Meaning of hospice #cheap #places #to #stay

#meaning of hospice

#

hospice

a house of shelter or rest for pilgrims, strangers, etc. especially one kept by a religious order.

Medicine/Medical.

  1. a health-care facility for the terminally ill that emphasizes pain control and emotional support for the patient and family, typically refraining from taking extraordinary measures to prolong life.
  2. a similar program of care and support for the terminally ill at home.

Origin of hospice Expand

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source

Examples from the Web for hospice Expand

We signed him up for hospice care, knowing that we still had limited time with him.

Leukaemia patient Zakwan Anuar, 15, died two weeks after they visited his hospice in Kualar Lumpur, Malaysia, last month.

The next evening, Romero was saying mass in the chapel at the hospice where he lived in a tiny room near the infirm and the dying.

He has also demonstrated compassion for AIDS victims, washing and kissing the feet of 12 patients in a hospice in 2001.

Your loved one cannot be cured in an acute-care hospital but is not ready for hospice.

The pass of Great St. Bernard is celebrated for its hospice.

M. Julien, will you run for the doctor, and send him down to the hospice at once?

He built in fact later the hospice and church of Jesu-Nazareno—in compliance with this vow.

He, himself, was billeted with a French family, just around the corner from the hospice.

This hospice is said to have been first founded in the year 962, by Bernard, a Piedmontese nobleman.

British Dictionary definitions for hospice Expand

hospice

noun ( pl ) hospices

a nursing home that specializes in caring for the terminally ill

( archaic ) Also called hospitium ( hɒˈspɪtɪəm ), ( pl ) hospitia ( hɒˈspɪtɪə ). a place of shelter for travellers, esp one kept by a monastic order

C19: from French, from Latin hospitium hospitality, from hospes guest, host 1

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source

Word Origin and History for hospice Expand

1818, “rest house for travelers,” from French hospice (13c.), from Latin hospitium “guest house, hospitality,” from hospes (genitive hospitis ) “guest, host” (see host (n.1)). Sense of “home for the aged and terminally ill ” is from 1893; hospice movement first attested 1979.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

hospice in Medicine Expand

hospice hos·pice (hŏs’pĭs)
n.
A program or facility that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional, spiritual, social, and financial needs of terminally ill patients at a facility or at a patient’s home.

The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Discover our greatest slideshows


  • Liability insurance – definition of liability insurance by The Free Dictionary #general

    #

    liability insurance

    Total quantity or scope: Lot 1 first line of the SNCF Group liability insurance program.

    Oscar began his distinguished career in the field of executive liability insurance as an underwriter at the New York headquarters of American International Group (AIG).

    The subject of the public contract is the provision of property insurance, liability insurance. liability insurance for injury from the use of motor vehicles and accident insurance and supplementary motor vehicle Statutory city of Liberec.

    Because of their elite status, Elk Peak Performance Contractors will now have an opportunity to attain general liability insurance at a competitive price.

    The Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA), a national trade association of doctor-owned and/or operated medical professional liability insurance companies, today announced that Eric R.

    Contract notice: Insurance contract insurance services for risk (property insurance, liability insurance. group life and accident insurance, individual liability insurance ) incurred by the Municipal Street Maintenance Company, on the operation.

    through its subsidiary companies, is a leading provider of medical professional liability insurance for physicians, dentists and other healthcare providers and a provider of insurance management services to other medical professional liability insurance carriers.

    With the steady rise in medical malpractice premiums and soaring jury settlements over the past several years, healthcare providers have expressed concern over the affordability of medical liability insurance .

    Option B – Operations and product liability insurance (the insurance sum 30 million LTL;

    The Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA), a national trade association that represents doctor-owned and/or operated medical professional liability insurance companies, today reported that an analysis of data from a 48 company composite sample of medical malpractice specialty writers shows a return to profitability for only the second time in the last eight years.

    Listwan brings two decades of professional liability insurance experience to the Board as well as experience in a variety of medical leadership roles, including past president of the Wisconsin Medical Society.

    These include property insurance, liability insurance. liability insurance – non-pecuniary damage, professional liability insurance for damage to health facilities, travel insurance, liability insurance for damage caused by vehicles ( liability insurance ), motor vehicle insurance and additional car insurance .





