Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice #hospice #of #dayton #jobs

#hospice tampa

#

Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice

You’re not from hospice, are you?

They ask because they aren’t ready for hospice. They may equate it with death. They may not want to stop medical treatments meant to cure or prolong life, even if their suffering is intense.

Enter the palliative care movement — aimed at providing the comfort of hospice for people who aren’t yet at the end of life.

The distinction is important both to patients and the physicians seeking to help them. And while it is touted as a less expensive way to provide better care, it also represents a new line of business for health care facilities.

Farmer is the medical director of Chapters Health Palliative Care. It’s affiliated with LifePath Hospice, the major hospice provider in Hillsborough County.

Chapters Health Palliative Care started in 2006 for patients who need help managing their pain and other symptoms. Many of them are still getting curative treatment such as chemotherapy and radiation, which hospice patients — defined by Medicare as people with six months or less to live have usually abandoned.

Hospices around the country see a growing demand for palliative care, especially as b aby boomers age and develop chronic illnesses that require comfort care.

Hospitals, too, are expanding their palliative care services, often in coordination with hospice institutions, since research findings show that it improves patient outcomes. It is thought that patients who are less stressed by pain are better able to stabilize or even improve their health.

The palliative care program at the region’s largest hospital, Tampa General, served 1,300 patients last year. The hospital’s foundation is about halfway toward its goal of raising $320,000 to convert some hospital rooms into palliative care suites.

At Suncoast Hospice, the dominant provider in Pinellas County, new chief executive officer Rafael Sciullo plans to expand the palliative care program, which last year served nearly 1,730 people.

Suncoast already has a home-based palliative care program and a consult service to two hospitals, Mease Countryside Hospital and Mease Dunedin Hospital, said Sciullo. He wants to expand the consults to more hospitals, and increase marketing for home-based care.

We do want to dispel any myths that it’s all about dying, said Sciullo. Because it isn’t.

Pasco-Hernando Hospice has an in-home palliative care program for patients who don’t qualify for hospice. Gulfside Regional Hospice in New Port Richey started a spin-off company, Pasco Palliative Care LLC, which provides services to non-hospice patients at several facilities, including Morton Plant North Bay Hospital in New Port Richey and Medical Center of Trinity, said chief executive officer Linda Ward.

It’s really going to grow, said Ward. Many hospitals have come on board to recognize that palliative care helps prevent readmissions.

That’s important at a time when the Medicare program is penalizing hospitals whose patients are readmitted too soon.

Palliative care could also provide new Medicare income to hospices, who stand to lose money if the federal government clamps down on who qualifies for Medicare’s hospice benefit.

Why is Medicare eyeing hospice payments? Because most of Medicare spending on hospice in 2011 — $13.8 billion — was for patients who lived longer than six months, the trigger for the hospice benefit. While it’s often not possible to predict when a person will die, that large imbalance, critics say, indicates that some hospices are admitting people who should not qualify for the Medicare hospice benefit.

As a physician, Farmer says he sees every day how palliative care improves the lives of patients who face not only major illness, but also complicated treatment plans that can be difficult to navigate outside of the hospital. In fact, he said, LifePath’s parent company began its palliative program as a consult service at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Florida Hospital, both in Tampa. Patients were leaving the hospital and going on to live for years at home but without a coordinated plan to address their symptoms, he said.

Pain is just one issue. An emphysema patient, for instance, might also need low doses of morphine to help him deal with severe shortness of breath. The palliative team helps patients prepare advanced directives explaining what kind of health care they want as they reach the end of their lives.

What you find is a lot of these doctors know that (their patients) needed this type of care, but they just didn’t have the time, said Farmer.

Denise Alessandro is the sole caregiver for her 86-year-old mother, who has dementia, advanced arthritis and other ailments.

We didn’t feel Mom was quite ready at that point for hospice, but we wanted some direction, the Apollo Beach woman said. Farmer helped them with some small changes that made a huge difference, from getting them a hospital bed and wheelchair, to connecting Alessandro with caregiver support groups.

In recent weeks, Alessandro’s mother began qualifying for hospice care. As is the case in many families, the time in palliative care is making that transition easier to accept.

I think it’s a wonderful program, Alessandro said of palliative care. I wish more people knew about it.

Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice 04/27/13 [Last modified: Saturday, April 27, 2013 9:14pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints





Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior

#solari hospice

#

Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior Hospice Care

February 09, 2011 11:20 AM Eastern Standard Time

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–( BUSINESS WIRE )–The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published an article in its February 2 issue titled “Association of Hospice Agency Profit Status, With Patient Diagnosis, Location of Care, and Length of Stay.” Solari Hospice Care wants to emphasize that this article offers no supporting research or evidence that nonprofit hospice programs provide better care to terminally ill patients, are more ethical, or are more compassionate than for-profit hospices.

Solari Hospice Care would like to address the rampant misinformation regarding for-profit hospice care and stress that the fundamental principle of hospice will always be providing people with the greatest quality of life in the time they have left.

With more than one million people in the United States receiving hospice care in 2009 1. it’s apparent that hospices meet a very important need in this country — and to suggest that the primary motivation is financial does a disservice to the devoted hospice staffs caring for their patients facing life-limiting illnesses.

