Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary,

#hospice aide job description

#

Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary, Employment – Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

Training/Educational Requirements: High school diploma preferred

Median Salary: $9.34 per hour

Job Prospects: Excellent

Job Description

A hospice care aide helps individuals unable of helping themselves. These aides travel to the patient s home and help them perform activities required for daily life. Hospice care aides are often associated with the elderly or disabled who are unable to take care of themselves, so they perform all required functions specific to the patient.

Most of the time, a hospice aide is the first position an individual may take at the beginning of their career. Alternatively, an individual may seek such a career if they are interested in the nursing field, but do not have the required education or training. Most functions performed are rather fundamental in nature, and do not require much training.

Hospice aides usually work within a hospice environment or travel to the patient s home. They help the individual eat, get up out of bed, or help them with the bathroom or a bedpan. The number of duties involved depends on the nature and the status of the patient, since they are expected to help the patient function as normally as possible. If working within a hospice environment, they work with individual patients to make their final days as comfortable as possible. If working in a home environment, they spend time sitting with or caring for an elderly or disabled patient who requires extra care.

Many times, families of patients in either a home or hospice environment can t commit to 24 hour care, so they hire a hospice aide to help during the times they are absent. Hospice aides travel to the home and work in shifts providing round the clock supervision and care. They aren t usually a registered nurse or hold a license and cannot usually administer medication, so the responsibilities are typically fundamental.

Training/Educational Requirements

There is no educational or training requirement for this position. A hospice aide learns from on-the-job training with a registered nurse or a nurse s aide. They learn the proper way to do things such as help a patient out of bed or assist with a bedpan by observing other nurses and by practicing. Oftentimes the family of the patient has a particular way they want things done, so the best training comes from working directly on the job.

The National Association for Home Care and Hospice ( NAHC ) offers certification for personal and home care aides throughout the country. This certification is not mandatory although individuals may opt to gain it to demonstrate they have met established industry standards. It can be a simple certification and lend way to further development within this role. Those individuals wishing to gain their certification must complete a 75-hour course, observe and document work in up to 17 different skills signed off by a registered nurse. In addition, they must successfully pass a final exam. Although this isn t a requirement, it can certainly lend way to more opportunities for advancement.

There are some high school courses that prepare for this role. At the early stages, an individual can do a co-op job to better prepare themselves for becoming a hospice aide. There are some standalone classes an individual can take in patient care which prepares them for the real thing. Individuals interested in a career as a hospice aide receive basic training from the company they work for before they are sent to a patient s home.

When working in a hospice environment, the facility will provide some training not only in how to care for a patient but also in how to make them comfortable as they prepare for death. There are certain personality traits such as patience and compassion that are required for such a role since most patients are elderly, disabled, or dying.

How to Get Hired

Most individuals wishing to get a job as a hospice aide look for employment with a home health care services company. This is usually the best way to get hired because the patients and their families go to such a company to hire this type of individual. It helps to take training classes or work through a high school co-op to prepare for this role. In turn, this also helps to get hired much faster.

For the hospice aide wishing to get hired into a hospice environment, it helps to apply to the facility directly. Usually these facilities are looking for background and experience since patients who come in here require a certain type of personality. It is also helpful to have experience working with a dying patient.

Although there is no specific educational requirement for this position, experience helps to get hired. It is especially true for families who are hiring someone to come to their home and care for their loved one.

Job Prospects, Employment Outlook, and Career Development

There is expected to be a better than average increase in the hiring of hospice aides. This role is expected to grow as families continue to look for individuals to care for their loved ones in a home or hospice environment. Since this is an entry-level position, the requirements for hiring are much lower. Therefore, it appeals to those who may not have a college education. There is a high potential for growth since people oftentimes don t want to work within an entry-level role.

As more hospice centers become a popular environment, the need for hospice aides will increase. So, too, will the need to keep aging or disabled family members in their home rather than sending them to a nursing home. This means there will be an increased need for individuals in this role, and within the home health care services business.

Working Environment

Depending on the type of facility a hospice aide wishes to work within, the environment may be slightly different. If focused within home health care, the individual will often travel to patient s homes. The assignment may last for a short time or may become a regular job. Individuals in this role care for more than one patient in their home or sometimes travel between a variety of different patient s homes. It all depends on the patients, the workload and the hours required. However, if focused within the home health care niche, hospice aides can expect the working environment to be an actual home. If focused within the hospice niche, it is expected to work within such a facility or institution. These facilities strive to create a cozy environment for their patients so they can be comfortable before they die. This work environment is more like an actual medical facility, but feels cozier.

Salary and Benefits

As of 2006, the average earnings for a hospice aide was about $9.34 an hour. The range averaged anywhere from $7.99 all the way up to $13 per hour depending on the facility. In some instances, a home health care company pays slightly higher depending on the environment and patient s needs. The more experience an individual has, the more they can expect to earn per hour.

