30 Best Cape May Bed and Breakfasts #motels #las #vegas

#cape may motels

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Cape May Bed and Breakfasts

Cape May Bed and Breakfasts

Best Price Guarantee

What is the Best Price Guarantee?

Simple! BedandBreakfast.com guarantees you’re getting the best price on your bed and breakfast stay when you book your room on BedandBreakfast.com. Within 24 hours of your booking, if you find a better price for the same room on the same date(s) at the same B B, BedandBreakfast.com will refund the difference to you!

What does the Best Price Guarantee cover?

The Best Price Guarantee covers any Bed and Breakfast booked online through BedandBreafkast.com. The Bed and Breakfast must be booked using the Book It button on BedandBreakfast.com in order to qualify.

How do I take advantage of the Best Price Guarantee?

Just call 1-512-322-2710 within 24 hours of booking and give our customer support representative the details on the lower price you found.

Best Price Guarantee Terms and Conditions

The BedandBreakfast.com Best Price Guarantee ensures that when you book and pay for your reservation online through the BedandBreafkast.com website, you are booking your room at the lowest available price. If you find a lower price for the same room on the same dates at the same B B, and contact us within 24 hour of making your booking, we will refund the difference in price to you. This guarantee does not apply to bookings made over holidays and/or for special events. All requests are subject to verification by BedandBreakfast.com. BedandBreafkast.com will not accept screenshots or other purported evidence of a lower price that cannot be independently confirmed by BedandBreakfast.com personnel. Nor will BedandBreakfast.com verify any requests that it believes, in its sole discretion, is the result of a printing or other error or is made fraudulently or in bad faith.

Diamond Collection





Welcome – Cape May Motels #palms #hotel

#cape may motels

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Two sisters run this family kind of place right across from the ocean in Cape May, NJ. The Capri has been in their family for over 45 years. There’s a swimming pool and a kiddie pool, shuffleboard and ping pong, plus popcorn fresh fruit in the lobby. Cook out one night on the barbeque and make memories with your family that will last a lifetime. Steps from the beach and just a short walk to shops and restaurants, The Capri is the perfect location for your vacation.

© 2015 Capri Motor Lodge • Beach Madison Avenues • Cape May, NJ 08204 • 609.884.4727 • Design: www.cpwcreative.com • Contact The Capri





2 star Wildwood hotels in Cape May, Cape May #cheap #hotels #rooms

#motels in wildwood nj

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2 star Wildwood hotels in Cape May, Cape May

Nice Hotel, convenient to beach and Boardwalk

Stayed here for one extended weekend with family and grandchildren. We had two rooms, rooms were comfortable with separate bedroom, kitchenette and living room space. Not a very large space but comfortable enough. We were only 3 persons in each room, 2 adults and one child so two double beds and a sofa bed was plenty. Two small pools and they were not too crowded so it was plenty for us, plenty of parking. My experience in Wildwood has been typical small rooms with most amenities, this hotel fits that description well. I do recommend this Days Inn but know that this is not a Five Star facility.

Traveller from New Rochelle, NY

Situated by the ocean, this hotel is steps from Doo Wop Experience, Wildwood Beach, and Wildwood Convention Center. Boardwalk More

Rating: 2.5 Stars

5310 Park Blvd, Wildwood 08260 – Map

Nieces wedding in Cape May

Great hotel. Parking was a little tight, worried about door dings. Rooms were booked via third party, so first floor handicapped accomodations was not available as requested. We endured survived. We were offered upgrades on both rooms at no additional cost, which I declined, and my daughter accepted. With the fireman’s convention in town, I expected more commotion, but things were pretty quiet. Great site, close to several eateries, stores main routing, making our trips to from Cape May fast pleasant. Let me not forget how greatly hospitable the owners staff ALL were. VERY NICE PLACE, VERY NICELY PRICED, GREAT LOCATION, VERY NICE STAFF. WOULD DEFINITELY RECCOMEND TO FRIENDS FAMILY.

Traveller from WILLOW GROVE, PA

Situated near the beach, this motel is within 1 mi (2 km) of Doo Wop Experience, Wildwood Beach, and Wildwood Convention More

Nice hotel steps from the beach

Upon arriving the manager was very friendly. The check-in was very quick and we were in our room in less than 10 minutes. The boardwalk to the beach was literally a few steps away so the car stayed on hotel premises the whole time. So that meant no parking lots and surcharges from other parking places.

Traveller from Brooklyn, NY

Situated by the ocean, this hotel is steps from Boardwalk Chapel, Doo Wop Experience, and Wildwood Beach. Wildwood Convention More

Rating: 2.0 Stars

3200 Atlantic Avenue, Wildwood 08260 – Map

big room have 3 bed is good for family with kid

good place for family with kid close to broardwalk and the pier. they have everything you need. Is only 2 stars so don’t expect too much. they do have kichen and grill if you need. I like the grill they have by the pool is nice, the only thing I don’t like is the bathroom is kind of out date and old. everything else is o.k

Traveller from ventnor nj

Situated near the beach, this motel is within a 5-minute walk of Seaport Aquarium, Raging Waters, and Mariner’s Pier. Splash More

Rating: 2.0 Stars

Pocket Guide: Cape May Wildwood 2 stars Hotels

The five-mile-long island is divided into three distinct beach resorts. North Wildwood, home to the Hereford Inlet, is a favorite spot for water sports. The Wildwood Boardwalk is a two-mile stretch of amusement piers, carnival games, roller coasters, and water parks. In the quieter community of Wildwood Crest, beaches are less crowded and spectacular sunsets are on view at the aptly named Sunset Lake.

