Online Certified Travel Agent Courses with Certification Info #travel #agent #online #courses,

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Online Certified Travel Agent Courses with Certification Info

Essential Information

Most online travel agent courses are part of diploma programs that prepare graduates for national travel agent certification. Online travel agent programs can typically be taken fully online and depending on the school, can usually be completed in six months or less. After completion, graduates are prepared for entry-level jobs as travel agents.

There are several certifications available to travel agents. First is the Travel Institute’s Travel Agent Proficiency (TAP) test, which certifies that graduates have entry-level understanding of the travel industry. For those who successfully pass the test, six months of work experience is required for the second certification, the Certified Travel Associate (CTA) certification. CTA agents are prepared for a career with a travel company or through independent practice.

For those who wish to advance into management roles, Certified Travel Counselor (CTC) certification qualifies travel agents in business negotiations and marketing strategies. The Certified Travel Industry Executive (CTIE) credential is geared toward agents in upper-level management and indicates a higher-level understanding of business relations.

Online Travel Agent Classes

Commonly offered online travel agent courses are summarized below.

  • Travel Agent Training Course: The initial component of this class covers the history, function and marketing of the travel industry. Geography and travel technology are discussed, as well as the financial and business aspects of the travel industry, including marketing, communication and specialized sales. A second component of the course covers the function and use of industry-standard travel agent computer programs and students learn to operate by using a simulation mode that mimics real-world travel agent operations. The course culminates with career education, and students learn job-searching techniques and the fundamentals of working in the travel industry.
  • Certified Travel Associate (CTA) Certification Course: Travel agents must have 18 months of full-time industry experience or 12 months with TAP test completion to qualify for this program. Classes build upon topics covered in the travel agent training course, with emphasis on specialized travel sales techniques, consumer-focused professionalism and office skills. Students also choose four electives to supplement the eight core courses, with options ranging from management of time to sales of specialized travel packages.
  • Certified Travel Counselor (CTC) Certification Course: This 6-month program is designed for the established travel professional with CTA certification and at least five years of experience. Courses focus on marketing and consumer relationships and classes discuss the development of marketing strategies, productive management of office politics and effective presentation tactics. Graduates must complete relevant continuing education classes every year to keep certification.
  • Certified Travel Industry Executive (CTIE) Certification Course: Candidates for this program must have at least five years of experience within the field and CTC certification. Courses cover advanced elements of travel industry business management and topics include the logistics of travel law, mutually beneficial conflict resolution, bookkeeping and marketing management. Students can have 18 months to complete the program.
  • The Hospitality Industry Course: This course provides students with a broad overview of the travel industry. Coursework typically includes the history of the hospitality industry, the influence of food and beverage services, sales and reservations technologies and branding.

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Travel agents need little formal education. Learn about the training, job duties and voluntary certifications to see if this is.

Travel agents provide customized service for clients and make arrangements for transportation, hotel reservations, and car.

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a travel agent. Get a quick view of the requirements, including.

Get info about online travel agent certificate programs. Read about program requirements, course topics, and descriptions, and.





Online Masters Degree in American History: Program Info #online #masters #degree #in

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Online Masters Degree in American History: Program Info

Essential Information

A small number of schools offer online master’s degree programs in American history. This may involve taking American history courses as part of a general history program. In addition to online courses, students must complete independent research. Thesis and non-thesis programs are available. Students can complete this program fully online without any on-campus visits.

A master’s degree is typically the educational level required for historians. High school history teachers are not necessarily required to hold a master’s degree, but some states require teachers to earn a master’s degree after earning teaching certification. Important prerequisites for master’s programs include a bachelor’s degree and GRE scores.

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  • American History
  • Ancient Studies
  • Asian History
  • Classical Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies
  • Cultural Resource Management
  • European History
  • Historic Preservation
  • History of Science and Technology
  • Holocaust Studies
  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Museum Studies
  • Public History and Archival Administration

Master’s Degree in History – American History

Online master’s degree programs in history are offered by a handful of schools and typically allow students to tailor their studies to their personal interests; American history is a common concentration offered for this degree. Although subject matter will vary, most program courses cover the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, domestic and international politics and a variety of cultural developments and changes that have occurred up through the modern period.

Since teachers often pursue master’s degrees to increase their salaries, the online degree programs are often designed with history teachers in mind. However, they are also appropriate for students intending to move on to doctoral programs. Most programs require students to have a bachelor’s degree and submit GRE scores.