Since these are hourly positions, most of the time hospice aides work without any true benefits. Any travel expenses incurred are the individuals responsibility and are often not reimbursed. Instead, a flat hourly rate is given to hospice aides. For those working within a hospice environment, they can expect some benefits if they are hired by the facility directly.

Citing this material

Please include a link to this page if you have found this material useful for research or writing a related article. Content on this website is from high-quality, licensed material originally published in print form. You can always be sure you’re reading unbiased, factual, and accurate information.

Highlight the text below, right-click, and select copy . Paste the link into your website, email, or any other HTML document.





Getting a Patent in China #getting #a #patent #cost


#

Getting A Patent In China. The China Patent Shuffle.

Kelly Spors, the Wall Street Journal s spot on Q A columnist on entrepreneurship and small business answered a question today on securing a China patent.

The question asked of Ms. Spors by a U.S. patent holder is whether it is worth spending the money for a patent in China to prevent knockoffs from being made there?

Ms. Spors says probably yes.

She starts out by noting that given China s reputation for meagerly enforcing intellectual property rights, getting a patent there may seem like a pointless expense. But you may kick yourself later on if you don t.

She then rightfully notes that in spite of the problems companies have in enforcing their patents in China, they are sometimes critical to prevent others from patenting YOUR product:

The big risk: If another company patents your idea first, it can turn around and sue you for infringement. It isn t as much about getting a patent in China as preventing other people from getting one, says Siva Yam, president of the U.S.-China Chamber of Commerce, a Chicago-based organization that helps businesses navigate China. Mr. Yam says the Chinese government is trying to better enforce patents, so having a Chinese patent may be worth more in the future.

Mr. Yam recalls a few years back when a Pennsylvania company decided not to seek a patent in China since it was already selling the technology there. But a Chinese company later sought and received a patent on a similar technology and then sued the U.S. company, along with writing letters to its customers threatening to sue if they continued doing business with the firm. The Chinese company eventually backed down, but not before the U.S. company had spent ample time and money fending off the claims.

She says it also makes sense to get a Chinese patent if you are selling your product into the Chinese market and that a patent will allow you to fight back if the manufacturer starts selling knockoffs of your product. She then notes that if you are going to seek a China patent of that which you have already patented in the United States, you must do so within a year of filing your U.S. patent application, unless you get an extension by filing an international patent application.

She is absolutely right about this. The China lawyers at my firm have received countless phone calls from companies agonizing over whether or not to get a China patent until we end that particular agony by telling them that they are too late.

I am probably a bit less upbeat than Ms. Spoor on the benefits of securing a China patent because they do tend to be difficult to enforce in China. One of the Chinese lawyers with whom we regularly work is even of the view that getting a strong trademark and constantly updating your product militate against the need to get a patent most of the time. But this ignores the problem of someone else stepping in and registering your patent in China. Though we are constantly seeing instances where Chinese companies swoop in and register someone s US trademark in China, it is less common with patents and I think this is because it is generally considerably more complicated and expensive to register a patent than it is to register a trademark.

Bottom Line: f you are doing business in China or even just considering doing so, you should be looking now at what you can do to protect your IP (patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, etc.) in China.

Dan Harris

Dan Harris is internationally regarded as a leading authority on legal matters related to doing business in China and in other emerging economies in Asia. Forbes Magazine, Business Week, Fortune Magazine, BBC News, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Economist, CNBC, The New York Times, and many other major media players, have looked to him for his perspective on international law issues.

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About China Law Blog

We will be discussing the practical aspects of Chinese law and how it impacts business there. We will be telling you what works and what does not and what you as a businessperson can do to use the law to your advantage. Our aim is to assist businesses already in China or planning to go into China, not to break new ground in legal theory or policy.

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How Big a Mortgage Can You Afford? #can #you #assume #a #mortgage,


#

5 Questions to Ask Before You Trust Someone with Your Money

  • 9 Small Financial Steps That Will Pay Off Big in the Future

  • 10 Stylists’ Secrets to Make Your Home Look Great

  • Who Am I Meant to Be?

  • How to Find Your Budgeting Personality

  • 5 Things People with Hefty Savings Don’t Do

  • 6 Things Not to Do in a Job Interview

  • The Best Time of Year to Buy Anything

  • 5 Things to Say in Awkward Situations Instead of “I’m Sorry”

  • Suze Orman: “What Money Has Taught Me About Personal Power”

    tuszqcexswfqrvtaub

  • How to Make Any Bathroom Look Bigger (and We Mean Any)

  • 12 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Quitting Your Job

  • Becoming the Person You Were Meant to Be: Where to Start

  • 4 Brilliant Ways to Make an Extra $500 a Month

  • Money-Saving Myths You Can Ignore

  • Tony Robbins On How To Trick Yourself Into Growing Your Savings

  • 5 Things Wealthy People Don’t Do

  • Suze Orman Answers All Your Financial Aid Questions

  • Find $1,230 in Your Dining Room

  • Suze Orman: The Best Financial Moves for Your 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and Beyond

    How Big a Mortgage Can I Afford?

