Analysis shows homeowners face $471 annual fire service bill #nsw, #fire #and


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Analysis shows homeowners face $471 annual fire service bill

Sydney homeowners face average annual bills as high as $471 under a new system for funding the state’s fire and emergency services, an analysis suggests.

The figure, based on an analysis by the NSW fire fighters’ union, is 2½ times the $185 average touted by the state government when it unveiled the reform earlier this month.

The analysis reveals homeowners in North Sydney, Mosman and the northern beaches face paying the higher average levy as they prepare to vote in the North Shore and Manly by-elections on April 8.

Treasurer Dominic Perrottet has introduced legislation to Parliament that shifts the bulk of the funding of the $950 million annual fire and emergency services budget from a tax on insurance contracts to a levy on all NSW land from July 1.

Homeowners will be able to calculate the exact size of the levy from May 1 after the fire and emergency services budget is set.

But announcing the reform, Mr Perrottet said the average bill for residential property owners would be $185.

The government says for fully-insured homeowners the fire services levy contribution should drop from an annual average $233, for a saving of $47 a year.

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However, the Fire Brigade Employees Union analysis shows the highest residential payments will on average be $471.

It says homeowners in areas including Parramatta, Canterbury, Ku-ring-gai, Bankstown, Burwood, Canada Bay, Hornsby, Ryde and Strathfield face annual bills of $361.

For homeowners in Sydney’s west, including Liverpool, Penrith, The Hills, Campbelltown, Fairfield, Hawkesbury, Blacktown, Blue Mountains and Camden, the bill is estimated at $224.

A spokesman for Mr Perrottet said the union figures “do not appear to accurately reflect the amount of FESL that property owners will pay” but did not release government estimates.

The union also argues that the burden of funding will shift towards residential land owners and away from business under the reforms.

A 2011 Insurance Council report said residential property owners contributed 45 per cent to the three-quarters of the fire and emergency services budget raised through insurance contracts under the existing system. Commercial property owners contributed 49 per cent.

Under the changes, the residential component is 58 per cent and for commercial land 26.6 per cent.

Mr Perrottet’s spokesman said the government figures were based on “far more rigorous and comprehensive data” than the “estimates” in the Insurance Council report.

FBEU state secretary Leighton Drury said the levy was “a new billion-dollar tax on property owners that will cost many NSW households hundreds of dollars more”.

Mr Drury said a government promise that land owners can calculate the exact amount of their levy from May 1 was too late as “the Berejiklian government is trying to ram this through the Parliament now”.

Sean Nicholls

The Tax Lawyer – s Blog – Notice of IRS Levy #irs


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Notice of IRS Levy

A levy is a legal seizure of your property to satisfy a tax debt. Levies are different from liens. A lien is a claim used as security for the tax debt, while a levy actually takes the property to satisfy the tax debt.

If you do not pay your taxes (or make arrangements to settle your debt), the IRS may seize and sell any type of real or personal property that you own or have an interest in. For instance the IRS

  • Could seize and sell property that you hold (such as your car, boat, or house), or
  • Could levy property that is yours but is held by someone else (such as your wages, retirement accounts, dividends, bank accounts, licenses, rental income, accounts receivables, the cash loan value of your life insurance, or commissions).

The IRS should only levy after these three requirements are met:

  • It assessed the tax and sent you a Notice and Demand for Payment;
  • You neglected or refused to pay the tax; and
  • It sent you a Final Notice of Intent to Levy and Notice of Your Right to A Hearing (levy notice) at least 30 days before the levy.

The IRS may give you this notice in person, leave it at your home or your usual place of business, or send it to your last known address by certified or registered mail, return receipt requested.

Please note: if the IRS levy s your state tax refund, you may receive a Notice of Levy on Your State Tax Refund, Notice of Your Right to Hearing after the levy.

