The Different Types of Eye Care Professionals #montana #eye #care


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The Different Types of Eye Care Professionals

Ophthalmology and Ophthalmologists

What is ophthalmology?

Ophthalmology is a branch of medicine that specializes in the anatomy, function, and diseases of the eye.

What is an ophthalmologist?

  • An ophthalmologist is a medical or osteopathic physician who specializes in the medical and surgical care of the eyes and the prevention of eye disease. An ophthalmologist diagnoses and treats refractive, medical, and surgical problems related to eye diseases and disorders.
  • Ophthalmologists are licensed by state regulatory boards to practice medicine and surgery, as well as deliver routine eye care.
  • An ophthalmologist will have the initials “M.D.” (Doctor of Medicine) or “D.O.” (Doctor of Osteopathy) after his or her name.

What does an ophthalmologist do?

  • Ophthalmologists are trained to provide the full spectrum of eye care, from prescribing glasses and contact lenses to complex and delicate eye surgery.
  • Ophthalmologists treat eye diseases, prescribe medications, and perform all types of surgery to improve, or prevent the worsening of, eye and vision-related conditions.
  • Many ophthalmologists are also involved in scientific research into the causes of, and cures for, eye diseases and vision problems.

How is an ophthalmologist educated and trained?

  • In addition to four years of medical school and one year of internship, all ophthalmologists spend a minimum of three years of residency (hospital-based training) in ophthalmology.
  • During residency, ophthalmologists receive specialized training in all aspects of eye care, including prevention, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment of eye conditions and diseases.
  • Often, an ophthalmologist spends an additional one to two years training in a subspecialty, or a specific area of eye care, such as glaucoma or pediatric ophthalmology.
  • All ophthalmologists are required to fulfill continuing education requirements to stay current regarding the latest standards of care.

More Information about Ophthalmology

  • For more information, you can visit the American Academy of Ophthalmology website.
  • SmartSight is a resource from the American Academy of Ophthalmology that provides essential tips for making the most of remaining vision. SmartSight also provides information resources for ophthalmologists to use in referring patients who need low vision rehabilitation services.
  • The EyeSmart® public awareness campaign, sponsored by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, helps Americans to take charge of their eye health; know their risk factors for eye diseases, infections and injuries; and understand how ophthalmologists can help prevent, diagnose, and treat eye conditions.

J. Gregory Rosenthal, MD: Ophthalmologist and Humanitarian

Dr. J. Gregory Rosenthal is an ophthalmologist who specializes in eye care for people with diabetes. complex retinal detachments. and macular degeneration. He is also a strong supporter of vision loss support groups as an integral component of the comprehensive vision rehabilitation process.

Says Dr. Rosenthal, “I think that sometimes doctors give up on what they consider to be ‘failures’: people whom they cannot return to good vision. It is a quality of life issue. Being a doctor is more than just providing medicine and surgery. Medical care is not a business first. It is a calling. A doctor is supposed to be the patient’s advocate. We are supposed to use our skills to serve the patient’s best interests, regardless of what we get back. It is important to think from the patient’s perspective, find out how they are doing, what problems they are having.”

Learn more about Dr. Rosenthal and vision rehabilitation services:

Optometry and Optometrists

What is optometry?

Optometry is a vision care specialty that is concerned with the health of the eyes, the visual system, and related structures.

What is an optometrist?

  • An optometrist is a health care professional who specializes in function and disorders of the eye, detection of eye disease, and some types of eye disease management. An optometrist conducts eye examinations, prescribes corrective contact lenses and glasses, and diagnoses and treats eye diseases and disorders.
  • Optometrists are licensed by state regulatory boards that determine their scope of practice, which may vary from state to state.
  • An optometrist will have the initials “O.D.” (Doctor of Optometry) after his or her name.

What does an optometrist do?

  • Optometrists are trained to examine the eyes for visual defects, diagnose problems or impairments, prescribe corrective lenses, and provide certain types of treatment.
  • Many (but not all) U.S. states have passed legislation that allows optometrists to perform certain surgical procedures, such as laser treatment; administer injections, such as local anesthesia or treatment for macular degeneration; and prescribe additional diagnostic, therapeutic, and oral medications. Visit the American Optometric Association website to determine if your state permits optometrists to perform these additional procedures.
  • Many optometrists are also involved in scientific research into the causes of, and cures for, a range of vision problems.

How is an optometrist educated and trained?

  • Prior to admittance into optometry school, optometrists typically complete four years of undergraduate study, culminating in a bachelor’s degree.
  • Optometrists then complete a four-year postgraduate program in optometry school to earn the Doctor of Optometry degree.
  • Some optometrists go on to complete one- to two-year residencies with training in a specific sub-specialty area, such as pediatric or geriatric eye care, specialty contact lens, ocular disease, or neuro-optometry.
  • All optometrists are required to fulfill continuing education requirements to stay current regarding the latest standards of care.

More Information about Optometry

Low Vision Specialist

  • Many optometrists and some ophthalmologists have additional credentials or specialization in low vision testing, diagnosis, and treatment, and are trained to conduct low vision eye examinations and prescribe special low vision optical devices .
  • If you’re experiencing significant vision loss, a low vision specialist can determine whether special optical and non-optical devices. improved lighting. or other types of specialized services and equipment can help make the best use of your remaining vision.
  • You can find a listing of low vision specialists in the “Low Vision Services” category in the VisionAware Directory of Services .