    When you’re buying a home or refinancing a mortgage—as record number of us are doing these days—one of your most important considerations is what size mortgage you can realistically afford. To figure out that number, just follow the steps below.

    This formula does not account for the tax savings conferred by home ownership. You will want to figure that savings into your calculations before you shop for a home. A tax advisor can help.


  • What Is a Divorce? #divorce, #separate, #custody, #moms #and #dads, #remarriage, #remarry,


    #

    What Is a Divorce?

    Do you know someone whose parents are divorced? Are your parents separated or divorced? Chances are that you can answer yes to one or maybe both of those questions. And you are not alone! About 1 out of every 2 or 3 marriages ends in divorce.

    A divorce happens after a husband and wife decide not to live together anymore and that they no longer want to be married to each other. They agree to sign legal papers that make them each single again and allow them to marry other people if they want to.

    Divorce Is Hard for Everyone

    It might sound simple, but it’s not easy for a husband and wife to decide to end a marriage. Often they spend a long time trying to solve problems before deciding to divorce. But sometimes they just can’t fix the problems and decide that a divorce is the best solution. Change is a natural part of life, but when it happens to your family, it is sometimes really hard to deal with.

    Sometimes both parents want to divorce, and sometimes one wants to and the other one doesn’t. Usually, both parents are disappointed that their marriage can’t last, even if one wants a divorce and to live apart more than the other.

    Sometimes it hurts kids’ feelings when one parent wants to leave the house where they live. It is hard not to take it personally. It’s important to remember that divorce happens between the husband and wife, and even though it affects the whole family, it doesn’t mean that a parent who leaves the house doesn’t care about the kids.

    Many kids don’t want their parents to divorce. Some kids have mixed feelings about it, especially if they know their parents weren’t happy together. Some kids may even feel relieved when parents divorce, especially if there’s been a lot of fighting between parents during the marriage.

    It’s important to remember that divorce doesn’t change one important fact: A dad or mom who lives somewhere else is still your dad or mom. That’s forever. That will never change.

    Kids Don’t Cause Divorce!

    People divorce for lots of different reasons. Usually, parents divorce when they have too many problems and they just can’t seem to fix them, no matter how hard they try. Sometimes anger builds and parents fight a lot or say mean things to each other. Sometimes they stop talking to each other because they’re mad at each other, and sometimes they meet someone else that they fall in love with and want to live with.

    Adults have their own reasons for divorce. Whatever the reasons are, one thing is for sure: Kids don’t cause divorce.

    Still, many kids believe they’re the reason their mom and dad got divorced. They think that if only they had behaved better, gotten better grades, or helped more around the house, the divorce wouldn’t have happened. But this isn’t true. Divorce is between moms and dads only!

    Even if you once heard your parents argue about you, or your friend next door thinks his parents broke up because he got in trouble at school, these things don’t cause a husband and wife to end their marriage.

    You might feel you’re to blame for your parents’ divorce, but you are not the cause. And the fact that your parents decide not to stay married is not your fault.

    Kids Can’t Fix Divorce!

    Just like the divorce is not a kid’s fault, getting parents back together is not up to the kid, either. And most likely, this doesn’t happen, although plenty of kids wish for it and even try things they think might work. Acting like an angel at home all the time (who can do that?) and doing really well at school may make your mom and dad happy, but it doesn’t mean they’ll get back together.

    The opposite is also true. Getting in trouble so your mom and dad will have to get together to talk about these problems is not going to make the divorce go away either. So, just be yourself and try to talk through the feelings you have with a parent, another family member, friend, or teacher or counselor .

    Date reviewed: January 2015


    Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary,

    #hospice aide job description

    #

    Hospice Care Aides Job Description, Career as a Hospice Care Aides, Salary, Employment – Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

    Training/Educational Requirements: High school diploma preferred

    Median Salary: $9.34 per hour

    Job Prospects: Excellent

    Job Description

    A hospice care aide helps individuals unable of helping themselves. These aides travel to the patient s home and help them perform activities required for daily life. Hospice care aides are often associated with the elderly or disabled who are unable to take care of themselves, so they perform all required functions specific to the patient.

    Most of the time, a hospice aide is the first position an individual may take at the beginning of their career. Alternatively, an individual may seek such a career if they are interested in the nursing field, but do not have the required education or training. Most functions performed are rather fundamental in nature, and do not require much training.

