Nurses Care Inc #discount #on #hotels

#home health care nurse

#

Friendly and Compassionate Care

Professional home health care

Certified health care services

Wide range of skilled services

Welcome to Nurses Care Inc.

Rely on our skilled professionals.

Quality Health Care From Highly Qualified Professionals

Nurses Care has won the 2016 Eclipse Integrity Award by the judges of the BBB award! Businesses in the area are nominated if they show integrity in the way they conduct business contribute to the well being of the community. To be chosen is quite an honor! We are very proud of this want to thank all of Nurses Care’s staff who make Nurses Care a great place to work contribute to our impeccable reputation in the communities we serve! Great job Nurses Care. the agency that cares!

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Nurses Care Inc. | Health Care | Miamisburg, OH





Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says #orlando #hotels

#hospice news

#

Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says

DALLAS The owner of a Dallas-area hospice ordered nurses to increase drug dosages for patients to speed their deaths and maximize profits, according to an FBI affidavit.

A copy of the affidavit for a search warrant obtained by KXAS-TV in Dallas-Fort Worth alleges Brad Harris ordered higher dosages for at least four patients at Novus Health Services in Frisco. It’s unclear whether any deaths resulted from overdoses of drugs like morphine.

Harris has not been charged. The FBI on Wednesday declined to say whether an investigation is ongoing.

The warrant refers to an FBI raid on the hospice in September. It alleges Harris sent text messages to workers such as, You need to make this patient go bye-bye. On another occasion, Harris told administrators during a lunch meeting that he wanted to find patients who would die within 24 hours.

In at least one instance, an employee refused to follow orders to increase a dosage, the warrant said.

The document explains that federal reimbursements can diminish the longer a patient receives care. A provider eventually can be forced to return federal payments.

A woman who answered the phone Wednesday at Novus declined to comment. Attempts to reach Harris for comment on Wednesday were unsuccessful. A working number for him could not be found; listings for a Brad Harris in the Dallas and Houston areas had either been disconnected or turned out not to be his. The Associated Press also sent a request for comment to two email addresses believed to be his.

Harris, 34, is an accountant who founded Novus in 2012, according to KXAS, citing state records.

Novus’ website says the company offers hospice and home health care services.

The FBI investigation of Novus, which included interviewing several employees, began in 2014 and initially focused on allegations that the company sought federal reimbursements for patients recruited by Novus who didn’t qualify for services, according to KXAS.





Hospice Patients Alliance – Physicians, nurses and other staff patient advocates? #motels

#advocate hospice

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PHYSICIANS, NURSES AND OTHER STAFF:
ADVOCATES FOR YOUR WELFARE?

When any individual seeks health care, he expects that the physicians, nurses, social workers and other professionals will provide the very best of care in accordance with the most modern standards in the health care industry. Whether it is surgery or medical management of a disease, the expectation never changes. Most people trust their physician and the nurses who care for them. They trust their counselors and therapists. Health care professionals are quite often perceived as quite dedicated individuals who do their very best in caring for their patients.

Hospice is no different from any other aspect of the health care industry in terms of the degree of competence and integrity that is expected by the general public. However, hospice patients and their families are less likely to know when they’re being exploited, because it is less likely that they would know about the standards of care for end-of-life care. Even if they do know the standards, hospice patients and their families are less likely to complain, because of their fatigue, the overwhelming intensity of involvement in caring for their loved one (often around the clock), and their intense grief.

Physicians, nurses, social workers, professional counselors and therapists are licensed in each State to provide health care services. Each State has standards of care for all health care professionals, and each professional organization has published its own Code of Ethics and standards of care. Any licensed health care professional has a duty under the law to maintain professional competence, abide by the Code of Ethics, and actually provide care that meets the standards of care. Most health care professionals take pride in being competent at their work, staying up-to-date, and doing the best for their patient. There is a natural bond between health care professionals and their patients. Many will fight for their patients to protect the patients’ interests. That is what patients expect and what they often receive.

However, with the changes in the health care industry, constantly rising costs of providing services, and stiff competition among health care agencies, hospitals, nursing homes, and hospices, the business of running a health care agency or hospice has taken over in terms of controlling what directives management gives to its staff. No longer can you safely assume that the agency or hospice will necessarily do what’s right or according to the standard of care. Cutting corners has become commonplace in health care. This places terrible strain on the health care staff, who are pulled in mutually exclusive directions by their different obligations under their license and to their employer.