In addition to the low vision providers in the Directory listings, you can find additional providers through the following directories:

Orthoptist

  • An orthoptist is a certified allied health professional who works under the supervision of an ophthalmologist to evaluate and treat disorders of the visual system with an emphasis on binocular vision (using both eyes to see) and eye movement problems.
  • Orthoptists most commonly work in pediatric ophthalmology settings.
  • An orthoptist has a bachelor’s degree in addition to a post-graduate two-year orthoptic fellowship in an accredited program.
  • For more information, you can visit the American Association of Certified Orthoptists website.

Optician

  • An optician is a health professional who is trained to supply, prepare, and dispense optical appliances through interpretation of written prescriptions. An optician fits and finishes eyeglass lenses and frames and may also dispense low vision devices. contact lenses, and artificial eyes.
  • Opticians typically learn job skills through formal on-the-job programs. This training includes technical instruction in measuring eyes or adjusting frames under the supervision of an experienced optician.
  • A number of community colleges and technical schools offer formal education in opticianry. Some award a two-year associate degree, while others offer a one-year certificate.
  • Twenty-three U.S. states require licensure for opticians.
  • For more information, you can visit the Opticians Association of America website.
  • Opticianedu.org provides information about education, internship, and licensure requirements to maintain Dispensing Optician credentials.

Locate an Eye Care Professional in Your Area

  • Visit the American Academy of Ophthalmology website and use their Find an Ophthalmologist online database to locate an ophthalmologist in your area.
  • Visit the American Optometric Association website and use their Doctor Locator online database to locate an optometrist in your area.
  • Ask for a recommendation from family members, friends, or your family doctor.
  • Call your local hospitals and ask if they have outpatient ophthalmology departments.
  • Check your health insurance plan for listings of approved eye care providers.
  • In most cases, it is not recommended that you visit an optician for your initial exam and diagnosis.

If your vision loss can’t be corrected and interferes with your everyday living, vision rehabilitation services can help maintain or restore your independent living skills.

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Ic laser eye care #ic #laser #eye #care


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Important Safety Information for Obagi Nu-Derm Clear and Blender ®

(contains 4% hydroquinone)

CONTRAINDICATIONS:
People with prior history of sensitivity or allergic reaction to this product or any of its ingredients should not use it. The safety of topical hydroquinone use during pregnancy or in children (12 years and under) has not been established.

WARNINGS:
Avoid contact with eyes, nose, mouth, or lips. In case of accidental contact, patient should rinse eyes, nose, mouth, or lips with water and contact physician.

Sunscreen use is an essential aspect of hydroquinone therapy because even minimal sunlight exposure sustains melanocytic activity.

Contains sodium metabisulfite, a sulfite that may cause allergic-type reactions including anaphylactic symptoms and life-threatening or less severe asthmatic episodes in certain susceptible people. The overall prevalence of sulfite sensitivity in the general population is unknown and probably low. Sulfite sensitivity is seen more frequently in asthmatic than in nonasthmatic people.

PRECAUTIONS (ALSO SEE WARNINGS):
Treatment should be limited to relatively small areas of the body at one time since some patients experience a transient skin reddening and a mild burning sensation, which does not preclude treatment.

Pregnancy Category C: Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with topical hydroquinone. It is also not known whether hydroquinone can cause fetal harm when used topically on a pregnant woman or affect reproductive capacity. It is not known to what degree, if any, topical hydroquinone is absorbed systemically. Topical hydroquinone should be used on pregnant women only when clearly indicated.

Nursing Mothers: It is not known whether topical hydroquinone is absorbed or excreted in human milk. Caution is advised when topical hydroquinone is used by a nursing mother.

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Important Safety Information for Obagi-C Rx C-Clarifying Serum and C-Therapy Night Cream

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People with prior history of sensitivity or allergic reaction to this product or any of its ingredients should not use it. The safety of topical hydroquinone use during pregnancy or in children (12 years and under) has not been established.

WARNINGS:
Avoid contact with eyes, nose, mouth, or lips. In case of accidental contact, patient should rinse eyes, nose, mouth, or lips with water and contact physician.

Sunscreen use is an essential aspect of hydroquinone therapy because even minimal sunlight exposure sustains melanocytic activity.

Contains sodium metabisulfite, a sulfite that may cause allergic-type reactions including anaphylactic symptoms and life-threatening or less severe asthmatic episodes in certain susceptible people. The overall prevalence of sulfite sensitivity in the general population is unknown and probably low. Sulfite sensitivity is seen more frequently in asthmatic than in nonasthmatic people.

PRECAUTIONS (ALSO SEE WARNINGS):
Treatment should be limited to relatively small areas of the body at one time since some patients experience a transient skin reddening and a mild burning sensation, which does not preclude treatment.

Pregnancy Category C: Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with topical hydroquinone. It is also not known whether hydroquinone can cause fetal harm when used topically on a pregnant woman or affect reproductive capacity. It is not known to what degree, if any, topical hydroquinone is absorbed systemically. Topical hydroquinone should be used on pregnant women only when clearly indicated.