    Hospice aides usually work within a hospice environment or travel to the patient s home. They help the individual eat, get up out of bed, or help them with the bathroom or a bedpan. The number of duties involved depends on the nature and the status of the patient, since they are expected to help the patient function as normally as possible. If working within a hospice environment, they work with individual patients to make their final days as comfortable as possible. If working in a home environment, they spend time sitting with or caring for an elderly or disabled patient who requires extra care.

    Many times, families of patients in either a home or hospice environment can t commit to 24 hour care, so they hire a hospice aide to help during the times they are absent. Hospice aides travel to the home and work in shifts providing round the clock supervision and care. They aren t usually a registered nurse or hold a license and cannot usually administer medication, so the responsibilities are typically fundamental.

    Training/Educational Requirements

    There is no educational or training requirement for this position. A hospice aide learns from on-the-job training with a registered nurse or a nurse s aide. They learn the proper way to do things such as help a patient out of bed or assist with a bedpan by observing other nurses and by practicing. Oftentimes the family of the patient has a particular way they want things done, so the best training comes from working directly on the job.

    The National Association for Home Care and Hospice ( NAHC ) offers certification for personal and home care aides throughout the country. This certification is not mandatory although individuals may opt to gain it to demonstrate they have met established industry standards. It can be a simple certification and lend way to further development within this role. Those individuals wishing to gain their certification must complete a 75-hour course, observe and document work in up to 17 different skills signed off by a registered nurse. In addition, they must successfully pass a final exam. Although this isn t a requirement, it can certainly lend way to more opportunities for advancement.

    There are some high school courses that prepare for this role. At the early stages, an individual can do a co-op job to better prepare themselves for becoming a hospice aide. There are some standalone classes an individual can take in patient care which prepares them for the real thing. Individuals interested in a career as a hospice aide receive basic training from the company they work for before they are sent to a patient s home.

    When working in a hospice environment, the facility will provide some training not only in how to care for a patient but also in how to make them comfortable as they prepare for death. There are certain personality traits such as patience and compassion that are required for such a role since most patients are elderly, disabled, or dying.

    How to Get Hired

    Most individuals wishing to get a job as a hospice aide look for employment with a home health care services company. This is usually the best way to get hired because the patients and their families go to such a company to hire this type of individual. It helps to take training classes or work through a high school co-op to prepare for this role. In turn, this also helps to get hired much faster.

    For the hospice aide wishing to get hired into a hospice environment, it helps to apply to the facility directly. Usually these facilities are looking for background and experience since patients who come in here require a certain type of personality. It is also helpful to have experience working with a dying patient.

    Although there is no specific educational requirement for this position, experience helps to get hired. It is especially true for families who are hiring someone to come to their home and care for their loved one.

    Job Prospects, Employment Outlook, and Career Development

    There is expected to be a better than average increase in the hiring of hospice aides. This role is expected to grow as families continue to look for individuals to care for their loved ones in a home or hospice environment. Since this is an entry-level position, the requirements for hiring are much lower. Therefore, it appeals to those who may not have a college education. There is a high potential for growth since people oftentimes don t want to work within an entry-level role.

    As more hospice centers become a popular environment, the need for hospice aides will increase. So, too, will the need to keep aging or disabled family members in their home rather than sending them to a nursing home. This means there will be an increased need for individuals in this role, and within the home health care services business.

    Working Environment

    Depending on the type of facility a hospice aide wishes to work within, the environment may be slightly different. If focused within home health care, the individual will often travel to patient s homes. The assignment may last for a short time or may become a regular job. Individuals in this role care for more than one patient in their home or sometimes travel between a variety of different patient s homes. It all depends on the patients, the workload and the hours required. However, if focused within the home health care niche, hospice aides can expect the working environment to be an actual home. If focused within the hospice niche, it is expected to work within such a facility or institution. These facilities strive to create a cozy environment for their patients so they can be comfortable before they die. This work environment is more like an actual medical facility, but feels cozier.

    Salary and Benefits

    As of 2006, the average earnings for a hospice aide was about $9.34 an hour. The range averaged anywhere from $7.99 all the way up to $13 per hour depending on the facility. In some instances, a home health care company pays slightly higher depending on the environment and patient s needs. The more experience an individual has, the more they can expect to earn per hour.

    Since these are hourly positions, most of the time hospice aides work without any true benefits. Any travel expenses incurred are the individuals responsibility and are often not reimbursed. Instead, a flat hourly rate is given to hospice aides. For those working within a hospice environment, they can expect some benefits if they are hired by the facility directly.

    Citing this material

    Please include a link to this page if you have found this material useful for research or writing a related article. Content on this website is from high-quality, licensed material originally published in print form. You can always be sure you’re reading unbiased, factual, and accurate information.