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Twin Cities Calendar #calendar,now,today,day,week,month,january,february,march,april,may,june,july,august,september,october,november,december,minneapolis,st #paul,saint #paul,twin #cities,twin #cities #calendar,twin #cities #directory,twin #cities


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Minneapolis – St. Paul prime places for Creative Odd Performances

Minneapolis – St. Paul prime places for Science History

History Center – St. Paul – more depth than Lake Superior or a list of dates (see history list below)
Science Museum of Minnesota – St. Paul – galleries feature the human body and other fossils (IMAX-2D )

Sea Life Aquarium – Bloomington – Mall of America – formerly Underwater World (coupons at Subway Cub)
Mysteries of the Rainforest – caiman crocodiles, poison dart frogs, piranha, tortoises
Wabasha Street Caves – storied histories of the seedier days of St. Paul and Castle Royal

Minneapolis – St. Paul prime places for Culture

Native American
Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Tribe. 340 River Road, Mendota, MN 55150 651-452-4141
Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe. Mille Lacs Band Gov’t Center, 43408 Oodena Drive, Onamia, MN 56359 320-532-4181
Minneapolis American Indian Center. 1530 E Franklin Av, Minneapoli,s MN 55404 612-879-5913
Prairie Island Mdewakanton Dakota. 5636 Sturgeon Lake Road, Welch, MN 55089
Saint Paul American Indian Magnet School. 1075 3rd Street E, St Paul, MN 55106 651-778-3100
Shakopee Mdewakanton Tribe. 2330 Sioux Trail NW, Prior Lake, MN 55372 952-445-8900
Winona Dakota Unity Alliance. Box 393, Winona, MN 55987

Hmong ( MN history )
Hmong Academy Charter School. 1515 Brewster St, St Paul, MN 55108 651-209-8002
Hmong American Partnership. 1075 Arcade Street, St Paul, MN 55106 651-495-9160
Hmong Archives. 343 Michigan Street, St Paul, MN 55102 651-621-5469
Hmong Cultural Center. 995 University Av W #214, St Paul, MN 55104 651-917-9937
Hmong Freedom Celebration – J4, Lao Family Community of MN, 320 University Av W, St Paul 55103 651-221-0069
Hmong Times. Box 9068, St. Paul, MN 55109 651-224-9395
Hmong Today (Xov-Xwm Hmoob), 1552 White Bear Av, St Paul, MN 55106 651-489-0021
Hmong Village (market, food court, shopping mall), 1001 Johnson Parkway, Saint Paul, MN 55106 651-771-7886

Somali( MN history )
Confederation of Somali Community. 420 15th Av S, Minneapolis, MN 55454 612-605-3222
Ka Joog (artists), at The Southern Theater, 1420 Washington Av S, Minneapolis, MN 55454 612-460-5628
St. Cloud Somali Radio (KVSC 88.1FM), 720 – 4th Av S, 27 Stewart Hall, SCSU, St. Cloud, MN 56301 320-308-4748
Somali Action Alliance. 2525 Franklin Av E #100, Minneapolis, MN 55406 612-455-2185
Somali Artifact Cultural Museum. 1516 E Lake St, Minneapolis, MN 55407 612-998-1166
Somali Senior Center. 3015 Ceder Av S, Minneapolis, MN 55407 612-208-0636
Suuqa Karmel Somali Mall (shopping), 2936-2944 Pillsbury Av S, Minneapolis, MN 55408 612-722-1480

Minneapolis – St. Paul media

Minneapolis – St. Paul best coupons (printable coupons – no signups, no installations)

Events in Minnesota History

January 5 – Walter Mondale born in Ceylon, MN in 1928
January 19 – Tippi Hedren born in New Ulm in 1931
January 21 – Largest protest (Women’s March) in 2017
February 2 – Record cold -60 in 1996
February 7 – Sinclair Lewis born in Sauk Centre in 1885
February 24 – Mitch Hedberg born in St. Paul in 1968
March 1 – 1st MN Capitol burned in 1881
March 3 – MN becomes a territory in 1849
March 3 – Jessica Biel born in Ely in 1982
March 18 – Peter Graves born in Minneapolis in 1926
March 24 – Louis Anderson born in Minneapolis in 1953
April 20 – Jessica Lange born in Cloquet, MN in 1949
April 21 – Prince died in 2016
April 23 – John Dillinger shootout in Hastings in 1934
May 11 – MN becomes 32nd state in 1858
May 24 – Bob Dylan born in Duluth in 1941
May 28 – Latest snow in 1965
June 7 – Prince born in Minneapolis in 1958
June 13 – Mick Jagger met Jimmy Hutmaker in Excelsior who said, “You can’t always get what you want,” in 1964
July 6 – Prairie Home Companion – 1st live broadcast in 1974
July 6 – Philando Castile was killed by a police officer in 2016
July 10 – Edward Lowe, inventor of Kitty Litter, born in 1920
July 15 – Jesse Ventura born in Minneapolis in 1951
July 23 – Snowman built in North St Paul in 1974
August 1 – I-35W bridge collapses over Mississippi River in 2007
August 5 – Loni Anderson born in St Paul in 1945
August 7 – Garrison Keiller born in 1942
August 11 – Mall of America opens in 1992
September 1 – Fire burned the pine forests of Hinckley in 1894
September 2 – 1st open heart surgery at UofMN in 1952
September 2 – VP Teddy Roosevelt gives Speak Softly speech at MN State Fair in 1902
September 6 – Robert Pirsig born in Minneapolis in 1928
September 7 – Jesse James gang attempts to rob Northfield bank in 1876
September 15 – Earliest snow in 1916
September 19 – Mary Tyler Moore show 1st airs in 1970
September 24 – F Scott Fitzgerald born in St Paul in 1896
September 24 – Kevin Sorbo born in Mound, MN in 1958
September 25 – Cheryl Tiegs born in Breckenridge, MN in 1947
September 30 – Mayo Clinic opens in 1889 (as St Mary’s)
October 2 – 1st Peanuts comic strip in 1950
October 4 – Rachael Leigh Cook born in Minneapolis in 1979
October 6 – 1st indoor shopping mall – Southdale – opens in 1956
October 25 – Marion Ross born in Watertown in 1928
October 25 – MN Twins win World Series in 1987
October 25 – Senator Paul Wellstone dies in 2002
October 29 – Winona Ryder born in Olmsted County in 1971
October 31 – 21 inches of snow in 24 hours in 1991
November 13 – Steve Zahn born in Marshall, MN in 1967