Nursing Mothers: It is not known whether topical hydroquinone is absorbed or excreted in human milk. Caution is advised when topical hydroquinone is used by a nursing mother.

Pediatric Usage: Safety and effectiveness in children below the age of 12 years have not been established.

Use of the product should be discontinued if hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients is noted.

Important Safety Information for Obagi Nu-Derm Clear and Blender ® ; and Obagi-C Rx C-Clarifying Serum and C-Therapy Night Cream

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People with prior history of sensitivity or allergic reaction to this product or any of its ingredients should not use it. The safety of topical hydroquinone use during pregnancy or in children (12 years and under) has not been established.

WARNINGS:
Avoid contact with eyes, nose, mouth, or lips. In case of accidental contact, patient should rinse eyes, nose, mouth, or lips with water and contact physician.

Sunscreen use is an essential aspect of hydroquinone therapy because even minimal sunlight exposure sustains melanocytic activity.

Contains sodium metabisulfite, a sulfite that may cause allergic-type reactions including anaphylactic symptoms and life-threatening or less severe asthmatic episodes in certain susceptible people. The overall prevalence of sulfite sensitivity in the general population is unknown and probably low. Sulfite sensitivity is seen more frequently in asthmatic than in nonasthmatic people.

PRECAUTIONS (ALSO SEE WARNINGS):
Treatment should be limited to relatively small areas of the body at one time since some patients experience a transient skin reddening and a mild burning sensation, which does not preclude treatment.

Pregnancy Category C: Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with topical hydroquinone. It is also not known whether hydroquinone can cause fetal harm when used topically on a pregnant woman or affect reproductive capacity. It is not known to what degree, if any, topical hydroquinone is absorbed systemically. Topical hydroquinone should be used on pregnant women only when clearly indicated.

Nursing Mothers: It is not known whether topical hydroquinone is absorbed or excreted in human milk. Caution is advised when topical hydroquinone is used by a nursing mother.

Pediatric Usage: Safety and effectiveness in children below the age of 12 years have not been established.

Use of the product should be discontinued if hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients is noted.


LASIK Raleigh – Laser Eye Surgery Durham #cost #of #lasik #eye #surgery


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North Carolina LASIK Center

Serving Cary, Durham, Raleigh Laser Eye Surgery Patients

Welcome to the Laser Eye Center of Carolina

Imagine seeing your world in high definition with improved night vision. Genuine iLASIK at the Laser Eye Center of Carolina can make it possible. At Laser Eye Center of Carolina, we have one goal: giving you excellent vision with the attentive, personal care you expect. We pride ourselves on quality surgical outcomes and exceptional visual results. Our commitment to providing the highest quality surgical treatments has helped us become renowned as foremost Durham / Raleigh LASIK eye surgery, cataracts and phakic IOLs specialists.
Tim Gleason
Carolina Hurricanes

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Experience

Having performed thousands of successful LASIK procedures, phakic IOL implantations. cataracts treatments and PRK procedures. Dr. Dornic is one of Carolina s most experienced and qualified refractive surgeons. He is a board certified, fellowship-trained, vision correction specialist dedicated to the highest standards in ophthalmic surgery .

Safety

An experienced surgeon, FDA-approved state-of-the-art technology. a thorough evaluation process. and first class patient care reduce the chance for complications, improve overall results and increase confidence of our Raleigh and Durham LASIK patients. You will benefit by being personally examined and counseled by Dr. Dornic before being scheduled for your LASIK or other vision correction procedure. Also, because we are more than just a LASIK center, you can be assured that you will be receiving the procedure that is most appropriate for you.

Technology

Everyone claims to have the best technology but what matters are results. We offer vision correction technology proven to be the safest with the highest rate of success. IntraLase is a revolutionary evolution of the LASIK procedure that utilizes a laser, rather than a blade, to create the LASIK flap. CustomVue technology offered by Laser Eye Center of Carolina boasts the highest rate of 20/20 vision ever reported to the FDA. The VISX S4-IR laser utilizes a state-of-the-art eye tracking system, iris registration and Wavefront technology for added safety and increased precision. We invite our Durham and Raleigh LASIK patients to learn more about our advanced technologies and why they should not settle for other, inferior techniques by visiting our LASIK page .

Our Staff

Extensively trained, our staff are warm and friendly people who have a clear focus on personalized care and patient education. In addition, our surgical coordinator is available every day to answer all of your questions.
Dr. Dean Dornic, M.D.

Dedicated to maintaining the highest standards in ophthalmic surgery, Dr. Dean Dornic is a recognized authority on LASIK and other vision correction procedures. Founder and Medical Director of the Laser Eye Center of Carolina, Dr. Dornic has more than 15 years of surgical experience and has performed thousands of successful LASIK eye surgery procedures. He was selected as one of “America’s Top Ophthalmologists” by Consumer’s Research Council of America and was named a LASIK Gold surgeon – an honor bestowed upon the top 50 LASIK surgeons nationwide by Sightpath Medical. Newsweek recently named Dr. Dornic one of “15 Leaders in Laser Eye Surgery.”

