Slieve Donard from Bloody Bridge – Walk NI #motels #rotorua

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Slieve Donard from Bloody Bridge

Route Description

From the southern end of the car park cross the main A2 road to reach a gate. Pass through and follow the path on the right hand side of the Bloody Bridge River.

Look out for the attractive stonework of the original Bloody Bridge. During the 1641 rebellion this was the scene of a massacre of prisoners on escort from Newry to Newcastle.

In common with most Mourne rivers, the Bloody Bridge River is a spate river : carrying little more than a trickle in dry weather, but swelling to a torrent during heavy rainfall. In addition, it occupies an outsize glaciated valley and its waters have eroded through a bank of glacial sand, boulders and gravel (called a moraine) to reach the sea. The exposed cliff-like face of the moraine is visible (left) upstream of the old bridge.

After 750m the path narrows and crosses a wooden footbridge at the confluence of the Bloody Bridge and Glen Fofanny Rivers before (in 50m) reaching the stile.

Beyond the stile the path picks its way upstream. After 400m look for an obvious slab of rock inclining towards a narrow section of river. Several conveniently placed boulders make this an easy crossing point. Continue upstream along the opposite bank.

After 80m the path climbs above the river s course, twisting back on itself (seawards) along a broad track giving views across the valley.

View north. From this point Slieve Donard is largely hidden by the bulk of Crossone whose lower slopes form a watershed dividing the Bloody Bridge and Glen Fofanny Rivers. The long shelf of Leganabruchan borders Glen Fofanny on its northern side with the edge of Donard Wood just visible against the backdrop of Dundrum Bay.

Continue for 30m before turning sharp right onto a narrower track which zig-zags uphill. PLEASE KEEP TO THE ZIG-ZAG SECTION OF PATH AND DO NOT TAKE SHORT-CUTS.

Above the zig-zag, the path follows an old quarry track which extends 1.4km into the upper valley before skirting (right) along the north side of the quarry.

From a vantage point above the quarry the line of a disused railway leading to Carr s Face on the slopes of Chimney Rock Mountain can be discerned. Large flat granite slabs were hewn from this area for use as ornamental stone or as foundation blocks in post-war construction works.

Beyond the quarry the path meets the Mourne Wall at 750m. From here Slieve Donard can be reached by following the Mourne Wall uphill for 1km to the tower on the mountain summit.

On a clear day the panorama from Slieve Donard is superb. In particular, note the continuation of the Brandy Pad further west and the scale of the quarry operation on the side of Chimney Rock Mountain now vividly revealed from Donard s viewpoint.

Please be aware – Although, there are numerous walking routes in the Mournes, the majority of these popular walks are not formally designated public rights of way. Most routes have developed over time due to traditional use. Below 600 feet (180m) most land is privately owned and is farmed or grazed. Many of the traditional access routes cross this land or pass along farm lanes and quarry tracks. Walkers are advised to respect that they may be walking on private land and are encouraged to make themselves aware of and adhere to the principles of ‘Leave No Trace’ – www.leavenotraceireland.org”

Please remember that much of the land you will cross is private property and access is only available through the goodwill of the landowners. Although some areas of the countryside have been traditionally used for recreation, the public have no general rights to access such land and are only walking with the tolerance of the landowner.

Getting to the Start

From Newcastle head south towards Kilkeel. Approx 1.86 miles (3kms) look out for a car park on the left hand side. This is Bloody Bridge car park and the starting point for this walk.

Accessibility Grade

Thursday 15th July 2010

An excellent walk although found it very tight in places especially on the feet.

started out from the carpark on the A2 Bloody bridge and headed up the right hand side of the Bloody Bridge River which is a well walked track for about 1km at which point we crossed the Glen Fofanny River, the wooden footbridge is no longer in place but the River can be safely crossed with the use of large boulders. Still staying on the right hand side of the BBR for another 350m we then crossed the fjord and made our way to a stile you have to cross at this fjord as there are no paths on the right hand side of the river after this crossing point. We then made our way upwards along the left hand side of the BBR on the old Quarry track this is where we found the walk more taxing as for the next 1.5km we were walking on large stones/boulders all the way to the Quarry. The views and scenery are outstanding both downwards towards the sea and upwards towards the summit of Slieve Donard.

From the Quarry the terrain is a mixture of boulders/grass and peat with some places being very soft underfoot at which you could easly sink above ankle depth so a good pair of waterproof boots would be advisable.

From the Quarry it would be another 500m to the Mourne wall at which point we stopped and took a well earned cup of tea and some ham sandwiches & after climbing an exhaustive 3.5km ham sandwiches would of been fit for a king.

