Using Amazon Glacier or S3 as an Online Backup Server #cloud #storage,

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Using Amazon Glacier or S3 as an Online Backup Server

Cloud storage solutions have become a simple, cost-effective solution for backing up your important data. Check out these feature-rich tools for helping efficiently manage your cloud storage data.

Amazon Glacier is an extremely low-priced cloud storage solution as low as one cent per gigabyte (GB), in fact that is designed for long-term file and data backups with infrequent retrievals or removals. It’s great for manually archiving data or maybe even serving as online backup for your PCs, especially if you also back up to a local drive.

Just keep in mind, there are additional fees If you re looking for a storage solution for frequent utilization, in which case you’ll likely want to consider another Amazon Web Service: the Simple Storage Service (S3). pricing for which starts at three cents per GB.

Amazon, however, may not always be the best storage option. For instance, if you want a quick and easy online PC backup solution, consider another company that s designed for PC backup. When backing up large amounts of data, such as half a terabyte (TB) or more, unlimited backup offerings from other companies like CrashPlan or Backblaze may be cheaper to utilize than even Amazon Glacier.

If you do choose one of the Amazon storage offerings, you can use a client program similar to an FTP client to upload, download, synchronize and back up your data. Here are several different clients to consider that support Amazon and other cloud services:

Fast Glacier. A multipurpose Windows client for Amazon Glacier that is free for personal use, and commercial licensing for it starts at $39.95. Fast Glacier supports manual uploads/downloads, syncing, and automated backup functionality. It features pause/resume for uploads, pre-upload compression and encryption, and download limiting to control data retrieval costs.

CrossFTP. An FTP-style client that supports FTP, Amazon S3, Amazon Glacier and Google storage client for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. In addition to their free basic edition, they offer a Pro edition for $24.99 and an Enterprise edition for $39.99 that adds support for SFTP, WebDav, pre-upload encryption, syncing, scheduling and other features.

Duplicati. A free and open source backup client for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux that supports many different cloud and remote file services, including Amazon Glacier and S3, Windows Live SkyDrive, Google Drive (Google Docs), Rackspace Cloud Files, WebDAV, SSH and FTP. Duplicati supports incremental updates, encryption and signing using GNU Privacy Guard, and scheduling capabilities.

Simple Amazon Glacier Uploader. A simple Java-based cross-platform client that offers a GUI for the Glacier command-line tools. This likely isn t a client you ll want to use all the time, but it is good to keep on a flash drive for quick and simple access from any computer or OS.

Syncovery. A commercial file synchronization and backup software tool that is priced at $59.90 for the fully functioning edition, which runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Syncovery supports traditional FTP-like protocols and many cloud-based services, including those from Amazon S3, Microsoft, Rackspace, Google, DropBox and Box.com. It s a feature-rich solution supporting syncing, automated scheduled backups, compression and encryption, and many other functionalities.

CloudBerry. CloudBerry offers a large line of commercial backup product solutions designed for different types of machines or applications, such as desktop PCs ($29.99), servers ($79.99) and bare metal backups ($119.99). CloudBerry sells products for specific servers and applications as well, such as MS SQL servers ($149.99) and MS Exchange servers ($229.99). They even offer solutions for IT or managed service providers (MSPs). Their products support backing up to Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and Openstack cloud storage services and are feature-rich solutions.

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Planning underway for Mendenhall Glacier visitor center improvements #climate #change,cruise #ship,emission,glacier,greenhouse #gas,intergovernmental

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Planning underway for Mendenhall Glacier visitor improvements

View of the staging lot for waiting buses at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)

Managers of Juneau s most popular tourist attraction say they’re planning for a more sustainable facility, even as the very object of many a visitors fascination continues retreating at a faster rate because of climate change.

Most of the $415,000 dollars for drafting a master plan for the U.S. Forest Service s Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center comes from the Federal Highway Administration. The plan may address everything from Glacier Spur Road access to improving parking, culverts, trails and other outdoor areas, and even heat loss from the large, inefficient windows at the Visitor Center.

Visitor Center Director John Neary briefly explained the plan during a press conference Tuesday about potential impacts to the Alaska tourism industry from climate change.

It seems like a no-brainer to me, Neary said.

We have people coming on cruise ships that are belching emissions that are contributing (to climate change), and they get on diesel buses that are belching emissions, and they land at the glacier, and get off, and they see this glacier, and they’re not making the connection between everything they’ve just done and what they’re seeing before them.

Neary went into more detail during an interview with KTOO immediately after the teleconferenced presentation. He’s open to ideas such as reconstruction of a Nugget Creek hydroelectric project that served miners a century ago, closing off the end of Glacier Spur Road and using an electric circulator or tram to transport visitors from a parking lot to the Center, and offering incentives for tour companies to electrify their bus fleet.

Passengers board a bus at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center on Tuesday. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)

Such as, if we were to provide plug in stations for those buses with electricity at competitive rates, and with those stations offering the best parking spot that is available.

Neary points out that the Mendenhall Glacier is the most popular tourism destination with 450,000 visitors, or almost half of the total number of cruise ship passengers that visit Juneau each year. Of that number, about 10,000 visitors to the glacier are locals. He also said companies can’t sell trips to other destinations in Juneau (like the DIPAC hatchery, for example) unless the Mendenhall Glacier is included in the package.

Neary admits that achieving zero-net energy and zero-net waste at the Visitor Center, or entirely eliminating carbon emissions would be extremely difficult, if not impossible. But that’s not the ultimate goal anyway. He said their job as interpreters is about making that link, or connecting people to the landscape in a way that they never had thought about before.

We’re not making the fact that ‘You are the cause of the retreating glacier. You and everyone else.’ We all collectively need to address this. And a starting point would be right here at this Visitor Center.

He hopes that visitors will then go home, start a discussion, and take action in their own community.

Neary said they’ll finish the plan and have priorities identified by next spring. Implementation of the plan, however, may take years and a lot more funding.

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