Health care professionals’ first obligation under the law and their license is to the patient: to abide by the Code of Ethics for their profession, maintain professional competence and actually provide the care that meets the standards of care for their line of work. The second obligation health care professionals may feel heavily weighing on their shoulders is to their employer; if the employer directs the health care professional to violate the standards of care (in order to save the employer money), he or she must choose between pleasing the employer (and keeping a job) and doing what’s right for the patient.

Physicians, nurses, social workers and others routinely confront these conflicting obligations and try to find a compromise between the two that is acceptable to both obligations. However, when the policy of the employer is clearly in violation of the standards, the health care professional must choose between right and wrong. There is no middle ground when health care fraud is directed and intentionally committed at the administrative level.

Hospice is fertile ground for health care fraud. There are many ways of exploiting the patients, families and the reimbursement source, whether Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, or the patients and families own money. Federal investigators have struggled with attempting to stop the flood of health care fraud violations occurring. When the U.S. Office of Inspector General started its Fraud Hotline, they were flooded with thousands of calls about health care fraud. Some career criminals have even been quoted as saying that it was easier to make fortunes defrauding Medicare than through the sales of illegal drugs.

If you are receiving care from health care professionals, you can expect that most of them are very dedicated, and honest individuals. That does not mean that fraud might not occur. Some honest individuals do not have the courage to fight the system and simply decide to choose to ignore violations which are occurring, trying to stay uninvolved and just do their jobs. The financial incentive to the agency/health care institution is to commit fraud in order to bolster their bottom line. The financial incentive to the health care professional to keep quiet arises out of their need to keep their paycheck coming to support their family. Challenging one’s employer’s policies is a sure method of becoming very unpopular at work. Management does not look favorably on employees who expose their white-collar crime! Even co-employees may avoid a health care professional who makes a complaint against the employer. they simply don’t want to have their own jobs threatened.

For the hospice patient and families, you can expect that some of the physicians, nurses, social workers or other staff will definitely speak up on your behalf if they think that improper decisions regarding health care occurring. The best thing you can do to help these health care professionals is to listen closely to what they may say to you. Remember their comments if any problem arises, if you are having difficulty getting proper services. By listening to what some of the hospice staff may tell you, you can glean extremely important clues to what you should be receiving, but may not be receiving. or you may learn of problems which you did not even know existed.

Remember, if you don’t know the standards in hospice, how can you know when you’re being exploited? If you determine that any of the services you are receiving are inadequate or improper, your complaint directly made to the hospice management will be much more powerful than any complaint made by an employee. If you have questions about the care being provided, ask one of the staff who you seem to have a stronger, closer relationship, who you trust. If you’re still unsure, you can contact other hospices, health care professionals you may know or call us at the Hospice Patients Alliance.

While all health care professionals are required to be advocates for the patients under their care, the reality is that some health care professionals choose to look the other way and keep quiet, to save their own job. Health care fraud, under-serving patients and outright violations of standards of care does occur. You can help stop it from continuing by listening closely to the staff you meet, by learning as much as you can about the standards of care (that’s one of the reasons for the Hospice Patients Alliance. to help inform you and protect you), read the contracts and literature provided by the hospice, and be willing to ask probing questions of the hospice staff who work with you. Some hospice staff do not know the full meaning of the standards of care and have been misled by their hospice employers. If you have doubts about what you are told, look up the law for yourself in the Section on Federal Laws Governing Hospice: the Uniform Standards of Care. We will be happy to explain the standards to you if you call.





VNA of Rhode Island Hospice Care – Visiting Nurses Association #booking #hotels

#hospice ri

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OUR HOSPICE TEAM:

Our team members are professionals with a strong commitment to providing physical, emotional, social, and spiritual care.

It was the patient’s last wish to die at home. Without Hospice, this would have been impossible and a frightening experience. I appreciate all who helped through this difficult time.”
-Dorothy Allen

We take Medicare and Medicaid and some third-party payers. Donations we’ve received allow us to provide the extra services that are so important to patients and families.

ABOUT HOSPICE OF VNA Rhode island

Hospice of the VNA of Rhode Island provides specialized and individual supportive care to the patient and family.

We are a non-profit organization and have provided Hospice care in patients’ homes in Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts for many decades. The VNA of Rhode Island began in April of 1900, and a member of our team participated in the ground-breaking group of professionals who started Hospice in the United States.

Our home care agency, VNA of Rhode Island, also provides Palliative Care for terminally ill patients who want to continue curative treatments.

Our offices are centrally located in Warwick, but our clinicians travel from all over the state.

Meet our Palliative/Hospice Team of Health Care Professionals.

Our nurses, social workers, chaplain, physician, bereavement counselor, nurse practitioner and clinical supervisor are all trained in the special kind of care that is unique to our program. These are very special people.