We decided that we would return back down the same way we arrived as the weather was very temperamental so after our late lunch we started our descent and although we were only 550m above sea level it was high enough because as we set off the cloud dropped and within 150m of our descent the hail came down hard eventually turning to rain as we reached the Quarry we had covered approx 1.5km before we had sight of the sun again but from the fjord all the way down to Bloody Bridge it turned out to be pleasantly warm but it is on the descent that care should be taken because of the terrain you are crossing it could be so very easy to twist/break an ankle if you were forced to move faster due to weather conditions.

all in all i found this walk very exhillerating & enjoyable and would recommend to all walkers novice and veteran

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Copyright 2016 Outdoor Recreation Northern Ireland. All rights reserved. Contact us Disclaimer

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Every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information. We cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions but where such are brought to our attention, the information will be amended accordingly.

Whilst all the clubs, associations and activity operators listed on this website generally operate according to which is accepted as current best practice, it is the responsibility of the participant to ensure that they are credible and all appropriate safety standards are adhered to. Outdoor Recreation Northern Ireland have, nor assume, any responsibility for the accuracy or the completeness of the information supplied or the service and level of care afforded by any of the clubs, associations and activity operators listed on this website.

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Slieve Donard (via the Glen River) – Northern Ireland s Highest Peak

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Slieve Donard (via Glen River)

Route Description

Leave the car park in Donard Park heading towards the mountain and follow the Glen River uphill through old woodland of Scots Pine, Oak and Birch. At the first of 3 bridges, cross to the opposite bank.

Continue uphill through the forest, above a deep cut riverbed, for about 400m until another bridge is reached. The riverbank overhangs along this section so extra care is needed.

At this point cross back to the left hand side and resume journey uphill through the trees.

At the next bridge continue across the forest road and onto the rough track heading up towards the mountains, with thick forest on right (fenced), until a gate and stile is reached.

Cross the stile and follow the track above the river for about 2kms, heading towards the saddle between Donard and Commedagh.

At this point, the path crosses the river and continues uphill to the ‘Saddle’ where it meets the Mourne Wall.

At the Mourne Wall turn left and follow the wall steeply uphill towards the summit.

From the summit return by the same route, staying close to the wall until the Saddle is reached again. The cliffs on the north side of Donard known as Eagle Rocks should be avoided by walkers since the approaches are steep.

Return to Donard Park following the line of the Glen River.

Getting to the Start

Follow the one way system to the south end of Newcastle main street. Donard Car Park has ample parking.

Accessibility Grade

Managed to get to the top of Slieve Donard today. Still some snow against the wall.loads of couples climbing which was nice to see. It is also such a really quite place when the large groups have disappeared. Went from bloody bridge, first time so I do not know the Newcastle car park route. I decided against fell running it and it took me 7.20 11.10kms. my pace trebles backwards once I hit a hill. The view at the top was amazing, the sea was flat calm, Dublin, the sugar loaf, Scotland, isle of Man and Belfast and all the surrounding mountains visible. Although there are boggy areas, I do not know if boots which pull the legs off you are better than a decent pair of trainers, runners or gutties depending where you are from

My first ever proper hill/mountain walk, and my 47 year old knees are showing their age. The forest stage at the start is tougher than you would imagine, the next section is fine, the hike to the saddle isn’t easy and the final ascent along the wall required a good few short breaks. That being said, it was a wonderful experience filled with fabulous views and friendly hikers. I had hoped for a bit of cloud to move in as I reached the summit and the weather didn’t let me down. It went from clear skies to a downpour and 20m visibility in a heartbeat. Very glad to have decent waterproof clothing in the rucksack. All in all a great day. I will be back.

Copyright 2016 Outdoor Recreation Northern Ireland. All rights reserved. Contact us Disclaimer

WalkNI.com Disclaimer

Every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information. We cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions but where such are brought to our attention, the information will be amended accordingly.

Whilst all the clubs, associations and activity operators listed on this website generally operate according to which is accepted as current best practice, it is the responsibility of the participant to ensure that they are credible and all appropriate safety standards are adhered to. Outdoor Recreation Northern Ireland have, nor assume, any responsibility for the accuracy or the completeness of the information supplied or the service and level of care afforded by any of the clubs, associations and activity operators listed on this website.

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Medical Gases at New NI Hospice – Pipeline Solutions #north #west #hospice

#ni hospice

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Wed, 18 March 2015

Medical Gases at New NI Hospice

Under HPI Ireland Ltd, we have recently secured the installation works for the medical gases at the new hospice in Somerton Road.

Worked started on the purpose built adult hospice in March 2014 with a construction team led by H J Martin. The state of the art facility will consist of 18 single en-suite rooms, a Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy facility, peaceful internal gardens with a children and relatives area, a sanctuary, a Chaplain’s room and timeout space where patients and families can relax together during this important time. A separate Day Hospice providing therapies and activities and access to an outpatient clinic with an Education and Research centre.

