Clinical psychology program #ubc #psychology, #ubc #psych, #psychology #ubc, #university #of #british

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Clinical

UBC s Graduate Program in Clinical Psychology s broad mission is to advance clinical science. We view clinical science as composed of research efforts and practice directed toward:

  1. The promotion of adaptive functioning
  2. Assessment, understanding, amelioration, and prevention of human problems in behaviour, affect, cognition or health
  3. The application of knowledge in ways consistent with scientific evidence

The program s emphasis on the term science underscores its commitment to empirical approaches to evaluating the validity and utility of testable hypotheses and to advancing knowledge and practice by this method.

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association. If you are interested in more information about our accreditation status, contact the Director of Clinical Training (Lynn Alden ) or:

Initial accreditation 1986-87
Next site visit due 2015-16

As of 2012, CPA and APA signed the First Street Accord which is a mutual recognition agreement on accreditation. It demonstrates that the APA views the accreditation standards and principles of the CPA as equivalent to the Commission on Accreditation guidelines and principles. View the statement .

This webpage presents an overview of important information about the clinical program. To fully understand the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology at UBC, please read the material in all the links on this page and in the Graduate Student Handbook.





Wildlife Animal Control – Pest Critter Removal #gopher #removal #methods

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Wildlife Animal Control

My name is David, and I am a nuisance wildlife removal expert. This website is a resource to help educate people about wild animals, and some of the problems that wildlife can cause. This website contains many guides to help you solve your critter problem. I have also written several information articles about the most common nuisance wildlife species, just click your animal.

Wildlife removal is not easy. It is also fraught with health and safety risks. Most wildlife control situations are significantly more complex than they may seem. It is also illegal in most US states for non-licensed persons to trap or relocate wild animals. In, not all, but many cases, critter removal is not a do-it-yourself job.

HUMANE HINTS: Sometimes you don’t need to remove wildlife at all! When possible, use exclusion, rather than trapping, techniques. Always be aware that an animal in your attic likely has a nest of babies inside. NEVER attempt to poison a mammal. Set traps in shade, and never leave an animal in a trap for more than a few hours. If you are uneducated, please enlist the help of a professional.

If you wish to hire professional help, I have complied a directory of expert wildlife removal specialists, covering over 500 different US cities and towns. I have spent significant time talking to these companies, and have even directly trained many of them, and believe that the companies in this directory are superior to most of the companies you may find in your own search. Just click your state on the below map, and you will find a good wildlife expert in your area. Updated weekly, current 2017.

If you have any additional questions about your wildlife problem, feel free to email me, or go ahead and click the above map, and talk to the person I have listed in your city or town. They will surely be able to answer your wildlife questions, and if you wish, they can give you a price quote and quickly solve your problem – usually same-day or next-day.

I have personally trained many of the operators on this list. However, since I do list companies in over 500 US cities and towns, I of course did not train them all. However, I have spoken with all of them, and I do know that they are all dedicated wildlife control specialists, not big-name pest control companies. I have listed them for many years, and have not heard any complaints about their services – but I certainly have heard many compliments! However, if you should ever have a bad experience with any of the wildlife operators that I recommend, let me know, so that I can talk to them and perhaps revise my listings to someone better. Just give them a call, talk to them, and see for yourself.

This month’s featured wildlife removal education article: Why do groundhogs dig?

Groundhogs are known to be the most excellent diggers; they are capable of making both simple and very complex burrows that are used for different purposes. Most burrows dug up by groundhogs are usually from two to five feet deep with a length of approximately thirty feet. These burrows usually have several entrances but in most cases you will come across two entrances leading to a single burrow. Their main entrance is usually visible in the sense that there is always a very big mound of freshly dug soil and other dirt.

The other entrance points dug are not very visible because they act as escape routes when their homes have been invaded by enemies.

Groundhogs usually use the dug burrows for sleeping, hibernating or raising their young ones. Groundhogs usually dig very large burrows that are later on partitioned to serve different purposes. Typically, you will find two main chambers; the nesting chamber whose main function is sleeping and also raising their young ones and an extreme chamber that is used as toiletry. The burrows dug by groundhogs slightly differ but they all have entrance points, a hole that is used for spying purposes, a nest for resting and another chamber that is used as a toilet.

Since groundhogs are one of the few animals that enter true hibernation, they usually dig separate burrows commonly referred to as winter burrows. They are witty animals therefore they will dig the burrows in areas that either woody or bushy. The burrows are then built below the frost line which allows the burrows to maintain constant warm temperatures during the extreme winter periods.