“Having IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit status does not automatically equate to superior care for terminally ill patients,” said Gary W. Polsky , chief executive officer , Solari Hospice Care. “There is no correlation between the profit status of a hospice program and the quality of care provided.”

So what is similar between nonprofit and for-profit hospices? The regulations are identical. All licensed and certified hospices must comply with state law and the Code of Federal Regulations governing hospice care. In addition, Medicare’s reimbursement rate is fixed regardless of the care needs of individual patients, the services patients receive, or the tax status of the hospice providing the care.

“For those who continue to pit nonprofit hospices against for-profit hospices, it’s my opinion that you are fighting the wrong battle,” Polsky remarked. “What we all should be advocating for is helping people to live with dignity and comfort by providing comprehensive and compassionate hospice care. Hospice practices, including quality of care, depend on an organization’s staff and leadership, not tax status. In any field of business, there are ‘good’ companies and ‘bad’ companies, and hospice is no different.”

According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s (NHPCO) recent comprehensive survey, the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care, detailed analysis of data submitted by hospices shows no difference in family caregivers’ evaluation of the quality of care based on a hospice program’s profit status.

Polsky added, “As a member of the NHPCO, I am proud to say that Solari Hospice Care exceeds NHPCO’s Standards of Practice for Hospice Programs and fully complies with all hospice regulations.”

“I am focused on and passionate about providing the highest quality of care to patients facing complex end-of-life issues,” Polsky commented. “My education in health care administration and my experience in the health care field over the years have given me the opportunity to work with some of the most skilled doctors, nurses, specialists, counselors and caring staff members. When I founded Solari Hospice Care in 2002, I knew that I wanted and expected the same level of passion and dedication from my staff in Las Vegas and Houston. Hospice patients deserve nothing less than excellent care specific to their unique needs.”

Polsky concluded, “Ultimately, the most important measure of a hospice should be the quality of care provided to patients — not its tax status.”

With this insight, you and your loved ones will be better informed how hospice care can address symptoms and pain management, ease suffering and grief, as well as provide emotional and spiritual support during the final phase of life. To learn more about the issues, opportunities and trends impacting the hospice industry, please read the new CEO Viewpoint blog from Solari Hospice Care’s Gary Polsky at http://bit.ly/f6evtE.

1 “Hospice Care in America,” National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, October 2010

About Solari Hospice Care

Contacts





Zafira not starting, ignition goes on, but no clicks from starter FIXED


#

Welcome to the MSE Forums

Forum Social Team

Zafira not starting, ignition goes on, but no clicks from starter FIXED 14th Jul 12 at 5:23 PM

Wife’s Zafira is not starting again.
The last 2 times this happened it was the starter, replaced and all was OK.

The difference between the last 2 times and this time is that the solenoid on the starter is not clicking (still clicking before)
And when I took the starter off it was still free. (was jammed before)

Also checked the old starter at the 2 live connections while off the car.
1) starter starts to spin OK
2) the solenoid clicks OK

Tried a new starter anyway but same symptoms.

The other symptoms is that the central locking is sluggish, and feels like the battery is quite low – however same symptoms as when the starter did go previously.
When trying to start all the dashboard lights go out. (or is that normal)

I have checked the earth wire from the starter to the battery earth and no resistance – so OK here
The battery was tested with Gunson’s Start check battery tester and was 75-100% so seems OK here too.
Battery has been smart charged anyway just in case.

It would appear that the solenoid is not getting power to get the starter spinning.

Any mechanics here that know what to check now, or what the likely cause is ?

Last edited by JesseJames; 17-07-2012 at 8:19 PM. Reason: set title to FIXED

Glad you like it!

If your dash lights are going out and theres barely enough juice to activate the central locking, while I’d check all major connections, I’d bet the battery is just about to give up the ghost.
Modern batteries appear to be all or nothing and can go off very suddenly.
Check the voltage across the battery terminals and if its less than 10.5 – 11 volts, it’s very tired. Get it started with a jump, check across the terminals again and make sure it’s at least 13v with the engine running, ideally around 14-14.5 volts to make sure the alternator is fine. Anything higher is just as much a problem too!

Glad you like it!

Users saying Thanks (1)

It ended up being the battery – a shorted cell.

What threw me was that it initially was showing OK.
After charging it was not showing OK and 10.6 volts
I checked it an hour later to confirm readings and checked out OK with around 12.5 volts – so intermittent readings.

So wasted my time and effort changing the starter motor twice, and that’s not easy to do on a Zafira.

Glad you like it!

Sorry!

There are currently no thanks for this post.

Sorry, thread closed.

This thread is closed, therefore you are unable to respond.

Sign up for MoneySaving Emails

Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Byebye! I’m about to stop work twitter, to instead spend glorious time with Mrs mini MSE. Wishing u a lovely summer. See u in 10 days.

WARNING Did you start Uni in or after 2012? The interest’s rising to 6.1%; yet it doesnt work like you think. See https://t.co/IQ8f0Vyetu RT

12 rail firms agree to refund passengers who pay too much for tickets

  • Want a special edition ‘Buy and Keep’ film from Sky? Your DVD may not have all the bells and whistles

  • A new app for railcards is en route

  • Lloyds, Halifax and Bank of Scotland to pay �283 million compensation for mortgage arrears

  • Co-op Energy offers customers up to �150 to stick with it � but is it worth it?