    Highlight the text below, right-click, and select copy . Paste the link into your website, email, or any other HTML document.





    Is an Online MBA Easy? #getting #an #mba #online


    #

    Is an Online MBA Easy?

    Taking classes at home saves commuting time. That alone would make an online MBA degree program seem easy for a busy adult, who must fit studies around work, community activities and perhaps family responsibilities.

    Other issues must also be considered, however, making the ease or difficulty of an online MBA ultimately come down to questions of personal habits and lifestyle.

    Can You Get In?

    Getting admitted to an online MBA program is almost certainly easier than gaining admission to a traditional program. A 2012 study by the Graduate Management Admissions Council found median acceptance rates differed dramatically between the two kinds of schools:

    • 45 percent for full-time traditional MBA programs
    • 82 percent for part-time online MBA programs

    Applicants are much more likely to be accepted into online degree programs.

    Can You Pay for It?

    It may come as a surprise, but according to CBS News. quality online MBA programs sometimes cost more than traditional classroom programs. The higher price tag is due in part to the school s investment in new technology. Another cost is the additional time instructors spend preparing for this new kind of class and the extra office hours provided for online students.

    Can You Handle the Loneliness?

    Studies done by Harvard and MIT found that 95 percent of the students signed up for their 2012-13 online courses quit before finishing. Harvard Business School Professor Regina Hertzlinger says the loneliness of studying in isolation is a significant factor, especially in MBA classes where collaboration is the norm.

    How Much Help Do You Expect?

    In its annual ranking of online MBA programs, US News considers, among other factors, the quality of student services provided. In an MBA program, student services are especially important for initial job placement and subsequent alumni networking that helps maintain a professional advantage. Students who enter online programs often have the benefit of an existing professional network. The connections to be gained from an MBA program by means of its student services still remain valuable.

    How Full is Your Schedule?

    Any MBA requires a specific number of hours of classroom time. Additional hours must be dedicated to study, research, team projects and writing. A classroom-based curriculum forces the student to set the time aside for studies by establishing the schedule for class attendance and project completion. Online courses may offer flexible scheduling, allowing students to fit in studies at their convenience. At the same time, some busy students may be inclined to procrastinate.

    How Hard is It to Find an Easy School?

    As of 2010, universities accredited by AACSB International. the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International, offered 202 online MBA programs. These programs, recognized by the most rigorous accrediting organization for business degree programs, may not always rank highest in search engines, but they are the majority of online MBA programs. That means that the easiest online degree to find may not always be the most typical kind of program, which is actually quite rigorous.

    The weight of the evidence suggests that online MBA programs are easy to get into but sometimes difficult to complete. Successful online students must practice self-discipline in the face of appealing opportunities to invest their time at work or with family and friends. They need to endure lonely hours at a computer without the social stimulation of a classroom. They have to make these challenging investments for programs that may be as expensive as and should be as difficult as traditional classroom-based MBA programs.

    One benefit, of course, is that online students can keep their jobs and the related income throughout school. In this way, the online MBA program makes a student s life easier while in school.

    Most important, however, is the long-term benefit of gaining an MBA. This credential opens doors, making professional life easier for the rest of the career.

    Related Posts


    Getting Low Hotel Rates #galveston #hotels

    #low hotel rates

    #

    Thanks to Conrad Hackett for sharing info about obtaining low hotel rates.

    On this page, I share with you information about how you can obtain low hotel rates for very good hotels across the United States. (Priceline also lists hotels for Canada, some European countries, the Carribean and Mexico.)

    To give you an example of what you can expect, in the past I have stayed at a 4* hotel for

    $50/night and one summer I stayed at a 3* hotel for $46/night (the regular rate was well over $100).

    There are two sites of interest for this procedure of bidding for low hotel rates and maximizing the chances that your proposed low rate will find a match. Priceline is where the bidding takes place, Bidding For Travel is where you get the information necessary to submit an informed (i.e. realistic) bid. Please note that the information on this page will only be relevant for those who are willing to use their credit cards online.

    Priceline is a service that allows you to bid on prices for airfare, hotels, rental cars, vacation packages and cruises. I will address hotels here but I suspect similar strategies will work for the rest.
    The basic idea is that you specify the time you want the service, you give some details about your travel plans and then bid. You name the price and the system tells you whether there is a company out there willing to give you the service for that price. Once you submit a bid, you have committed to it and if the system makes a match your credit card will be charged.

    For hotels this works in the following way. When you go to the Priceline page, click on Hotels. The form then asks you to fill in the city where you’ll need a hotel room, the arrival date and the check-out date.
    Next you specify the location within the city where you’d prefer a room. Although Priceline recommends that you pick two locations, you do not have to! You can specify just one. Note that if you scroll down that page, Priceline gives you a map of the city with the hotel blocks.
    On the following page you specify the quality of the hotel you prefer. And this is also where you name your price!