We have been employed to alter and extend the existing medical gas systems in accordance with HTM 02.01 including:

  • Medical Oxygen Installation – Consisting of Auto-Changeover Manifolds and Emergency Reserve Manifolds located within the basement manifold room. The pipework is routed through the basement rising in three locations to the ground floor AVSUs. The pipework is then distributed to the required rooms terminating with GEM 10 outlets.
  • Medical Vacuum Installation – Consisting of a Triplex Vacuum plant with 300 litre receiver vessel, which will be located within the Basement Plant room. The pipework is routed through the basement rising in three locations to the ground floor AVSUs. The pipework is then distributed to the required rooms terminating with GEM 10 outlets.
  • Medical Air Installation (4 bar) – Consisting of Triplex Air plant with 3 No. 270 receiver vessels, which will be located within the basement LTHW pump room. The pipework is routed through the basement rising in three locations to the ground floor AVSUs. The pipework is then distributed to the required rooms terminating with GEM 10 outlets.
  • Wed, 3 December 2014
  • Wed, 24 September 2014

    We offer a free industrial & laboratory gas system survey

    Pipeline Solutions NI are proud to offer a high quality, personal and competitive industrial gas system design, manufacture and installation service throughout the UK and Ireland.

    Northern Ireland Office





  • Killyhevlin Hotel – Food NI #hospice #locations

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    Restaurants

    Killyhevlin Hotel

    You can pretty much eat round the clock at this long-established, family-run 4 star hotel. The Killyhevlin Lakeside Hotel is as much part of the landscape as its stunning lakeside setting. They take such good care of you here. Don’t you just love it when someone else does the cooking?

    Cassidy’s eggs from Derrygonnelly, Sprotts Bacon and sausages from Graham’s in Lisbellaw make their way into the breakfast Ulster fry. Truly, it will set you up for the day, but come lunchtime, why not enjoy one of their famous carvery roasts?

    Local goodies are great with morning coffee or the uber-trendy afternoon tea on vintage china. Very chic, and not at all shabby.

    Kove is a stylish restaurant with art-deco interior. Fresh local produce savoured with iconic drinks and unspoilt views of scenic Lough Erne to enhance the dining experience.

    Kove is a proud member of Taste of Ulster and this is reflected in the restaurant’s menu which offers a varied range of wholesome yet innovative dishes prepared from only the freshest local produce and served with great care and attention to detail.

    Address





    NI Hospice Care is fundraising for Northern Ireland Hospice #motels

    #ni hospice

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    Lights To Remember

    Each light and every life is special to Northern Ireland Hospice..

    Brighten the memory of someone you love by sponsoring a light on the Northern Ireland Hospice Christmas tree and help us to continue caring for those who need our help most this Christmas and throughout the coming year.

    We hope that by Christmas Eve our Christmas tree standing in the grounds of the hospice in Belfast, will be shining brightly with thousands of lights shining in memory of all our loved ones, a beloved child, a mother, father, husband, wife, sister, brother, relative or dear friend…

    President Northern Ireland Hospice

    Read full story

    At Northern Ireland Hospice, caring is at the heart of everything we do. We care for over 3,000 adults, children and young people living in the shadow of a terminal illness both in Hospice and in the community. We look after every patient s nursing, medical, social, spiritual and emotional needs with support for the family continuing into bereavement. Our services are available 24 hours a day, every day of the year and there is no charge. Your support is important to us as we rely heavily on legacies and donations to fund our services.

    Charity Registration No. NIC102337

    Donation summary





    Killyhevlin Hotel – Food NI #park #lane #hotel

    #killyhevlin hotel

    #

    Restaurants

    Killyhevlin Hotel

    You can pretty much eat round the clock at this long-established, family-run 4 star hotel. The Killyhevlin Lakeside Hotel is as much part of the landscape as its stunning lakeside setting. They take such good care of you here. Don’t you just love it when someone else does the cooking?

    Cassidy’s eggs from Derrygonnelly, Sprotts Bacon and sausages from Graham’s in Lisbellaw make their way into the breakfast Ulster fry. Truly, it will set you up for the day, but come lunchtime, why not enjoy one of their famous carvery roasts?

    Local goodies are great with morning coffee or the uber-trendy afternoon tea on vintage china. Very chic, and not at all shabby.

    Kove is a stylish restaurant with art-deco interior. Fresh local produce savoured with iconic drinks and unspoilt views of scenic Lough Erne to enhance the dining experience.

    Kove is a proud member of Taste of Ulster and this is reflected in the restaurant’s menu which offers a varied range of wholesome yet innovative dishes prepared from only the freshest local produce and served with great care and attention to detail.

    Address