Program Details and Information

In order to complete an online master’s degree program in American history, most schools require students to conduct independent research and write a master’s thesis; however, there are also non-thesis online programs available. Non-thesis programs typically require students to complete 36 credits of coursework, and many students are able to finish their degree within three years. Most programs can be completed entirely online, and schools rarely require students to attend classes on-campus.

Students interested in an online master’s degree program in American history should make sure their computers are running a current operating system and an updated Internet browser. Some schools will require students to familiarize themselves with Web-based course management software like Blackboard; this program is used to deliver online course materials to students, including recorded lectures, exams and assignments.

Course Topics

Online master’s degree programs in American history allow students to focus on the periods and aspects of the U.S. timeline in which they have the greatest interest. Most schools also have a core curriculum of classes that all students must take.

American Revolution

This course covers the cultural and sociological context of the Revolutionary War. Students also discuss the importance of social and cultural factors in relation to military action of all types.

Constitutional History

In this class, students examine the origin, content and legacy of the United States Constitution. The course also covers both contemporary and historical debates over topics such as State’s rights, amendments and Due Process.

African-American History

This course focuses on the social and cultural development of the African-American community in the United States. Students discuss the transportation of Africans to the New World, the civil rights movement and contemporary African-American issues.

Teaching American History

This class is designed for high school and college American history instructors. It teaches students how to approach curriculum development, create assessments and craft lesson plans.

Career Information

Graduates of online master’s degree programs in American history often pursue careers in education. Students who weren’t already professional history teachers upon enrollment will need to apply for teaching licensure in their state if they wish to teach at the K-12 level. The licensure process typically involves passing both a general teacher certification exam and a subject-specific exam in history.

Graduates who already held teacher licensure before entering the master’s degree program may continue in their history teaching careers, often with increased salary prospects. A master’s degree in history is also a beginning qualification for teaching at the college level.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, certified secondary school teachers (in all areas, not just history) earned a median annual salary of around $57,200 as of May 2015. Meanwhile, postsecondary history teachers earned a median salary of $69,400 that same year (www.bls.gov ).

Continuing Education Information

Once a student completes an online master’s degree program in American history, he or she is eligible to move into a Ph.D. program. Many schools offer both online and on-campus Ph.D. programs in American history, allowing students to conduct independent research and work towards completing a dissertation.

Individuals who have an interest in American history and are interested in become high school or postsecondary teachers have several online options to choose from at the master’s degree level. These degrees can also be good preparation for doctoral degrees.

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Areas of study you may find at Youngstown State University include:
  • Liberal Arts and Humanities
    • Cultural Studies
    • Ethnic and Gender Studies
    • Geography and Cartography
    • Human and Consumer Sciences
    • Human and Social Services
    • Liberal Arts, Humanities, and General Studies
    • Parks, Recreation and Leisure Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Political Science
    • Public Administration
    • Religious Studies
    • Social Science and Studies
    • Social Studies and History
      • American History
      • Historic Preservation

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Areas of study you may find at Yeshiva University include:
  • Liberal Arts and Humanities
    • Human and Social Services
    • Liberal Arts, Humanities, and General Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Political Science
    • Social Science and Studies
    • Social Studies and History
      • American History
    • Theological, Religious, and Ministerial Studies

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Areas of study you may find at Yale University include:
  • Liberal Arts and Humanities
    • Cultural Studies
    • Ethnic and Gender Studies
    • Liberal Arts, Humanities, and General Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Political Science
    • Religious Studies
    • Social Science and Studies
    • Social Studies and History
      • American History
      • Medieval and Renaissance Studies
    • Theological, Religious, and Ministerial Studies

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9 Harvard University

Areas of study you may find at Harvard University include:
    • Graduate: Doctorate, First Professional Degree, Master
    • Post Degree Certificate: Postbaccalaureate Certificate
    • Undergraduate: Associate, Bachelor
  • Liberal Arts and Humanities
    • Cultural Studies
    • Ethnic and Gender Studies
    • Liberal Arts, Humanities, and General Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Political Science
    • Public Administration
    • Religious Studies
    • Social Science and Studies
    • Social Studies and History
      • American History
      • Asian History
      • Classical Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies
      • History of Science and Technology
      • Museum Studies
    • Theological, Religious, and Ministerial Studies

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Areas of study you may find at Worcester State University include:
  • Liberal Arts and Humanities
    • Geography and Cartography
    • Liberal Arts, Humanities, and General Studies
    • Social Science and Studies
    • Social Studies and History
      • American History

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How to Become a Financial Advisor: 6 Steps (with Pictures) #financial #advisor

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How to Become a Financial Advisor

Financial advisors provide advice relating to investment strategies, mutual funds, bonds, and stocks, and their knowledge is more necessary than ever as Baby Boomers near retirement. Becoming a financial advisor takes work, but it can be a rewarding experience. There are many different options for getting started as a financial advisor but all of them involve time and effort and a commitment to the business as a long term career.