    This is where things get interesting. How do you know how low you can go? Priceline limits your bids to one every 72 hours (or three days) so unless you have lots of time before your trip, you don’t want to make unrealistic bids.

    BiddingForTravel is a very helpful site at this point. People from all over who have recently bid on Priceline post information about their bids. This information is presented by type of service (hotel vs airfare, etc.) and by details within categories.

    The list starts with some general information about the site that you may wish to read. Alternatively, you can skip down to the list of Hotels. Here, you pick the state in which you are planning to stay at a hotel. Major cities have their own categories. Once you’ve clicked through to a category, you will notice posts from members about what did and did not work. People include information about the quality of the hotel (number of stars), the name of the hotel, the dates of their stay and the winning bid. Occasionally, people will post information about what bid had been rejected.

    Once you’ve gotten information from this site, you’re ready to go back to Priceline and bid in an informed manner. Priceline may erase your initial bid and suggest that you bid higher because your bid seems unrealistic to the system. DO NOT be deterred by this. If you got information from BiddingForTravel you should be fine. Of course, there are no guarantees, but there’s a good chance it will work.

    Please note that once you’ve placed a bid you are committed to paying for the room if a hotel accepts your rate. Also, taxes and certain fees may not be included in this fee so please realize that the final price may be somewhat higher. Of course, this is also the case for the regularly listed figures, too.

    Find something great that helped you save a bundle? I’m always happy to hear about successful outcomes.

    >>Back to the Eszter.com Welcome Page

    Last updated: April, 2005
    Contact: website





    Getting a Cheap Hotel: Does It Matter What Booking Site You Use?

    #hotel booking website

    #

    There are countless hotel booking sites out there, but how do you decide which one to use? They all deliver a wide range of search results when you re looking for a hotel, and it s hard to tell if there are any differences. I decided to do some testing and find out which sites offer the best deals.

    As much as I love hostels and other forms of cheap accommodation, there is something nice about the luxuriousness of hotels. They are clean and quiet, feature comfy beds, strong showers, and lots of soap I can take for later.

    But luxury comes at a price. Hotels certainly aren t cheap and I hate spending a lot of money for a room I am only going to be in for a few hours. It s why I mostly avoid hotels—I don t think they are a good use of money (and there are far better accommodation options out there ). If I m not in a hostel, you can usually find me at a cheap guesthouse or at an Airbnb.

    But I ve been traveling a lot for work lately, and with the seemingly endless hotel booking sites out there, I decided this was a good time to do some testing. Does it matter which site you use to book a hotel?

    I also picked five cities to research: London, Los Angeles, Paris, NYC, and Seattle. I picked bookings close to the current date of research as well as far in advance, on both weekdays and weekends. (I did my research end of March, which is why the dates are different than what you d expect from a post published in early May.)

    I searched six booking websites: Expedia. Hotels.com. Booking.com. Hotwire. Priceline. and a new one called TravelPony in two, three, and four star categories. Below are the data tables with the lowest price shown (Priceline rates are based on their search listings, not the bidding section of the site). If you re not interested in the raw data, just skip ahead.

    Seattle, WA





    Getting respite #hospice #nurses

    #respite care

    #

    Ageing, Disability Home Care

    Getting respite

    What is respite?

    Disability respite services provide families and unpaid carers of a person with disability with planned, short-term, time-limited breaks from their usual caring role. They are services that assume the caring role during the period of respite with the intention that families/carers resume care at the end of the respite period.

    Respite services aim to provide a positive experience for both the carer and the person with disability.

    There are several different types of respite services, either provided directly by us or by non-government organisations we fund to deliver these services. We are committed to improving the flexibility and quality of respite for people with disability, and their families.

    Types of respite

    Own home respite

    This is provided in the home of the person with disability and can range from a few hours to a few days.

    Host family respite

    This type of respite is where the person with disability spends time in the home of a volunteer family who has been carefully matched with the interests and background of the individual and their family.

    Peer support

    People with disability are supported in leisure, recreational and group activities that are provided by or with people of similar age and with similar interests.

    Flexible respite

    This is provided in a range of settings and uses a mix of service types, including care in the home of the person with disability, with a host family and/or in community settings through day outings, camps, holidays, social or recreation activities.

    After school and vacation care

    Teen Time after school and vacation care aims to improve access to employment and/or vocational study opportunities for parents and carers of secondary school students with disability attending high school.

    Respite camps

    Respite camps for children, young people and adults provide opportunities for participation in social and recreational activities outside their normal day to day activities. The camps aim to give experiences that contribute to social independence, a sense of responsibility, team work and self reliance. Some camps are tailored for special needs including physical disability, intellectual disability and siblings.

