Welcome to Heaven At Home, Grand Rapids, MI At-Home Pet Hospice and

#hospice of michigan

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Welcome

Welcome

Heaven at Home PLC is an in-home provider of veterinary hospice. end-of-life care and euthanasia in Grand Rapids and West Michigan. We know that avoiding pain and suffering is one of the most important things to pet owners. We know it is difficult to tell when the time is right.

Our services are performed by a licensed veterinarian in the comfort of your home. This allows for comprehensive evaluation of your pet s quality of life in his or her usual and most comfortable surroundings. At-home pet hospice and euthanasia offer a number of advantages, including the opportunity to allow your pet s story to end peacefully surrounded by loved ones without the stress of clinical surroundings. It s the kind of compassionate care your companion animal deserves.

What We Do

We can assist with a peaceful end of life transition for your beloved pet that includes:

  • Hospice Care
  • Pain Recognition and Management
  • Palliative Care
  • Fluid Therapy
  • Wound Care
  • Nutrition Management
  • Medication Administration
  • In-Home Euthanasia

We can help with information on the disease process and what to expect next whenever possible.

Request An Appointment

After hours and emergency care available upon request





Bold Christian University – The International Free University #bold,christian, #university,ludwig,otto,ludwig #otto,bold #christian


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BOLD Christian University

Bold Christian University Is An Amazing Success Storywww.bcuniversity.net

BOLD Christian University

Dear Dr. Otto,

Greetings in the wonderful name of Jesus Christ. How are you doing Sir? Here in the parish I am doing well.

I will never forget Bold Christian University. I still remember it as a true God’s tool for sharpening God’s servants for his ministry. The church in my area is growing as a result of evangelism we always do to reach the lost. This is a result of Bold Christian University. My studies at this university have opened my eyes to see the importance of reaching the lost and the strategies of how to reach them.

I always train men and women in my area how to reach the lost and the results are tremendous. We daily see people being added to the Lord. Praise Him! May the Lord richly bless you. In Him,

Dr. Elisha Ndema, Mwanza, Tanzania

Dear Doctor Otto,I wish I’d had a chance to say a proper thank you in person to you for being such a fantastic educator. I had a terrific experience in this program.

I just wanted to let you know how much I appreciate everything you’ve done to help me improve my spiritual knowledge and spiritual growth process.You’ve helped me to build the foundation for improved academic achievement, also focus on winning souls for the Kingdom of God.You have such enthusiasm and patience. I don’t know how you’re able to keep it up!

I wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed this program this year. I know it’s not easy to deal with me via emails but you managed to keep up with me and answered all my questions and answered emails on time.Enjoy the rest of the school year. You’re doing a fantastic job!

Sincerely,Mrs. Charlyne Prince ,P.O Box F-40397, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
The Bahamas

Please Help Support Our Ministry!

The Ludwig Otto Organization

United States Publishing Company (since 2016) www.unitedstatespublishing.net

Franklin Publishing Company (since 1966)www.franklinpublishing.net

Great Churches Great Chrictians (since 2004)www.franklindevelopment.org

London Press (since 1998)www.londonpress.us

Bold Christian University (since 1983)www.bcuniversity.net

Association of Christian Educators (since 1981)www.associationchristianeducators.net

United States Christian University (since 2016)www.uschristianu.net

The Ludwig Otto Organization (since 1958)www.ludwigotto.com


Welcome to Heaven At Home, Grand Rapids, MI At-Home Pet Hospice and

#hospice of michigan

#

Welcome

Welcome

Heaven at Home PLC is an in-home provider of veterinary hospice. end-of-life care and euthanasia in Grand Rapids and West Michigan. We know that avoiding pain and suffering is one of the most important things to pet owners. We know it is difficult to tell when the time is right.

Our services are performed by a licensed veterinarian in the comfort of your home. This allows for comprehensive evaluation of your pet s quality of life in his or her usual and most comfortable surroundings. At-home pet hospice and euthanasia offer a number of advantages, including the opportunity to allow your pet s story to end peacefully surrounded by loved ones without the stress of clinical surroundings. It s the kind of compassionate care your companion animal deserves.

What We Do

We can assist with a peaceful end of life transition for your beloved pet that includes:

  • Hospice Care
  • Pain Recognition and Management
  • Palliative Care
  • Fluid Therapy
  • Wound Care
  • Nutrition Management
  • Medication Administration
  • In-Home Euthanasia

We can help with information on the disease process and what to expect next whenever possible.

Request An Appointment

After hours and emergency care available upon request





All Dogs May Go to Heaven #booking #hotel #rooms

#hospice for dogs

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The New York Times

All Dogs May Go to Heaven. These Days, Some Go to Hospice.

By MATT RICHTEL

November 30, 2013

More and more, cats and dogs get the human treatment. There are pet spas, pet therapists, pet clothes. And as it goes in life, so it now goes in the twilight. The latest phenomenon: pet hospice.

Around the country, a growing number of veterinarians are offering hospice care, and marketing it as a way to give cats and dogs — and their owners — a less anxious, more comfortable passing.

The approach, in the spirit of the human variety, entails ceasing aggressive medical treatment and giving pain and even anti-anxiety drugs. Unlike in hospice care for humans, euthanasia is an option — and in fact, is a big part of this end-of-life turn. When it’s time, the vet performs it in the living room, bedroom or wherever the family feels comfortable.