    Set up online store #set, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #set #definition, #define

    #

    before 900; (v.) Middle English setten, Old English settan; cognate with Old Norse setja, German setzen, Gothic satjan, all 1 ; (noun) (in senses denoting the action of setting or the state of being set) Middle English set, set(t)e, derivative of the v. and its past participle; (in senses denoting a group) Middle English sette Expand

    interset, verb (used with object), interset, intersetting.

    misset, verb, misset, missetting.

    Can be confused Expand

    set, sit (see usage note at the current entry)

    1. position, locate, situate, plant. 11. estimate, appraise, evaluate, price, rate. 13. establish. 55. solidify, congeal, harden. 70. clique. 72. attitude. 73. posture. 94. predetermined. 98. stubborn, obstinate.

    Synonym Study Expand

    Usage note Expand

    The verbs set and sit 1 are similar in form and meaning but different in grammatical use. Set is chiefly transitive and takes an object: Set the dish on the shelf. Its past tense and past participle are also set. Yesterday he set three posts for the fence. The judge has set the date for the trial. Set also has some standard intransitive uses, as “to pass below the horizon” ( The sun sets late in the northern latitudes during the summer ) and “to become firm, solid, etc.” ( This glue sets quickly ). The use of set for sit, “to be seated,” is nonstandard: Pull up a chair and set by me.
    Sit is chiefly intransitive and does not take an object: Let’s sit here in the shade. Its past tense and past participle are sat. They sat at the table for nearly two hours. Have they sat down yet? Transitive uses of sit include “to cause to sit” ( Pull up a chair and sit yourself down ) and “to provide seating for” ( The waiter sat us near the window ).

    Set

    a number of objects or people grouped or belonging together, often forming a unit or having certain features or characteristics in common: a set of coins, John is in the top set for maths

    a group of people who associate together, esp a clique: he’s part of the jet set

    ( maths. logic )

    1. Also called class. a collection of numbers, objects, etc, that is treated as an entity: 3, the moon is the set the two members of which are the number 3 and the moon
    2. (in some formulations) a class that can itself be a member of other classes

    any apparatus that receives or transmits television or radio signals

    ( tennis. squash. badminton ) one of the units of a match, in tennis one in which one player or pair of players must win at least six games: Graf lost the first set

    1. the number of couples required for a formation dance
    2. a series of figures that make up a formation dance
    1. a band’s or performer’s concert repertoire on a given occasion: the set included no new numbers
    2. a continuous performance: the Who played two sets

    verb sets, setting, set

    ( intransitive ) (in square dancing and country dancing) to perform a sequence of steps while facing towards another dancer: set to your partners

    ( usually transitive ) to divide into sets: in this school we set our older pupils for English

    C14 (in the obsolete sense: a religious sect): from Old French sette, from Latin secta sect ; later sense development influenced by the verb set 1

    Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
    © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
    Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
    Cite This Source

    Word Origin and History for set Expand

    Old English settan (transitive) “cause to sit, put in some place, fix firmly; build, found; appoint, assign,” from Proto-Germanic *(bi)satjan “to cause to sit, set” (cf. Old Norse setja. Swedish sätta. Old Saxon settian. Old Frisian setta. Dutch zetten. German setzen. Gothic satjan ), causative form of PIE *sod-. variant of *sed- “to sit” (see sit (v.)). Also cf. set (n.2).

    Intransitive sense from c.1200, “be seated.” Used in many disparate senses by Middle English; sense of “make or cause to do, act, or be; start” and that of “mount a gemstone” attested by mid-13c. Confused with sit since early 14c. Of the sun, moon, etc. “to go down,” recorded from c.1300, perhaps from similar use of the cognates in Scandinavian languages. To set (something) on “incite to attack” (c.1300) originally was in reference to hounds and game.

    “fixed,” c.1200, sett. past participle of setten “to set” (see set (v.)). Meaning “ready, prepared” first recorded 1844.

    “collection of things,” mid-15c. from Old French sette “sequence,” variant of secte “religious community,” from Medieval Latin secta “retinue,” from Latin secta “a following” (see sect ). “[I]n subsequent developments of meaning influenced by SET v .1 and apprehended as equivalent to ‘number set together'” [OED]. The noun set was in Middle English, but only in the sense of “religious sect” (late 14c.), which likely is the direct source of some modern meanings, e.g. “group of persons with shared status, habits, etc.” (1680s).