Dr. Dornic is the first Raleigh / Durham laser eye surgery specialist to perform LASIK with IntraLase®, an exciting advance in LASIK technology that utilizes a laser rather than a metal blade to make the LASIK flap. He is also the first area ophthalmologist to provide implantable contact lenses.

Nationally recognized, Dornic has authored an ophthalmological text and serves as a moderator on the web site AskLASIKDocs.com. He is also a featured expert at “Healthtap.com” and “Monkeysee.com.”

Dr. Dornic has lectured at international meetings and trained several other surgeons on LASIK. He is an active member of the medical staff at Rex Health Care Center, WakeMed Cary Hospital and Johnston Health.

Many doctors and other health care providers have made Dr. Dornic their choice for vision correction and are enjoying life with freedom from glasses and contacts. As you consider any type of vision correction, such as LASIK in Raleigh / Durham, you can be confident in our commitment to be there every step of the way to make the process comfortable, and above all, successful.

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Laser Therapy: Purpose, Procedure, and Risks #eye #laser #therapy


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Laser Therapy

What is laser therapy used for?

Laser therapy may be used to:

  • shrink or destroy tumors, polyps, or precancerous growths
  • relieve symptoms of cancer
  • remove kidney stones
  • remove part of the prostate
  • repair a detached retina
  • improve vision
  • treat hair loss resulting from alopecia or aging
  • treat pain, including back nerve pain

Lasers can have a cauterizing, or sealing, effect and may be used to seal:

  • nerve endings to reduce pain after surgery
  • blood vessels to help prevent blood loss
  • lymph vessels to reduce swelling and limit the spread of tumor cells

Lasers may be useful in treating the very early stages of some cancers, including:

  • cervical cancer
  • penile cancer
  • vaginal cancer
  • vulvar cancer
  • non-small cell lung cancer
  • basal cell skin cancer

For cancer, laser therapy is usually used alongside other treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation.

Laser therapy is also used cosmetically to:

  • remove warts, moles, birthmarks, and sun spots
  • remove hair
  • lessen the appearance of wrinkles, blemishes, or scars
  • remove tattoos

Who shouldn’t have laser therapy?

Some laser surgeries, such as cosmetic skin and eye surgeries, are considered elective surgeries. Some people decide the potential risks can outweigh the benefits of these types of surgeries. For example, some health or skin conditions may be aggravated by laser surgeries. As with typical surgery, poor overall health also increases your risk of complications.

Talk to your doctor before deciding to undergo laser surgery for any kind of operation. Based on your age, overall health, healthcare plan, and the cost of laser surgery, your doctor may recommend that you choose traditional surgical methods. For example, if you’re younger than 18 years, you should not get Lasik eye surgery.

How do I prepare for laser therapy?

Plan ahead to ensure that you have time to recover after the operation. Also make sure someone can take you home from the procedure. You will likely still be under the influence of anesthesia or medications.

A few days before the surgery, you may be advised to take precautions such as stopping any medications that can affect blood clotting, such as blood thinners.

How is laser therapy done?

Laser therapy techniques vary based on the procedure.

If a tumor is being treated, an endoscope (a thin, lighted, flexible tube) may be used to direct the laser and view tissues inside the body. The endoscope is inserted through an opening in the body, such as the mouth. Then, the surgeon aims the laser and shrinks or destroys the tumor.

In cosmetic procedures, lasers are usually applied directly to the skin.

What are the different types?

Some common laser surgeries include:

  • refractive eye surgery (often called LASIK)
  • tooth whitening
  • cosmetic scar, tattoo, or wrinkle removal
  • cataract or tumor removal

Different lasers are used for different procedures. For example, carbon dioxide (CO2 ) lasers make shallow cuts. They’re often used for superficial cancers, such as skin cancer.

Argon lasers also make shallow cuts and can be used to activate photosensitizing (light-activated) drugs during photodynamic therapy. This type of cancer treatment combines light with chemotherapy to kill more cancer cells.

Nd:YAG lasers can travel along optical fibers. They’re used in laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, a type of cancer treatment.

Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is also called cold laser therapy. It uses laser light set to wavelengths between 600 and 980 nanometers. The laser is used to perform minor surgeries and promote regeneration in tissue. Programs exist that offer LLLT as an aid to quit smoking, but little evidence supports its use for this purpose.

What are the risks?

Laser therapy has some risks. The risks for skin therapy include:

Also, the intended effects of treatment may not be permanent, so repeated sessions may be necessary.

Some laser surgery is performed while you’re under general anesthesia, which carries its own set of risks. They include:

  • pneumonia
  • confusion after waking from the operation
  • heart attack
  • stroke

Treatments can also be expensive and are therefore not accessible to everyone. Laser eye surgery can cost anywhere from $600 to $8,000 or more based on your healthcare plan and the provider or facility you use for your surgery. The costs of laser skin therapies can range from $200 to over $3,400, according to the University of Michigan Cosmetic Dermatology Laser Center .

What are the benefits?

Lasers are more precise than traditional surgical instruments, and cuts can be made shorter and shallower. This causes less damage to tissue.