You may ask an IRS manager to review your case, or you may request a Collection Due Process hearing with the Office of Appeals by filing a request for a Collection Due Process hearing with the IRS office listed on your notice.

You must file your request within 30 days of the date on your notice. Some of the issues you may discuss include:

  • You paid all you owed before we sent the levy notice,
  • The IRS assessed the tax and sent the levy notice when you were in bankruptcy, and subject to the automatic stay during bankruptcy,
  • The IRS made a procedural error in an assessment,
  • The time to collect the tax (called the statute of limitations) expired before we sent the levy notice,
  • You did not have an opportunity to dispute the assessed liability,
  • You wish to discuss the collection options, or
  • You wish to make a spousal defense.

At the conclusion of your hearing, the Office of IRS Appeals will issue a determination. You will have 30 days after the determination date to bring a suit to contest the determination.

If your property is levied or seized, contact the employee who took the action. You also may ask the manager to review your case. If the matter is still unresolved, the manager can explain your rights to appeal to the Office of Appeals.

Levying your wages, federal payments, state refunds, or your bank account. If the IRS levy s your wages, salary, or federal payments, the levy will end when:

  • The levy is released,
  • You pay your tax debt, or
  • The time expires for legally collecting the tax.

If the IRS levy s your bank account, your bank must hold funds you have on deposit, up to the amount you owe, for 21 days. This holding period allows time to resolve any issues about account ownership. After 21 days, the bank must send the money plus interest, if it applies, to the IRS.

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Peter is a tax attorney and certified public acccountant with over 20 years experience helping taxpayers resolve their IRS and state tax problems.

He has represented thousands of taxpayers who have been experiencing difficulty dealing with the Internal Revenue Service or State tax officials.

He is a member of the American Association of Attorney-Certified Public Accountants. the Florida Bar Association and The Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants and is admitted to practice before the United States Tax Court, the United States Supreme Court, U.S. District Courts – Middle District of Florida


National Tax Relief – Professional Tax Help for Small Businesses and Individuals


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An IRS Payment Plan is for taxpayers who can’t afford to pay off their entire back tax debt at once or for those who can’t make large payments to the IRS without experiencing an economic hardship. The key word here is hardship. One could say that anyone who is paying back the IRS for past due taxes is experiencing an economic hardship in that there are always more pleasurable things to do with one’s money. Unfortunately, the IRS doesn’t see it that way.

In order to set up a Payment Plan for IRS back taxes and stop collection action. a taxpayer must demonstrate to the IRS that paying all that is due or making excessively large payments to the IRS would result in an undue economic hardship to the taxpayer. This is done by showing that payment of what the IRS is demanding would result in the taxpayer taking food off their family’s table or doing without some other necessity of life to give the money to the IRS instead. Fortunately for many people, this is not that difficult to demonstrate. Other times it is a bit harder, but there is almost always some type of resolution available. If you contact us. we will help you deal with the IRS and correctly complete the right forms to set up a Payment Plan that works for you.

The main benefit of setting up installment payments with the IRS is that it will put you back in compliance and you will no longer have to worry about the IRS knocking on your door. The IRS will have disappeared from your life and there will be no threat of levy and seizure (garnishment) of your wages, bank accounts, or any other property. The harassment by the IRS will be completely over, as long as you continue to make the agreed upon payments.

It is possible that by having us take a look at your financial situation, you may actually qualify for a hardship deferment of collection action and be put on uncollectable status. If this is the case, you would then be completely left alone by the IRS and make no payments. Do not count on this, but it does sometimes work out that way. Furthermore, you will not have to wait long for an answer. According to the IRS’s internal rules, they must answer your request for hardship within ten (10) working days of receipt of your request. THAT IS FAST.

In order to get set up on a really low payment plan or better yet on uncollectable status, you must demonstrate economic hardship to the IRS. You may be asking yourself: “How do I prove economic hardship to the IRS?” Economic hardship according to IRS rules and procedures is when paying the IRS would result in undue or unreasonable hardship to you, the taxpayer. As a taxpayer, you may think that not paying off your VISA debt or a loan from Aunt Mary and giving that money to the IRS instead is unreasonable, but the IRS doesn’t see it that way – and they never will.