Accelerated Bachelor – s-Master – s Degree Programs #master #degree #for #nurses


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Accelerated Bachelor s-Master s Degree Programs

Sacred Heart University offers qualified University undergraduates the opportunity to complete an undergraduate degree and a graduate degree within 5 to 6 years, depending on the degree program. Students choosing one of these options must work carefully with their undergraduate advisor to follow a specific sequence of study.

Isabelle Farrington College of Education

INITIAL TEACHER CERTIFICATION AND PAID TEACHING INTERNSHIPS*

  • Elementary Education (K-6)
  • Secondary Education (7-12) subject areas include:
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • General Science
    • English
    • History/Social Studies
    • Math
    • Spanish
    • Art
    • Special Education

College of Health Professions | Accredited by ACOTE, CAATE, CAPTE

EXERCISE SCIENCE NUTRITION (M.S.)*

  • Clinical Track
  • Performance Track

Jack Welch College of Business | Accredited by AACSB International

College of Arts and Sciences

  • Community Psychology
  • Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • General Applied Psychology
  • General Chemistry
  • Molecular Biochemistry
  • Criminal Justice Management
  • National Security

School of Communication Media Arts

  • Corporate Communication and Public Relations
  • Broadcast and Digital Journalism‌
  • Digital Multimedia Production
  • Children, Health and Media
  • Media and Social Justice
  • Athletic Communications Promotions
  • Sports Broadcasting

School of Computing

* 5-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE/GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OPTION

+ 5 ½-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE/GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OPTION

^ 6-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE/GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OPTION


Florida Board of Nursing – Education and Training Programs – Licensing, Renewals


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The Florida Board of Nursing (Board) approves new pre-licensure nursing education programs that meet the application requirements specified in Section 464.019, Florida Statutes. This Section of Florida law also defines the Board s regulatory authority over established nursing education programs.

Nursing education programs in Florida that hold specialized nursing accreditation by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) or by the Collegiate Commission on Nursing Education (CCNE) are not regulated by the Florida Board of Nursing. Consumers are advised that the Board is not authorized to conduct site visits, and oversight of approved nursing education program quality measures is limited by Florida law.

All concerns or complaints pertaining to approved nursing education programs in Florida should be directed to the Consumer Services Unit of the Department of Health s Division of Medical Quality Assurance.


Understanding Your Lab Test Results #understanding #lab #results #for #nurses


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Understanding Your Lab Test Results

When you have cancer it often seems like someone is always taking blood for some kind of test. Blood tests are done to help watch your body’s response to treatment. They can show small changes before problems get serious. Keeping track of your results lets your doctor take action as soon as your blood counts change to help prevent many cancer-related problems and cancer treatment side effects .

Here are 2 of the most common types of blood tests and what they can tell the doctor about your health: the complete blood count (CBC) and the chemistry panel.

Some people find it helps to ask for a copy of their lab results and have a member of their cancer care team go over the numbers with them. By getting a copy, you can also see what the normal ranges are for the lab that tested your blood and where your numbers fall within that range.

Complete blood count (CBC)

The most common lab test that you’ll have done during treatment is called a complete blood count, or CBC. Blood is made up of water, proteins, nutrients, and living cells. A CBC tells your cancer care team about the cells in your blood. It measures 3 basic types of blood cells:

  • Red blood cells
  • White blood cells
  • Platelets

Each of these cells has a special purpose. And each can be harmed by cancer and cancer treatments.

Red blood cells (RBCs)

RBCs carry oxygen to and carbon dioxide away from the cells in your body. The CBC measures red blood cells in many ways, but the simplest measure is either

Hemoglobin (Hgb). the part of each RBC that carries iron
or
Hematocrit (Hct). the percent of RBCs in the blood

When the Hgb and Hct values fall too low, it’s called anemia (uh-NEE-me-uh).

Platelets (Plts)

Platelets help control bleeding. You may bruise or bleed easily when your platelet levels are low. The risk of bleeding goes up when platelet levels drop below 20,000.

When your platelet count is low, your health care team may call it thrombocytopenia (throm-bo-SY-tuh-PEEN -e-uh).

White blood cells (WBCs)

WBCs fight infection . There are many types of white blood cells and each fights infection in a special way.

The most important infection-fighting WBC is the neutrophil (NEW-truh-fil). The number doctors look at is called your absolute neutrophil count (ANC). A healthy person has an ANC between 2,500 and 6,000.

The ANC is found by multiplying the WBC count by the percent of neutrophils in the blood. For instance, if the WBC count is 8,000 and 50% of the WBCs are neutrophils, the ANC is 4,000 (8,000 × 0.50 = 4,000).