    More News

    • A year of fighting to break the link between mental illness and money problems�

    • How to make a tweet/Facebook post go viral � 7 lessons from �You don�t need your polling card�

    • Do I need to show my boarding pass at airport shops? (video & guide)

    • When will your student loan be written off?

    • Should you buy euros/dollars now, before the general election?


    3 Ways to Respond to a Pennsylvania Traffic Citation #pleading #not #guilty


    #

    How to Respond to a Pennsylvania Traffic Citation

    Traffic citations are one of those annoying things you just need to deal with. If you are guilty of the offense, pay your fine. However, if you want to fight your ticket, then you should enter a not guilty plea and prepare for your trial. Remember to hire a traffic ticket attorney if you feel overwhelmed or are unsure about how to prepare for your trial.

    Steps Edit

    Method One of Three:
    Paying Your Traffic Fine Edit

    Ask if you can pay in installments. Most courts will let you pay in monthly installments if you can’t afford to pay your entire ticket all at once. To set up an installment plan, stop into traffic court and appear before the judge. Take your citation with you. [1]

    • The citation will tell you which court you should appear at.

    Pay in person. You can stop into the court and pay using a money order, personal check, debit card, or credit card. Look at your ticket to see where you must go to pay. [2] Make sure to get a receipt for your payment.

    Pay by mail instead. Stopping into court might be inconvenient. In that situation, you can pay by mail. You’ll need to check the “guilty” box on the ticket. Read the instructions carefully. [3]

    • You can pay through the mail using a check or money order.

    Pay online if that is an option. Some courts might let you pay online. This can be particularly convenient if you want to pay using a debit or credit card but don’t want to stop into the court. Check the court’s website to see if online payment is an option. [4]

    Method Two of Three:
    Pleading Not Guilty Edit

    Read the code sections you were cited for violating. Before deciding to fight your ticket, you should realistically assess whether you in fact broke the law. Look at your ticket to see what section of the Pennsylvania legal code you allegedly violated. You can read the law online.

    • Look to see if the law has any vague terms you can argue about. For example, you might have been cited for reckless driving. [5] The term “reckless” is open to interpretation. You can argue that your behavior—whatever it was—doesn’t rise to the level of recklessness.

    Enter a not guilty plea. Contact the appropriate court to check how you can enter your plea. Generally, you need to stop into the court in person to enter a not guilty plea, but some courts will let you enter the plea by mail, phone, or online. [6]

    • Avoid delay. You only get 10 days to enter your not guilty plea. If you miss the deadline, then you’ll be guilty.

    Post collateral with the court. You’ll need to pay the traffic ticket fine and any court costs upfront. If you win at trial, the ticket fine will be refunded to you. [7] However, you won’t get the court costs back.

    Attend a pretrial conference, if necessary. In some courts, you need to attend a conference where you’ll discuss possibly pleading guilty to the traffic charge. In exchange, the prosecutor will offer reduced penalties. You don’t have to accept any plea deal, though you should consider it. [8]

    • If you can’t reach an agreement, then the judge will set a date for your trial.

    Hire a lawyer, if necessary. A traffic ticket lawyer can be a big help. They will know what evidence to collect to bolster your case, and they understand the trial process. However, it might not make financial sense to hire a traffic attorney, especially if the fine is low.

    • To find an attorney, contact the Pennsylvania Bar Association’s lawyer referral service at 800-692-7375, Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. [9]
    • Also check if you can hire the lawyer for an hour of advice. They might be willing to walk you through the process of going to trial.

    Method Three of Three:
    Fighting the Ticket at Your Trial Edit

    Gather evidence. You’ll need to present proof that you aren’t guilty of the traffic violation. The evidence you use will depend on the circumstances. Consider the following:

    • If you were stopped for speeding, you can make several arguments. For example, you might claim the cop pulled over the wrong car.
    • You might also argue that the technology used to clock you is error-prone. Look at your ticket and see if VASCAR technology was used. This technology is often wrong. [10]

    Find witnesses. You can also have people testify on your behalf at trial. Get their names and telephone numbers, so you can notify them of the trial date. For example, try to identify any of the following, who will make great witnesses:

    • If someone was in the car with you, they can testify about what you did. For example, they can testify you weren’t speeding.
    • Another person on the road or on the sidewalk can testify as to how you were driving. A witness like this, who doesn’t know you, is often very persuasive.

    Make an opening statement . If you have a lawyer, they will handle everything for you at trial, including the opening statement. Otherwise, you’ll want to preview for the judge what the evidence will be. A good opening statement shouldn’t be any longer than necessary.

    • Avoid making arguments. Instead, you should simply lay out a roadmap of what the evidence will be.
    • Use the phrase, “As the evidence will show….” For example, “As the evidence will show, I was going only 44 miles per hour. You’ll hear from Alice Joyce, who was a passenger in the car. She will testify that she bent forward to change the radio station and saw the speedometer right before I was pulled over.”

    Cross-examine witnesses. The prosecutor should put on witnesses first. Typically, they will call the officer who pulled you over. You will have a chance to cross-examine them. [11] Consider what you hope to achieve with cross-examination:

    • You might want to ask the cop a series of questions about your car. For example, have them explain the make, model, year, and color. You can also ask the cop what the weather was like or what you were wearing. If the officer makes a mistake, then you can argue later that they couldn’t really see that you were speeding.
    • You can also challenge how the cop measured your speed. For example, ask when was the last time they calibrated their speed gun. VASCAR technology should be calibrated every 60 days. [12]

    Present your own case. You get to go second. Call any of your witnesses and ask them questions. You may also testify on your own behalf. If you have a lawyer, they will ask you questions. However, if you are representing yourself, then you will need to give your testimony in the form of a speech.

