Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior

#solari hospice

#

Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior Hospice Care

February 09, 2011 11:20 AM Eastern Standard Time

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–( BUSINESS WIRE )–The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published an article in its February 2 issue titled “Association of Hospice Agency Profit Status, With Patient Diagnosis, Location of Care, and Length of Stay.” Solari Hospice Care wants to emphasize that this article offers no supporting research or evidence that nonprofit hospice programs provide better care to terminally ill patients, are more ethical, or are more compassionate than for-profit hospices.

Solari Hospice Care would like to address the rampant misinformation regarding for-profit hospice care and stress that the fundamental principle of hospice will always be providing people with the greatest quality of life in the time they have left.

With more than one million people in the United States receiving hospice care in 2009 1. it’s apparent that hospices meet a very important need in this country — and to suggest that the primary motivation is financial does a disservice to the devoted hospice staffs caring for their patients facing life-limiting illnesses.

“Having IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit status does not automatically equate to superior care for terminally ill patients,” said Gary W. Polsky , chief executive officer , Solari Hospice Care. “There is no correlation between the profit status of a hospice program and the quality of care provided.”

So what is similar between nonprofit and for-profit hospices? The regulations are identical. All licensed and certified hospices must comply with state law and the Code of Federal Regulations governing hospice care. In addition, Medicare’s reimbursement rate is fixed regardless of the care needs of individual patients, the services patients receive, or the tax status of the hospice providing the care.

“For those who continue to pit nonprofit hospices against for-profit hospices, it’s my opinion that you are fighting the wrong battle,” Polsky remarked. “What we all should be advocating for is helping people to live with dignity and comfort by providing comprehensive and compassionate hospice care. Hospice practices, including quality of care, depend on an organization’s staff and leadership, not tax status. In any field of business, there are ‘good’ companies and ‘bad’ companies, and hospice is no different.”

According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s (NHPCO) recent comprehensive survey, the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care, detailed analysis of data submitted by hospices shows no difference in family caregivers’ evaluation of the quality of care based on a hospice program’s profit status.

Polsky added, “As a member of the NHPCO, I am proud to say that Solari Hospice Care exceeds NHPCO’s Standards of Practice for Hospice Programs and fully complies with all hospice regulations.”

“I am focused on and passionate about providing the highest quality of care to patients facing complex end-of-life issues,” Polsky commented. “My education in health care administration and my experience in the health care field over the years have given me the opportunity to work with some of the most skilled doctors, nurses, specialists, counselors and caring staff members. When I founded Solari Hospice Care in 2002, I knew that I wanted and expected the same level of passion and dedication from my staff in Las Vegas and Houston. Hospice patients deserve nothing less than excellent care specific to their unique needs.”

Polsky concluded, “Ultimately, the most important measure of a hospice should be the quality of care provided to patients — not its tax status.”

With this insight, you and your loved ones will be better informed how hospice care can address symptoms and pain management, ease suffering and grief, as well as provide emotional and spiritual support during the final phase of life. To learn more about the issues, opportunities and trends impacting the hospice industry, please read the new CEO Viewpoint blog from Solari Hospice Care’s Gary Polsky at http://bit.ly/f6evtE.

1 “Hospice Care in America,” National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, October 2010

About Solari Hospice Care

Contacts





Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior

#solari hospice

#

Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior Hospice Care

February 09, 2011 11:20 AM Eastern Standard Time

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–( BUSINESS WIRE )–The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published an article in its February 2 issue titled “Association of Hospice Agency Profit Status, With Patient Diagnosis, Location of Care, and Length of Stay.” Solari Hospice Care wants to emphasize that this article offers no supporting research or evidence that nonprofit hospice programs provide better care to terminally ill patients, are more ethical, or are more compassionate than for-profit hospices.

Solari Hospice Care would like to address the rampant misinformation regarding for-profit hospice care and stress that the fundamental principle of hospice will always be providing people with the greatest quality of life in the time they have left.

With more than one million people in the United States receiving hospice care in 2009 1. it’s apparent that hospices meet a very important need in this country — and to suggest that the primary motivation is financial does a disservice to the devoted hospice staffs caring for their patients facing life-limiting illnesses.

“Having IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit status does not automatically equate to superior care for terminally ill patients,” said Gary W. Polsky , chief executive officer , Solari Hospice Care. “There is no correlation between the profit status of a hospice program and the quality of care provided.”

So what is similar between nonprofit and for-profit hospices? The regulations are identical. All licensed and certified hospices must comply with state law and the Code of Federal Regulations governing hospice care. In addition, Medicare’s reimbursement rate is fixed regardless of the care needs of individual patients, the services patients receive, or the tax status of the hospice providing the care.

“For those who continue to pit nonprofit hospices against for-profit hospices, it’s my opinion that you are fighting the wrong battle,” Polsky remarked. “What we all should be advocating for is helping people to live with dignity and comfort by providing comprehensive and compassionate hospice care. Hospice practices, including quality of care, depend on an organization’s staff and leadership, not tax status. In any field of business, there are ‘good’ companies and ‘bad’ companies, and hospice is no different.”

According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s (NHPCO) recent comprehensive survey, the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care, detailed analysis of data submitted by hospices shows no difference in family caregivers’ evaluation of the quality of care based on a hospice program’s profit status.

Polsky added, “As a member of the NHPCO, I am proud to say that Solari Hospice Care exceeds NHPCO’s Standards of Practice for Hospice Programs and fully complies with all hospice regulations.”

“I am focused on and passionate about providing the highest quality of care to patients facing complex end-of-life issues,” Polsky commented. “My education in health care administration and my experience in the health care field over the years have given me the opportunity to work with some of the most skilled doctors, nurses, specialists, counselors and caring staff members. When I founded Solari Hospice Care in 2002, I knew that I wanted and expected the same level of passion and dedication from my staff in Las Vegas and Houston. Hospice patients deserve nothing less than excellent care specific to their unique needs.”

Polsky concluded, “Ultimately, the most important measure of a hospice should be the quality of care provided to patients — not its tax status.”

With this insight, you and your loved ones will be better informed how hospice care can address symptoms and pain management, ease suffering and grief, as well as provide emotional and spiritual support during the final phase of life. To learn more about the issues, opportunities and trends impacting the hospice industry, please read the new CEO Viewpoint blog from Solari Hospice Care’s Gary Polsky at http://bit.ly/f6evtE.

1 “Hospice Care in America,” National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, October 2010

About Solari Hospice Care

Contacts