tier, title

    Main Entry: deal

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: amount, share

    Synonyms: abundance, degree, distribution, extent, plenty, plethora, portion, quantity, shake, superabundance, transaction

    Main Entry: diploma

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: certificate for achievement

    Synonyms: authority, award, charter, commission, confirmation, credentials, degree, honor, recognition, sheepskin, shingle, voucher, warrant

    Main Entry: division

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: something produced from separating

    Synonyms: affiliate, associate, border, boundary, branch, category, chunk, class, compartment, cut, degree, demarcation, department, divide, dividend, divider, dividing line, divvy, end, fraction, fragment, grouping, head, kind, lobe, lump, member, moiety, offshoot, parcel, partition, piece, piece of action, portion, rake-off, ramification, section, sector, segment, share, slice, sort, split, subdivision, wedge

    Main Entry: echelon

    Part of Speech: noun

    Definition: class, level

    Synonyms: degree, file, grade, line, office, place, position, queue, rank, row, string, tier

    degree early 13c. from O.Fr. degre “a degree, step, rank,” from V.L. *degradus “a step,” from L.L. degredare, from L. de- “down” + gradus “step” (see grade). Most modern senses date from M.E. from notion of a hierarchy of steps. Meaning “a grade of crime” is 1670s; that of “a unit of temperature” is from 1727. The division of the circle into 360 degrees is very ancient and was known in Babylon and Egypt. It is perhaps from the daily motion of the sun through the zodiac in the course of a year.


    Perinatal – definition of perinatal by The Free Dictionary #cheap #hotel #site

    #perinatal hospice

    #

    perinatal

    The 86 interdisciplinary recommendations in six different topic areas were developed by a workgroup convened by the National Perinatal Association (NPA) beginning in January, 2014.

    Joint Commission-accredited health care organizations looking to up their perinatal care credentials now can, thanks to a new Perinatal Care Certification program.

    A REVIEW of perinatal and maternal mortality released last month showed that, while there was a reduction in stillbirths in New Zealand between 2007 and 2013, more could be done to further reduce perinatal mortality in at-risk groups, during and after pregnancy.

    Stefan Maxwell, Chairman of the Perinatal Partnership gave testimony in a hearing entitled, “Examining the Growing Problems of Prescription Drug and Heroin Abuse: State and Local Perspectives.

    com)– Meticulous Research announced the release of new market research report titled, Global Perinatal Software Market Outlook: 2014-2020.

    Tenders are invited for Wisconsin Perinatal Quality Collaborative.

    The announcement follows feedback from staff who were keen to develop their skills to support women during the perinatal period, which extends from the start of the pregnancy until their child is 12 months old.

    The Maternal Mental Health Alliance (MMHA) is warning that women who develop a perinatal mental illness are missing out on potentially lifesaving care.

    Perinatal mental health disorders potentially have long-term negative sequelae for women, their infants and their families.

    Overcoming Baby Blues: A Comprehensive Guide to Perinatal Depression

    Some involve the health delivery system, including delayed admission to a delivery area and lack of transportation, essential obstetric and perinatal skills among caregivers, and equipment.

    One such set of population data that is collected in the Australian context within obstetrics and midwifery, which contributes to areas such as funding, research, and education is perinatal data.





    Inpatient – definition of inpatient by The Free Dictionary #home #healthcare #nurse

    #inpatient care

    #

    inpatient

    References in periodicals archive ?

    With the exception of some unique programs that integrate inpatient rehabilitation care into the acute care management of their patients, TBI inpatient rehabilitation usually begins after the individual is medically stabilized in the acute care setting and discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation facility.

    VAMC nursing officials–nurse executives who are responsible for all nursing care at VAMCs and nurse managers who are responsible for supervising RNs on VAMC inpatient units–GAO interviewed reported that although VA inpatient RNs are required to input patient data into VA’s PCS, they do not rely on the information generated by PCS because it is outdated and inaccurate.

    This activity logger and its earlier version the ‘Uptimer’ have also been used in investigations of inpatient physical activity in children (Pirpiris and Graham 2004), adults (Browning et al 2007), and the elderly (Bernhardt et al 2005).

    Robert Rohrbaugh argue that inpatient training helps foster the development of psychiatry’s fundamental skills in indispensable ways, and they note that other specialties appear to place great value on inpatient training (Academic Psychiatry 2007;31:266-9).

    Major trauma inpatients including those with serious internal injuries and multiple fractures.