    Make a closing argument . This is your chance to pull together all of the evidence and explain to the judge how it supports your case. The prosecutor should go first, and you’ll go second. [13]

    • Remember to explain away any negative information that came out. For example, you might have admitted to the cop that you were speeding. On the witness stand, you might have clarified that you misspoke because you were nervous.

    Receive the verdict. The judge should deliver the verdict soon after all evidence has been submitted. If you win, the collateral you posted will be returned to you and your driving record will not be affected.

    • If you lose, you can appeal to the Court of Common Pleas. [14] Ask the court clerk how to appeal.

    Grand Canyon National Park Lodges – You – re Not Just Close

    #bright motels

    #

    Inside the National Park. On the Rim of the Grand Canyon.

    We’re Not Just Close. We’re There.

  • The “Must-See” Historic Village

    No Visit to the Grand Canyon is Complete Without Experiencing the South Rim Historic Village

  • Make a Grand Trip Grander – Go by Rail

    Keep your car out of the park and let the train do the driving

  • Exploring the Grand Canyon is truly a breathtaking experience and just steps from your room

  • Explore America’s Best Idea

    Discover your parks

    Share your Grand Canyon
    Experience with us.

    Winter Escape Vacation Package

  • El Tovar Romance Package 2016

  • Take the Train to the Canyon

  • Winter Specials at Maswik Lodge

  • Experience the Must-See Historic Village

  • Explore America’s Best Idea

  • Learning Lodging Package

    Grand Canyon National Park Lodges

    Grand Canyon National Park, founded in 1919, is one of the oldest national parks in the United States and is home to the awe-inspiring Grand Canyon, a 1-mile deep gorge carved by the Colorado River.

    Long considered one of the natural wonders of the world, visitors flock to see this unique combination of geological color and erosional forms. With Grand Canyon National Park Lodges providing the premier in-park lodging at the South Rim with iconic lodges like El Tovar, you’ll find everything you need to plan and enjoy your visit to the Grand Canyon.

    When you stay at Grand Canyon National Park Lodges, you re not just close you re there!

    What s Happening at Grand Canyon South Rim





  • Hospice care is not about – giving up hope – Prayers for

    #hospice prayers

    #

    Hospice care is not about giving up hope

    When I tell folks I am a hospice chaplain, I often get puzzled looks. Most people do not understand what hospice is about. Just as often, I am told “That must be hard,” or “You must be a special person.” What they mean by that is, they can t imagine a job such as mine could be anything but depressing. The truth is, many people are afraid to talk about hospice.

    The specialized health care program known as “hospice” today was introduced by a British physician, Cicely Saunders, in 1967. But even before Dr. Saunders organized this program, the work of hospice was done as a community initiative. It came out of people s loving support for their neighbors and friends as they faced life-threatening illness. The term “hospice” was used in Medieval times to denote a place of rest or shelter for folks who were ill or weary from a long journey.

    Thanks to Dr. Saunders and other pioneers, hospice is now available in this country to anyone who has been diagnosed with an illness for which there is no medical cure. Hospice patients come from a variety of backgrounds, ranging from different ages, social classes, and illnesses. Today, hospice care involves the work of health care professionals who are trained to deliver symptom management and to provide guidance, emotional and spiritual support related to end of life issues. However, the movement and philosophy of hospice continues to depend on community: local volunteers are an integral part of the hospice team, and cards and visits from friends mean a lot to those who are ill and/or unable to leave their homes.

    For many people, the word “hospice” has come to be associated with “death” and “giving up hope.” When a loved one is diagnosed with a terminal or life-limiting illness, it is common to feel as though the world is crumbling and life can never feel good or normal or light again. But even when medical treatments cannot offer us hope for a cure, there can still be hope – for meaning, for connections, for quality of life, for meaningful time.

    People are surprised sometimes to find that life can still be beautiful and enriching in the midst of illness. Hospice families (or any families struggling with illnesses) have many difficult moments marked by sadness, anger, or exhaustion. But they also have wonderful moments that are full of life. I see families doing that everyday saying things they might not have thought to say, reminiscing and reaffirming, celebrating birthdays, holding each other.

    A life-threatening diagnosis changes one s priorities. When our bodies are failing, we have to become more selective about how to spend our energy. When time is an issue, we are more aware about how we want to spend it. The truth is none of us knows how much time we really have. Life is a gift, and it is meant to be lived – fully and richly, to its very last drop.

    Post navigation





    Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice #santa #monica #motels

    #hospice tampa

    #

    Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice

    You’re not from hospice, are you?

    They ask because they aren’t ready for hospice. They may equate it with death. They may not want to stop medical treatments meant to cure or prolong life, even if their suffering is intense.

    Enter the palliative care movement — aimed at providing the comfort of hospice for people who aren’t yet at the end of life.

    The distinction is important both to patients and the physicians seeking to help them. And while it is touted as a less expensive way to provide better care, it also represents a new line of business for health care facilities.