Groundhogs are accustomed to digging because they are diurnal animals, the burrows and dens that they build also act as homes to other small animals once they abandon them because they are usually dug deep into the ground.

Historically, groundhog burrows have led to revelation of an archeological site, as they dug burrows into the soil that brought to the surface significant artifacts that are believed to be archaeological. They are also known to have dug small ridges that have led to the introduction and important historical sites.





Aokigahara Suicide Forest – Koshu, Japan – Atlas Obscura #clean #suicide #methods

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Aokigahara Suicide Forest

Aokigahara Suicide Forest Wikimedia (Creative Commons)

Aokigahara Suicide Forest User submitted

Aokigahara Suicide Forest User submitted

Aokigahara Suicide Forest Coal Miki on Flickr (Creative Commons)

Aokigahara Suicide Forest Wikimedia (Creative Commons)

Aokigahara Suicide Forest Wikimedia (Creative Commons)

Aokigahara Suicide Forest

Aokigahara, Misaka Mountains and Lake Sai seen from Mount Ryu of Tenshi Mountains, Japan. Alpsdake on Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Aokigahara, Misaka Mountains and Lake Sai seen from Mount Ryu of Tenshi Mountains, Japan. Alpsdake on Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Aokigahara, the infamous suicide forest of Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan. Jordy Meow (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Aokigahara suicide forest Karl Baron on Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Aokigahara Forest adrienneleighm (Atlas Obscura User)

Aokigahara Forest adrienneleighm (Atlas Obscura User)

Aokigahara Forest adrienneleighm (Atlas Obscura User)

Aokigahara sea of trees, near Mt Fuji. manrikemorera (Atlas Obscura User)

Called “the perfect place to die,” the Aokigahara forest in Japan has the unfortunate distinction of the world’s second most popular place to take one’s life. (The first is the Golden Gate Bridge.) Since the 1950s, Japanese businessmen have wandered in, and at least 500 of them haven’t wandered out, at an increasing rate of between 10 and 30 per year. Recently these numbers have increased even more, with a record 78 suicides in 2002. In 2003, that record was beat with a number of 105 bodies discovered.

Buried Forest Museum

Roots and stumps that lay inundated for two millennia are on display in Japan s city of three mysteries.

Karuizawa Picture Book Forest Museum

Children s literature fills this museum and a forest surrounds it.

Mimizuka

Burial mound for the ears and noses of thousands of mutilated Korean soldiers.

See more things to do in Japan »

Japanese spiritualists believe that the suicides committed in the forest have permeated Aokigahara’s trees, generating paranormal activity and preventing many who enter from escaping the forest’s depths. Complicating matters further is the common experience of compasses being rendered useless by the rich deposits of magnetic iron in the area’s volcanic soil.

Due to the vastness of the forest, desperate visitors are unlikely to encounter anyone once inside the so-called “Sea of Trees,” so the police have mounted signs reading “Your life is a precious gift from your parents,” and “Please consult the police before you decide to die!” on trees throughout.

This does not deter determined people from committing suicide in this dense forest. Annually about 70 corpses are found by volunteers who clean the woods, but many are forever lost in the very thick woods. Japanese authorities discontinued publishing exact suicide numbers in order to avoid making the place even more popular.

Contemporary news outlets noted the recent spike in suicides in the forest, blamed more on Japan’s economic downturn than on the romantic ending of Seicho Matsumoto’s novel Kuroi Jukai. which revitalized the so-called suicide forest’s popularity among those determined to take their final walk. (The novel culminates in Aokigahara as the characters are driven to joint-suicide.)

Locals say they can easily spot the three types of visitors to the forest: trekkers interested in scenic vistas of Mount Fuji, the curious hoping for a glimpse of the macabre, and those souls who don’t plan on leaving.

What those hoping to take their lives may not consider is the impact the suicides have on the locals and forest workers. In the words of one local man, “It bugs the hell out of me that the area’s famous for being a suicide spot.” And a local police officer said, “I’ve seen plenty of bodies that have been really badly decomposed, or been picked at by wild animals… There’s nothing beautiful about dying in there.”

The forest workers have it even worse than the police. The workers must carry the bodies down from the forest to the local station, where the bodies are put in a special room used specifically to house suicide corpses. The forest workers then play jan-ken-pon —rock, paper, scissors—to see who has to sleep in the room with the corpse. It is believed that if the corpse is left alone, it is very bad luck for the yurei (ghost) of the suicide victims. Their spirits are said to scream through the night, and that their bodies will move on their own.