WD My Cloud 6TB External Hard Drive (NAS) White WDBCTL0060HWT-NESN – Best


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WD – My Cloud 6TB External Hard Drive (NAS) – White

A Better Alternative for Cloud Backup Posted by: MikeTheRetiredActuary from: Southlake, TX on I was torn between using an Internet Cloud service for backup versus having my own external hard drive connected to my router. I looked at the pluses and minuses of Internet Cloud versus personal Cloud. I decided that the pluses of a personal Cloud outweighed the pluses of Internet Cloud, while its negatives were not great enough to outweigh that decision. What I liked about the WD MyCloud was that I could directly connect the MyCloud to my router via an Ethernet cord so that it could handle backup of all of my wireless devices, be accessible by everything on my home network, and could also be accessed via the Internet when I was traveling. I chose the 6TB version simply because I didn’t want to decide I needed a larger capacity later. I certainly don’t need that much at this time, but the extra cost for the additional capacity wasn’t a problem. It was easy to install, and I had no problems with setting up its backup software on the two laptops and one Surface Pro 3 that I am currently backing up. I will say that the setup process wasn’t quite as simple as the instructions leads you to believe, but it isn’t not so involved that I needed to rely on outside help. It has been functioning fine since I installed it. And it is exactly what I was desiring to add to my home network, and I am glad I purchased and installed it.

15 out of 15 found this review helpful.

Great cloud storage drive. Posted by: Spudmuffin from: on I have always had good luck with Western Digital drives. I needed more space and liked the idea that I could access files from home while on the road. The medical files I had were too much for my Macbook so this was an awesome solution. The only problem I found was streaming video. Higher definition home movies end up buffering a lot (about every 2-3 minutes) which can be annoying. An option is download the file on your computer then play it. Overall I’m very happy with this purchase.

8 out of 8 found this review helpful.

Awesome product Posted by: beast2 from: RI on Currently doing a 750GB time machine backup, while remotely uploading 60GB of data and remotely streaming a 14GB Hd movie, with no buffering. I can mount the drive remotely and even setup users to share data with. The web interface is awesome and so are the apps. the setup was simple. Make sure you have a good ISP with a good router and know what you’re doing. by far one of the best NAS setups I’ve ever used. 20 years in the tech world

7 out of 7 found this review helpful.

Good for the Price Posted by: Jokeronlne from: on Haven’t had any real problems with this NAS. Am able to pull up files, photos or whatever else I have stored on it with ease from any device I have connected, including my iPhone and iPad. Besides basic storage and retrieval, I haven’t played around with the extra features as of yet.

6 out of 6 found this review helpful.

Great external hardrive Posted by: Anonymous from: on At the time of writing 12/13/14 You’re not able to install a plex media server on this drive you will first have to mount or map the drive on the network. You will have to install plex media server on a computer and the computer will have to be on 24/7.

5 out of 5 found this review helpful.

Disappointing Waste of Time Posted by: CrunchyTech from: on BOTTOM LINE FIRST: Does not truly provide cloud functionality. Use free cloud services for remote access, and cheaper alternatives for expanding your LAN storage. You CANNOT connect remotely without using the WD software. This is because this drive (and apparently all the rest of WD’s products) uses AFT protocol to locate the local drive on the local network. This does not work over the internet! I bought this to connect to my iTunes library remotely and to do remote Time Machine backups. But again, the only way to access this drive remotely (outside of your local network) is by using the WD application. This renders this drive useless for what I needed it for. The benefits of this drive are storing your data on your own drive rather than using a cloud service, or having a storage device on your local area network that can be used by devices on that network, or sharing the data with remote users using the provided WD software. But those are no big benefits over the existing free cloud solutions. For storing, accessing and sharing files remotely you can use Google Drive or Dropbox for free. For having extra storage on your local area network you can buy a drive at half the price that will do the same (I was using a 2TB portable USB drive plugged into the back of my router and it worked fine). About WD technical service: I spoke to them several times. Tech service suggested I speak to Sales to see what other products might work for me. The Sales rep said that doing what I want should be possible and told me to call back and ask for a Level 2 tech support, but that didn’t solve the issue either. Turn out that the entire WD product line is NOT MAC FRIENDLY and will not work using anything else but the WD software.

14 out of 21 found this review helpful.

Lots of storage-not powerful enough processor Posted by: Tbobtx from: on I’ve had a 2TB WD nas for last 4yrs but outgrew it. I could use it to stream and backup at the same time no problem. Also the firmware was not so demanding on the unit and user friendly. For backups you did not need to assign a user to it. Now I decided to get the 6TB WD my cloud to allow me to add all new computers and smartphones. First thing I did was update firmware. Then I setup users and shares. The interface is more of a fancier GUI Than older one but very bloated. Anyway, I started backing up 1 computer with multiple partitions and drive at a time and was have issues where it would just sit there and drop off the network and then come back. Repeat. I called WD and was Told to reset to factory defaults to clear it up. Tried again setting all up. Still failed. Tried 1 partition at time. Still failed. Did some research and found Trick was turning off all media sharing for the shares and backups as that was taking up all the nas processor bandwidth and causing the nas to drop off-line. Once all the backups from 6 computers were done, I turned on the sharing. All good but crazy it cannot do what it was built to do which is backup and share. Here are some other tips you can thank me later for. For ensuring long life, I have strapped a 60mm fan to back side of the nas to give it forced airflow. it reduced case temperature from 100F+down to steady 80F Other recommendation is to have it connected to a ups so if power drops out, you don’t stress the electronics.