November 24 – Mystery Science Theater airs on KTMA in 1988
November 26 – Charles Schultz born in Minneapolis in 1922
December 26 – Dakota executions in Mankato in 1862

September seems the busiest month in Minnesota history. I don’t know why.


May Court Club of Brockville #nashville #motels

#maycourt hospice

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Welcome to the May Court Club

The May Court Club of Brockville, a registered charitable organization, is a diverse and dedicated group of women who actively volunteer their time by providing both service and financial assistance to those in need. Beginning with a membership of 29, in 1959, and a project to help start a new senior citizens club, the May Court Club of Brockville has grown to more than 140 members, achieved a significant number of service undertakings, and contributed more than $1,300,000 to our community. Funds are raised principally through the May Court Thrift Shop as well as various fund raising events held throughout the year.

Our Thrift Shop


The May Court Club of Brockville operates the May Court Thrift Shop, a consignment store, open 12 months of the year, Monday – Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The money generated from the shop is donated to non-profit charitable organizations and individuals in need within the community.

Supporting Our Community

The Club supports many non-profit organizations through donation of time and financial assistance in Leeds and Grenville.





Books That May Help – Hospice of Humboldt #online #hotels

#hospice books

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Books That May Help

All of these books can be found at the main branch of the Humboldt County library.

Books for Younger Children

  • Annie and the Old One by Miska Miles is a beautiful story of a little Navajo girl whose grandmother is very old. It is gently explained in the book that dying is a natural process.
  • Everett Anderson s Goodbye by Lucille Clifton is a picture book that illustrates the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) through the eyes of a five-year-old whose father has died.
  • Saying Good-bye to Grandma by Jane Thomas helps children understand what goes on at a funeral. This book gives details of this event that seldom includes children.
  • The Fall of Freddie the Leaf by Leo Buscaglia uses a leaf named Freddie and his companion leaves to discuss natural change and is a gentle way of addressing the balance between life and death.
  • The Mountains of Tibet by Mordicai Gerstein is a story about an old woodcutter and his choices when he faces the chance to live life over again. This story is a gentle look at one human being dealing with life s choices and possibilities.
  • The Tenth Good Thing About Barney by Judith Viorst shows how remembering the good things about those we love, even a cat, can make their death less sad.
  • When a Pet Dies by Fred Rogers deals with a child s feelings about the loss of a beloved pet. Mr. Rogers is sensitive but clear and direct when he explains the finality of death.
  • When Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to Understanding Death by Laurie Krasny Brown is a beautifully illustrated book that addresses children s fears and curiosity about death by answering some very basic questions.
  • Where Is Grandpa? by T. A. Barron and Chris K. Soentpiet is a touching story of a boy and his family who remember Grandpa after his death by sharing special memories of him.

Books for Older Children and Teenagers

  • Charlotte s Web by E.B. White is the story of friendship. When Charlotte, the spider, dies at the fair grounds, her friends Templeton the rat and Wilbur the pig take her eggs back to the farm where they can safely hatch. (on video)
  • Lifetimes by Bryan Mellonie and Robert Ingpen tells about plants, animals, and people all having a lifetime. This beautifully illustrated book lets children see how dying is as much a part of living as being born.
  • Meet the Austins by Madeleine L Engle tells the story of Maggy, a child orphaned when her father is killed in a plane crash. Maggy is insolent and sullen when she comes to live with the Austins but eventually accepts the loss, aided by the warmth and security of the Austin family.
  • The Two of Them by Aliki is about a little girl who takes care of her sick grandfather because of all the love and caring he had always given her.
  • How It Feels When a Parent Dies by Jill Krementz includes the conversations of eighteen boys and girls from seven to sixteen years-old as they discuss their experiences and feelings about the deaths of their parents. The causes of the deaths include accidents, illness and suicide.
  • Straight Talk about Death for Teenagers: How to cope with losing someone you love by Earl Grollman discusses normal reaction to the shock of death, how grief can affect a teen s relationship with others, how participating in a funeral can help and how to work through the grief process. A journal section is included.
  • The Grieving Teen: A Guide for Teenagers and Their Friends by Helen Fitzgerald is a compassionate guide that pays attention to the special needs of adolescents struggling with death and gives them the tools to work through their pain and grief.
  • Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume explains how a young girl and her brother cope with the murder of their father. This story is particularly useful in helping children deal with sudden and traumatic death.
  • Where the Lilies Bloom by Vera and Bill Cleaver tells the story of a 14-year-old girl and her sibling who survive a bitter winter together after the death of their parents.
  • How to Help Children Through a Parent s Serious Illness by Kathleen McCue contains two chapters on death and grief. This book helps with children s anticipatory grief by discussing what to tell the child about the illness; how children of different ages are likely to act; how to recognize early warning signs of grief; and how to find out what a child is really thinking or feeling.
  • Talking about Death: A dialogue between parent and child by Earl Grollman is divided into three sections: a Children s Read-Along picture book with large type and beautiful illustrations; a Parent s Guide to Explaining Death which contains ways of answering children s questions; and a Resources listing of professional organizations, self-help groups, and books as well as audio and video tapes.