Laser operations are usually shorter than traditional surgeries. They can often be done on an outpatient basis. You also don’t have to spend the night in the hospital. If general anesthesia is required, it’s usually used for a shorter time.

People also tend to heal faster with laser operations. You may have less pain, swelling, and scarring than with traditional surgeries.

What happens after laser therapy?

Recovery after laser surgeries is similar to that of typical surgery. You may need to rest for the first few days after the operation and take over-the-counter pain medication until the discomfort and swelling have gone down.

Recovery after laser therapy varies based on the type of therapy you received and how much of your body was affected by the therapy.

You should follow any orders your doctor gives you very closely. For example, if you have laser prostate surgery, you may need to wear a urinary catheter. This can aid in urinating right after the surgery.

If you received therapy on your skin, you may experience swelling, itching, and rawness around the treated area. Your doctor may use an ointment and dress up the area so that it’s airtight and watertight.

For the first couple of weeks after the treatment, be sure to do the following:

  • Use over-the-counter medications for pain, such as ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol).
  • Clean the area regularly with water.
  • Apply ointments, such as petroleum jelly.
  • Use ice packs.
  • Avoid picking any scabs.

Once the area has become overgrown with new skin, you may use makeup or other cosmetics to cover up any noticeable redness if you’d like.


How Much Is Laser Eye Surgery In the UK? #laser #eye #surgery


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How Much Is Laser Eye Surgery In the UK?

Laser eye surgery is now considered a common procedure with about 100,000 people undergoing this treatment in the UK each year. Nevertheless, the concept of undergoing laser surgery to correct vision problems can still be a bit of a mystery to many, especially as it was once deemed risky and expensive.

If you’re looking into the possibility of undergoing laser eye surgery, chances are, the cost is one of your main concerns. Some patients find the wide range of advertised prices quite confusing, with some clinics claiming to charge as little as £600 for a treatment and other clinics charging considerably more. We will try and give some clarity on the typical costs of laser eye surgery and the types of treatments available. If you are interested you can also quickly compare prices of laser eye surgery near you by entering your postcode in the short form on this page .

The Typical Cost of Laser Eye Surgery

The cost of laser eye surgery varies according to a set of factors, foremost of which is the type of procedure. The current average prices for the most common procedures are as follows:

These average costs are higher than the rates often quoted on the websites of the main laser surgery clinics in the UK because those headline costs are typically only available to a minority of patients with low prescriptions. It is more realistic to prepare for costs similar to above rather than think you will get something closer to the From £X prices often quoted. There is so much variability in cost due to the factors explained below that it is worth getting 2 or 3 quotes from respected clinics near you which we can do for you if you fill in the form on this page.

Why Do Laser Eye Surgery Prices Vary So Much?

What determines how much you will pay for your laser eye surgery?

  1. The Type of Procedure: Non-standard procedures such as those that utilise wavefront technology are considerably more expensive than standard ones (see table below for an overview of the different types of laser eye treatments).
  2. The Patient’s Prescription: Some clinics ask for higher payments from patients with higher prescriptions.
  3. The Surgeon: Generally, the more experienced the surgeon is, the higher their professional fee will be.
  4. The Clinic: The reputation and size of a clinic will normally determine how much it charges its patients. Clinics with high success rates tend to charge higher fees compared to those with lower success rates. Larger clinics can afford to charge lower fees as they have a larger volume of customers coming in.

An Overview of Laser Eye Surgery Treatment Types

The first thing to understand is that there are different kinds of laser eye surgical procedures, depending on the problem that needs to be corrected and the patient’s prescription. Let’s take a quick look at the most popular procedures:

LASIK (Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis)

This is the most common type of laser treatment and is relatively painless. It involves creating a flap in the cornea, peeling it back to expose the stromal layer. The cornea is then reshaped with a laser beam and the flap is replaced afterwards.

This procedure is suitable for people with common sight problems, such as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism.

LASEK (Laser-assisted epithelial keratomileusis)

In this procedure, the epithelium (the thin layer of cells that cover the cornea) is peeled back, exposing the Bowman’s layer. This is then reshaped with a laser beam and the epithelium is replaced.

This treatment is the most viable option for patients with thin corneas, and is a good alternative to LASIK surgery.

Wavefront is a type of technology utilised in LASIK and LASEK procedures. Special software creates a map of the patient’s eye to give an accurate picture of the aberrations to be corrected. The map is then loaded into the computer that controls the laser to let it reshape the cornea exactly to the patient’s specific requirements.

This customised treatment is designed to be an alternative to standard LASIK and LASEK procedures. This is perfect for people who rely on perfect vision for their jobs, such as airline pilots.

PRK (Photorefractive Keratoctomy)

This is the oldest type of laser eye treatment and involves the removal of the epithelium in order to access the cornea. The cornea is reshaped with laser and the patient will then have to wear a protective lens during the recovery period.

This is rarely used these days, but is a good alternative to LASIK and LASEK for people with very thin corneas who would otherwise not be considered as candidates for laser eye treatment.


LASIK Detroit, Michigan – Laser Eye Surgery Detroit Michigan – Dr, lasik


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Welcome To Akler Eye Center

Dr. Akler in the news

Serving the Detroit area, our goal is to provide modern, high quality medical and surgical opthalmologic care that will exceed our patients’ expectations. From eye disease, cataract surgery to LASIK surgery, our Detroit area surgery centers in Sterling Heights and Dearborn are conveniently located for you.