    An extensive survey by the Career Satisfaction Study Group suggested the need to balance outpatient and inpatient hours in order to relieve stress.

    3M Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital DRGfinder works in conjunction with 3M Codefinder Software, a coding application used by more than 4,000 U.

    To obtain an overall understanding of MRSA throughout Taiwan, we first chose 80 MRSA isolates (68 inpatient and 12 outpatient isolates) collected in 2002 from 4 hospitals located in the north, middle, south, and east regions of Taiwan.

    They have to make arrangements for the transfer and or discharge of all patients before they can close the door to being an inpatient facility.

    Internal medicine residents self-reported greater preparedness to treat typically inpatient conditions than family practice residents, while family practice residents self-reported greater preparedness to treat typically outpatient conditions, said Dr.

    The success of the reconstruction phase, coupled with the signing of inpatient contracts with Hospice of New York and Hospice Care Network, plus the fact that all the beds were filled (average length of stay: 13 days), prompted conversion of another six private resident care rooms beginning in April 2001 and completed six weeks later.

    Catheter insertions using the Fast Tract inpatient method solve this problem.





    Cocos Definition from Financial Times Lexicon #bond #definition


    #

    Definition of cocos

    Contingent convertibles, also known as CoCo bonds, Cocos or contingent convertible notes, are slightly different to regular convertible bonds in that the likelihood of the bonds converting to equity is “contingent” on a specified event, such as the stock price of the company exceeding a particular level for a certain period of time.

    They carry a distinct accounting advantage as unlike other kinds of convertible bonds, they do not have to be included in a company’s diluted earnings per share until the bonds are eligible for conversion. [1]

    It is also a form of capital that regulators hope could help buttress a bank’s finances in times of stress.

    CoCos are different to existing hybrids because they are designed to convert into shares if a pre-set trigger is breached in order to provide a shock boost to capital levels and reassure investors more generally.

    Hybrids, including CoCos, contain features of both debt and equity. They are intended to act as a cushion between senior bondholders and shareholders, who will suffer first if capital is lost. The bonds usually allow a bank to either hold on to the capital past the first repayment date, or to skip paying interest coupons on the notes.

    FT Articles & Analysis

    See more articles mentioning “cocos ” or search FT.com

    Related Terms

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    Definition of palliative care #hospice #nurse #certification

    #definition of palliative care

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Definition of bail #definition #of #bail


    #

    Bail-in – D finition

    Le bail-in est une pratique financière qui impose à certains créanciers d’une banque en difficulté (y compris parfois de simples clients épargnants) une diminution du montant des créances qu’ils possèdent sur l’établissement de crédit ou une conversion de celles-ci en actions de capital. Le bail-in permet ainsi aux banques de se recapitaliser en cas de crise.
    On dinstingue le bail in du bail out qui désigne le renflouement d’une banque par un Etat (comme lors de la crise de 2008).
    Cette méthode a déjà été pratiquée par certains Etats (Chypre notamment) pour venir en aide aux banques considérées comme trop importantes pour les laisser faire faillite (banques too big to fail ). Cet outils peut parfois directement viser les comptes bancaires des déposants, éventuellement sous certaines conditions de seuil de dépôt dans l’établissement concerné (lorsque les sommes déposées dépassent un plafond de 100 000 euros par exemple).
    Voir aussi les règles applicables à la garantie des dépôts bancaires en France.

    A voir galement

    Ce document intitul Bail-in – D finition issu de Droit-Finances (droit-finances.commentcamarche.net) est soumis au droit d’auteur. Toute reproduction ou représentation totale ou partielle de ce site par quelque procédé que ce soit, sans autorisation expresse, est interdite.

    Grosses réparations – définition

    Garantie de parfait achèvement – définition

    Dossier la une

    Transmission du patrimoine. tout ce qu’il faut savoir


    Hospice – definition of hospice by The Free Dictionary #motels #for #sale

    #hospice definition

    #

    hospice

    References in classic literature ?

    Near this point the footpath joins the wider track, which connects the Grimsel with the head of the Rhone SCHNAWP; this has been carefully constructed, and leads with a tortuous course among and over LES PIERRES, down to the bank of the gloomy little SWOSH-SWOSH, which almost washes against the walls of the Grimsel Hospice .

