Funding Program Types – Australian Government Grants & Loans – Australian Government


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Funding Program

Choose from many available funding types

Depending on the size and the nature of your business you may qualify for a government grant or loan from between $1,500 to over $10 million. Our Centre has helped small businesses just like yours receive over $45,072,143 in business funding as you can see from our own success stories. The average funding amount we see is approximately $254,645 and come from a variety of funding types such as:

Loans

Grants and subsidies

Tax breaks

Business advantages

Get Expert Help

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Call: 1800 813 863

Still not sure where to start? Our in-house group of experts can help. Give us a call or fill out the form below to begin.

For More Info Call 1800 813 863

Use Our Fund Finder Speak with a Funding Expert

Find out if you may be eligible for funding

Call: 1800 813 863

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Iranian child asylum seeker wins payout over detention on Christmas Island –


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Iranian child asylum seeker wins payout over detention on Christmas Island

The Federal Government has agreed to pay a confidential settlement to a nine-year-old Iranian asylum seeker over her detention on Christmas Island.

Lawyers for the girl, who was five at the time she was detained, alleged she received inadequate care on Christmas Island where she was held for 13 months in 2013 and 2014.

It was argued the girl developed post-traumatic stress disorder, a recurrent dental infection, a stammer, separation anxiety and major depression.

The settlement between her lawyers and the Federal Government was approved by the Victorian Supreme Court ahead of an eight-week trial which was due to start today.

The terms of the settlement will remain confidential.

In a statement, a spokesperson from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection said the Commonwealth does not admit liability.

“As this matter is still before the court in relation to some outstanding issues, it would not be appropriate for the department to comment further,” it said.

The girl, who cannot be identified, arrived on Christmas Island by boat with her family and now lives in Australia on a temporary bridging visa.

Photo: The girl’s litigation guardian, Sister Brigid Arthur, with Thomas Valentine, the lawyer who ran the case. (ABC News: Emma Younger)

Her litigation guardian, Sister Brigid Arthur, said the girl’s family was relieved the case had settled.

“While it’s an effort to get justice it’s also an extra trauma for them and an extra thing that they were waiting for a response to,” she said.

“Families in this situation just have an ongoing waiting, waiting, waiting.”

The case was initially launched as a class action on behalf of other asylum seekers who said they also suffered injury while being detained on the island.

About 35,000 people were held in offshore detention centres on Christmas Island in the period covered by the class action claim, between August 2011 and August 2014.

Asylum seekers urged to make claims

But the court earlier ruled the case should proceed as an individual claim only because claims made by the class action group members were too different.

Lawyer Thomas Ballantyne from Maurice Blackburn said despite the court refusing to hear the case as a class action, asylum seekers should be encouraged to make individual claims for compensation.

“This case really will have made subsequent cases a lot easier,” he said.

“It’s really important too that this litigation continues to shine a light on what happened on Christmas Island.

“So in that respect we’d also be hopeful that more people come forward.”

First posted April 26, 2017 13:06:35


Security Assessment, VAPT, ECSA Training in Bangalore, Chennai, Mumbai, Pune, Delhi, Gurgaon,


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A penetration test is done to evaluate the security of a computer system or network by simulating an attack by a malicious user / hacker. The process involves active exploitation of security vulnerabilities that may be present due to poor or improper system configuration, known and / or unknown hardware or software flaws, or operational weaknesses in process or design.

This analysis is carried out from the position of a potential attacker, to determine feasibility of an attack and the resulting business impact of a successful exploit. Usually this is presented with recommendations for mitigation or a technical solution.

About this workshop

This workshop gives an in-depth perspective of penetration testing approach and methodology that covers all modern infrastructure, operating systems and application environments.

This workshop is designed to teach security professionals the tools and techniques required to perform comprehensive information security assessment.

Participants will learn how to design, secure and test networks to protect their organization from the threats hackers and crackers pose. This workshop will help participants to effectively identify and mitigate risks to the security of their organization s infrastructure.

This 40 hour highly interactive workshop will help participants have hands on understanding and experience in Security Assessment.

A proper understanding of Security Assessment is an important requirement to analyze the integrity of the IT infrastructure.