Books for Adults and Caregivers

  • Dying Well: Peace and possibilities at the end of life by Ira Byock, M.D. brings readers to the homes and bedsides of the dying and tells stories of love and reconciliation in the face of tragedy, pain, and conflict.
  • Final Gifts by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley describes the messages that the dying give as they enter Near Death Awareness. This book helps caregivers to listen to those they love and become less fearful of what their loved one is saying.
  • Who gets Grandma s Yellow Pie Plate? by M. Stum is a family-focused guide to transferring non-titled property such as Grandma s yellow pie plate or Grandpa s gold watch. It treats the matter with sensitivity, recognizing that belongings have different meanings to different individuals.
  • I m With You Now: A guide through incurable illness for patients, families, and friends by M. Catherine Ray teaches the communication skills necessary to deal with the frightening topics and situations that accompany incurable illness.
  • The Dying Time: Practical wisdom for the dying and their caregivers by Joan Furman and David McNabb is a comprehensive and thorough handbook for the dying and their caregivers. It provides details on how to make the environment conducive to peace and tranquility, give physical care, and understand and respond to the emotional and spiritual crises that naturally occur.
  • The Grace in Dying: How we are transformed spiritually as we die by Kathleen Dowling Singh describes phases that signal when a dying person is entering the final stages of spiritual and psychological transformation and through this understanding subdues the ultimate fear of the dying process.

Books about Grief and Recovery

  • After Goodbye: How to Begin Again After the Death of Someone You Love by Ted Menten and Theodore Menten is designed to help the survivors find ways to grieve, let go, and move on after the death of a loved one.
  • A Broken Heart Still Beats: After Your Child Dies by Anne McCracken and Mary Semel, two mothers who share that unfortunate experience of having a child die. The authors describe their grieving process and how it affected their lives. The book also includes excerpts from works by authors such as Melville, Frost, and Shelley about the death of a child.
  • A Time to Grieve: Meditations for healing after the death of a loved one by Carol Staudacher begins with a quote from a survivor before each meditation then reflects upon the feeling and content of the quote. Affirmations follow to lead one forward in the grief process.
  • Grieving the Death of a Friend by Harold Ivan Smith guides the reader to move with the natural process of one of the most significant but unrecognized experiences of grief, the death of a friend. The book explores the aspects of friendship, passing, burying, mourning, remembering, and reconciling.
  • Swallowed by a Snake: The gift of the masculine side of healing by Thomas Golden blends folklore, cross-cultural analysis, and clinical advice to help both men and women understand the specific context and needs of grieving men.
  • The Courage to Grieve by Judy Tatelbaum presents the three phases of grief, talks about unsuccessful grieving, children s grief, and the recovery process.




Cape May, NJ Hotels & Motels – See All Discounts #motel #rates

#cape may motels

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Hotel Guides

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Hotel Tips

  • Beware non-refundable hotel reservations that could cost you a lot of money if you change or cancel them.
  • Read cancellation policies carefully before you make a reservation.
  • When you make a reservation, you will receive a confirmation email. Print it and take it with you to the hotel.
  • The earlier in the day you check into a hotel, the more likely you will get a room or suite that matches your preferences.

Hotels in Nearby Cities

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Cape May Hotels, Motels, Lodging, and Accommodations Cape May, New Jersey NJ, USA

2016 HotelGuides.com, Inc. All rights reserved.





Cape May Hotels Sea Crest Inn Cape May NJ Hotels Cape May

#cape may motels

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Sea Crest Inn

The Sea Crest Inn

THE RESERVATION DESK IS NOW OPEN FROM 8AM – 10PM.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO HEARING FROM YOU.

We at the Sea Crest Inn would like to express our gratitude to our guests, past, present and future.

We Thank You and Value You!!

The Sea Crest Inn is the perfect romantic Cape May getaway for couples. The Sea Crest is owned and operated by a local couple, and located in a quiet part of Cape May overlooking one of the largest beaches on the island. Close to the shopping area, fine restaurants and historical homes.

With features like ocean front suites with fully equipped kitchens, the only out door whirlpool in Cape May and extra large balconies, why stay anywhere else? Close to restaurants, nightspots, fishing, tennis, golfing, swimming, horseback riding, biking shopping and just steps away from the beach, you haven’t experienced the Jersey Shore until you’ve experienced Cape May at the Sea Crest Inn.





2 star Wildwood hotels in Cape May, Cape May #hospice #aide #jobs

#motels in wildwood nj

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2 star Wildwood hotels in Cape May, Cape May

Nice Hotel, convenient to beach and Boardwalk

Stayed here for one extended weekend with family and grandchildren. We had two rooms, rooms were comfortable with separate bedroom, kitchenette and living room space. Not a very large space but comfortable enough. We were only 3 persons in each room, 2 adults and one child so two double beds and a sofa bed was plenty. Two small pools and they were not too crowded so it was plenty for us, plenty of parking. My experience in Wildwood has been typical small rooms with most amenities, this hotel fits that description well. I do recommend this Days Inn but know that this is not a Five Star facility.

Traveller from New Rochelle, NY

Situated by the ocean, this hotel is steps from Doo Wop Experience, Wildwood Beach, and Wildwood Convention Center. Boardwalk More

Rating: 2.5 Stars

5310 Park Blvd, Wildwood 08260 – Map

Nieces wedding in Cape May

Great hotel. Parking was a little tight, worried about door dings. Rooms were booked via third party, so first floor handicapped accomodations was not available as requested. We endured survived. We were offered upgrades on both rooms at no additional cost, which I declined, and my daughter accepted. With the fireman’s convention in town, I expected more commotion, but things were pretty quiet. Great site, close to several eateries, stores main routing, making our trips to from Cape May fast pleasant. Let me not forget how greatly hospitable the owners staff ALL were. VERY NICE PLACE, VERY NICELY PRICED, GREAT LOCATION, VERY NICE STAFF. WOULD DEFINITELY RECCOMEND TO FRIENDS FAMILY.