Steps Edit

Decide whether financial advising is right for you. Being a financial advisor can be a rewarding career, but it demands certain skills and can involve grueling hours. While many people think that being a financial advisor is all about mathematics, it actually is very people-centric and your communication skills and ability to help families evaluate their current position and available options are crucial. Technology platforms make the science of investing much easier than in the past, but learning to communicate complex ideas to investors takes time and experience.

  • Some financial advisors start as unpaid interns, so ask yourself if you’re willing to start at the bottom and work up. Additionally, keep in mind that traditional financial advising is a sales position in that you are constantly trying to gather clients and convince them to invest their money. If you don’t handle rejection well, you might want to consider another career. More professional firms will focus on building long term relationships and serving clients over their investing lifetime.

Get a bachelor’s degree. The vast majority of financial advisors have college degrees – and if you want a professional certification such as a CFP or CFA, having a four-year degree is a requirement for licensing. Your major doesn’t matter as much as demonstrating your willingness to stick with a program and meet deadlines, though degrees in finance, accounting, economics, mathematics and computer science can look good on a financial advisor’s resume.

Gain some work experience. Look for an internship that can help you get a feel for the business, or take an entry-level job with a bank or brokerage. Gather as much information as you can about what the job entails and the various career paths financial advisors can take.

Look for a training program. Some large investment companies offer complete training programs for financial advisors, during which they’ll help you accumulate the necessary work experience and prepare you for licensing exams. Such programs are competitive, but worth the work if you can get into them. Remember, the company expects to teach you the rules and regulations, but they can’t force you to care about the job. To get your foot in the door, demonstrate that you’re passionate about being a top-notch financial adviser.

  • Alternatively, start with a small company. Instead of trying to get in with a large investment firm, try starting out with a smaller company. You might not go through the same structured training regimen, but you’ll have opportunities for one-on-one mentoring and be able to broaden your knowledge by performing several different tasks for different clients.

Get licensed. Having a professional license is required to engage in the business. Anyone who claims to be a financial advisor but isn’t a registered representative with FINRA and/or a Registered Investment Advisor isn’t able to truly help clients with investing. Which license(s) you need will depend on how you choose to build your financial advising career.

  • Become a Certified Financial Planner. Some financial advisors become CFPs. To do so, you must take preparation courses at an accredited college or university, pass a two-day, ten-hour exam, have three years of work experience, and have a four-year college degree. (If you already have a pre-approved professional designation, you can register for the exam without taking the prep courses. People who can waive the education requirement include PhDs in business or economics, attorneys, Certified Public Accountants, Chartered Financial Analyst, and others.) This designation, however, doesn’t actually impact an advisors ability to sell various products but is a professional credential only. In other words, being a CPA is required in order to engage in certain aspects of accounting, whereas a CFP designation doesn’t allow advisors the ability to do any more or less for their clients, but rather just signifies the meeting of certain standards.
  • Become a Chartered Financial Analyst. Becoming a CFA requires mastery of a complicated curriculum and passing three six-hour exams, as well as having a bachelor’s degree and four years of work experience. Some universities provide CFA preparation course, but for most people the preparation is based entirely on self-study; you’ll receive the curriculum when you register for the exam.
  • Become a Registered Investment Advisor. An investment advisor is anyone who receives compensation for providing financial advice. If you manage a portfolio with assets totaling less than $100 million, you’ll register with your state securities agency; if your portfolio is over $100 million, you’ll register with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. RIAs must pass the Series 66 exam, as well as the Series 6 or 7 exam. Alternatively, they may also just pass the series 65 exam.
  • Follow up with continuing education. Some licenses require you to take continuing education examinations every few years, or pay re-licensing fees.

Be prepared to work hard. Though the rewards of being a financial advisor can be great, the hours can also be long. Particularly when you’re beginning your career, be ready to work demanding shifts. Build your business by showing your clients or your employer that you’re willing to do extra work for incredible results.