Expertise in security assessment is an absolute requirement for a career in information security management and could be followed by management level certifications like CISA, CISSP, CISM, CRISC and ISO 27001.

There are many reasons to understand Security Assessment:

  • Prepare yourself to handle penetration testing assignments with more clarity
  • Understand how to conduct Vulnerability Assessment
  • Expand your present knowledge of identifying threats and vulnerabilities
  • Bring security expertise to your current occupation
  • Become more marketable in a highly competitive environment

Therefore this workshop will prepare you to handle VA / PT assignments and give you a better understanding of various security concepts and practices that will be of valuable use to you and your organization.

This workshop will significantly benefit professionals responsible for security assessment of the network / IT infrastructure.

  • IS / IT Specialist / Analyst / Manager
  • IS / IT Auditor / Consultant
  • IT Operations Manager
  • Security Specialist / Analyst
  • Security Manager / Architect
  • Security Consultant / Professional
  • Security Officer / Engineer
  • Security Administrator
  • Security Auditor
  • Network Specialist / Analyst
  • Network Manager / Architect
  • Network Consultant / Professional
  • Network Administrator
  • Senior Systems Engineer
  • Systems Analyst
  • Systems Administrator

Anyone aspiring for a career in Security Assessment would benefit from this workshop. The workshop is restricted to participants who have knowledge of ethical hacking countermeasures.

The entire workshop is a combination of theory and hands-on sessions conducted in a dedicated ethical hacking lab environment.

  • The Need for Security Analysis
  • Advanced Googling
  • TCP/IP Packet Analysis
  • Advanced Sniffing Techniques
  • Vulnerability Analysis with Nessus
  • Advanced Wireless Testing
  • Designing a DMZ
  • Snort Analysis
  • Log Analysis
  • Advanced Exploits and Tools
  • Penetration Testing Methodologies
  • Customers and Legal Agreements
  • Rules of Engagement
  • Penetration Testing Planning and Scheduling
  • Pre Penetration Testing Checklist
  • Information Gathering
  • Vulnerability Analysis
  • External Penetration Testing
  • Internal Network Penetration Testing
  • Routers and Switches Penetration Testing
  • Firewall Penetration Testing
  • IDS Penetration Testing
  • Wireless Network Penetration Testing
  • Denial of Service Penetration Testing
  • Password Cracking Penetration Testing
  • Social Engineering Penetration Testing
  • Stolen Laptop, PDAs and Cell phones Penetration Testing
  • Application Penetration Testing
  • Physical Security Penetration Testing
  • Database Penetration testing
  • VoIP Penetration Testing
  • VPN Penetration Testing
  • War Dialing
  • Virus and Trojan Detection
  • Log Management Penetration Testing
  • File Integrity Checking
  • Blue Tooth and Hand held Device Penetration Testing
  • Telecommunication and Broadband Communication Penetration Testing
  • Email Security Penetration Testing
  • Security Patches Penetration Testing
  • Data Leakage Penetration Testing
  • Penetration Testing Deliverables and Conclusion
  • Penetration Testing Report and Documentation Writing
  • Penetration Testing Report Analysis
  • Post Testing Actions
  • Ethics of a Penetration Tester
  • Standards and Compliance

Almanac of Policy Issues: Criminal Justice #criminal #justice #policies #list, #public #policy


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Criminal Justice

Crime in the United States has declined substantially in recent years. Homicide, robbery, rape, and assault have all dropped sharply since highs in the early 1990s. Substance abuse has declined less sharply, however, and drug-related arrests have actually increased steadily, reaching record highs over the past few years. The number of people under some form of correctional supervision, meanwhile, has also continued to reach new highs. In 1996, over 5.5 million Americans (or about 2 percent) were in prison, jail, on probation or parole.

While criminologists (and, indeed, most Americans) agree that more needs to be done to lower the national crime rate, there are sharp differences over how this should be accomplished. Some believe that tougher enforcement policies should be pursued, including increased spending on law enforcement and prison facilities, longer sentences for offenders, and stepped up use of the death penalty for the worst crimes. Others argue that more money needs to be spent on prevention, including social services and education, to provide hope and opportunity for potential offenders.