To view this in the proper perspective, you must look at it from the way the IRS Collections folks do. You see, they have all the power and hold most of the cards. What you have going for you are some reasonable outs provided by Congress and the IRS to keep the system efficient and within the bounds of reason. It is not efficient for the IRS to spend its time and money trying to collect a large sum of money from somebody who has no way of paying so large of an amount. The IRS and Congress have provided for this by instituting Payment Plans. The key is to make sure it is a Livable Payment Plan that you can afford and continue to pay without defaulting. This is what National Tax Relief makes sure of. You do not want to get coerced into a Payment Plan by a revenue officer in which the payments are so high that you will not be able to keep them up in the long run. If you get into a Payment Plan and later default, then you will be in bigger trouble than before.

How to Qualify for a Payment Plan or Uncollectable Status

You must show the IRS on the proper forms that your allowable expenses are equal to, or only slightly less than, your income. This is how you show the IRS that you can pay them only an “affordable and livable amount” without “undue economic hardship. Your allowable expenses are what the IRS considers the necessities of life. In general, they are: food, clothing, housing, utilities, transportation, medical, insurance and work-related expenditures. It is our job at National Tax Relief to help you get into a Payment Plan that fits your budget and gets you out of debt.


Tax Levy FAQ: IRS Levy Frequently Asked Questions #levy #tax


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Tax Levy FAQ: IRS Levy Frequently Asked Questions manny 2015-08-20T19:44:50+00:00

Tax Levy Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Can a Tax Levy be stopped?

  • A tax levy can be stopped. When the IRS sends their final notice of intent to levy they are giving 30 days for the taxpayer to resolve their problem before the begin to levy. The IRS does not want to levy any taxpayer s assets, it is a last resort effort to collect taxes from the uncooperative taxpayers. Some ways to stop the levy are by appealing the levy, pay the IRS in full, enter into an installment agreement, or to file for an offer in compromise.

What assets can the IRS take through a levy?

  • The IRS can take almost anything of value from you that can be used to satisfy tax debt. There is a small list of things they cannot take, but most things they can legally take. The most common assets they seize are wages, vendor payments due to you, money from bank accounts, commissions, employee travel advances, SSA benefits, property, rights to property, and anything else of value that can satisfy the tax liability.

What can t the IRS take through a tax levy?

  • A few things the IRS cannot take are the following: welfare, SSI, disability payments, court ordered child support, school books, clothing, livestock if farmer, tools used for a job, undelivered mail, workers compensation benefits and other exemptions that are related to the annual cost of living.

What if I don t agree with the notice of intent to levy?

  • The IRS does make mistakes sometimes and will misplace payments or get paperwork mixed up, so it is possible you received a levy by accident. Or even if you don t think they went through the levy process the right way etc, you have a right to appeal the levy. It is important that you both call the notice listed on the levy and file for an appeal .

Can a tax levy be released?

  • Yes you can release a tax levy. The IRS requires you to get back into compliance with your taxes before they stop the levy. You can release the levy by paying in full, settling through an offer in compromise, setting up a payment plan with the IRS, having the statute of limitations expire on the taxes that are due or by getting declared uncollectible.

How can I avoid a Levy?

  • The best way to avoid a tax levy is by staying in full compliance with IRS taxes and taking immediate action to any notices the IRS may send you. If you cannot afford to pay your taxes it is important to let the IRS know and arrange some other form of tax debt settlement.

What is the difference between a tax levy and a tax lien?

  • A tax lien is only the governments invisible claim on the property that is owned by the taxpayer, but a tax levy is the actual seizure of the assets owned by a taxpayer. With a levy the IRS can take money from bank accounts, garnish wages, or even seize physical property owned by the taxpayer.

