Enterprise Request Management #enterprise #request #management, #erm #approach, #erm #strategy, #erm #model,


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Enterprise Request Management

What is ERM?

World-class service delivery today means a relentless focus on customer-centricity–delighting internal and/or external service consumers in the fastest, easiest and most economical manner possible. Frameworks like ITIL, while not dead, have often been applied incorrectly, leading to more frustration than improvement. Service management best practices in the age of the customer need to be more agile, provide greater choice, and demonstrate value.

Enterprise Request Management, or ERM, is a concept that offers fully integrated business process automation delivered in an intuitive user interface, while employing an integrated back-end delivery model that leverages your existing enterprise software investments. This approach ensures cost-effective enterprise service delivery with first-time fulfillment, resulting in lower costs and happier customers.

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To share your thoughts and insights on ERM, join the Enterprise Request Management Group on LinkedIn.

The problem: Misaligned business processes waste money and frustrate customers

In shared-service environments, organizational entities (e.g. functional departments like IT, HR, facilities, marketing, accounting) use various methods to interact with “customers” (internal or external) who need business services. This includes recording and resolving incidents, defining and delivering services, and fulfilling other needs people have in order to be productive in their jobs.

In general, each business support area has its own systems and processes for managing business services delivery. Organizing service delivery in functional silos may seem logical from a departmental perspective, but it leads to inefficiency at the enterprise level. End users are often required to use different systems (for example, a service catalog limited to IT services), or at least different user interfaces, to request business services from different areas. This duplication of effort wastes time and money, creates frustration, and increased training costs.

Self-Service ROI Calculation

In general, each business support area has its own systems and processes for managing business services delivery. Organizing service delivery in functional silos may seem logical from a departmental perspective, but it leads to inefficiency at the enterprise level. End users are often required to use different systems (for example, a service catalog limited to IT services), or at least different user interfaces, to request business services from different areas. This duplication of effort wastes time and money, creates frustration, and increased training costs.

The answer: Enterprise Request Management (ERM)

The Enterprise Request Management (ERM) approach replaces old-style, proprietary request management approaches with an open model that leverages information in existing enterprise applications and data sources for a centralized, efficient way to manage service requests enterprise-wide.

With ERM, business process automation follows a defined flow that assures all necessary tasks are completed in the proper order. It can include simple tasks (e.g. register a user for system access) or more complex tasks such as onboarding a new employee. Automation is applied wherever possible. ERM is an agile approach that enables organizations to augment their existing tools and processes to be more customer-focused.

ERM encompasses the complete request management process from the initial service request through costing and reporting for continuous process improvement.

Benefits of the ERM approach include:

  • Improved User Experience
  • Centralization of Business Services
  • First time and automated fulfillment
  • Leveraging Existing Systems
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Service Portfolio vs #service #catalog #itil


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Service Portfolio vs. Service Catalog: What s The Difference?

Are you in the stages of defining and setting up your business ITSM strategy? Perhaps you re redesigning yours and are looking at all your options. If so, you ll likely be faced with the decision between setting up a service catalog or a service portfolio (or both!). Here is what those terms mean, along with a handy guide for selecting the option that is right for you.

What is a Service Catalog?

With a service catalog, you can empower users by telling them exactly what is currently available to them. They can even set everything up right from a portal, making it a breeze for IT to track service tickets.

A service catalog is a listing of all of the products and services your IT department currently offers. It includes any hardware you can provide and/or install, as well as any software and applications you offer. The service catalog allows users to log in, select the services they need, and make a request for them. It streamlines the way users interact with the help desk and also serves as a tracking system for user requests and the progress of the help desk in terms of getting requests taken care of.

A service catalog lists currently available products and services.

If the help desk has a wide variety of services to offer, the service catalog can be divided into categories with a comprehensive list of products and services under each category. This helps users find what they need in a large catalog. The defining characteristic of a service catalog is that it lists only items that are currently available. not what used to be available or has been retired or what will be made available in the future.

What is a Service Portfolio?

A service portfolio is a complete listing of all of IT s products and services. It includes both what has been retired and is no longer available and what is upcoming in the future, as well as what is offered now. For instance, if all your machines are now running Windows 10, then the service catalog would only list Windows 10 as an option, whereas the service portfolio may list Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1 with an explanation regarding when each product was retired.

There are great reasons just to offer a service catalog. But there are also good reasons to offer a full service portfolio. Or, you could provide both if your department is able and willing to maintain it all.

There are good and valid reasons to consider either option, as well as both. For instance, some IT departments might not want to list products and services that have been retired because users might insist that they get access to them anyway. For example, some users might want to keep Windows 7, even though the IT infrastructure has moved on to version 10, or they might want to keep using their old Blackberry device even though the rest of the organization has migrated to Android devices.

Conversely, a benefit of a service portfolio is that it provides a historical perspective on where the company s IT has been, where it is now, and where it s heading in the future. This can help for issues like budgeting, judging user interest in new technologies and platforms, and generating excitement for upcoming projects. It is perfectly acceptable to manage both just realize that this takes time and effort. Neither type of service portal is much good to either IT or to the users if it isn t well maintained.

Whether your organization chooses to manage a service catalog, service portfolio, or both is merely a matter of what your user base has come to expect from the IT department. There are many options to consider when it s time to develop your ITSM solution, and BMC can help.

Last updated: 2/1/2017

Forbes State of ITSM 2017