This section examines all of these issue in depth.

RELATED SITES, ISSUES ARTICLES

  • Political Magazines. The Almanac’s links to political and public policy magazine sites.
  • Public Policy Jobs. Sites listing public policy, lobbying, and media jobs in government and at major national organizations.
  • Questia. Search over 400,000 books and journals at Questia online.

Directories

  • American Bar Association. Voluntary professional association of US attorneys.
  • Cato Institute – Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement. Promoting an American public policy based on individual liberty, limited government, free markets and peaceful international relations. Extensive library of studies, articles and monographs available
  • Center for Court Innovation. Information about problemsolving courts, such as drug courts, community courts and mental health courts, which seek to improve case outcomes for communities and litigants.
  • Equal Justice USA. Seeks to bring into clear focus the racial, economic and political biases active in U.S. courts, prisons, jails and policing agencies, and to expand public opposition to the death penalty.
  • Heritage Foundation – Crime
  • Impact of a Criminal Record. Information about the effects of a criminal record on such matters as voting rights, employment, pensions, and ability to obtain a license.
  • Miranda Rights. News and resources on the history and fate of the warnings given while being arrested.
  • National Consortium for Justice Information Statistics
  • National Criminal Justice Reference Service. Lists publications and links on corrections, courts, crime, drugs, international crime, juvenile justice, law enforcement, research, statistics, crime victims.
  • National Institute of Corrections
  • Progressive Policy Institute – Crime & Public Safety
  • Supreme Court Decisions. FindLaw for Legal Professionals is a free resource for attorneys that includes online case law, free state codes, free federal codes, free legal forms, and a directory of products and services for lawyers. This online legal Web site also includes a legal career center.
  • Urban Institute – Justice

Articles

  • Check and Credit Card Fraud (US Department of Justice: September 30, 2003) — PDF File
  • Family Violence (National Criminal Justice Reference Service: Added August 7, 2003)
  • Criminal Victimization: 2002 (US Bureau of Justice Statistics: August, 2003)
  • Crime Control: The Federal Response (Congressional Research Service: September 12, 2002)
  • Identity Theft: Growing Prevalence and Cost (General Accounting Office: February 14, 2002)
  • Domestic Violence (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: April, 2000)
  • Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics (U.S. Department of Justice: provided through State University of New York at Albany)

Feds sue Hospice of the Comforter: Federal government sues Hospice of the

#hospice of the comforter

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Feds sue Hospice of the Comforter for Medicare fraud

January 14, 2013 | By Kate Santich, Orlando Sentinel

The federal government is suing Hospice of the Comforter for Medicare fraud, alleging that since at least 2005 the Altamonte Springs-based nonprofit knowingly billed for patients who were not terminally ill and even encouraged “creative” record-keeping to cover up the truth.

The facility could face millions of dollars in fines and damages as a result.

The suit, filed late last week by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, cites a case where the facility allegedly billed for hospice care over 4 1/2 years for an Alzheimer’s patient who was never considered terminally ill. Typically patients move to hospice care when they have less than six months to live.

In another case, when a nurse noted that a patient’s current condition would not qualify for hospice care, the diagnosis was suddenly changed to rectal cancer, the suit says, though there was no evidence the patient had cancer at any point during her 287-day stay in hospice.

At charges averaging more than $4,000 a month, bills for the two patients added up to more than $180,000 from Medicare the taxpayer-funded health-insurance program for the elderly and disabled.

The suit specifically alleges that longtime hospice CEO Robert Wilson instructed employees to admit patients without determining whether they were terminally ill, as Medicare requires, and then to bill the federal program for reimbursement. Staff also was instructed to find ways to document the cases in patients’ medical files so that the billings appeared legitimate.

Latour “LT” Lafferty, a Tampa attorney representing Hospice of the Comforter, said the charity “vehemently denies” that there was ever any intent to defraud the government. He also said management has been fully cooperative with the investigation and is trying to resolve the matter.

“What I can tell you is that Bob [Robert Wilson] has always been and is fully committed to providing the highest quality of care to his patients, regardless of whether or not they’re reimbursed by the federal government,” Lafferty said. “So if a person comes to Hospice of the Comforter seeking care, Bob will be the first person to give it to them, regardless of payment.”