Traveller from WILLOW GROVE, PA

Situated near the beach, this motel is within 1 mi (2 km) of Doo Wop Experience, Wildwood Beach, and Wildwood Convention More

Nice hotel steps from the beach

Upon arriving the manager was very friendly. The check-in was very quick and we were in our room in less than 10 minutes. The boardwalk to the beach was literally a few steps away so the car stayed on hotel premises the whole time. So that meant no parking lots and surcharges from other parking places.

Traveller from Brooklyn, NY

Situated by the ocean, this hotel is steps from Boardwalk Chapel, Doo Wop Experience, and Wildwood Beach. Wildwood Convention More

Rating: 2.0 Stars

3200 Atlantic Avenue, Wildwood 08260 – Map

big room have 3 bed is good for family with kid

good place for family with kid close to broardwalk and the pier. they have everything you need. Is only 2 stars so don’t expect too much. they do have kichen and grill if you need. I like the grill they have by the pool is nice, the only thing I don’t like is the bathroom is kind of out date and old. everything else is o.k

Traveller from ventnor nj

Situated near the beach, this motel is within a 5-minute walk of Seaport Aquarium, Raging Waters, and Mariner’s Pier. Splash More

Rating: 2.0 Stars

Pocket Guide: Cape May Wildwood 2 stars Hotels

The five-mile-long island is divided into three distinct beach resorts. North Wildwood, home to the Hereford Inlet, is a favorite spot for water sports. The Wildwood Boardwalk is a two-mile stretch of amusement piers, carnival games, roller coasters, and water parks. In the quieter community of Wildwood Crest, beaches are less crowded and spectacular sunsets are on view at the aptly named Sunset Lake.

More Wildwood hotels

Destinations near Wildwood

Hotels in Other Popular Destinations

Transportation to and Around Wildwood

Customers Rate Expedia

From 29,939 Reviews

  • About Expedia |
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  • Media Room |
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  • Terms of Use |
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2016 Expedia, Inc. All rights reserved.





OSCA – Hospice at May Court Struggling to Stay Afloat #hospice #homes

#maycourt hospice

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Neighbourhood

Last Updated on 05 February 2013 Written by Gwendolyn Gall

The Hospice at May Court, located right here in Old Ottawa South, is struggling to stay afloat and is merging with the Kanata-based Friends of Hospice to share donations and funding. The Hospice at May Court will have a $150,000 deficit this year without the merger, as they’ve seen donations decline in recent years. Click here to find out more about them and how to donate .

The Hospice offers an extremely valuable service for terminally ill patients and their families, providing end-of-life residential care for 9 patients and support for their families in a beautiful spot on the Rideau River. This type of care keeps patients from spending their last days in hospital, and relieves the health care system of pressure to provide these beds to the terminally ill rather than the acutely ill patient. With the merger, they plan to open as many as 40 more beds in the next two to three years.

Merging with Friends of Hospice means they won’t need to compete for donations and government funding, and makes the new beds possible. Ottawa has only 9 beds of the 88 that a city of its size is expected to have available.

Visit The Hospice at May Court website and find out how you can contribute. Annual Membership is also a wonderful way to show your support to The Hospice and be part of the “circle of caring”. In addition to accepting donations. they have a very active volunteer community .

The Hospice at May Court,
114 Cameron Avenue,
Ottawa ON K1S 0X1

Email. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.





Welcome – May Court Club of Ottawa #hearts #for #hospice

#maycourt hospice

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Welcome to the May Court Club of Ottawa

Founded in 1898 by Lady Aberdeen, the wife of the Governor General, the May Court Club has been providing volunteer services and financial assistance for 117 years to help those in need in the Ottawa community.

We are a vibrant group of women who, over the years, have donated thousands of volunteer hours and millions of dollars to help those in need in our community. We operate under the direction of a Board of Directors elected by the membership at the Annual General Meeting.

  • our About Us for a glimpse of some of the highlights of our projects and initiatives;
  • our Community Projects to find out where our present service efforts are directed;
  • our Scholarship pages to apply for one of our three post-graduate scholarships;
  • our Grants for a list of the charities that we have recently supported and for a grants application form;
  • our Member Activities where you will see that it is not all work and no play;
  • our Contact Us page if you would like to be in touch with us.

Today the May Court Club of Ottawa is one of nine May Court Clubs that comprise the Association of May Court Clubs of Canada. Until 1934 the Ottawa Club was the only one of its kind but that year it was joined by like-minded organisations in Windsor and London and together they formed the Affiliation of May Court Clubs. Over the next thirty years other May Court Clubs joined the Affiliation and in 1965, after revision of its constitution and by-laws, the organisation was incorporated as the Association of May Court Clubs of Canada.

For more information about the Association and links to the other Clubs, please visit the Association web site at www.maycourtclubs.org

The May Court Bargain Box

228 Laurier Avenue East, Ottawa
Telephone: (613)235-0333

Monday: 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Tuesday – Friday: 9:30 am – 3:30 pm
Saturday: 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS – 50% off denim until September 10.

New Stock Weekly!

Upcoming Events

Ottawa South Porch Sale
Treasure hunt for bargains on Saturday September 10. For details click here.

Christmas Craft Fair and Art Sale
This fundraising event will be held on Saturday November 5.
For details click here.

For more on fundraising activities, please check our Member Activities page.