    Meaning “complete collection of pieces” is from 1680s. Meaning “group of pieces musicians perform at a club during 45 minutes” (more or less) is from c.1925, though it is found in a similar sense in 1580s. Set piece is from 1846 as “grouping of people in a work of visual art;” from 1932 in reference to literary works.

    “act of setting; condition of being set” (of a heavenly body), mid-14c. from set (v.) or its identical past participle. Many disparate senses collect under this word because of the far-flung meanings assigned to the verb:

    “Action of hardening,” 1837; also “manner or position in which something is set” (1530s), hence “general movement, direction, tendency” (1560s); “build, form” (1610s), hence “bearing, carriage” (1855); “action of fixing the hair in a particular style” (1933).

    “Something that has been set” (1510s), hence the use in tennis (1570s) and the theatrical meaning “scenery for an individual scene in a play, etc.,” recorded from 1859. Other meanings OED groups under “miscellaneous technical senses” include “piece of electrical apparatus” (1891, first in telegraphy); “burrow of a badger” (1898). Old English had set “seat,” in plural “camp; stable,” but OED finds it “doubtful whether this survived beyond OE.” Cf. set (n.1).

    Set (n.1) and set (n.2) are not always distinguished in dictionaries; OED has them as two entries, Century Dictionary as one. The difference of opinion seems to be whether the set meaning “group, grouping” (here (n.2)) is a borrowing of the unrelated French word that sounds like the native English one, or a borrowing of the sense only, which was absorbed into the English word.





    The #1 Feature of a Meaningless Job #meaningless #job,significance,purpose,huffmag,meaning,best #of #huffpost,career #advice,jobs,worklife,work,well-being

    #

    The #1 Feature of a Meaningless Job

    Ask people what they want in a job, and meaningfulness looms large. For decades, Americans have ranked purpose as their top priority — above promotions, income, job security, and hours. Work is a search “for daily meaning as well as daily bread,” wrote Studs Terkel after interviewing hundreds of people in a striking array of jobs. Yet all too often, we feel that our work doesn’t matter. “Most of us have jobs that are too small for our spirit. Jobs are not big enough for people.”

    What makes a job meaningless? After more than 40 years of research. we know that people struggle to find meaning when they lack autonomy, variety, challenge, performance feedback, and the chance to work on a whole product or service from start to finish. As important as these factors are, though, there’s another that matters more.

    Consider the following jobs. They all meet some of the criteria above, yet about 90 percent of people fail to find them highly meaningful.

    • Fashion designer
    • TV newscast director
    • Revenue analyst
    • Web operations coordinator
    • Airline reservation agent
    • Graphics animator

    Why is meaning missing in these jobs? They rarely have a significant, lasting impact on other people. If these jobs didn’t exist, people wouldn’t be all that much worse off. By contrast, here are the jobs that are highly meaningful to virtually everyone who holds them:

    • Adult literacy teacher
    • Fire chief
    • Nurse midwife
    • Addiction counselor
    • Child life specialist
    • Neurosurgeon

    They all make an important difference in the lives of others. Not convinced yet? Here’s a taste of the evidence on the link between helping others and meaningful work:

    • A comprehensive analysis of data from more than 11,000 employees across industries: the single strongest predictor of meaningfulness was the belief that the job had a positive impact on others.
    • Interviews with a representative sample of Americans: more than half reported that the core purpose of their jobs was to benefit others
    • Surveys of people around the world. in defining when an activity qualifies as work, “if it contributes to society” was the most common choice in the U.S. — but also in China and Eastern Europe. On multiple continents, people defined work more in terms of contributing to society than as getting paid for a task, doing a strenuous activity, or being told what to do.
    • Studies of people who view their work as a calling. not only a job or career: Yale professor Amy Wrzesniewski, widely regarded as the world’s leading expert on the meaning of work, shows that a core element of a calling is the belief that your work makes the world a better place.

    Enriching the Meaningfulness of a Job

    Becoming a neurosurgeon isn’t for everyone. The good news is that there are steps we can take to make jobs more meaningful — for ourselves and others.

    In many cases, our jobs do have an impact, but we’re too distant from the end users of our products and services. Think of automotive safety engineers who never meet the drivers of their cars or medical scientists who don’t see a patient. By connecting directly with these end users, we can see our past and potential impact. When university fundraisers met a single student whose scholarship was funded by their work, they increased 142 percent in weekly phone minutes and over 400 percent in weekly revenue. When radiologists saw a patient’s photo included in an x-ray file, they wrote 29 percent longer reports and made 46 percent more accurate diagnoses.