Federal tax records show that Wilson made large bonuses based on how many patients were under hospice care each day.

Tax returns filed with the Internal Revenue Service for 2009, for instance, show that Wilson earned a base salary of $122,000, plus patient bonuses of nearly $207,000 for the year. That did not include retirement pay and other deferred compensation, including a clergy-housing allowance, that brought his total to more than $362,000. Wilson is a chaplain.

The latest allegations echo charges first made in October 2011 by a former hospice executive, who said he tried to get the hospice management to “do the right thing” by acknowledging improper Medicare billings and repaying the money.

When that effort failed, former vice president of finance Douglas Stone said, he was fired by Hospice of the Comforter. Stone filed his own federal whistleblower case but agreed in August to let the Department of Justice pursue the matter instead.

“I am pleased that after a more than yearlong investigation the Justice Department complaint describes in detail exactly what was alleged” in his own lawsuit, Stone said. “The Hospice of the Comforter Board of Directors had ample opportunity to do the right thing, follow the law, and return overpayments. Instead they allowed retaliation against a number of individuals making good faith efforts to report potential fraud.”

Wilson, who co-founded the hospice in 1990 and helped establish its well-regarded reputation in the community, referred a request for his comments to Lafferty. The attorney said Wilson is no longer CEO at Hospice of the Comforter, but he remains its president as well as chairman of the Comforter Health Care Group Board of Directors, the hospice’s parent company.

Although patients can and often do stay under hospice care for longer than the six-month guideline, a physician must periodically recertify the patient as terminally ill.

But at Hospice of the Comforter, the suit says, if a review committee recommended that a patient be discharged, the hospice would order more tests to delay the discharge and continue billing Medicare.

Wilson also had a list of patients whom nurses referred to in notes as FOBs, or “friends of Bob” who were not to be discharged regardless of what reviewers found, the suit says.

The total amount of actual damages, the government said, would have to be determined at trial, but the law allows the court to fine hospice as much as triple that amount.

Since May, Hospice of the Comforter has operated under a management agreement with Adventist Health System, the parent company of Florida Hospital chain, which reportedly had been interested in buying the facility at one point.

Spokeswoman Samantha O’Lenick would not comment on the lawsuit, noting that Adventist Health’s contract with the hospice went into effect after the whistleblower lawsuit was filed and so is not involved.





Nationally Ranked MPA – Rockefeller College of Public Affairs – Policy –


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Department of Public Administration Policy

The Department of Public Administration and Policy provides graduate and undergraduate students the skills and insights necessary to participate in the management of public and nonprofit organizations and the creation of public policy. Our curriculum offers more than 30 areas of specialization, including IT/e-government, homeland security, financial market regulation, non-profit management, local government management, public finance, and health policy. The diversity of our offerings reflects the diversity of our faculty: 24 experts drawn from seven fields, plus a set of master practitioners who bring their wealth of experience to the classroom.


Isle of Man Government – Hospice Isle of Man #motels #adelaide

#hospice isle of man

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Hospice Isle of Man

The range of services we provide include:

12 bedded In-patient Unit (IPU) – the role of the IPU is to provide specialist palliative care to patients who have complex symptoms, require respite care or have chosen Hospice for their End of Life Care.

Hospice Clinical Team – The Hospice Clinical Team provide 24 hour, 7 day support for all the patient related activities carried out by Hospice Isle of Man. They are all senior doctors and nurses with expertise in palliative care.

Scholl Centre: Provides therapeutic palliative day care from diagnosis onwards. Patients are invited to spend one day a week and share experiences with others facing similar situations.

The Scholl Centre contains accommodation for therapeutic massage, manicure, hairdressing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, lymphoedema, relaxation and exercise services. Diversional therapies consisting of creative art, silk painting, felting, therapeutic horticulture and a social programme including outside speakers are also provided.

Complementary Therapies: Patients can experience a range of therapies as out-patients, whilst attending the Scholl Centre, and during their stay as an in-patient. These include acupuncture, aromatherapy, massage, reflexology, relaxation, hypnotherapy, counselling and more. Therapies are also available for anxious or bereaved relatives and carers.