    Farmer is the medical director of Chapters Health Palliative Care. It’s affiliated with LifePath Hospice, the major hospice provider in Hillsborough County.

    Chapters Health Palliative Care started in 2006 for patients who need help managing their pain and other symptoms. Many of them are still getting curative treatment such as chemotherapy and radiation, which hospice patients — defined by Medicare as people with six months or less to live have usually abandoned.

    Hospices around the country see a growing demand for palliative care, especially as b aby boomers age and develop chronic illnesses that require comfort care.

    Hospitals, too, are expanding their palliative care services, often in coordination with hospice institutions, since research findings show that it improves patient outcomes. It is thought that patients who are less stressed by pain are better able to stabilize or even improve their health.

    The palliative care program at the region’s largest hospital, Tampa General, served 1,300 patients last year. The hospital’s foundation is about halfway toward its goal of raising $320,000 to convert some hospital rooms into palliative care suites.

    At Suncoast Hospice, the dominant provider in Pinellas County, new chief executive officer Rafael Sciullo plans to expand the palliative care program, which last year served nearly 1,730 people.

    Suncoast already has a home-based palliative care program and a consult service to two hospitals, Mease Countryside Hospital and Mease Dunedin Hospital, said Sciullo. He wants to expand the consults to more hospitals, and increase marketing for home-based care.

    We do want to dispel any myths that it’s all about dying, said Sciullo. Because it isn’t.

    Pasco-Hernando Hospice has an in-home palliative care program for patients who don’t qualify for hospice. Gulfside Regional Hospice in New Port Richey started a spin-off company, Pasco Palliative Care LLC, which provides services to non-hospice patients at several facilities, including Morton Plant North Bay Hospital in New Port Richey and Medical Center of Trinity, said chief executive officer Linda Ward.

    It’s really going to grow, said Ward. Many hospitals have come on board to recognize that palliative care helps prevent readmissions.

    That’s important at a time when the Medicare program is penalizing hospitals whose patients are readmitted too soon.

    Palliative care could also provide new Medicare income to hospices, who stand to lose money if the federal government clamps down on who qualifies for Medicare’s hospice benefit.

    Why is Medicare eyeing hospice payments? Because most of Medicare spending on hospice in 2011 — $13.8 billion — was for patients who lived longer than six months, the trigger for the hospice benefit. While it’s often not possible to predict when a person will die, that large imbalance, critics say, indicates that some hospices are admitting people who should not qualify for the Medicare hospice benefit.

    As a physician, Farmer says he sees every day how palliative care improves the lives of patients who face not only major illness, but also complicated treatment plans that can be difficult to navigate outside of the hospital. In fact, he said, LifePath’s parent company began its palliative program as a consult service at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Florida Hospital, both in Tampa. Patients were leaving the hospital and going on to live for years at home but without a coordinated plan to address their symptoms, he said.

    Pain is just one issue. An emphysema patient, for instance, might also need low doses of morphine to help him deal with severe shortness of breath. The palliative team helps patients prepare advanced directives explaining what kind of health care they want as they reach the end of their lives.

    What you find is a lot of these doctors know that (their patients) needed this type of care, but they just didn’t have the time, said Farmer.

    Denise Alessandro is the sole caregiver for her 86-year-old mother, who has dementia, advanced arthritis and other ailments.

    We didn’t feel Mom was quite ready at that point for hospice, but we wanted some direction, the Apollo Beach woman said. Farmer helped them with some small changes that made a huge difference, from getting them a hospital bed and wheelchair, to connecting Alessandro with caregiver support groups.

    In recent weeks, Alessandro’s mother began qualifying for hospice care. As is the case in many families, the time in palliative care is making that transition easier to accept.

    I think it’s a wonderful program, Alessandro said of palliative care. I wish more people knew about it.

    Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice 04/27/13 [Last modified: Saturday, April 27, 2013 9:14pm]
    Photo reprints | Article reprints





    Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior

    #solari hospice

    #

    Solari Hospice Care Outlines Why Nonprofit Status Does Not Equate to Superior Hospice Care

    February 09, 2011 11:20 AM Eastern Standard Time

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–( BUSINESS WIRE )–The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published an article in its February 2 issue titled “Association of Hospice Agency Profit Status, With Patient Diagnosis, Location of Care, and Length of Stay.” Solari Hospice Care wants to emphasize that this article offers no supporting research or evidence that nonprofit hospice programs provide better care to terminally ill patients, are more ethical, or are more compassionate than for-profit hospices.

    Solari Hospice Care would like to address the rampant misinformation regarding for-profit hospice care and stress that the fundamental principle of hospice will always be providing people with the greatest quality of life in the time they have left.

    With more than one million people in the United States receiving hospice care in 2009 1. it’s apparent that hospices meet a very important need in this country — and to suggest that the primary motivation is financial does a disservice to the devoted hospice staffs caring for their patients facing life-limiting illnesses.

    “Having IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit status does not automatically equate to superior care for terminally ill patients,” said Gary W. Polsky , chief executive officer , Solari Hospice Care. “There is no correlation between the profit status of a hospice program and the quality of care provided.”

    So what is similar between nonprofit and for-profit hospices? The regulations are identical. All licensed and certified hospices must comply with state law and the Code of Federal Regulations governing hospice care. In addition, Medicare’s reimbursement rate is fixed regardless of the care needs of individual patients, the services patients receive, or the tax status of the hospice providing the care.