Are there tax professionals that can help with a tax levy?

  • Yes, there are many tax professionals out there that specialize in finding solutions for taxpayers that are in trouble. The IRS s complexity has spawned many great companies to hire trained professionals that have lots of experience in making the various different forms of tax filings required when settling tax debt. Find more information on how our tax levy services work.

National Tax Relief – Professional Tax Help for Small Businesses and Individuals


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An IRS Payment Plan is for taxpayers who can’t afford to pay off their entire back tax debt at once or for those who can’t make large payments to the IRS without experiencing an economic hardship. The key word here is hardship. One could say that anyone who is paying back the IRS for past due taxes is experiencing an economic hardship in that there are always more pleasurable things to do with one’s money. Unfortunately, the IRS doesn’t see it that way.

In order to set up a Payment Plan for IRS back taxes and stop collection action. a taxpayer must demonstrate to the IRS that paying all that is due or making excessively large payments to the IRS would result in an undue economic hardship to the taxpayer. This is done by showing that payment of what the IRS is demanding would result in the taxpayer taking food off their family’s table or doing without some other necessity of life to give the money to the IRS instead. Fortunately for many people, this is not that difficult to demonstrate. Other times it is a bit harder, but there is almost always some type of resolution available. If you contact us. we will help you deal with the IRS and correctly complete the right forms to set up a Payment Plan that works for you.

The main benefit of setting up installment payments with the IRS is that it will put you back in compliance and you will no longer have to worry about the IRS knocking on your door. The IRS will have disappeared from your life and there will be no threat of levy and seizure (garnishment) of your wages, bank accounts, or any other property. The harassment by the IRS will be completely over, as long as you continue to make the agreed upon payments.

It is possible that by having us take a look at your financial situation, you may actually qualify for a hardship deferment of collection action and be put on uncollectable status. If this is the case, you would then be completely left alone by the IRS and make no payments. Do not count on this, but it does sometimes work out that way. Furthermore, you will not have to wait long for an answer. According to the IRS’s internal rules, they must answer your request for hardship within ten (10) working days of receipt of your request. THAT IS FAST.

In order to get set up on a really low payment plan or better yet on uncollectable status, you must demonstrate economic hardship to the IRS. You may be asking yourself: “How do I prove economic hardship to the IRS?” Economic hardship according to IRS rules and procedures is when paying the IRS would result in undue or unreasonable hardship to you, the taxpayer. As a taxpayer, you may think that not paying off your VISA debt or a loan from Aunt Mary and giving that money to the IRS instead is unreasonable, but the IRS doesn’t see it that way – and they never will.

To view this in the proper perspective, you must look at it from the way the IRS Collections folks do. You see, they have all the power and hold most of the cards. What you have going for you are some reasonable outs provided by Congress and the IRS to keep the system efficient and within the bounds of reason. It is not efficient for the IRS to spend its time and money trying to collect a large sum of money from somebody who has no way of paying so large of an amount. The IRS and Congress have provided for this by instituting Payment Plans. The key is to make sure it is a Livable Payment Plan that you can afford and continue to pay without defaulting. This is what National Tax Relief makes sure of. You do not want to get coerced into a Payment Plan by a revenue officer in which the payments are so high that you will not be able to keep them up in the long run. If you get into a Payment Plan and later default, then you will be in bigger trouble than before.

How to Qualify for a Payment Plan or Uncollectable Status

You must show the IRS on the proper forms that your allowable expenses are equal to, or only slightly less than, your income. This is how you show the IRS that you can pay them only an “affordable and livable amount” without “undue economic hardship. Your allowable expenses are what the IRS considers the necessities of life. In general, they are: food, clothing, housing, utilities, transportation, medical, insurance and work-related expenditures. It is our job at National Tax Relief to help you get into a Payment Plan that fits your budget and gets you out of debt.