Books That May Help – Hospice of Humboldt #palliative #radiation #therapy

#hospice books

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Books That May Help

All of these books can be found at the main branch of the Humboldt County library.

Books for Younger Children

  • Annie and the Old One by Miska Miles is a beautiful story of a little Navajo girl whose grandmother is very old. It is gently explained in the book that dying is a natural process.
  • Everett Anderson s Goodbye by Lucille Clifton is a picture book that illustrates the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) through the eyes of a five-year-old whose father has died.
  • Saying Good-bye to Grandma by Jane Thomas helps children understand what goes on at a funeral. This book gives details of this event that seldom includes children.
  • The Fall of Freddie the Leaf by Leo Buscaglia uses a leaf named Freddie and his companion leaves to discuss natural change and is a gentle way of addressing the balance between life and death.
  • The Mountains of Tibet by Mordicai Gerstein is a story about an old woodcutter and his choices when he faces the chance to live life over again. This story is a gentle look at one human being dealing with life s choices and possibilities.
  • The Tenth Good Thing About Barney by Judith Viorst shows how remembering the good things about those we love, even a cat, can make their death less sad.
  • When a Pet Dies by Fred Rogers deals with a child s feelings about the loss of a beloved pet. Mr. Rogers is sensitive but clear and direct when he explains the finality of death.
  • When Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to Understanding Death by Laurie Krasny Brown is a beautifully illustrated book that addresses children s fears and curiosity about death by answering some very basic questions.
  • Where Is Grandpa? by T. A. Barron and Chris K. Soentpiet is a touching story of a boy and his family who remember Grandpa after his death by sharing special memories of him.

Books for Older Children and Teenagers

  • Charlotte s Web by E.B. White is the story of friendship. When Charlotte, the spider, dies at the fair grounds, her friends Templeton the rat and Wilbur the pig take her eggs back to the farm where they can safely hatch. (on video)
  • Lifetimes by Bryan Mellonie and Robert Ingpen tells about plants, animals, and people all having a lifetime. This beautifully illustrated book lets children see how dying is as much a part of living as being born.
  • Meet the Austins by Madeleine L Engle tells the story of Maggy, a child orphaned when her father is killed in a plane crash. Maggy is insolent and sullen when she comes to live with the Austins but eventually accepts the loss, aided by the warmth and security of the Austin family.
  • The Two of Them by Aliki is about a little girl who takes care of her sick grandfather because of all the love and caring he had always given her.
  • How It Feels When a Parent Dies by Jill Krementz includes the conversations of eighteen boys and girls from seven to sixteen years-old as they discuss their experiences and feelings about the deaths of their parents. The causes of the deaths include accidents, illness and suicide.
  • Straight Talk about Death for Teenagers: How to cope with losing someone you love by Earl Grollman discusses normal reaction to the shock of death, how grief can affect a teen s relationship with others, how participating in a funeral can help and how to work through the grief process. A journal section is included.
  • The Grieving Teen: A Guide for Teenagers and Their Friends by Helen Fitzgerald is a compassionate guide that pays attention to the special needs of adolescents struggling with death and gives them the tools to work through their pain and grief.
  • Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume explains how a young girl and her brother cope with the murder of their father. This story is particularly useful in helping children deal with sudden and traumatic death.
  • Where the Lilies Bloom by Vera and Bill Cleaver tells the story of a 14-year-old girl and her sibling who survive a bitter winter together after the death of their parents.
  • How to Help Children Through a Parent s Serious Illness by Kathleen McCue contains two chapters on death and grief. This book helps with children s anticipatory grief by discussing what to tell the child about the illness; how children of different ages are likely to act; how to recognize early warning signs of grief; and how to find out what a child is really thinking or feeling.
  • Talking about Death: A dialogue between parent and child by Earl Grollman is divided into three sections: a Children s Read-Along picture book with large type and beautiful illustrations; a Parent s Guide to Explaining Death which contains ways of answering children s questions; and a Resources listing of professional organizations, self-help groups, and books as well as audio and video tapes.

Books for Adults and Caregivers

  • Dying Well: Peace and possibilities at the end of life by Ira Byock, M.D. brings readers to the homes and bedsides of the dying and tells stories of love and reconciliation in the face of tragedy, pain, and conflict.
  • Final Gifts by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley describes the messages that the dying give as they enter Near Death Awareness. This book helps caregivers to listen to those they love and become less fearful of what their loved one is saying.
  • Who gets Grandma s Yellow Pie Plate? by M. Stum is a family-focused guide to transferring non-titled property such as Grandma s yellow pie plate or Grandpa s gold watch. It treats the matter with sensitivity, recognizing that belongings have different meanings to different individuals.
  • I m With You Now: A guide through incurable illness for patients, families, and friends by M. Catherine Ray teaches the communication skills necessary to deal with the frightening topics and situations that accompany incurable illness.
  • The Dying Time: Practical wisdom for the dying and their caregivers by Joan Furman and David McNabb is a comprehensive and thorough handbook for the dying and their caregivers. It provides details on how to make the environment conducive to peace and tranquility, give physical care, and understand and respond to the emotional and spiritual crises that naturally occur.
  • The Grace in Dying: How we are transformed spiritually as we die by Kathleen Dowling Singh describes phases that signal when a dying person is entering the final stages of spiritual and psychological transformation and through this understanding subdues the ultimate fear of the dying process.