    This was followed by many more bursts, none of WELCHE, however, was so dangerously near; and after waiting a long DEMI-hour in our icy prison, we sallied out to talk through a HABOOLONG which, though not so heavy as before, was quite enough to give us a thorough soaking before our arrival at the Hospice .

    In the valley beneath lay the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric drawing–among them the broad cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St Thomas’s, the pinnacled tower of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice. where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale.

    There is a hospice of monks yonder, where you may see the roof among the trees, and there it was that Sir Roland was slain.

    7, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — In recent weeks, millions of people have had the opportunity to learn more about hospice and palliative care through outreach and efforts of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and National Hospice Foundation.

    The majority of end of life care in Wales is provided by hospices across a range of settings, including inpatient units and hospice at home services.

    STAFF at Birmingham St Mary’s Hospice gathered yesterday to mark the 35th anniversary of the first patient admittance on March 5, 1979.

    KirKwood Hospice at Dalton and Elland’s Overgate Hospice have for a number of years received annual grants from the Freemasons’ Grand Charity in London.

    com)– Clearwater Suncoast Hospice joins hospices across America and National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) in celebrating National Hospice and Palliative Care Month in November.

    THE growing need for hospice services across the UK is being highlighted as part of Hospice Care Week.

    MIDDLESBROUGH ERIMUS ROTARY CLUB: The club president, Malcolm Bareham, asked Mike Robson past president to present a cheque for PS440 to Graham Leggatt-Chidgey, chief executive of Butterwick Hospice .

    Claire House Children’s Hospice in Wirral was awarded PS509,025.





    Hospice definition #terminal #care

    #hospice definition

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Fixed-income – definition of fixed-income by The Free Dictionary #fixed #income #definition


    #

    fixed income

    References in periodicals archive ?

    SAN FRANCISCO — Stone Youngberg LLC (S Y), a financial services firm specializing in fixed-income securities and a leading underwriter of land-secured debt in the United States, announced today that it has hired Eric Sutherland to manage its new fixed-income sales and trading office in downtown Chicago, a move aimed at expanding the firm’s growing national footprint.

    As the Global Head of Fixed-Income Prime Brokerage, Gunewardena will build a fully-integrated Fixed-Income Prime Brokerage which will offer hedge fund clients access to Deutsche Bank’s industry-leading fixed income products.

    Providing our clients with access to high quality, timely, and relevant data can help them analyze fixed-income securities to help them make more informed trading decisions,” said Tom Vales, chief executive officer, TheMuniCenter.

    NEW YORK — Dow Jones Company (NYSE: DJ) today announced a renewal of an agreement to distribute Dow Jones Newswires’ Capital Markets Report to Reuters North American fixed-income customers.

    In conjunction with BGC, a leading inter-dealer brokerage firm providing integrated voice and electronic services to wholesale fixed-income. interest rate, foreign exchange and derivatives markets worldwide, eSpeed plans on adding further instruments to its wireless application in the future in an effort to broaden the pipeline of tradable instruments and market data that will be available on a wireless basis.

    SAN FRANCISCO — Stone Youngberg (S Y), a fixed-income securities firm and one of the largest underwriters of tax-exempt local government debt in the West, announced today that it has hired Kevin Schultze as Director of the Fixed Income Portfolio Strategy Group.

    amp; DENVER — Clayton Fixed Income Services, formerly The Murrayhill Company, creators of credit risk management for the fixed-income industry, today launched its Regulation AB compliance service to help industry issuers and servicers comply with the challenging landscape of Regulation AB.

    John Chalker, Managing Director of LM Capital, said the firm’s Opportunistic Core Fixed Income strategy utilizes a macro economic, fundamental analysis approach incorporating Global Scenario Planning to assemble a portfolio representing the most attractive fixed-income investment opportunities.

    The launch of Evergreen Institutional Enhanced Income Fund builds upon Evergreen Investments’ strong fixed-income franchise and capitalizes on the firm’s longstanding capability of managing fixed-income investments for institutions,” said Dennis Ferro, President Chief Executive Officer of Evergreen Investments.

    FRANKFURT, Germany DUBLIN, Ireland — ION Trading, a leading provider of high-performance software solutions for trading on electronic fixed-income markets, announced today that it is in the process of completing the acquisition of Frankfurt-based finvision Financial Systems AG, a provider of analytics and pricing for fixed-income securities.

    com) today announced that it has launched Qwik KonneKT(R), the first shrink-wrapped connectivity tool, that will increase efficiency and productivity in fixed-income securities trading by significantly reducing software installation fees and minimizing costly trade errors.

    a leading global financial services provider to the institutional equity and fixed-income markets, today announced that two new offices have opened in Houston and Austin, Texas.