That’s a big part of the job, the vets say, relieving pet owner guilt, giving them an emotional bridge to a pet’s death, and letting them grieve at home — rather than in a clinic or animal shelter. The intimacy carries a premium, sometimes costing 25 percent or more than euthanasia in a clinic. Vets, and their customers, say it can be worth it.

“They’re in their own environment, not only the pet but the owners,” said Dr. Mary Gardner, co-founder of Lap of Love, a Florida-based company that is one of the leaders in a small but growing market. “They’re allowed to have other animals present, other cats or dogs present, other children,” added Dr. Gardner, who refers to a pet’s owner as its “mom” or “dad,” and has since relocated her own practice to Los Angeles. “I’ve been to some homes where they had barbecues for that dog, and invited me and the neighbors, and the dog was the man of the hour.”

Lap of Love’s business has blossomed since 2010 from two providers to more than 68 vet partners in 18 states. The International Association for Animal Hospice and Palliative Care, a group started in 2009, now has 200 members, mostly vets, but also several family therapists, lawyers and an animal sanctuary in Northern California that takes in and provides holistic healing and hospice for terminally ill and elderly pets.

“There is a formal end-of-life movement, a formal hospice movement,” said Dr. Eden Myers, a veterinarian in Kentucky who runs JustVetData.com. which tracks industry trends. Of the providers who do this, she said: “They’re everywhere.”

Dr. Amir Shanan, a vet in Chicago who started the International Association for Animal Hospice, described the movement as growing, but still not mainstream; veterinary schools are only now embracing the idea. “There are skeptics out there,” he said. “But 20 years ago, there was almost no one other than skeptics, and that’s changing rapidly.”

Denise Fitzmaurice, right, brought her 4-year-old dog, Sophie, to Dr. Michele Price s mobile veterinary clinic for an examination.

Daniel Rosenbaum for The New York Times

There are no formal standards for this hospice care, and Dr. Shanan said there was a debate about what those standards should look like. “The core of the debate is who is to decide when is the right time to euthanize, if at all,” he said, noting that some hospice supporters advocate giving pets palliative care until they die naturally, as in human hospice.

Hospice and in-home euthanasia are different things. Their growth is owing to similar factors, says Dr. Myers, including a growing acceptance of hospice for humans, as well as cellphones, laptops and online marketing that make mobile vet services easier to operate. Plus, she said, more vets offer the services as a business alternative to the high cost of starting and maintaining a traditional clinic.

“And,” she added, “you’ve got people willing to spend scads of money on their pets.”

For pet owners, the financial implications of this end-of-life movement cut two ways. In one light, hospice can be seen as reducing the cost of aggressive medical care, or it can be seen as its own version of aggressive comfort care, at least when compared to euthanizing a pet sooner.

A hospice or euthanasia visit from Lap of Love generally costs $200 or $250, including drugs. Euthanasia at a clinic typically runs less, though prices vary widely, and is even less at a nonprofit shelter, like a local animal shelter. Some pet owners say costs are irrelevant given the peace of mind — their own.

“It was more for me than him,” said Jan Dorr, a bookkeeper in Boca Raton, Fla. who was an early Lap of Love customer in 2010. She’d spent $5,000 on chemotherapy for her chocolate lab, Darby, but the dog’s health continued to fail. When she heard about the idea of pet hospice, her reaction was positive; a year earlier, her own father died after a positive hospice experience. She called Dr. Gardner, who helped make Darby comfortable by increasing his pain medications, and giving Ms. Dorr a checklist of ways to recognize when it was time to let go, such as when Darby stopped eating, walking or interacting.

When Darby’s condition worsened just days later, the vet returned to perform euthanasia. Ms. Dorr lay down on her bed with Darby, hugging him. “She let me say when,” Ms. Dorr said, referring to the vet’s final injection. It was far preferable, she said, to the alternative: “I just couldn’t get it into my head to put him on a steel table in a cold room and let him go.”

Kathryn D. Marocchino, a professor of death and dying at California State University in Vallejo, who in 1996 founded the Nikki Hospice Foundation for Pets, said the end-of-life movement for pets addressed what she described as a “sense of coercion” faced by owners of sick pets forced to decide between aggressive treatment or euthanasia. She said that her group got calls from people thanking them, and saying things like: “Where were you 30 years ago? They made me kill my dog.”

Dr. Michele Price, a veterinarian in Northern Virginia whose in-home end-of-care business has doubled since 2009 to 20 percent of her practice, got a call recently about an ailing Labrador named Champ. She’d first seen the dog in August when his owners thought it was time to euthanize. But when Dr. Price got to the house, Champ was doing O.K. and she and the family decided on hospice treatment and pain meds. Later, Champ took a sharp downward turn and couldn’t walk. Dr. Price returned and they set up for the euthanasia.

Champ was on a quilt next to the fireplace when Dr. Price administered the initial sedation. “They hugged him, and told him what a good dog he was. They said, ‘We love you’ and ‘We’ll miss you,’ ” Ms. Price said of the dog’s owners. As for Champ, “He fell asleep. That’s the last thing he remembered.”

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