    This is why leaders at John Deere invite employees who build tractors to meet the farmers who buy their tractors, leaders at Facebook invite software developers to hear from users who have found long-lost friends and family members thanks to the site, and leaders at Wells Fargo film videos of customers describing how low-interest loans have rescued them from debt. When we see the direct consequences of our jobs for others, we find greater meaning. “The greatest untapped source of motivation,” Susan Dominus explains. “is a sense of service to others.”

    Of course, some jobs are simply not designed to have a major impact on others. In these situations, people often make the mistake of treating their job descriptions as fixed, overlooking the fact that they can take initiative to alter their own roles. Wrzesniewski, Jane Dutton, and Justin Berg call this job crafting — adding, emphasizing, revising, delegating, or minimizing tasks and interactions in pursuit of greater meaning. For example, hospital cleaners who lack patient contact stepped up to provide emotional support to patients and their families, and technology associates began volunteering for mentoring, teaching, and training roles.

    When people craft their jobs, they become happier and more effective. In an experiment at Google. colleagues and I invited salespeople and administrators to spend 90 minutes doing the Job Crafting Exercise — they mapped out ways to make their tasks and interactions more meaningful and contribute more to others. Six weeks later, their managers and coworkers rated them as happier and more effective. When they developed new skills to support more significant changes, the happiness and performance gains lasted for at least six months.

    Like all things in life, meaning can be pushed too far. As the psychologist Brian Little observes. if we turn our trivial pursuits into magnificent obsessions, we gain meaning at the price of manageability. When the weight of the world is on our shoulders, we place ourselves at risk for burnout.

    Yet most people are facing the opposite problem in their jobs, of too little meaning rather than too much. Against this backdrop, the chance to help others can be what makes our work worthwhile. “Suffering ceases to be suffering once it finds a meaning,” wrote Viktor Frankl in Man’s Search For Meaning . “Being human always points, and is directed, to something or someone, other than oneself — be it a meaning to fulfill or another human being to encounter. The more one forgets himself — by giving himself to a cause to serve or another person to love — the more human he is.”

    Adam Grant is a Wharton professor and the author ofGive and Take . a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller on the hidden power of helping others.

    This story appears in Issue 87 of our weekly iPad magazine, Huffington, available Friday, Feb. 7 in the iTunes App store .

    From Our Partners





    Semester online #semester, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #semester #definition, #define #semester, #definition

    #

    semester

    Examples from the News

    • I had been studying abroad in London, and came back to finish the semester at Tufts.

    Everyone at This Dinner Party Has Lost Someone

  • The trick, in any case, was repeated semester after semester.
    Stonewall Jackson, VMI’s Most Embattled Professor
  • According to his suit, Carleton would rotate four new boys into his home every semester.
    Headmasters Behaving Badly
  • During his spring semester at Duke University, senior Lewis McLeod was expelled for committing a sexual assault.
    The College Bro’s Burden: Consent and Assault Cast a Shadow on Sexy Times
  • The exposure my client would have had in criminal court doesn t compare to a second semester senior getting expelled.

    Is UMass-Amherst Biased Against Male Students in Title IX Assault Cases?

  • Examples

    • But we had so many new girls this semester that I could not get around sooner.

    Elizabeth Hobart at Exeter Hall

  • The students of the present semester number fifteen hundred.
    Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror
  • There were enough paintings there to last till the end of the semester.

    Julia Augusta Schwartz

    Beatrice Leigh at College

  • I had other uses for the semester twenty marks, unless he absolutely needed them.
    My Life
  • One semester in this subject was usually considered sufficient.




  • Ad hoc #ad #hoc, #online #dictionary, #english #dictionary, #ad #hoc #definition, #define

    ad hoc

    ad hoc in Culture Expand

    ad hoc [(ad hok. ad hohk )]

    A phrase describing something created especially for a particular occasion: “We need an ad hoc committee to handle this new problem immediately.” From Latin. meaning “toward this (matter).”