    “For those who continue to pit nonprofit hospices against for-profit hospices, it’s my opinion that you are fighting the wrong battle,” Polsky remarked. “What we all should be advocating for is helping people to live with dignity and comfort by providing comprehensive and compassionate hospice care. Hospice practices, including quality of care, depend on an organization’s staff and leadership, not tax status. In any field of business, there are ‘good’ companies and ‘bad’ companies, and hospice is no different.”

    According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s (NHPCO) recent comprehensive survey, the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care, detailed analysis of data submitted by hospices shows no difference in family caregivers’ evaluation of the quality of care based on a hospice program’s profit status.

    Polsky added, “As a member of the NHPCO, I am proud to say that Solari Hospice Care exceeds NHPCO’s Standards of Practice for Hospice Programs and fully complies with all hospice regulations.”

    “I am focused on and passionate about providing the highest quality of care to patients facing complex end-of-life issues,” Polsky commented. “My education in health care administration and my experience in the health care field over the years have given me the opportunity to work with some of the most skilled doctors, nurses, specialists, counselors and caring staff members. When I founded Solari Hospice Care in 2002, I knew that I wanted and expected the same level of passion and dedication from my staff in Las Vegas and Houston. Hospice patients deserve nothing less than excellent care specific to their unique needs.”

    Polsky concluded, “Ultimately, the most important measure of a hospice should be the quality of care provided to patients — not its tax status.”

    With this insight, you and your loved ones will be better informed how hospice care can address symptoms and pain management, ease suffering and grief, as well as provide emotional and spiritual support during the final phase of life. To learn more about the issues, opportunities and trends impacting the hospice industry, please read the new CEO Viewpoint blog from Solari Hospice Care’s Gary Polsky at http://bit.ly/f6evtE.

    1 “Hospice Care in America,” National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, October 2010

    About Solari Hospice Care

    Contacts





    Nevada Division of Insurance #auto #insurance #companies #that #do #not #use #credit


    #

    Understanding Auto Insurance

    What is auto insurance?

    Auto insurance is a product that provides financial protection for cars, trucks, motorcycles, and other road vehicles from loss, physical damage and/or bodily injury liability resulting from traffic collision, theft or other losses.

    By law, all drivers in Nevada must purchase auto insurance.

    How much auto insurance am I required to have in Nevada?

    Nevada drivers are required to have protection levels of at least $15,000 per person for bodily injury, $30,000 per accident for bodily injury, and $10,000 per accident for property damage. This minimum level of coverage is often referred to as 15/30/10. It is possible to purchase more coverage protection than the minimum level of coverage required.
    Liability insurance coverage protects you only if you are liable for an accident and pays for the injuries to others or damages to their property. It does not provide coverage for you, your passengers who are your resident relatives, or your property. Property Damage coverage is also available but is a separate coverage and is not required by law.

    What other types of coverage can I buy?

    Drivers who want to protect their vehicles against physical damage can need to purchase:

    • Collision – This coverage is for damage to your vehicle resulting from a collision, regardless of who is at fault. It provides for repair of the damage to your vehicle or a monetary payment to compensate you for your loss.
    • Comprehensive – This coverage insures you against theft or other damage to your vehicle resulting from causes other than collision. Other causes may include damage from wind, falling objects, fire, flood or vandalism.

    None of the above insurance coverages will pay for your injuries or your passengers’ injuries in the case of an accident.

    The following two coverages help ensure that everyone in your vehicle has the protection needed to pay for medical treatment costs.

    • Uninsured / Underinsured Motorist (UM/UIM) – If you or your passengers are injured in an accident in which the other driver is at fault and either does not have insurance (uninsured) or does not have enough insurance (underinsured) to pay all of your loss, this coverage pays for the medical costs of you and your passengers.
    • Medical Payments (Medpay) – This pays for treating injuries to you and your passengers without regard to fault. It also pays for treating injuries resulting from being struck as a pedestrian by a motor vehicle.

    What is a deductible?

    Your auto insurance deductible is the amount of money you must pay out-of-pocket before your insurance compensates you. A deductible only applies to Collision and Comprehensive coverages.

    For example: You have a Subaru Outback that has Collision Coverage with a $1,000 deductible. You rear end another driver, and your Subaru is damaged. You take it to the body shop and the total cost to repair all the damage is $6,500. In this scenario, you would pay the body shop $1,000. This is your deductible. Once you have met your $1,000 deductible the insurance company will pay the remaining $5,500.

    How does my deductible affect the cost of my insurance?

    Generally, the lower your deductible, the higher the cost of your insurance will be. The higher your deductible is, the lower the cost of your insurance will be. This is because the insurance company is assuming more or less liability for repair costs.

    How do I buy auto insurance?

    When buying insurance, the Division of Insurance recommends that you seek the advice of a qualified insurance professional. There are three types of professionals that typically sell insurance:

    Independent agents: can sell insurance from multiple unaffiliated insurers.

    Exclusive agents: can only sell insurance from the company or group of companies with which they are affiliated.

    Direct writers: are insurers that do not always use agents as intermediaries; instead, some of their employees are licensed as agents in Nevada and are authorized to sell insurance.

    Regardless of what type of professional you choose to use, it is important to confirm that they are licensed to conduct business in the State of Nevada. You can check the license of an insurance professional or company here.