    Hydrogen bond – definition of hydrogen bond by The Free Dictionary #hydrogen


    #

    hydrogen bond

    A chemical bond in which a hydrogen atom of one molecule is attracted to an electronegative atom, especially a nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine atom, usually of another molecule.

    hydrogen bond

    (Chemistry) a weak chemical bond between an electronegative atom, such as fluorine, oxygen, or nitrogen, and a hydrogen atom bound to another electronegative atom. Hydrogen bonds are responsible for the properties of water and many biological molecules

    hy drogen bond`

    an electrostatic bond between a hydrogen atom in a covalent bond and an electronegative atom, as oxygen.

    hydrogen bond

    A chemical bond in which a hydrogen atom that is already bonded to an atom in a molecule forms a second bond with another atom, either in the same molecule or in a different one. The second atom is usually of a type that strongly attracts electrons, such as nitrogen or oxygen.

    Thesaurus Antonyms Related Words Synonyms Legend:

    Researchers added an edible oligosaccharide, [beta]-cyclodextrin, during film preparation to form hydrogen bond interactions with propionic acid.

    Most of these “anomalous” properties of water–which are by no means mysterious, unpredictable, or abnormal–depend on the extremely weak hydrogen bonding, so weak that a hydrogen bond does not survive for more than a tiny fraction of a second.

    Specifically, by inducing a hydrogen bond within a molecular, the new reagent obtains high-reactive aminated oligonucleotide in a few minutes with improved purification efficiency.

    Just one tiny tweak in a hydrogen bond is enough to let the microbes pick out the phosphate they need to build their DNA–while keeping arsenic out.

    Effect of water on the hydrogen bond formation in Estonian kukersite kerogen as revealed by molecular modeling // Fuel.

    Previous studies have used single-crystal x-ray diffraction to explore the use of bis- and trisphenols in crystal engineering and the interaction of this type of phenol, acting as a hydrogen bond donor, with hexamethylenetetramine, (C[H.

    It is found that the spectra are highly sensitive to solvent polarity but are insensitive to solvent hydrogen bond donor or acceptor strength.

    Also, the photon energy carried by such waves is millions of times less than that needed to break a hydrogen bond and thereby damage living tissue.

    Both hydrogen-bonding functional groups must be within approximately an atomic diameter for the hydrogen bond to form.

    Part 2 explains forces acting at long range between closed-shell atoms or molecules, focusing on the van der Waals bond and the hydrogen bond .

    Some of our knowledge has come from the study of the simple water dimer [5-9], the gaseous adduct of two molecules linked by a single hydrogen bond (see Figure 2).


    Palliative – definition of palliative by The Free Dictionary #center #for #hospice

    #palliative drugs

    #

    palliative

    Edgar Caswall again tortured his brain to find any antidote or palliative of this greater evil than before.

    My own imperfect health has induced me to give some attention to those palliative resources which the divine mercy has placed within our reach.

    The hope, if I could only live long enough, of increasing it to a certain sum, has impelled me to resist the disease by such palliative means as I could devise.

    This doctor therefore proposed, “that upon the meeting of the senate, certain physicians should attend it the three first days of their sitting, and at the close of each day’s debate feel the pulses of every senator; after which, having maturely considered and consulted upon the nature of the several maladies, and the methods of cure, they should on the fourth day return to the senate house, attended by their apothecaries stored with proper medicines; and before the members sat, administer to each of them lenitives, aperitives, abstersives, corrosives, restringents, palliatives. laxatives, cephalalgics, icterics, apophlegmatics, acoustics, as their several cases required; and, according as these medicines should operate, repeat, alter, or omit them, at the next meeting.

    The fear from which she was suffering I might have soothed, but the serious heart- disease, under which she laboured, was beyond the reach of all moral palliatives .

    com)– Harbor Light Hospice, a national hospice care, a palliative care services provider, has released a new online informational website section on palliative care in the United States.

    NHPCO’s “Moments of Life: Made Possible by Hospice” campaign releases new video about how palliative care has changed one woman’s life.

    By Mehdi Nemr ROME, Nov 12 (KUNA) — Cofounder and Manager of the Bayt Abdullah Children’s Hospice Margaret Al-Sayer welcomed on Thursday a recent world document on the right of children with life-threatening illnesses and their families to palliative care.