Our philosophy is to provide precision eye care that is tailored to our patients’ individual needs. Dr. Michelle Akler is a board-certified ophthalmologist who has been proudly providing advanced medical and surgical eye care to the Dearborn, Downriver, and East Side communities of Metropolitan Detroit for over 14 years.

A leader in Detroit LASIK vision correction, Dr. Akler has performed over 10,000 LASIK procedures and was named a LaserVision ® Top 5 LASIK surgeon in the USA. She was awarded the Patients’ Choice Award and Compassionate Doctor Recognition Award by Vitals ™, a leading physician review site, for the last 3 consecutive years.

Dr. Akler is also an experienced cataract surgeon with over 5,000 procedures performed. She has been trained in all the most advanced surgical techniques, and was presented with a Center of Excellence Award as a nationally recognized leader in Crystalens® implantation.

Akler Eye Center offers a full range of services to meet the eye care needs of the entire family. We offer diabetic eye examinations, LASIK laser vision correction, cataract evaluation and surgery, eyelid surgery, routine eye examinations, advanced dry eye treatments, glaucoma and macular degeneration management.

Dr. Michelle Akler and her experienced, caring staff understand how important your vision is to you. They will take the time to thoroughly explain every step of the examination and to make sure all of your questions are addressed.

Come visit us at Akler Eye Center, serving the Detroit metro area with locations in Dearborn or Sterling Heights to EXPERIENCE EXCELLENCE IN EYE CARE.

Read Our Reviews From Around The Web

Lasik eye surgery doctor reviews

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Epi-LASIK Eye Surgery – How Epi-LASIK Works, and What To Expect #lasik


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Epi-LASIK Eye Surgery: How It Works

Epi-LASIK is a laser vision correction procedure that is very similar to LASIK and LASEK. and may be a good alternative to these procedures for certain eyes.


In epi-LASIK, the flap created on the cornea is thinner than a LASIK flap. This can be an advantage for patients with thinner-than-normal corneas.

The epi-LASIK flap is very similar to the thin flap created in LASEK surgery. In both procedures, the flap contains only cells from the very thin outer layer of the cornea, called the epithelium.

The difference is how the epi-LASIK and LASEK flaps are produced.

A LASEK flap is created with a tool that has a sharp blade. In epi-LASIK, the flap is separated from the underlying corneal layer (the stroma) with an instrument called an epithelial separator that has an oscillating plastic blade that has a thin blunt edge.

And unlike in LASEK, an alcohol solution typically is not applied to the eye in epi-LASIK to loosen epithelial cells from the underlying corneal stroma. Some surgeons prefer epi-LASIK over LASEK for this reason, since alcohol is toxic to epithelial cells and can increase healing time after the procedure.

After the epi-LASIK flap is created, it is folded back and the underlying central stroma is reshaped with an excimer laser steps identical to those performed in LASIK.

Because the epi-LASIK flap is so thin, the surgeon typically will apply a soft contact lens over the flap when it is repositioned after the laser treatment. The contact lens acts as a bandage to increase comfort and allow new epithelial cells to grow onto the cornea more quickly for faster healing.

Your surgeon or eye doctor will remove the bandage contact lens at one of your early follow-up visits a few days after your epi-LASIK procedure.

After Epi-LASIK

Your vision probably will not be perfect immediately: In three days many patients do have 20/40 or even 20/20 vision. but others take longer possibly three or six months to reach their final result. Usually you can drive within a week after surgery.

These recovery times are significantly longer than with LASIK, which usually allows people to achieve good vision from the same day up to a few weeks later and to drive by the day after surgery.

myopia, hyperopia and/or astigmatism, ineligible for LASIK

  • Procedure time: about 10 minutes per eye
  • Typical results: 20/20 vision without glasses or contact lenses
  • Recovery time: several days to several months for vision to stabilize
  • Cost: about $1,500 to $2,500 per eye

As with any laser eye surgery. after Epi-LASIK it is very important to follow your surgeon’s instructions exactly, because the quality of the final vision you achieve is affected by how well your corneas heal. Don’t neglect to use the eye drops or other medications your doctor prescribes, and don’t miss any follow-up appointments.

Who Can Have Epi-LASIK

If you are considering LASIK, but your doctor says you need Epi-LASIK instead, ask why.

It’s not for everyone, but many surgeons who perform Epi-LASIK consider it a better option than LASIK for some patients. These include people who have thin corneas, with insufficient tissue for a good LASIK flap.

Epi-LASIK also may be safer than LASIK for people who have professions or hobbies that increase the chance of being hit in the eye (such as soldiers, police officers, boxers and racquet sports enthusiasts) because there’s no risk of the flap being dislodged.

If you have Epi-LASIK, you will likely experience some discomfort after the procedure. This is usually manageable with over-the-counter painkillers. The discomfort after Epi-LASIK is reportedly less than that experienced after PRK or LASEK.