    ADHC and Sport and Recreation, a division of the NSW Department of Education and Communities, have entered into a partnership to provide the Respite Camps for Teens with a Disability program.

    ADHC is also partnering with Muscular Dystrophy Association of NSW (MDANSW) to provide a respite camp and retreat program for children, young people and adults with degenerative neuromuscular disorders.

    Centre-based respite

    Centre-based respite is provided in a house in the community where the person with disability stays overnight or longer. Centre-based respite is not provided for children younger than seven years unless the child has complex health care needs.

    Specialised centre-based respite

    This is provided in a designated centre for children or adults whose primary disability is an intellectual disability and who have complex health care needs that require specialist care.

    Emergency respite

    Sometimes, unforeseen events such as an illness, hospitalisation or a death in the family can create an urgent need for respite.

    Emergency and crisis short-term respite care may be available to help families and carers with unplanned or emergency situations.

    Respite services cannot provide long-term accommodation.

    Are you eligible for help?

    Access to a respite service will depend on the needs of the person with disability and their carer, as well as the availability of respite services. Priority is given to people with the greatest need.

    Getting a service

    Contact your local ADHC Information, Referral and Intake (IRI) service for further information about getting a respite service.

    Your local Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre can also help you arrange a break from caring.





    Getting Low Hotel Rates #motel #usa

    #low hotel rates

    #

    Thanks to Conrad Hackett for sharing info about obtaining low hotel rates.

    On this page, I share with you information about how you can obtain low hotel rates for very good hotels across the United States. (Priceline also lists hotels for Canada, some European countries, the Carribean and Mexico.)

    To give you an example of what you can expect, in the past I have stayed at a 4* hotel for

    $50/night and one summer I stayed at a 3* hotel for $46/night (the regular rate was well over $100).

    There are two sites of interest for this procedure of bidding for low hotel rates and maximizing the chances that your proposed low rate will find a match. Priceline is where the bidding takes place, Bidding For Travel is where you get the information necessary to submit an informed (i.e. realistic) bid. Please note that the information on this page will only be relevant for those who are willing to use their credit cards online.

    Priceline is a service that allows you to bid on prices for airfare, hotels, rental cars, vacation packages and cruises. I will address hotels here but I suspect similar strategies will work for the rest.
    The basic idea is that you specify the time you want the service, you give some details about your travel plans and then bid. You name the price and the system tells you whether there is a company out there willing to give you the service for that price. Once you submit a bid, you have committed to it and if the system makes a match your credit card will be charged.

    For hotels this works in the following way. When you go to the Priceline page, click on Hotels. The form then asks you to fill in the city where you’ll need a hotel room, the arrival date and the check-out date.
    Next you specify the location within the city where you’d prefer a room. Although Priceline recommends that you pick two locations, you do not have to! You can specify just one. Note that if you scroll down that page, Priceline gives you a map of the city with the hotel blocks.
    On the following page you specify the quality of the hotel you prefer. And this is also where you name your price!

    This is where things get interesting. How do you know how low you can go? Priceline limits your bids to one every 72 hours (or three days) so unless you have lots of time before your trip, you don’t want to make unrealistic bids.

    BiddingForTravel is a very helpful site at this point. People from all over who have recently bid on Priceline post information about their bids. This information is presented by type of service (hotel vs airfare, etc.) and by details within categories.

    The list starts with some general information about the site that you may wish to read. Alternatively, you can skip down to the list of Hotels. Here, you pick the state in which you are planning to stay at a hotel. Major cities have their own categories. Once you’ve clicked through to a category, you will notice posts from members about what did and did not work. People include information about the quality of the hotel (number of stars), the name of the hotel, the dates of their stay and the winning bid. Occasionally, people will post information about what bid had been rejected.

    Once you’ve gotten information from this site, you’re ready to go back to Priceline and bid in an informed manner. Priceline may erase your initial bid and suggest that you bid higher because your bid seems unrealistic to the system. DO NOT be deterred by this. If you got information from BiddingForTravel you should be fine. Of course, there are no guarantees, but there’s a good chance it will work.

    Please note that once you’ve placed a bid you are committed to paying for the room if a hotel accepts your rate. Also, taxes and certain fees may not be included in this fee so please realize that the final price may be somewhat higher. Of course, this is also the case for the regularly listed figures, too.

    Find something great that helped you save a bundle? I’m always happy to hear about successful outcomes.