    Remember – Always verify that an insurance company or agent are licensed before giving them personal information or payment.

    How much should I expect auto insurance to cost?

    Insurance companies look at a number of different factors when determining the cost of your insurance. These factors include, but are not limited to:

    • Driving record
    • Claims history
    • Where you live
    • Gender and age
    • Marital Status
    • Make and model of your vehicle
    • Credit

    Nevada has one of the most competitive and healthy auto insurance markets in the country. Shopping for insurance may allow you to achieve competitive pricing.

    To learn more about how insurance companies determine the cost of your auto insurance, you can read our Consumer’s Guide to Auto Insurance Rates .

    To learn about the use of your credit information by insurance companies read our Frequently Asked Questions About Credit-Based Insurance Scores .


    Hospice care is not about – giving up hope – Prayers for

    #hospice prayers

    #

    Hospice care is not about giving up hope

    When I tell folks I am a hospice chaplain, I often get puzzled looks. Most people do not understand what hospice is about. Just as often, I am told “That must be hard,” or “You must be a special person.” What they mean by that is, they can t imagine a job such as mine could be anything but depressing. The truth is, many people are afraid to talk about hospice.

    The specialized health care program known as “hospice” today was introduced by a British physician, Cicely Saunders, in 1967. But even before Dr. Saunders organized this program, the work of hospice was done as a community initiative. It came out of people s loving support for their neighbors and friends as they faced life-threatening illness. The term “hospice” was used in Medieval times to denote a place of rest or shelter for folks who were ill or weary from a long journey.

    Thanks to Dr. Saunders and other pioneers, hospice is now available in this country to anyone who has been diagnosed with an illness for which there is no medical cure. Hospice patients come from a variety of backgrounds, ranging from different ages, social classes, and illnesses. Today, hospice care involves the work of health care professionals who are trained to deliver symptom management and to provide guidance, emotional and spiritual support related to end of life issues. However, the movement and philosophy of hospice continues to depend on community: local volunteers are an integral part of the hospice team, and cards and visits from friends mean a lot to those who are ill and/or unable to leave their homes.

    For many people, the word “hospice” has come to be associated with “death” and “giving up hope.” When a loved one is diagnosed with a terminal or life-limiting illness, it is common to feel as though the world is crumbling and life can never feel good or normal or light again. But even when medical treatments cannot offer us hope for a cure, there can still be hope – for meaning, for connections, for quality of life, for meaningful time.

    People are surprised sometimes to find that life can still be beautiful and enriching in the midst of illness. Hospice families (or any families struggling with illnesses) have many difficult moments marked by sadness, anger, or exhaustion. But they also have wonderful moments that are full of life. I see families doing that everyday saying things they might not have thought to say, reminiscing and reaffirming, celebrating birthdays, holding each other.

    A life-threatening diagnosis changes one s priorities. When our bodies are failing, we have to become more selective about how to spend our energy. When time is an issue, we are more aware about how we want to spend it. The truth is none of us knows how much time we really have. Life is a gift, and it is meant to be lived – fully and richly, to its very last drop.

    Post navigation





    Hospice of the Sacred Heart – You – re Not Alone #homecare

    #sacred heart hospice

    #

    Welcome to Hospice of the Sacred Heart

    Hospice affirms life, but never denies death. Recognizes dying as a natural process of life. Honors wishes. Offers choices. Brings commitment and compassion. Strengthens families. Is about comfort, care, hope, and choice.

    Hospice of the Sacred Heart is here to help you in any way we can, so that your involvement in the hospice experience will be as uncomplicated and fulfilling as possible.

    This website has a comprehensive list of information and resources that can help you make a more informed healthcare decision regarding hospice care.

    Our highly experienced staff is dedicated to providing the most compassionate and highest quality hospice care for your loved one and you. Each of our staff members shares a passionate belief in the hospice concept and the benefits it provides to our patients. Each has been intimately involved with hospice care for many years. Each has been privileged to share first hand the unique lessons, life experiences and gifts that hospice brings to its patients and their families. Please spend as much time as you like here to review subjects of interest in more detail. Also, please return often to learn more about:

    • The hospice philosophy of care
    • How hospice can be a beneficial solution to the situation you face
    • The many ways that we at Hospice of the Sacred Heart can help you





    Ten Facts about Hospice Care You May Not Know #weekend #hotel #deals

    #hospice quotes

    #

    Ten Facts about Hospice Care You May Not Know

    For Immediate Release:
    April 3, 2013

    NHPCO Stresses that Hospice is about Living Fully

    (Alexandria, Va) – Some people have the wrong idea about hospice care. They think that hospice is only about dying and that hospice is the place you go when there’s nothing more to be done. Nothing could be further from the truth. Hospice helps people with a life-limiting illness focus on living as fully as possible for as long as possible.

    The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization is working to people understand that hospice brings comfort, dignity, and peace to people facing a terminal illness. Hospice provides support and care for the family caregivers, too.

    Last year, 1.65 million dying Americans were cared for by hospice. Yet, there are some important facts about hospice that people don’t know. And this may be keeping people from getting the best care possible, when they need it most.