Resident Care Coordinator: Job Description, Requirements & Career Info #resident #care #coordinator:

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Resident Care Coordinator: Job Description, Requirements Career Info

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Job Duties

Resident care coordinators work with patients who require assistance with day-to-day living. Generally, resident care coordinators are responsible for overseeing the smooth operations of the facility. They supervise current employees and the events that take place within the facility. They also recruit and hire new employees, ensure all necessary paperwork is in place, and provide orientation sessions for the new hires. Evaluations must be conducted for all employees and any complaints or concerns are looked into by the resident care coordinator.

Careful monitoring of healthcare routines for residents is absolutely necessary. Any irregularities must be immediately reported to a superior such as a registered nurse (RN) consultant who can stabilize the situation. Any residents who seem to be in very poor health or at risk for complications must be monitored closely according to a plan created by the resident care coordinator, who interacts with other professionals, residents, and their families. Individuals in this occupation should possess a high amount of tact and sensitivity for difficult situations.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Health Care Administration
  • Health Information and Records Admin
  • Health Information Technology
  • Health Management and Clinical Administration
  • Health Unit Coordinator
  • Health Ward Supervisor
  • Medical Administrative Assistant or Secretary
  • Medical Claims Examiner
  • Medical Facilities Management
  • Medical Insurance Billing and Coding
  • Medical Insurance Services
  • Medical Office Computer Technologies
  • Medical Office Management
  • Medical Office Specialist
  • Medical Receptionist
  • Medical Staff Services
  • Medical Transcriptionist

Education Requirements

Most employers require these managerial leaders to have either an RN or licensed practical nurse (LPN) credential and possess two or more years of experience in a relevant work environment, commonly gerontological. This is largely due to the fact that resident care coordinators must know proper medical techniques and practices as well as being familiar with the legal regulations for long-term care giving. Some employers prefer that their resident care coordinators be CPR and First Aid certified or hold bachelor’s degrees in nursing or nursing administration.

Additional licensure and education is required of those resident care coordinators who provide nursing care for residents as opposed to simply assisting with daily activities. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the minimum educational requirements of nursing care facility administrators in every state include a bachelor’s degree and a commitment to continuing education. These professionals must also pass an exam to obtain licensure, as well as completing a training program approved by their state. General resident care facilities administrators may or may not be required by their states to obtain licensure depending upon where they live.

Salary Info and Job Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), resident care coordinators are categorized as one type of medical and health services manager. Such managers working in nursing care facilities earned an average annual salary of $87,970 in 2015, according to the BLS. Employment opportunities for medical and health services managers who work in nursing care facilities are expected to increase by about 22% between 2014 and 2024, per the BLS.

Becoming a resident care coordinator typically requires a bachelor’s degree, with registered nurses being preferred by most employers. Potential candidates are also expected to have practical experience in the field.

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Salary and Career Info for a Doctorate in Counseling #phd #in #counseling

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Salary and Career Info for a Doctorate in Counseling

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Clinical Pastoral Counseling
  • Community Health Services
  • Genetic Counseling
  • Marriage and Family Counseling
  • Medical Social Work
  • Mental Health Counseling
  • Mental Health Services Technician
  • Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis
  • Substance Abuse Counseling

Career Information for Counseling Psychologists

Counseling psychologists work with individuals, families and groups to help cope with emotional, mental and behavioral issues that affect their lives. A doctoral program in counseling psychology trains students to assess and diagnose mental and emotional problems in order to develop a therapeutic treatment plan. Counseling psychologists often run a private or group practice or work in healthcare facilities. Some counseling psychologists choose to go into more specialized fields of psychology, such as education or rehabilitation counseling. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicted a 19% growth in employment for psychologists for the 2014-2024 time period.

Licensing Information

All states require counseling psychologists to be licensed in order to practice. State requirements vary, but common provisions include a doctoral degree with a minimum number of internship hours and post-doctoral experience. The National Board of Certified Counselors oversees three exams, but states recognize the National Counselor Examination for Certification and Licensure as the most common.

Certification Information

The American Board of Professional Psychology oversees and administers board certified specialist exams. Candidates are required to complete both a written and oral test. Thirteen specialist exams are currently available, including a counseling psychology specialization. Requirements for becoming board certified include a doctoral degree from an accredited psychology program, an internship, a state license and post-licensure experience. Additionally, two psychologists must endorse the qualifying candidate.