Books about Grief and Recovery

  • After Goodbye: How to Begin Again After the Death of Someone You Love by Ted Menten and Theodore Menten is designed to help the survivors find ways to grieve, let go, and move on after the death of a loved one.
  • A Broken Heart Still Beats: After Your Child Dies by Anne McCracken and Mary Semel, two mothers who share that unfortunate experience of having a child die. The authors describe their grieving process and how it affected their lives. The book also includes excerpts from works by authors such as Melville, Frost, and Shelley about the death of a child.
  • A Time to Grieve: Meditations for healing after the death of a loved one by Carol Staudacher begins with a quote from a survivor before each meditation then reflects upon the feeling and content of the quote. Affirmations follow to lead one forward in the grief process.
  • Grieving the Death of a Friend by Harold Ivan Smith guides the reader to move with the natural process of one of the most significant but unrecognized experiences of grief, the death of a friend. The book explores the aspects of friendship, passing, burying, mourning, remembering, and reconciling.
  • Swallowed by a Snake: The gift of the masculine side of healing by Thomas Golden blends folklore, cross-cultural analysis, and clinical advice to help both men and women understand the specific context and needs of grieving men.
  • The Courage to Grieve by Judy Tatelbaum presents the three phases of grief, talks about unsuccessful grieving, children s grief, and the recovery process.




All Dogs May Go to Heaven #booking #hotel #rooms

#hospice for dogs

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The New York Times

All Dogs May Go to Heaven. These Days, Some Go to Hospice.

By MATT RICHTEL

November 30, 2013

More and more, cats and dogs get the human treatment. There are pet spas, pet therapists, pet clothes. And as it goes in life, so it now goes in the twilight. The latest phenomenon: pet hospice.

Around the country, a growing number of veterinarians are offering hospice care, and marketing it as a way to give cats and dogs — and their owners — a less anxious, more comfortable passing.

The approach, in the spirit of the human variety, entails ceasing aggressive medical treatment and giving pain and even anti-anxiety drugs. Unlike in hospice care for humans, euthanasia is an option — and in fact, is a big part of this end-of-life turn. When it’s time, the vet performs it in the living room, bedroom or wherever the family feels comfortable.

That’s a big part of the job, the vets say, relieving pet owner guilt, giving them an emotional bridge to a pet’s death, and letting them grieve at home — rather than in a clinic or animal shelter. The intimacy carries a premium, sometimes costing 25 percent or more than euthanasia in a clinic. Vets, and their customers, say it can be worth it.

“They’re in their own environment, not only the pet but the owners,” said Dr. Mary Gardner, co-founder of Lap of Love, a Florida-based company that is one of the leaders in a small but growing market. “They’re allowed to have other animals present, other cats or dogs present, other children,” added Dr. Gardner, who refers to a pet’s owner as its “mom” or “dad,” and has since relocated her own practice to Los Angeles. “I’ve been to some homes where they had barbecues for that dog, and invited me and the neighbors, and the dog was the man of the hour.”

Lap of Love’s business has blossomed since 2010 from two providers to more than 68 vet partners in 18 states. The International Association for Animal Hospice and Palliative Care, a group started in 2009, now has 200 members, mostly vets, but also several family therapists, lawyers and an animal sanctuary in Northern California that takes in and provides holistic healing and hospice for terminally ill and elderly pets.

“There is a formal end-of-life movement, a formal hospice movement,” said Dr. Eden Myers, a veterinarian in Kentucky who runs JustVetData.com. which tracks industry trends. Of the providers who do this, she said: “They’re everywhere.”

Dr. Amir Shanan, a vet in Chicago who started the International Association for Animal Hospice, described the movement as growing, but still not mainstream; veterinary schools are only now embracing the idea. “There are skeptics out there,” he said. “But 20 years ago, there was almost no one other than skeptics, and that’s changing rapidly.”

Denise Fitzmaurice, right, brought her 4-year-old dog, Sophie, to Dr. Michele Price s mobile veterinary clinic for an examination.

Daniel Rosenbaum for The New York Times

There are no formal standards for this hospice care, and Dr. Shanan said there was a debate about what those standards should look like. “The core of the debate is who is to decide when is the right time to euthanize, if at all,” he said, noting that some hospice supporters advocate giving pets palliative care until they die naturally, as in human hospice.

Hospice and in-home euthanasia are different things. Their growth is owing to similar factors, says Dr. Myers, including a growing acceptance of hospice for humans, as well as cellphones, laptops and online marketing that make mobile vet services easier to operate. Plus, she said, more vets offer the services as a business alternative to the high cost of starting and maintaining a traditional clinic.

“And,” she added, “you’ve got people willing to spend scads of money on their pets.”

For pet owners, the financial implications of this end-of-life movement cut two ways. In one light, hospice can be seen as reducing the cost of aggressive medical care, or it can be seen as its own version of aggressive comfort care, at least when compared to euthanizing a pet sooner.

A hospice or euthanasia visit from Lap of Love generally costs $200 or $250, including drugs. Euthanasia at a clinic typically runs less, though prices vary widely, and is even less at a nonprofit shelter, like a local animal shelter. Some pet owners say costs are irrelevant given the peace of mind — their own.

“It was more for me than him,” said Jan Dorr, a bookkeeper in Boca Raton, Fla. who was an early Lap of Love customer in 2010. She’d spent $5,000 on chemotherapy for her chocolate lab, Darby, but the dog’s health continued to fail. When she heard about the idea of pet hospice, her reaction was positive; a year earlier, her own father died after a positive hospice experience. She called Dr. Gardner, who helped make Darby comfortable by increasing his pain medications, and giving Ms. Dorr a checklist of ways to recognize when it was time to let go, such as when Darby stopped eating, walking or interacting.

When Darby’s condition worsened just days later, the vet returned to perform euthanasia. Ms. Dorr lay down on her bed with Darby, hugging him. “She let me say when,” Ms. Dorr said, referring to the vet’s final injection. It was far preferable, she said, to the alternative: “I just couldn’t get it into my head to put him on a steel table in a cold room and let him go.”

