Clinical psychology program #ubc #psychology, #ubc #psych, #psychology #ubc, #university #of #british


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Clinical

UBC s Graduate Program in Clinical Psychology s broad mission is to advance clinical science. We view clinical science as composed of research efforts and practice directed toward:

  1. The promotion of adaptive functioning
  2. Assessment, understanding, amelioration, and prevention of human problems in behaviour, affect, cognition or health
  3. The application of knowledge in ways consistent with scientific evidence

The program s emphasis on the term science underscores its commitment to empirical approaches to evaluating the validity and utility of testable hypotheses and to advancing knowledge and practice by this method.

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association. If you are interested in more information about our accreditation status, contact the Director of Clinical Training (Lynn Alden ) or:

Initial accreditation 1986-87
Next site visit due 2015-16

As of 2012, CPA and APA signed the First Street Accord which is a mutual recognition agreement on accreditation. It demonstrates that the APA views the accreditation standards and principles of the CPA as equivalent to the Commission on Accreditation guidelines and principles. View the statement .

This webpage presents an overview of important information about the clinical program. To fully understand the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology at UBC, please read the material in all the links on this page and in the Graduate Student Handbook.


Access: Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching: Nature #nature, #science, #science #news, #biology,


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Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching

Victoria Gomez-Roldan 1. Soraya Fermas 2. Philip B. Brewer 3. Virginie Puech-Pag s 1. Elizabeth A. Dun 3. Jean-Paul Pillot 2. Fabien Letisse 4. Radoslava Matusova 5. Saida Danoun 1. Jean-Charles Portais 4. Harro Bouwmeester 5. 6. Guillaume B card 1. Christine A. Beveridge 3. 7. 8. Catherine Rameau 2. 8 Soizic F. Rochange 1. 8

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence that carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 shoot branching mutants of pea are strigolactone deficient and that strigolactone application restores the wild-type branching phenotype to ccd8 mutants. Moreover, we show that other branching mutants previously characterized as lacking a response to the branching inhibition signal also lack strigolactone response, and are not deficient in strigolactones. These responses are conserved in Arabidopsis. In agreement with the expected properties of the hormonal signal, exogenous strigolactone can be transported in shoots and act at low concentrations. We suggest that endogenous strigolactones or related compounds inhibit shoot branching in plants. Furthermore, ccd8 mutants demonstrate the diverse effects of strigolactones in shoot branching, mycorrhizal symbiosis and parasitic weed interaction.

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

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