    Palliative care is often considered end-of-life care, but recent studies are shifting the definition to “specialized medical care .

    He is being recognized for his efforts to improve the quality of care provided by palliative care services.

    A CHARITY has called on the Welsh Government and health boards to look at why there are “inconsistencies” in access to specialist palliative care in Wales.

    A Welsh Government spokesman said: ” Palliative and end-oflife care has improved significantly since 2008, when the Welsh Government invested in specialist palliative care services.





    Inpatient – definition of inpatient by The Free Dictionary #motels #in #billings

    #inpatient care

    #

    inpatient

    References in periodicals archive ?

    With the exception of some unique programs that integrate inpatient rehabilitation care into the acute care management of their patients, TBI inpatient rehabilitation usually begins after the individual is medically stabilized in the acute care setting and discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation facility.

    VAMC nursing officials–nurse executives who are responsible for all nursing care at VAMCs and nurse managers who are responsible for supervising RNs on VAMC inpatient units–GAO interviewed reported that although VA inpatient RNs are required to input patient data into VA’s PCS, they do not rely on the information generated by PCS because it is outdated and inaccurate.

    This activity logger and its earlier version the ‘Uptimer’ have also been used in investigations of inpatient physical activity in children (Pirpiris and Graham 2004), adults (Browning et al 2007), and the elderly (Bernhardt et al 2005).

    Robert Rohrbaugh argue that inpatient training helps foster the development of psychiatry’s fundamental skills in indispensable ways, and they note that other specialties appear to place great value on inpatient training (Academic Psychiatry 2007;31:266-9).

    Major trauma inpatients including those with serious internal injuries and multiple fractures.

    An extensive survey by the Career Satisfaction Study Group suggested the need to balance outpatient and inpatient hours in order to relieve stress.

    3M Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital DRGfinder works in conjunction with 3M Codefinder Software, a coding application used by more than 4,000 U.

    To obtain an overall understanding of MRSA throughout Taiwan, we first chose 80 MRSA isolates (68 inpatient and 12 outpatient isolates) collected in 2002 from 4 hospitals located in the north, middle, south, and east regions of Taiwan.

    They have to make arrangements for the transfer and or discharge of all patients before they can close the door to being an inpatient facility.

    Internal medicine residents self-reported greater preparedness to treat typically inpatient conditions than family practice residents, while family practice residents self-reported greater preparedness to treat typically outpatient conditions, said Dr.

    The success of the reconstruction phase, coupled with the signing of inpatient contracts with Hospice of New York and Hospice Care Network, plus the fact that all the beds were filled (average length of stay: 13 days), prompted conversion of another six private resident care rooms beginning in April 2001 and completed six weeks later.

    Catheter insertions using the Fast Tract inpatient method solve this problem.





    Definition of Palliative treatment #hudson #bay #hotel

    #palliative treatment

    #

    Palliative treatment: To palliate a disease is to treat it partially and insofar as possible, but not cure it completely. Palliation cloaks a disease. Also sometimes called symptomatic treatment.

    To take a case, a 91-year-old man was found to have a tumor in his lung. He did not have chest surgery because of his age and the general rule that cancer moves more slowly with age. Instead, he had radiotherapy of the tumor: palliation, to slow the progression of local disease, as opposed to a cure.

    The Latin “pallium” referred to a type of cloak in ancient Greece and Rome and, later, to a white woolen band with pendants in front and back worn by the pope or an archbishop as a symbol of full episcopal authority. Pallium was modified to form “palliate,” an adjective meaning “cloaked” or “concealed” and a verb meaning “to cloak,” “to cloth,” or “to shelter.” Today “palliation” implies the disguising or concealing of badness or evil and suggests the alleviation of the vile effects of wickedness or illness.

    Last Editorial Review: 6/9/2016

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    Hospice – definition of hospice by The Free Dictionary #all #inclusive #hotels

    #hospice definition

    #

    hospice

    References in classic literature ?

    Near this point the footpath joins the wider track, which connects the Grimsel with the head of the Rhone SCHNAWP; this has been carefully constructed, and leads with a tortuous course among and over LES PIERRES, down to the bank of the gloomy little SWOSH-SWOSH, which almost washes against the walls of the Grimsel Hospice .