Salary Information for Counseling Psychologists

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the average mean annual salary for clinical, counseling and school psychologists collectively was $76,040 in 2015. Those working in elementary and secondary schools made an average of $74,130 per year at that time, while those who worked in individual and family services made an average annual salary of $68,440.

Individuals with a doctorate in counseling are trained to assess and diagnose individuals with mental and emotional problems, and develop therapeutic plans to help these individuals address their issues. A state license is required to work as a clinical psychologist, while certification is optional. Annual salaries average to roughly $75,000 per year.

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  • Medical and Health Professions
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    • Pharmaceutical Sciences and Administration
    • Public Health and Safety
    • Therapeutic and Rehabilitation Professions

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Areas of study you may find at Harvard University include:
    • Graduate: Doctorate, First Professional Degree, Master
    • Post Degree Certificate: Postbaccalaureate Certificate
    • Undergraduate: Associate, Bachelor
  • Medical and Health Professions
    • Dental
    • Medical and Health Preparatory Sciences
    • Medical Residency Programs
    • Public Health and Safety

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  • Jobs and Salary Info for a Bachelor s Degree in Public Health

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    Jobs and Salary Info for a Bachelor s Degree in Public Health

    Career Options

    Students who get their bachelor’s in public health can work in many different sectors, such as non-profit organizations and with the government. Specific job titles include health educators and social workers. Below are descriptions and overviews of two possible career options for public health majors.

    Health Educator

    Health educators provide information to individuals and communities about healthy living, disease prevention, safety, parenting, family planning and many other areas. They may work for colleges or secondary schools, state and local public health departments, nonprofits or private businesses. The programs they run range from sex education classes in high school settings to outside counseling services to hospital patients.

    Health educators must have excellent communication skills to work well with individuals and groups from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Because they are often in charge of designing and implementing new programs, health educators must be adaptable, creative and in touch with the communities they serve.

    Due to the rising cost of healthcare, employers, insurance companies and governmental organizations are looking for ways to curb costs through preventative health measures. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicted that employment opportunities for health educators would grow by 12% from 2014-2024. The BLS reports that the mean annual salary for health educators is $56,690 as of May 2015.

    Find schools that offer these popular programs

    • Community Health and Preventive Medicine
    • Environmental Health
    • Health Physics
    • Health Services Administration
    • International Health
    • Maternal and Child Health
    • Medical Scientist
    • Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene
    • Public Health Education
    • Public Health Medicine, Treatment

    Social Worker

    Social workers assist clients in overcoming emotional, situational, socioeconomic and other types of hardships. They may work with children, families, mental health patients, substance abusers or prisoners. Social workers perform a wide range of duties, which may include counseling clients, planning and implementing programming, fundraising, advocacy and administrative work.

    Individuals interested in a social work career must typically pursue a graduate degree in social work to become licensed. However, a bachelor’s degree in public health often qualifies individuals for entry-level social work positions, which do not require licensing, such as those with non-profit or community-based organizations.

    Social workers need to be comfortable working with individuals who face severe hardships and must be able to communicate well with a diverse array of people. They should be able to work independently at on-site locations, such as clients’ homes, homeless shelters, mental health organizations, schools or jails. Additionally, social works require critical thinking skills to assess the needs of clients and apply problem-solving techniques.

    The BLS reports that the field of healthcare social work should see rapid job growth of 19% between 2014 and 2024, largely due to an aging baby boomer generation, who, along with their families, will seek help from social workers to locate appropriate care. As of May 2015, healthcare social workers earned a mean income of $54,020 per year, according to the BLS.

    Health educators and healthcare social workers provide services related to personal and public healthcare to individuals and groups in the community. While a health educator may seek to inform individuals about how to prevent the spread of disease, a healthcare social worker may work with individuals who have a disease and are facing life changes due to illness. The BLS expects faster than average job growth in both fields when compared to all occupations, and salaries averaged in the mid-$50,000s in 2015.

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    What is the GASTRIC SLEEVE? Information on cost, benefits of vertical sleeve?

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    GastricSleeve (Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy)

    The gastric sleeve is the lastest weight loss procedure that shows promising results. By restricting food absorbtion and reducing hunger the gastric sleeve might be your best option. Please consult with our surgeon or staff to find out if this is the best procedure for you. Advantages of gastric sleeve include lower cost, less dumping, fewer complications and does not require adjustments after the initial surgery.