[Page updated September 2016]

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LASEK Laser Eye Surgery #lasek, #lasik, #prk, #eye, #surgery, #vision, #glasses, #contacts,


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LASEK Eye Surgery

LASEK is an eye surgery that combines many of the benefits of other vision correction surgeries.

Laser epithelial keratomileusis, or LASEK, combines benefits of the two most commonly performed procedures — LASIK and PRK. LASEK eye surgery is used to treat astigmatism. nearsightedness. or farsightedness .

What Are the Advantages of LASEK Eye Surgery?

LASEK surgery is said to have several advantages, including:

  • Complications associated with creating and reattaching the flap in the cornea are avoided.
  • LASEK eye surgery causes dry eye less frequently than LASIK eye surgery .

In LASEK eye surgery, various techniques are used to retain the very thin corneal surface layer of cells (epithelium) that is used to recover the cornea after the laser sculpting is performed. With LASIK. a thicker flap is created using a laser or mechanical device (microkeratome) under which the laser sculpting is done.

What Are the Disadvantages of LASEK Eye Surgery?

Disadvantages of LASEK eye surgery include:

  • Longer visual recovery time compared to LASIK eye surgery. Many LASEK patients will not fully recover functional vision for at least one to two weeks while their eye heals, which is similar to the healing time experienced in PRK eye surgery. LASIK patients often have good vision by the day after surgery.
  • LASEK eye surgery usually causes more pain and discomfort than LASIK. but possibly less pain than PRK surgery.
  • Patients need to wear a “bandage contact lens” for about three or four days after LASEK eye surgery to serve as a protective layer between your blinking eyelids and the treated eye surface, which is not necessary after LASIK.
  • Patients must use topical steroid drops for several weeks longer than after LASIK eye surgery.

What Are the Possible Side Effects of LASEK Eye Surgery?

Side effects may include:

  • Sensation of having a foreign object in your eye (lasts anywhere from one to four days)
  • Temporarily reduced vision under poorly lit conditions (up to 12 months)
  • Dry eyes. requiring the use of moisturizing drops (up to six months)
  • Hazy or cloudy vision (should disappear within six to nine months)

Continued

How Do I Know If LASEK Eye Surgery Is for Me?

LASEK eye surgery may be better for patients who have steep or very thin corneas, which make it difficult for the surgeon to make a proper LASIK flap. Since traumatic injury to the eye is more serious after LASIK than after LASEK eye surgery, patients who engage in professional or leisure activities that put their eyes at increased risk for injury (such as boxing) may be better suited for LASEK. LASEK (or PRK) eye surgery may be better for people with dry eye syndrome because in avoiding a deeper flap, the corneal nerves responsible for the tearing reflex are not cut.

How Do I Prepare for LASEK Laser Eye Surgery?

Before your LASEK laser eye surgery you will meet with an eye surgeon or a coordinator who will discuss what you should expect during and after the laser eye surgery. During this session your medical history will be evaluated and your eyes will be tested. Likely tests include measuring corneal thickness, refraction, corneal mapping, eye pressure, and pupil dilation. Once you have gone through your evaluation your surgeon will answer any questions you may have. Afterwards, you can schedule an appointment for the procedure.

If you wear rigid gas permeable contact lenses. you should not wear them for three weeks before your evaluation. Other types of contact lenses shouldn’t be worn for at least three days prior to the evaluation.

On the day of your LASEK laser eye surgery, eat a light meal before going to the doctor, and take all of your prescribed medications. Do not wear eye makeup or have any bulky accessories in your hair that will interfere with positioning your head under the laser. If you do not feel well that morning, call the doctor’s office to determine whether the procedure needs to be postponed.

What Happens During LASEK Eye Surgery?

LASEK eye surgery is done under a topical anesthesia placed directly into the eye. During the procedure, the top layer of cells, or epithelium, is treated with alcohol for about 30 seconds and detached from the underlying tissue. It is then lifted or rolled back so that the eye doctor can access the cornea tissue. The newly exposed tissue is treated with the same laser used in LASIK eye surgery and PRK. Then the top layer of cells is put into place.

This is in contrast to LASIK eye surgery, in which a laser or cutting device makes a flap in the cornea. LASEK eye surgery differs from PRK by preserving the top layer of cells, rather than scraping them away and waiting for them to grow back. This is believed to facilitate healing of the cornea with less discomfort than PRK.

Continued

What Happens After LASEK Eye Surgery?

After LASEK eye surgery, expectations are similar to what can be expected after LASIK. The flap created by LASEK eye surgery heals in about four to seven days, and the patient usually wears a special contact lens that acts as a bandage for up to four days after surgery. Patients also may experience irritation in their eye during the first day or two after LASEK eye surgery.

For patients who undergo the LASIK procedure, good vision is usually attained in a few days. However, for LASEK eye surgery this may take as long as a week.

You will revisit the doctor for an evaluation the day after LASEK eye surgery, and commonly one week and three months after surgery.

When to Call the Doctor About LASEK

If you have any questions after your LASEK eye surgery or if you experience pain, a sudden decrease in vision, red eye(s), or discharge from your eye(s), contact your eye doctor immediately.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on January 24, 2016

Sources

SOURCES:
Council for Refractive Surgery Quality Assurance.
International Society For Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

© 2016 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


Am I a Candidate for LASIK Eye Surgery? #laser #eye #surgery #candidates


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Am I a Candidate for LASIK Eye Surgery?