    The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
    Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
    Cite This Source

    Idioms and Phrases with ad hoc Expand

    ad hoc

    For the special purpose or end at hand; also, by extension, improvised or impromptu. The term, Latin for “to this,” is most often used for committees established for a specific purpose, as in The committee was formed ad hoc to address health insurance problems. The term is also used as an adjective ( An ad hoc committee was formed ), and has given rise to the noun adhocism for the tendency to use temporary, provisional, or improvised methods to deal with a particular problem. [ Early 1600s ]

    The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
    Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Cite This Source





    Meaning of hospice #birmingham #hotels

    #meaning of hospice

    #

    hospice

    a house of shelter or rest for pilgrims, strangers, etc. especially one kept by a religious order.

    Medicine/Medical.

    1. a health-care facility for the terminally ill that emphasizes pain control and emotional support for the patient and family, typically refraining from taking extraordinary measures to prolong life.
    2. a similar program of care and support for the terminally ill at home.

    Origin of hospice Expand

    Dictionary.com Unabridged
    Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
    Cite This Source

    Examples from the Web for hospice Expand

    We signed him up for hospice care, knowing that we still had limited time with him.

    Leukaemia patient Zakwan Anuar, 15, died two weeks after they visited his hospice in Kualar Lumpur, Malaysia, last month.

    The next evening, Romero was saying mass in the chapel at the hospice where he lived in a tiny room near the infirm and the dying.

    He has also demonstrated compassion for AIDS victims, washing and kissing the feet of 12 patients in a hospice in 2001.

    Your loved one cannot be cured in an acute-care hospital but is not ready for hospice.

    The pass of Great St. Bernard is celebrated for its hospice.

    M. Julien, will you run for the doctor, and send him down to the hospice at once?

    He built in fact later the hospice and church of Jesu-Nazareno—in compliance with this vow.

    He, himself, was billeted with a French family, just around the corner from the hospice.

    This hospice is said to have been first founded in the year 962, by Bernard, a Piedmontese nobleman.

    British Dictionary definitions for hospice Expand

    hospice

    noun ( pl ) hospices

    a nursing home that specializes in caring for the terminally ill

    ( archaic ) Also called hospitium ( hɒˈspɪtɪəm ), ( pl ) hospitia ( hɒˈspɪtɪə ). a place of shelter for travellers, esp one kept by a monastic order

    C19: from French, from Latin hospitium hospitality, from hospes guest, host 1

    Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
    © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
    Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
    Cite This Source

    Word Origin and History for hospice Expand

    1818, “rest house for travelers,” from French hospice (13c.), from Latin hospitium “guest house, hospitality,” from hospes (genitive hospitis ) “guest, host” (see host (n.1)). Sense of “home for the aged and terminally ill ” is from 1893; hospice movement first attested 1979.

    Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
    Cite This Source

    hospice in Medicine Expand

    hospice hos·pice (hŏs’pĭs)
    n.
    A program or facility that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional, spiritual, social, and financial needs of terminally ill patients at a facility or at a patient’s home.

    The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary
    Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Cite This Source

    Discover our greatest slideshows


  • Meaning of palliative care #flight #and #hotel

    #meaning of palliative care

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.

    What does palliative mean? definition, meaning and pronunciation (Free English Language Dictionary)

    #what does palliative care mean

    #

    PALLIATIVE

    Dictionary entry overview: What does palliative mean?

    PALLIATIVE (noun)
    The noun PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

    1. remedy that alleviates pain without curing

    Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as a noun is very rare.

    PALLIATIVE (adjective)
    The adjective PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

    1. moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

    Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as an adjective is very rare.

    Dictionary entry details

    PALLIATIVE (noun)

    palliative [BACK TO TOP]

    Remedy that alleviates pain without curing

    Nouns denoting man-made objects

    Hypernyms ( palliative is a kind of. ):

    PALLIATIVE (adjective)

    palliative [BACK TO TOP]

    Moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

    moderating (lessening in intensity or strength)

    Learn English with. Proverbs of the week

    Beer before liquor, you’ll never be sicker, but liquor before beer and you’re in the clear. (English proverb)

    Complete idiot who can keep silent, to a wise man is similar (Breton proverb)

    The arrogant army will lose the battle for sure. (Chinese proverb)

    Where there’s a will, there is a way. (Dutch proverb)

    PALLIATIVE: related words searches

    Page delivered in 0.0837 seconds

    AudioEnglish Definitions. Just One Click Away!
    Now you can lookup any word in our dictionary, right from the search box in your browser! Click here to add the AudioEnglish.org dictionary to your list of search providers.