Physiotherapy: The aim of physiotherapy is to maximise mobility and to maintain functional independence. By helping to relieve physical symptoms resulting from life-limiting illness, the physiotherapist plays an important role in helping to improve the quality of life for patients.

Treatment is planned following a comprehensive assessment aimed at achieving patient-led goals. As the illness progresses the physiotherapist supports the individual by adapting treatments to suit their changing needs.

Occupational Therapy: The aim of Occupational Therapy is to maintain and, where possible, increase a patient’s independence in everyday tasks such as washing, dressing, eating and domestic activities. This is achieved through retraining and by the use of specialist equipment. Creative and therapeutic activities adapted to the individual’s abilities are also used to improve a patient’s quality of life.

Rehabilitation: The Rehabilitation Service at Hospice Isle of Man consists of an Occupational Therapist, a Physiotherapist and a Rehabilitation Support Worker. This service provides rehabilitation in the in-patient unit, the day therapy unit and in the community.

In addition it offers:

  • Breatheasy Programme
  • Fatigue Management Programme
  • Stress Management programme
  • Acupuncture Clinic

Lymphoedema: The lymphoedema service treats patients with secondary lymphoedema due to cancer and the side effects of its treatment.

Social Worker: The role of the social worker is to provide patients, families and carers with financial, practical and emotional support.

The Chaplaincy Team offer, for those who wish, spiritual care and support to all patients, families, carers and staff regardless of their faith, religion, or beliefs.

Palliative Care Clinical Nurse Specialists visit patients at home and give advice on management of pain and other distressing symptoms. They also provide information and psychological support and education to patients, families, carers and other professionals.

Hospice at Home: Nursing care is provided to enable patients to remain and die at home if that is their preference, prevent crisis admission into the hospice In Patient Unit (IPU) or hospital and give respite care for carers. Care can be provided during the daytime and/or overnight, depending on the patient and carer’s needs.

Rebecca House Children’s Hospice provides palliative care for children with life-threatening or life limiting conditions. Rebecca House provides day care, overnight stays, end of life care and an outreach nursing service for children who wish to remain at home at the end of life.

Hospice Counsellor offers counselling and support to patients and their families throughout the illness. Counselling can be arranged at the Hospice or in own homes. Hospice Counsellor encourages people to talk and share any difficulties or anxieties they may be experiencing. This service also supports staff and volunteers working within the Hospice.

Bereavement Support: Not everyone needs bereavement help. The support from the Hospice, however, does not stop once a loved one has died; it simply extends itself to family and friends and aims to help them adjust to a new way of living. Help can be given either on a one-to-one basis or in a group. Bereavement visitors may also offer counselling in people’s own home.

Education: Hospice Isle of Man leads the way in palliative care education. It supports the continued professional development of its staff and provides education and training for all those concerned with delivering high quality palliative care on the island.

Fundraising Team: The team is totally focused and driven with one core aim – raising over £3.5 million a year. That is £10,000 a day, £70,000 a week! These funds are raised through events, general donations, membership, regular giving, in memoriam donations and through legacies. The team work hard to keep everything they do ‘fresh’ and appealing – their motto is fundraising should be ‘fun’.

Support Services: The Support Service team are responsible for the running of the Hospice building, its maintenance, cleaning and catering facilities. In addition the Support Services Manager and her deputy fulfil the HR function in the Hospice.

Finance Team: The Finance Team are responsible for ensuring all finance functions are carried out according to the Finance Policy of the Charity, which is agreed by the Board of Governors. The Finance Manager is responsible for producing clear management accounts for the Finance Committee and the Board of Governors and works closely with the Chief Executive on financial performance against the annual budget.

Administration Team: The Secretariat/Administration team provide the office support to all teams that is necessary for Hospice to run smoothly and effectively.

Volunteer Department: The volunteer service manager and volunteer co-ordinator are the linchpin for the 700 volunteers who provide invaluable support to Hospice in all areas.