    >>Back to the Eszter.com Welcome Page

    Last updated: April, 2005
    Contact: website





    Medicare Benefits – Getting Starrted #hamilton #motel

    #medicare hospice benefits

    #

    Medicare Hospice Benefits – Getting Started

    Medicare hospice benefits
    Hospice is a program of care and support for people who are terminally ill. Here are some important facts about hospice:

    • Hospice helps people who are terminally ill live comfortably.
    • Hospice isn’t only for people with cancer.
    • The focus is on comfort, not on curing an illness.
    • A specially trained team of professionals and caregivers provide care for the “whole person,” including your physical, emotional, social, and spiritual needs.
    • Services may include physical care, counseling, prescription drugs, equipment, and supplies for the terminal illness and related conditions.
    • Care is generally provided in the home.
    • Family caregivers can get support.

    Important: The hospice program you choose must be Medicare approved to get Medicare payment.

    If you have Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) AND meet these conditions, you can get hospice care:

    • Your regular doctor and the hospice medical director certify that you’re terminally ill (with a life expectancy of 6 months or less.)
    • You accept palliative care (for comfort) instead of care to cure your illness.
    • You sign a statement choosing hospice care instead of other Medicare-covered benefits to treat your terminal illness and related conditions.

    Hospice care is given in benefit periods. You can get hospice care for two 90-day periods followed by an unlimited number of 60-day periods. At the start of each period, the hospice medical director and your doctor must recertify that you’re terminally ill, (with a life expectancy of 6 months or less), so you can continue to get hospice care. You have the right to change providers once during each benefit period.

    You always have the right to stop hospice care at any time for any reason. If you stop your hospice care, you’ll get the type of Medicare coverage you had before you chose a hospice program (like treatment to cure terminal illness.). If you’re eligible, you can go back to hospice care at any time.

    What’s covered?
    Hospice care is usually given in your home. Depending on your terminal illness and related conditions, the plan of care your hospice team creates can include any or all of these services:

    • Doctor services
    • Nursing care
    • Medical equipment (like wheelchairs or walkers)
    • Medical supplies (like bandages and catheters)
    • Prescription drugs
    • Hospice aide and homemaker services
    • Physical and occupational therapy
    • Speech-language pathology services
    • Social worker services
    • Dietary counseling
    • Grief and loss counseling for you and your family
    • Short-term inpatient care (for pain and symptom management)
    • Short-term respite care – If your usual caregiver (like a family member) needs a rest, you can get inpatient respite care in a Medicare-approved facility (like a hospice inpatient facility, hospital, or nursing home). Your hospice provider will arrange this for you.
    • Any other Medicare-covered services needed to manage your pain and other symptoms that are part of your terminal illness and related conditions, as recommended by your hospice team. If your usual caregiver (like a family member) needs a rest, you can get inpatient respite care in a Medicare-approved facility (like a hospice inpatient facility, hospital, or nursing home). Your hospice provider will arrange this for you.

    Important: Once you choose hospice care, your hospice benefit should generally cover everything you need. Original Medicare will still pay for covered benefits for any health problems that aren’t part of your terminal illness and related conditions, but this is very rare.

    What do I pay?
    You’ll pay:

    • A copayment of up to $5 per prescription for outpatient prescription drugs for pain and symptom management. In the rare case your drug isn’t covered by the hospice benefit, your hospice provider should contact your Medicare drug plan to see if it’s covered under Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D).
    • 5% of the Medicare-approved amount for inpatient respite care.

    All Medicare-covered services you get while in hospice care are covered under Original Medicare, even if you were previously in a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO) or other Medicare health plan.

    Note: If your Medicare Advantage Plan or other Medicare health plan covers extra services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover (like dental and vision benefits), your plan will continue to cover these extra services while you’re in hospice care (as long as you continue to pay your premium).

    Your Medicare rights
    People with Medicare have certain guaranteed rights. If your hospice program or doctor believes that you’re no longer eligible for hospice care because your condition has improved—and you don’t agree—you have the right to ask for a review of your case.

    Your hospice should give you a notice that explains your right to an expedited (fast) review by an independent reviewer hired by Medicare, called a Beneficiary and Family Centered Care Quality Improvement Organization (BFCC-QIO). If you don’t get this notice, ask for it. This notice lists your BFCC-QIO’s contact information and explains your rights.

    You can also visit Medicare.gov/contacts. or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) to get the phone number for your BFCC-QIO. TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048.

    Note: If you pay out-of-pocket for an item or service your doctor ordered, but the hospice refuses to give it to you, you can file a claim with Medicare. If your claim is denied, you can file an appeal.

    For more information on appeals, visit Medicare.gov/appeals or call 1-800-MEDICARE.

    For information about how to file a complaint about the hospice that’s providing your care, visit Medicare.gov/claims-and-appeals/file-a-complaint/complaints.html or call 1-800-MEDICARE.

    “Medicare Hospice Benefits: Getting Started” isn’t a legal document. More details are available atMedicare.gov/publications. Official Medicare Program legal guidance is contained in the relevant statutes, regulations, and rulings