How to Keep a Terminally Ill Patient at Home – making it

#care of terminally ill patient

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Keeping The Terminally Ill Patient At Home
(Making It Happen)

If your loved one wishes to stay at home up till the very end, then you need to make that wish clearly known to your RN casemanager, the social worker, your physician and any other hospice staff who inquires about your wishes. If there are other family members available to help out, discuss this decision with each other, and make sure that all family members are working together toward your goal.

Hospices can provide services which help during part of the day. At the Routine Home Care Level of Care, the hospice would be sending out Home Health Aides to help with bathing, dressing, basic bedside care and activities of daily living. They can sometimes send out home service aides to help with housework or cooking and other tasks. Volunteers from the community who serve at your hospice can also spend time with your loved one, freeing up time for you to go out if needed, or just to get a break from caregiving. The RN casemanager and other nurses will be visiting periodically during the week to evaluate your loved one’s condition, monitor for any changes, and to make sure your loved one is getting the medications and services needed meet his or her needs.

However, in some cases, you should be prepared for hospice staff who might attempt to convince you to bring your loved one to the hospice facility. While this may be appropriate for some patients, if you really want to keep your loved one home, you can. You, as patient or family/caregiver, have rights to choose to stay home, and nobody can force you to enter a facility against your will. However, if you do choose to stay home, then you need to mobilize all resources and assistance you can muster to help make it happen. A good first step would be to ask the hospice RN and the medical social worker if she or he knew of other community resources where you could get help to care for your loved one.

What can the family do to help keep their loved one home?

The family members can make a schedule of when each family member will be there to provide care so that all hours are covered.

You can ask for help from your local church or synogogue. Sometimes it is necessary to be willing to let others help out, if you are to succeed in keeping your loved one in the home.

You can ask for help from friend or acquaintances.

You can directly hire extra help. Help can come from nursing agencies or other sources. For example, if your loved one does not need nursing care all the time, then you could hire sitters from agencies or even directly hire people from the community. Some people put an ad in the newspaper letting people know that they would be hiring a helper and specifying the hourly wage they would directly pay to helpers. Many colleges and universities have employment centers for their students who are seeking part-time or full-time work. The students can often work hours that others may not be willing to take, and they usually do not need as high a wage as household bread-winners who are trying to support a household and family.

Whether you have the immediate family care for the patient or relatives, or close friends, you will probably need assistance of many sorts. If the family can come together and work together, that is the very best circumstance.

The hospice must meet the care needs of the patient and family unit. 1 The services which are required to be provided include family needs for support and counseling. If symptoms go out of control and the patient experiences uncontrolled severe pain or other symptoms, then the hospice must provide, in most circumstances, what is called continuous nursing care in your own home. which is around the clock nursing at home, provided by licensed nurses more than 50% of each day, with the rest of the care provided by home health aides. 2

A Registered Nurse (not an LPN) must personally visit the patient to assess his or her condition each day. If the patient’s symptoms are brought under control, then continuous care may be discontinued. However, if symptoms remain out of control, the RN may continue to have nursing staff provided around the clock in your home. After three days the hospice will re-evaluate whether continuous nursing care in the home can be continued. Continuous nursing care may also be provided when the patient is actively dying and very near the end.

The hospice will help you learn how to care for the patient at home. The Registered Nurse will teach you about the medications to be given and how to give them. If you have questions about your loved one’s care after normal business hours, you can always call the hospice’s on-call nurse. Whatever the situation, the hospice staff are experts in handling the types of situations that come up. There is much information available that can help you keep your loved one at home. Read whatever literature the hospice provides and ask questions. Discuss your wishes among yourselves as a family and with the hospice staff. The more you communicate, the better the outcome will be.

1 According to federal regulation 42 CFR 418.58(c) the hospice’s Plan of Care must state in detail the scope and frequency of services needed to meet the patient’s and family’s needs.

2 42 CFR 418.204 states that, Nursing care may be covered on a continuous basis for as much as 24 hours a day during periods of crisis as necessary to maintain an individual at home. A period of crisis is a period in which the individual requires continuous care to achieve palliation or management of acute medical symptoms. 42 CFR 418.82 states that Nursing services must be directed and staffed to assure that the nursing needs of patients are met. The hospice must meet your needs for nursing care!





Graphic Design For Beginners (Online) – Central Saint Martins #this #graphic #design


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Graphic Design For Beginners (Online)

Description

Graphic design begins with ideas, and this course encourages the development of ideas through observation and research as well as introducing students to layout and typography. The course includes six diverse but related projects, inspired by the BA degree course at Central Saint Martins. Beginning with a graphic ideas brief, the projects continue with an introduction to typography and layout; including projects to design a logo, a poster and a magazine spread; the final projects are to make a small book and build a portfolio using a template website. You will be required to complete the projects in your own time to maximise your learning process and upload your work for constructive feedback during the live session.

This course is aimed at beginners to graphic design who are keen to experiment and produce an inventive portfolio, either for an application for further study or for those who just want to refresh themselves and exercise an enquiring mind.

Please note that this course does not provide instruction in using computer programs and knowledge of graphic design computer programmes is not required to complete the projects.

Course Schedule – 6 weeks: 1.5 hours of live class per week

2nd week
Typography and logotypes

4th week
Magazine layout

6th week
Review of work and building a portfolio

Please note this course is being delivered on UK time.To view more information and a live UK clock, please follow this link:http://www.timeanddate.com/time/zone/uk/london

Please refer to your joining instructions about getting set up for your first session.
Further details about preparing for your online course, and the equipment you need, can be found here:
http://www.arts.ac.uk/csm/courses/short-courses/short-courses-online/frequently-asked-questions/

Please note: This course is for students aged 18 and older

Tutor information

Ruth Sykes is a co-founder of the REG design studio, whose clients include The Crafts Council, Central Saint Martins, English Heritage, Thames and Hudson and UP Projects. Ruth is an associate lecturer on the BA Graphic Design Course at Central Saint Martins, and a graduate of the course.

Materials

Please ensure that you have the following materials to hand:

  • Black ink pen
  • Sketchbook (A4 size)
  • Scissors
  • Scalpel knife
  • Cutting mat
  • Metal safety ruler
  • Glue stick
  • PVA glue
  • A3 white paper (around 80gsm) x 12 sheets
  • A3 tracing paper (around 6 sheets)
  • A camera (any sort, a camera phone is fine)
  • Millboard, A4 size x 2 sheets
  • Cartridge paper, A4 size x 4 sheets
  • Coloured pens and pencils can be useful
  • 1 x USB webcam (external), to easily show work in progress

To complete your projects further materials are usually required, which will depend on your ideas for your projects.

Details for booking