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Feds sue Hospice of the Comforter: Federal government sues Hospice of the

#hospice of the comforter

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Feds sue Hospice of the Comforter for Medicare fraud

January 14, 2013 | By Kate Santich, Orlando Sentinel

The federal government is suing Hospice of the Comforter for Medicare fraud, alleging that since at least 2005 the Altamonte Springs-based nonprofit knowingly billed for patients who were not terminally ill and even encouraged “creative” record-keeping to cover up the truth.

The facility could face millions of dollars in fines and damages as a result.

The suit, filed late last week by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, cites a case where the facility allegedly billed for hospice care over 4 1/2 years for an Alzheimer’s patient who was never considered terminally ill. Typically patients move to hospice care when they have less than six months to live.

In another case, when a nurse noted that a patient’s current condition would not qualify for hospice care, the diagnosis was suddenly changed to rectal cancer, the suit says, though there was no evidence the patient had cancer at any point during her 287-day stay in hospice.

At charges averaging more than $4,000 a month, bills for the two patients added up to more than $180,000 from Medicare the taxpayer-funded health-insurance program for the elderly and disabled.

The suit specifically alleges that longtime hospice CEO Robert Wilson instructed employees to admit patients without determining whether they were terminally ill, as Medicare requires, and then to bill the federal program for reimbursement. Staff also was instructed to find ways to document the cases in patients’ medical files so that the billings appeared legitimate.

Latour “LT” Lafferty, a Tampa attorney representing Hospice of the Comforter, said the charity “vehemently denies” that there was ever any intent to defraud the government. He also said management has been fully cooperative with the investigation and is trying to resolve the matter.

“What I can tell you is that Bob [Robert Wilson] has always been and is fully committed to providing the highest quality of care to his patients, regardless of whether or not they’re reimbursed by the federal government,” Lafferty said. “So if a person comes to Hospice of the Comforter seeking care, Bob will be the first person to give it to them, regardless of payment.”

Federal tax records show that Wilson made large bonuses based on how many patients were under hospice care each day.

Tax returns filed with the Internal Revenue Service for 2009, for instance, show that Wilson earned a base salary of $122,000, plus patient bonuses of nearly $207,000 for the year. That did not include retirement pay and other deferred compensation, including a clergy-housing allowance, that brought his total to more than $362,000. Wilson is a chaplain.

The latest allegations echo charges first made in October 2011 by a former hospice executive, who said he tried to get the hospice management to “do the right thing” by acknowledging improper Medicare billings and repaying the money.

When that effort failed, former vice president of finance Douglas Stone said, he was fired by Hospice of the Comforter. Stone filed his own federal whistleblower case but agreed in August to let the Department of Justice pursue the matter instead.

“I am pleased that after a more than yearlong investigation the Justice Department complaint describes in detail exactly what was alleged” in his own lawsuit, Stone said. “The Hospice of the Comforter Board of Directors had ample opportunity to do the right thing, follow the law, and return overpayments. Instead they allowed retaliation against a number of individuals making good faith efforts to report potential fraud.”

Wilson, who co-founded the hospice in 1990 and helped establish its well-regarded reputation in the community, referred a request for his comments to Lafferty. The attorney said Wilson is no longer CEO at Hospice of the Comforter, but he remains its president as well as chairman of the Comforter Health Care Group Board of Directors, the hospice’s parent company.

Although patients can and often do stay under hospice care for longer than the six-month guideline, a physician must periodically recertify the patient as terminally ill.

But at Hospice of the Comforter, the suit says, if a review committee recommended that a patient be discharged, the hospice would order more tests to delay the discharge and continue billing Medicare.

Wilson also had a list of patients whom nurses referred to in notes as FOBs, or “friends of Bob” who were not to be discharged regardless of what reviewers found, the suit says.

The total amount of actual damages, the government said, would have to be determined at trial, but the law allows the court to fine hospice as much as triple that amount.

Since May, Hospice of the Comforter has operated under a management agreement with Adventist Health System, the parent company of Florida Hospital chain, which reportedly had been interested in buying the facility at one point.

Spokeswoman Samantha O’Lenick would not comment on the lawsuit, noting that Adventist Health’s contract with the hospice went into effect after the whistleblower lawsuit was filed and so is not involved.