    1. Hospice is not a place—it’s high-quality care that focuses on comfort and quality of life.
    2. Hospice is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, and most insurance plans. Fear of costs should never prevent a person from accessing hospice care.
    3. Hospice serves anyone with a life-limiting illness, regardless of age or type of illness.
    4. Hospice provides expert medical care as well as spiritual and emotional support to patients and families.
    5. Research has shown that the majority of Americans would prefer to be at home at the end of life—hospice makes this possible for most people.
    6. Hospice serves people living in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.
    7. Hospice patients and families can receive care for six months or longer.
    8. A person may keep his or her referring physician involved while receiving hospice care.
    9. Hospice offers grief and bereavement services to family members to help them adjust to the loss in their lives.
    10. Research has shown people receiving hospice care can live longer than similar patients who do not opt for hospice.

    If this information about hospice surprises you, take the time to find out more. The best time to learn about hospice is before you or someone in your family is facing a medical crisis.

    For more information, visit NHPCO’s Caring Connections at www.caringinfo.org or call the InfoLine at 800-658-8898.





    Grand Canyon National Park Lodges – You – re Not Just Close

    #bright motels

    #

    Inside the National Park. On the Rim of the Grand Canyon.

    We’re Not Just Close. We’re There.

  • The “Must-See” Historic Village

    No Visit to the Grand Canyon is Complete Without Experiencing the South Rim Historic Village

  • Make a Grand Trip Grander – Go by Rail

    Keep your car out of the park and let the train do the driving

  • Exploring the Grand Canyon is truly a breathtaking experience and just steps from your room

  • Explore America’s Best Idea

    Discover your parks

    Share your Grand Canyon
    Experience with us.

    Winter Escape Vacation Package

  • El Tovar Romance Package 2016

  • Take the Train to the Canyon

  • Winter Specials at Maswik Lodge

  • Experience the Must-See Historic Village

  • Explore America’s Best Idea

  • Learning Lodging Package

    Grand Canyon National Park Lodges

    Grand Canyon National Park, founded in 1919, is one of the oldest national parks in the United States and is home to the awe-inspiring Grand Canyon, a 1-mile deep gorge carved by the Colorado River.

    Long considered one of the natural wonders of the world, visitors flock to see this unique combination of geological color and erosional forms. With Grand Canyon National Park Lodges providing the premier in-park lodging at the South Rim with iconic lodges like El Tovar, you’ll find everything you need to plan and enjoy your visit to the Grand Canyon.

    When you stay at Grand Canyon National Park Lodges, you re not just close you re there!

    What s Happening at Grand Canyon South Rim





  • Cheap, but not dirty #who #qualifies #for #hospice #care

    #motel prices

    #

    Cheap, but not dirty. – Review of Motel Pierre

    Cheap, but not dirty.

    Reviewed 30 July 2009

    I arrived at 22h00, just looking for an air-conditioned, bug-free place to sleep. Mr. Patel was kind enough to oblige.

    It had a phone and TV (porno was available or, um, so I discovered by accident. I swear). I had no idea of the services available, as no instructions were offered, and I didn’t ask. One criticism I had was the friendly but indifferent service.

    The air-conditioner was noisy, but efficient. I didn’t set it, because there are no controls on the unit. There’s a thermostat on the wall, but I didn’t know how to adjust it.

    There was no kitchen or fridge in my room, but there were clean drinking glasses. And a bottle opener mounted on the inside of the bathroom! Party on! (Actually, I was never disturbed by other guests during this visit.)

    There was a clothes rack, but a single plastic hanger on it.

    The bathroom had no evident fan, but the fixtures and decor were all modern and in good condition. From what I recall it was even a low-flush toilet. There seemed no danger of scalding myself with hot water, though.

    One short-coming was the small double bed, 6 feet (182 cm) long at most. Good thing I’m short. The bedcoverings were all clean and in good repair.

    The drawers have seen better days, but they all worked. No Gideon Bible.

    All lights had compact fluorescent bulbs, with a nice incandescent glow. But only one of the side drawer lamps was plugged in.

    Two comfortable, plain armchairs and a low coffee table were near the window, but no desk.

    In short: despite Mr. Patel’s proprietorship, this ain’t the Taj Mahal. But for around CDN $60.00, there are worse places to stay.

    • Stayed July 2009, travelled solo




    Forget Me Not Children s Hospice #hotel #rooms

    #childrens hospice

    #

    Forget Me Not Children s Hospice supports over 200 local children with life shortening conditions and their families in West Yorkshire. However in the area we cover there are more than 1,300 children who may need our support, so there is much more to do.

    We support children and families in our purpose built hospice in Huddersfield as well as in their homes through our acclaimed Hospice at Home service.

    We support children and families in many different ways to make their lives just a little bit easier. From offering respite to hydrotherapy, music therapy, neonatal care, counselling or bereavement support; our care team supports the whole family.

    We are rated as Outstanding by the Care Quality Commission putting us in the top 2% of Health and Social Care providers in the UK.

    We need to raise 3.8million each year and with just 6% of this coming from government sources, the support of our community is vital.

    The Arches, Dean Clough, Halifax, HX3 5AX

    Church Lane, Brighouse, HD6 1AT

    Registered Charity No. 1110457

    2016 Forget Me Not Children’s Hospice

    This website uses scripting to enhance your browsing experience.

    We recommend that you enable the use of scripts to get the most out of our website. Please see the links below for guides on how to enable scripting in your browser