    The vertical sleeve gastrectomy is a restrictive form of weight loss surgery in which approximately 85% of the stomach is removed leaving a cylindrical or sleeve shaped stomach with a capacity ranging from about 60 to 150 cc, depending upon the surgeon performing the procedure. Unlike many other forms of bariatric surgery, the outlet valve and the nerves to the stomach remain intact and, while the stomach is drastically reduced in size, its function is preserved. Again, unlike other forms of surgery such as the Roux en Y gastric bypass, the sleeve gastrectomy is not reversible.

    Because the new stomach continues to function normally there are far fewer restrictions on the foods which patients can consume after surgery, albeit that the quantity of food eaten will be considerably reduced. This is seen by many patients as being one of the great advantages of the sleeve gastrectomy, as is the fact that the removal of the majority of the stomach also results in the virtual elimination of hormones produced within the stomach which stimulate hunger.

    Perhaps the greatest advantage of the gastric sleeve lies in the fact that it does not involve any bypass of the intestinal tract and patients do not therefore suffer the complications of intestinal bypass such as intestinal obstruction, anemia, osteoporosis, vitamin deficiency and protein deficiency. It also makes it a suitable form of surgery for patients who are already suffering from anemia, Crohn’s disease and a variety of other conditions that would place them at high risk for surgery involving intestinal bypass.

    Facts about the gastric sleeve or sleeve gastrectomy:

    Alternative names: vertical sleeve gastrectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, greater curvature gastrectomy, parietal gastrectomy, gastric reduction and vertical gastroplasty.

    Surgery for high BMI patients. For patients with a particularly high body mass index (typically 50+) many forms of weight loss surgery are either difficult to perform or present increased risk. As a result, a vertical sleeve gastrectomy (or increasingly a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) is sometimes performed as the first of a two-part weight loss solution to provide an initial drop in weight which then makes other bariatric follow up possible at a reduced level of risk.

    Surgery for low BMI patients. For obese patients with a relatively low body mass index the vertical sleeve gastrectomy can also prove a good choice, especially where existing conditions (such as anemia or Crohn’s disease) prevent them from having other forms of bariatric surgery. In addition, patients may choose this form of surgery if they are concerned about the long-term affects of bypass surgery or object to having a ‘foreign’ body implanted into their body, as is the case with lap band surgery.

    Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery

    During sleeve gastrectomy, the surgeon will remove the larger, rounded part of the stomach.

    • The remaining stomach looks like a sleeve (or hose or tube) and holds about 15 percent as much food as the original stomach.
    • The surgeon will remove the larger, rounded part of the stomach from the body. (This is the only gastric surgery in which part of the stomach is taken out of the body.)
    • Unlike gastric bypass, which changes stomach openings, sleeve gastrectomy leaves the openings intact.
    • It may be a safer and more effective option than gastric bypass for patients with very high BMI, those with medical problems like anemia, Crohn�s disease, osteoporosis, extensive prior surgeries and other complex medical conditions.
    • Sleeve gastrectomy may be safer than gastric bypass for patients who have a number of health risks.
    • It lowers the risk of ulcers compared to gastric bypass.
    • The surgery cuts away the part of the stomach that produces grehlin, a stomach hormone that stimulates hunger.
    • Though the stomach is smaller, the openings are left intact, so digestion can go on as normal.
    • The body is free of foreign objects like the LAP-BAND� or Realize Band.
    • May be converted to gastric bypass or duodenal switch if necessary for additional weight loss
    • Expected excess weight loss for stand-alone procedure is 60 to 70% at two years
    • Sleeve gastrectomy is more common in Europe, but most American health insurance carriers still consider it an investigational procedure and do not cover the cost. But that is rapidly changing so please consult our office to see if your insurance will cover the gastric sleeve.
    • Anytime you have anesthesia or surgery, there is a risk of blood clots, other complications or death.
    • Do not smoke. Smoking would put you at high risk for infection, blood clots, slow healing and other life-threatening complications.
    • Complications can occur with the stapling, such as leaks or bleeding.
    • You may need malabsorptive surgery � intestinal bypass or duodenal switch � in addition to your sleeve gastrectomy in order to lose all the weight you need and want to lose.
    • The smaller portion of the stomach may stretch.
    • Foods that you eat now may cause discomfort, nausea or vomiting after your surgery.
    • Gastric surgery puts you at higher than normal risk of developing gallstones and gallbladder disease.
    • You will not lose weight or maintain your weight loss unless you eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly. This is the reason we stress long-term follow-up with our center and your doctor.