    This was followed by many more bursts, none of WELCHE, however, was so dangerously near; and after waiting a long DEMI-hour in our icy prison, we sallied out to talk through a HABOOLONG which, though not so heavy as before, was quite enough to give us a thorough soaking before our arrival at the Hospice .

    In the valley beneath lay the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric drawing–among them the broad cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St Thomas’s, the pinnacled tower of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice. where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale.

    There is a hospice of monks yonder, where you may see the roof among the trees, and there it was that Sir Roland was slain.

    7, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — In recent weeks, millions of people have had the opportunity to learn more about hospice and palliative care through outreach and efforts of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and National Hospice Foundation.

    The majority of end of life care in Wales is provided by hospices across a range of settings, including inpatient units and hospice at home services.

    STAFF at Birmingham St Mary’s Hospice gathered yesterday to mark the 35th anniversary of the first patient admittance on March 5, 1979.

    KirKwood Hospice at Dalton and Elland’s Overgate Hospice have for a number of years received annual grants from the Freemasons’ Grand Charity in London.

    com)– Clearwater Suncoast Hospice joins hospices across America and National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) in celebrating National Hospice and Palliative Care Month in November.

    THE growing need for hospice services across the UK is being highlighted as part of Hospice Care Week.

    MIDDLESBROUGH ERIMUS ROTARY CLUB: The club president, Malcolm Bareham, asked Mike Robson past president to present a cheque for PS440 to Graham Leggatt-Chidgey, chief executive of Butterwick Hospice .

    Claire House Children’s Hospice in Wirral was awarded PS509,025.





    Nearest – definition of nearest by The Free Dictionary #palms #hotel

    #nearest motel

    #

    nearest

    References in classic literature ?

    Beth said nothing, but wiped away her tears with the blue army sock and began to knit with all her might, losing no time in doing the duty that lay nearest her, while she resolved in her quiet little soul to be all that Father hoped to find her when the year brought round the happy coming home.

    Concerning the old carpenter who fixed the bed for the writer, I only mentioned him because he, like many of what are called very common people, became the nearest thing to what is understandable and lovable of all the grotesques in the writer’s book.

    The patch of yellow sunlight on the floor travelled back toward the stairway, and grandmother and I talked about my journey, and about the arrival of the new Bohemian family; she said they were to be our nearest neighbours.

    A ragged oak grew on the right bank of the river, nearly opposite to their position, which, seeking the freedom of the open space, had inclined so far forward that its upper branches overhung that arm of the stream which flowed nearest to its own shore.

    The usual hurried, feverish toil in the claim was suspended; the pick and shovel were left sticking in the richest “pay gravel;” the toiling millionaires themselves, ragged, dirty, and perspiring, lay panting under the nearest shade, where the pipes went out listlessly, and conversation sank to monosyllables.

    She was absurdly hurt, moreover, by the slight and idle effect that her setting up shop–an event of such breathless interest to herself–appeared to have upon the public, of which these two men were the nearest representatives.

    The age had not so much refinement, that any sense of impropriety restrained the wearers of petticoat and farthingale from stepping forth into the public ways, and wedging their not unsubstantial persons, if occasion were, into the throng nearest to the scaffold at an execution.

    The apparition had reached the landing halfway up and was therefore on the spot nearest the window, where at sight of me, it stopped short and fixed me exactly as it had fixed me from the tower and from the garden.

    Hussey concerning the nearest way to bed; but, as Queequeg was about to precede me up the stairs, the lady reached forth her arm, and demanded his harpoon; she allowed no harpoon in her chambers.

    With one intent all the combined rival boats were pointed for this one fish, because not only was he the largest, and therefore the most valuable whale, but he was nearest to them, and the other whales were going with such great velocity, moreover, as almost to defy pursuit for the time.

    I stood nearest the door, so he came to me first, patting me as he came in.

    Marija has apparently concluded about two hours ago that if the altar in the corner, with the deity in soiled white, be not the true home of the muses, it is, at any rate, the nearest substitute on earth attainable.





    Budget hotel – definition of Budget hotel by The Free Dictionary #hospice

    #budget hotel

    #

    hotel

    References in periodicals archive ?

    US-based private equity group Starwood Capital is seeking buyers for its international budget hotel operator Louvre Hotels Group (LHG), according to French media reports, with the sale expected to raise E1.

    There was, for example, the taxi driver who picked us up at the Athens airport late at night and drove us around the city for nearly two hours, allegedly searching for the budget hotel where we had reservations.