LASIK eye surgery may dramatically improve your life and the way you see it. Your candidacy depends on a comprehensive vision exam by an experienced eye doctor to determine your personal visual needs and if LASIK is a good fit for you. LASIK laser eye surgery can correct such eye problems as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. After your eye evaluation you will have the chance to discuss the different laser vision options and discover which would benefit your current condition and lifestyle.

Unlike many other providers, The LASIK Vision Institute offers a free, no-obligation evaluation, so contact us today and speak with one of our Eye Care Counselors to get started.

Before going to your LASIK eye surgery evaluation there are some general criteria that can guide you in deciding if this is the right procedure for you. To have laser eye surgery you should be in good eye health, good overall health, and have realistic expectations of the LASIK procedure .

Below are some eligibility requirements for LASIK surgery candidates.

LASIK Candidates Should Have Good Eye Health:

Your eye prescription should fall within certain prescription limits.

You should have no eye disease, including keratoconus, uncontrolled glaucoma, severe cataracts, corneal disease and certain retinal and optic nerve diseases.

You should have no residual or active eye conditions including optic neuritis, ocular herpes, some cases of amblyopia (lazy eye) AND strabismus (muscle imbalance).

You should have no current or recurring infections.

LASIK Candidates Should Have Overall Good Health:

You must be at least 18 years old.

To be a good candidate for LASIK laser eye surgery, you should not have any autoimmune diseases, such as Lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or multiple sclerosis.

If you have diabetes it must be well managed and under good control and not have diabetic retinopathy.

Certain health conditions may require medications that can slow or prevent healing. You should tell your surgeon about all the medications you are taking and have taken in the last year.

You cannot be pregnant or nursing, or plan to become pregnant in the next 6 months following surgery. If nursing and considering LASIK laser eye surgery, you should wait at least 3 months after you’ve stopped. Hormonal fluctuations can affect vision stability.

Considerations Expectations:

In preparation for a LASIK procedure, you will not be able to wear contact lenses for an extended period of time before the surgery due to contacts temporarily altering the shape of your corneas. This amount of time will be determined by your eye doctor. For LASIK surgery this is very important. Discontinuing the wear of your contacts and allowing the shape of your cornea to go back to their natural state, your LASIK scan can accurately determine your specific eye dimensions. This will insure the laser is programmed to reflect your true visual state and allow the surgery to be its most effective.

It’s important you are committed to following the LASIK post-operative instructions from your physician, including:

  • Resting your eyes immediately following surgery.
  • Using prescribed and non-proscribed eye drops to continue to the lubrication of your eyes after surgery.
  • Follow-up visits to check on progression of your eye healing and health.
  • Restriction on some activities that could impair the healing processes (such as swimming).

*Prices based on prescription: up to -1.00 $299, -1.25 to -2.0 $1099, -2.25 and up as well as all hyperopic and/or greater than -0.50 diopter of astigmatism $1799. Individual results will vary. Candidacy determined by an independent doctor located within or adjacent to the LASIK Vision Institute’s (LVI) facility. All procedures performed by an independent surgeon. Punctal plugs, assurance plans and other technologies available at additional cost. This offer may not be combined with other offers. Other conditions may apply. This offer depicts a model who is not an actual patient of LVI. LASIK is a medical procedure. Talk to your eye doctor and consider both the risks and benefits before having your procedure.

Florida Residents: The patient and any other person responsible for payment have a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Pennsylvania Residents: Please refer to www.lasikvisioninstitute.com for information concerning Pennsylvania’s Credit Services Act.

If you are a resident of Canada and received an email from us, please be advised that this email was sent to you in error. LVI does not have offices or provide services in Canada. We apologize for any inconvenience.


Eye Care After Laser Eye Surgery #laser #eye #surgery, #after #laser #eye


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How to Protect Your Eyes After Laser Eye Surgery

After laser eye surgery, take these precautions to prevent injury or infection:

  • Don’t take a shower or wash your hair until the day after.
  • Be careful when you’re in the shower or bath. Be sure to keep soap out of your eye when you wash your hair. and watch out for hair spray and shaving lotion.
  • Don’t rub your eyes for at least a month.
  • Don’t drive until you feel comfortable. Get your doctor’s OK first.
  • Wear the eye shield/goggles the doctor gave you while you sleep for the first week.
  • Keep tap water out of your eyes for at least a week.
  • Avoid pools, whirlpools, saunas, and lakes for at least 3 weeks.
  • No eye makeup for at least a week. Toss out partly used products to avoid an infection.
  • Don’t get your hair colored or permed for at least 10 days.
  • No exercise for two days.
  • Wear eye protection for at least a month once you start exercise and sports activities again.
  • Avoid dirty and dusty environments for 7 days.
  • Bright sunshine may cause scarring, so wear sunglasses on bright days for at least a year.

When Should I Call a Doctor?

If you have any questions, or if there’s pain, a sudden decrease in vision. redness, or discharge from your eye, contact your doctor right away.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky, MD on August 15, 2016

Sources

The Cleveland Clinic Cole Eye Institute.