Kathryn D. Marocchino, a professor of death and dying at California State University in Vallejo, who in 1996 founded the Nikki Hospice Foundation for Pets, said the end-of-life movement for pets addressed what she described as a “sense of coercion” faced by owners of sick pets forced to decide between aggressive treatment or euthanasia. She said that her group got calls from people thanking them, and saying things like: “Where were you 30 years ago? They made me kill my dog.”

Dr. Michele Price, a veterinarian in Northern Virginia whose in-home end-of-care business has doubled since 2009 to 20 percent of her practice, got a call recently about an ailing Labrador named Champ. She’d first seen the dog in August when his owners thought it was time to euthanize. But when Dr. Price got to the house, Champ was doing O.K. and she and the family decided on hospice treatment and pain meds. Later, Champ took a sharp downward turn and couldn’t walk. Dr. Price returned and they set up for the euthanasia.

Champ was on a quilt next to the fireplace when Dr. Price administered the initial sedation. “They hugged him, and told him what a good dog he was. They said, ‘We love you’ and ‘We’ll miss you,’ ” Ms. Price said of the dog’s owners. As for Champ, “He fell asleep. That’s the last thing he remembered.”

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Ten Facts about Hospice Care You May Not Know #weekend #hotel #deals

#hospice quotes

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Ten Facts about Hospice Care You May Not Know

For Immediate Release:
April 3, 2013

NHPCO Stresses that Hospice is about Living Fully

(Alexandria, Va) – Some people have the wrong idea about hospice care. They think that hospice is only about dying and that hospice is the place you go when there’s nothing more to be done. Nothing could be further from the truth. Hospice helps people with a life-limiting illness focus on living as fully as possible for as long as possible.

The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization is working to people understand that hospice brings comfort, dignity, and peace to people facing a terminal illness. Hospice provides support and care for the family caregivers, too.

Last year, 1.65 million dying Americans were cared for by hospice. Yet, there are some important facts about hospice that people don’t know. And this may be keeping people from getting the best care possible, when they need it most.

  1. Hospice is not a place—it’s high-quality care that focuses on comfort and quality of life.
  2. Hospice is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, and most insurance plans. Fear of costs should never prevent a person from accessing hospice care.
  3. Hospice serves anyone with a life-limiting illness, regardless of age or type of illness.
  4. Hospice provides expert medical care as well as spiritual and emotional support to patients and families.
  5. Research has shown that the majority of Americans would prefer to be at home at the end of life—hospice makes this possible for most people.
  6. Hospice serves people living in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.
  7. Hospice patients and families can receive care for six months or longer.
  8. A person may keep his or her referring physician involved while receiving hospice care.
  9. Hospice offers grief and bereavement services to family members to help them adjust to the loss in their lives.
  10. Research has shown people receiving hospice care can live longer than similar patients who do not opt for hospice.

If this information about hospice surprises you, take the time to find out more. The best time to learn about hospice is before you or someone in your family is facing a medical crisis.

For more information, visit NHPCO’s Caring Connections at www.caringinfo.org or call the InfoLine at 800-658-8898.





Welcome – Cape May Motels #cheap #hotels #in

#cape may motels

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Two sisters run this family kind of place right across from the ocean in Cape May, NJ. The Capri has been in their family for over 45 years. There’s a swimming pool and a kiddie pool, shuffleboard and ping pong, plus popcorn fresh fruit in the lobby. Cook out one night on the barbeque and make memories with your family that will last a lifetime. Steps from the beach and just a short walk to shops and restaurants, The Capri is the perfect location for your vacation.

© 2015 Capri Motor Lodge • Beach Madison Avenues • Cape May, NJ 08204 • 609.884.4727 • Design: www.cpwcreative.com • Contact The Capri





Welcome – May Court Club of Ottawa #st #johns #hospice

#maycourt hospice

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Welcome to the May Court Club of Ottawa

Founded in 1898 by Lady Aberdeen, the wife of the Governor General, the May Court Club has been providing volunteer services and financial assistance for 117 years to help those in need in the Ottawa community.

We are a vibrant group of women who, over the years, have donated thousands of volunteer hours and millions of dollars to help those in need in our community. We operate under the direction of a Board of Directors elected by the membership at the Annual General Meeting.

  • our About Us for a glimpse of some of the highlights of our projects and initiatives;
  • our Community Projects to find out where our present service efforts are directed;
  • our Scholarship pages to apply for one of our three post-graduate scholarships;
  • our Grants for a list of the charities that we have recently supported and for a grants application form;
  • our Member Activities where you will see that it is not all work and no play;
  • our Contact Us page if you would like to be in touch with us.

Today the May Court Club of Ottawa is one of nine May Court Clubs that comprise the Association of May Court Clubs of Canada. Until 1934 the Ottawa Club was the only one of its kind but that year it was joined by like-minded organisations in Windsor and London and together they formed the Affiliation of May Court Clubs. Over the next thirty years other May Court Clubs joined the Affiliation and in 1965, after revision of its constitution and by-laws, the organisation was incorporated as the Association of May Court Clubs of Canada.

For more information about the Association and links to the other Clubs, please visit the Association web site at www.maycourtclubs.org

The May Court Bargain Box

228 Laurier Avenue East, Ottawa
Telephone: (613)235-0333

Monday: 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Tuesday – Friday: 9:30 am – 3:30 pm
Saturday: 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS – 50% off denim until September 10.

New Stock Weekly!

Upcoming Events

Ottawa South Porch Sale
Treasure hunt for bargains on Saturday September 10. For details click here.

Christmas Craft Fair and Art Sale
This fundraising event will be held on Saturday November 5.
For details click here.

For more on fundraising activities, please check our Member Activities page.