    Microtel Inn Suites is a budget hotel chain with more than 250 locations worldwide.

    In the coming weeks, Hank Freid’s dream to invigorate the budget hotel category with an edgier flair will be realized as the Marrakech reopens with a multi-million dollar face-lift.

    The leisure group wants to double the size of its Costa Coffee chain to 2,000 and boost the budget hotel business Premier Inn by 50 per cent.

    3m on refurbishing the hotel and transforming it into a budget hotel that offers rooms from pounds 29.

    Travelodge, which was acquired by Dubai International Capital from Permira in 2006, was the first budget hotel to launch in the UK in 1985 when it opened its first outlet at Burton under Needwood in Staffordshire.

    A survey from budget hotel chain Travelodge claims regional retail therapy breaks could keep thousands of British shoppers away from New York and European cities, because it makes sense to save money for gifts instead.

    The report claimed that the revelations come, as the budget hotel sector seems to be bucking the downward trend in the hotel market amid the economic downturn.

    It seems that many are jumping on the budget hotel bandwagon that is sweeping through the GCC.

    It is Dubai’s first 1-star hotel that offers a clean room equipped with basic amenities and also the first budget hotel with a Gold Leed (Leadership in Energy Environmental Design) certification, a widely accepted benchmark for high-performance green buildings, said a senior official.

    This, budget hotel owners said, had led to losses in their business.





    Definition palliative care #elizabeth #hospice

    #definition palliative care

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Palliative – definition of palliative by The Free Dictionary #monterey #motels

    #palliative drugs

    #

    palliative

    Edgar Caswall again tortured his brain to find any antidote or palliative of this greater evil than before.

    My own imperfect health has induced me to give some attention to those palliative resources which the divine mercy has placed within our reach.

    The hope, if I could only live long enough, of increasing it to a certain sum, has impelled me to resist the disease by such palliative means as I could devise.

    This doctor therefore proposed, “that upon the meeting of the senate, certain physicians should attend it the three first days of their sitting, and at the close of each day’s debate feel the pulses of every senator; after which, having maturely considered and consulted upon the nature of the several maladies, and the methods of cure, they should on the fourth day return to the senate house, attended by their apothecaries stored with proper medicines; and before the members sat, administer to each of them lenitives, aperitives, abstersives, corrosives, restringents, palliatives. laxatives, cephalalgics, icterics, apophlegmatics, acoustics, as their several cases required; and, according as these medicines should operate, repeat, alter, or omit them, at the next meeting.

    The fear from which she was suffering I might have soothed, but the serious heart- disease, under which she laboured, was beyond the reach of all moral palliatives .

    com)– Harbor Light Hospice, a national hospice care, a palliative care services provider, has released a new online informational website section on palliative care in the United States.

    NHPCO’s “Moments of Life: Made Possible by Hospice” campaign releases new video about how palliative care has changed one woman’s life.

    By Mehdi Nemr ROME, Nov 12 (KUNA) — Cofounder and Manager of the Bayt Abdullah Children’s Hospice Margaret Al-Sayer welcomed on Thursday a recent world document on the right of children with life-threatening illnesses and their families to palliative care.

    Palliative care is often considered end-of-life care, but recent studies are shifting the definition to “specialized medical care .

    He is being recognized for his efforts to improve the quality of care provided by palliative care services.

    A CHARITY has called on the Welsh Government and health boards to look at why there are “inconsistencies” in access to specialist palliative care in Wales.

    A Welsh Government spokesman said: ” Palliative and end-oflife care has improved significantly since 2008, when the Welsh Government invested in specialist palliative care services.





    What does palliative mean? definition, meaning and pronunciation (Free English Language Dictionary)

    #what does palliative care mean

    #

    PALLIATIVE

    Dictionary entry overview: What does palliative mean?

    PALLIATIVE (noun)
    The noun PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

    1. remedy that alleviates pain without curing

    Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as a noun is very rare.

    PALLIATIVE (adjective)
    The adjective PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

    1. moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

    Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as an adjective is very rare.