6 out of 7 found this review helpful.

6 Amazing Terabytes always available Posted by: Dubaya from: on Love this product because it is faster and bigger than my previous 3 TB WD NAS which allows me to share movies, pictures, everything to my laptops, wifi enabled smart phones, tablets, PC’s, WDLIve, and Smart TV.

4 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Stop paying for Cloud Storage Posted by: TomOrlando from: on Buy these and you will never have to pay for Dropbox again. Easy setup and works from anywhere in the world. Score.

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Cool Posted by: Davesmith82 from: Marietta, ga on Very easy and dependable works great with Mac and windows

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.


BackupAssist – System State backup and restore #backupassist, #backup #assist, #backup, #back


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System State backup and restore

What’s included in a System State backup?

The exact system components that make up your machine’s System State depend on the operating system installed and how it is has been configured. A System State backup generally includes a copy of any installed device drivers and related files, most of the Windows directory, the Windows Registry, the Active Directory configuration (where applicable) and system files under Windows File Protection.

System State backups for Vista and Server 2008 are usually between 7GB and 15 GB and for XP and Server 2003, they are generally much smaller, being between 200MB and 300 MB. Many files in the Windows directory have multiple hard links. If you are backing up the System State using the File Replication Engine or the Rsync Engine and have Single Instance Store enabled, only a single copy of each multiply linked file will be stored on your backup destination. This data does not need to be copied on subsequent backups, which reduces backup times and saves storage space on your destination.

Why is a System State backup useful?

From a System State backup you can restore your Windows system settings in the event of a system failure or corruption. A System State backup is therefore particularly important for disaster recovery purpose as it eliminates you having to reconfigure Windows back to its original state before the system failure occurred.

We recommended that you always have a recent backup of your System State and that you should perform System State backups on a regular basis, even daily, to increase your level of protection. We also recommended that you perform System State backups before and after any major change is made to your server.

How to back up the System State

With BackupAssist v6 you can schedule local* ‘System State only’ backups across all modern Windows operating systems, or even back up the System State as part of a larger backup including files and applications, using File Replication, Zip, or Windows Imaging. A System State backup includes important Windows systems settings, such as the Registry, and is crucial for system recovery.

*BackupAssist cannot be used to back up the System State of a remote machine; you must install BackupAssist on each server of which you require a System State backup.

Complete the following steps to configure a BackupAssist job to back up the local machine’s System State:

  1. Launch BackupAssist and either edit an existing File Replication, Zip or Imaging job by selecting Edit from the top menu and choosing the appropriate job, or create a new File Replication, Zip or Imaging job by going to File New backup job .
  2. If you are creating a new job check the Backup local system state option during the Files and Folders step of the Job Creation Wizard.
  3. If you are editing an existing job select Files and folders from the left menu, click the Local system selections tab, and then enable the Backup local system state option .

How to restore the System State

Complete the following steps to restore the System Stattefrom a BackupAssist backup using the BackupAssist Restore Console:

  • Note. you cannot restore the System State from an Image backup using the BackupAssist Restore Console. You must use the built-in Windows tool, wbadmin. Visit wbadmin.info for instructions.
  1. In BackupAssist, Click Restore in the top navigation bar and choose the BackupAssist Restore Console .
  2. Click Load all known backups to load all backup catalogues located in the BackupAssist settings folder, or use the Browse option to locate the backup set from which you want to restore.
  3. Choose the job that corresponds to the backup from which you want to restore the System State
  4. Use the calendar to select the date of the backup from which you wish to restore.
    • Note. dates for which backups are available are marked in bold on the calendar.
  5. Use the middle pane to expand the loaded backup set and select the System State to restore.
    • Note. files located on the Windows system drive (C: drive in the example above) may be available for restore, even though only the System State was selected for backup. These files are associated with the System State. If you choose to restore individual files from this list and not the System State, the System State will not be restored, and the files themselves may not restore correctly. If you choose to restore these files together with the System State, the System State option will override selections where there is an overlap. If you want to perform a full restore and are unsure which files are included in the System State we recommend selecting both the System State and all other files listed.
  6. Once you have made your selections click the Restore to button on the bottom right of the window.
  7. The restore confirmation screen will then load:
    You can choose to restore the System State either to its original location or to an alternate location of your choosing. If you select an alternate location click [. ] to set an alternate restore path.
  8. Once you have selected where to restore the System State to, click OK to perform the restore.
    • Note. if you are restoring the System State to a machine that hosts Directory Services, you will be prompted to reboot into the Directory Services Restore Mode.
    • Note. During a System State restore the necessary files are copied to a temporary directory and then moved to their correct location after a reboot of the machine. Before the restore starts, the Restore Console will take a VSS snapshot of the volumes to be restored. This allows the user to manually roll back to a pre-restore state, if necessary, using Windows’ previous versions feature.