    Dictionary entry details

    PALLIATIVE (noun)

    palliative [BACK TO TOP]

    Remedy that alleviates pain without curing

    Nouns denoting man-made objects

    Hypernyms ( palliative is a kind of. ):

    PALLIATIVE (adjective)

    palliative [BACK TO TOP]

    Moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

    moderating (lessening in intensity or strength)

    Learn English with. Proverbs of the week

    Beer before liquor, you’ll never be sicker, but liquor before beer and you’re in the clear. (English proverb)

    Complete idiot who can keep silent, to a wise man is similar (Breton proverb)

    The arrogant army will lose the battle for sure. (Chinese proverb)

    Where there’s a will, there is a way. (Dutch proverb)

    PALLIATIVE: related words searches

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    Perinatal – definition of perinatal by The Free Dictionary #deals #on #hotels

    #perinatal hospice

    #

    perinatal

    The 86 interdisciplinary recommendations in six different topic areas were developed by a workgroup convened by the National Perinatal Association (NPA) beginning in January, 2014.

    Joint Commission-accredited health care organizations looking to up their perinatal care credentials now can, thanks to a new Perinatal Care Certification program.

    A REVIEW of perinatal and maternal mortality released last month showed that, while there was a reduction in stillbirths in New Zealand between 2007 and 2013, more could be done to further reduce perinatal mortality in at-risk groups, during and after pregnancy.

    Stefan Maxwell, Chairman of the Perinatal Partnership gave testimony in a hearing entitled, “Examining the Growing Problems of Prescription Drug and Heroin Abuse: State and Local Perspectives.

    com)– Meticulous Research announced the release of new market research report titled, Global Perinatal Software Market Outlook: 2014-2020.

    Tenders are invited for Wisconsin Perinatal Quality Collaborative.

    The announcement follows feedback from staff who were keen to develop their skills to support women during the perinatal period, which extends from the start of the pregnancy until their child is 12 months old.

    The Maternal Mental Health Alliance (MMHA) is warning that women who develop a perinatal mental illness are missing out on potentially lifesaving care.

    Perinatal mental health disorders potentially have long-term negative sequelae for women, their infants and their families.

    Overcoming Baby Blues: A Comprehensive Guide to Perinatal Depression

    Some involve the health delivery system, including delayed admission to a delivery area and lack of transportation, essential obstetric and perinatal skills among caregivers, and equipment.

    One such set of population data that is collected in the Australian context within obstetrics and midwifery, which contributes to areas such as funding, research, and education is perinatal data.





    Inpatient – definition of inpatient by The Free Dictionary #hotel #discount #codes

    #inpatient care

    #

    inpatient

    References in periodicals archive ?

    With the exception of some unique programs that integrate inpatient rehabilitation care into the acute care management of their patients, TBI inpatient rehabilitation usually begins after the individual is medically stabilized in the acute care setting and discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation facility.

    VAMC nursing officials–nurse executives who are responsible for all nursing care at VAMCs and nurse managers who are responsible for supervising RNs on VAMC inpatient units–GAO interviewed reported that although VA inpatient RNs are required to input patient data into VA’s PCS, they do not rely on the information generated by PCS because it is outdated and inaccurate.

    This activity logger and its earlier version the ‘Uptimer’ have also been used in investigations of inpatient physical activity in children (Pirpiris and Graham 2004), adults (Browning et al 2007), and the elderly (Bernhardt et al 2005).

    Robert Rohrbaugh argue that inpatient training helps foster the development of psychiatry’s fundamental skills in indispensable ways, and they note that other specialties appear to place great value on inpatient training (Academic Psychiatry 2007;31:266-9).

    Major trauma inpatients including those with serious internal injuries and multiple fractures.

    An extensive survey by the Career Satisfaction Study Group suggested the need to balance outpatient and inpatient hours in order to relieve stress.

    3M Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital DRGfinder works in conjunction with 3M Codefinder Software, a coding application used by more than 4,000 U.

    To obtain an overall understanding of MRSA throughout Taiwan, we first chose 80 MRSA isolates (68 inpatient and 12 outpatient isolates) collected in 2002 from 4 hospitals located in the north, middle, south, and east regions of Taiwan.

    They have to make arrangements for the transfer and or discharge of all patients before they can close the door to being an inpatient facility.

    Internal medicine residents self-reported greater preparedness to treat typically inpatient conditions than family practice residents, while family practice residents self-reported greater preparedness to treat typically outpatient conditions, said Dr.

    The success of the reconstruction phase, coupled with the signing of inpatient contracts with Hospice of New York and Hospice Care Network, plus the fact that all the beds were filled (average length of stay: 13 days), prompted conversion of another six private resident care rooms beginning in April 2001 and completed six weeks later.

    Catheter insertions using the Fast Tract inpatient method solve this problem.