When the ANC drops below 1,000 it is called neutropenia (new-truh-PEEN-e-uh). Your doctor will watch your ANC closely because the risk of infection is much higher when the ANC is below 500.

Chemistry panel (metabolic profile)

Another type of blood test looks at blood chemistry. Chemistry panels may also be called by other names, such as metabolic profile or blood chemistry profile. One blood sample can be used to measure many things like:

  • Fats (lipids)
  • Proteins
  • Sugar (glucose)
  • Electrolytes (like potassium, magnesium, sodium, and calcium)
  • Enzymes

Certain blood chemistry tests can show how well your organs are working. For instance, liver function studies tell your doctor how well your liver is working. Other tests look at how well your kidneys are working. The chemistry panel may also show other problems with body function.

Some treatments can cause changes in your body’s blood chemistry, such as a drop in the amount of potassium in your blood. Your blood chemistry balance can also be changed by dehydration (not enough fluid in the body), which may be caused by nausea. vomiting, or diarrhea. Your doctor will do blood chemistry tests if there’s concern that you may have any of these problems.

If the tests show that certain electrolytes are too low, your doctor may decide to replace them. If the tests show you are dehydrated, you may be given intravenous (IV) fluids. It’s important to get the tests your doctor wants because most of the time you won’t have any symptoms until one or more blood chemistry values are dangerously low or high.

How to find normal values

Each lab has its own range for what it considers normal values for complete blood counts and chemistry panel results. What’s normal for one lab might not quite be normal for another, so it’s important to know what your lab’s normal range is when looking at your results. Normal ranges for some tests also vary by age and gender. As a rule, the normal ranges are printed on the lab report, next to your test results.

Common terms and numbers you may see on a CBC report and what they mean are on this chart:


Grants – Visiting Nurses Foundation #treetops #hospice

#hospice grants

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Grants

Funding Request Guidelines

The mission of the Foundation is to create funding for education and assistance of Home Health and Hospice patients and their families. In pursuit of this mission, the Foundation raises funds for distribution to home health and hospice care organizations (we do not give grants to individuals) to help cover the costs of equipment, programs and uncompensated care for patients. We measure our success by our ability to raise and effectively distribute these funds.

The majority of the Visiting Nurse’s Foundation income comes from Foundation businesses. A portion of that income pays 100% of administrative expenses and the salaries of a minimal staff. The services of many hard working volunteers enables the remainder and 100% of all fund raisers, donations and memorials to go to benefit home health and hospice patients. The Foundation has a dedicated staff and active, all volunteer board, that works to increase funding to help meet a vital community need.

We are a unique partnership of donors and home healthcare providers, working together to insure that home health and hospice patients will not be denied medical care because of their inability to pay for those services. This relationship is based upon mutual respect and understanding.

The need to maintain a high level of accountability for contributed funds is basic to the partnership. As a condition of accepting funds, the agency in question should include in a year-end report, the number of unduplicated clients served with the funding, and the type of service(s) provided by the funds. They will provide at least three client stories that are representative of the patients helped by funds provided by the Foundation. Patients and communities benefiting from assistance given by the Foundation will be aware of this assistance.

We are aware the need for home health and hospice care, and the equipment and programs to support this care has increased dramatically over the last several years and that there has been an even greater increase in the number of patients who need and want the comfort and healing benefits of that care, but cannot afford it. The Foundation is committed to help home health and hospice care providers in their efforts to serve residents in need of care, regardless of the patients’ ability to pay.





Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says #motels #florida

#hospice news

#

Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says

DALLAS The owner of a Dallas-area hospice ordered nurses to increase drug dosages for patients to speed their deaths and maximize profits, according to an FBI affidavit.

A copy of the affidavit for a search warrant obtained by KXAS-TV in Dallas-Fort Worth alleges Brad Harris ordered higher dosages for at least four patients at Novus Health Services in Frisco. It’s unclear whether any deaths resulted from overdoses of drugs like morphine.

Harris has not been charged. The FBI on Wednesday declined to say whether an investigation is ongoing.

The warrant refers to an FBI raid on the hospice in September. It alleges Harris sent text messages to workers such as, You need to make this patient go bye-bye. On another occasion, Harris told administrators during a lunch meeting that he wanted to find patients who would die within 24 hours.

In at least one instance, an employee refused to follow orders to increase a dosage, the warrant said.

The document explains that federal reimbursements can diminish the longer a patient receives care. A provider eventually can be forced to return federal payments.

A woman who answered the phone Wednesday at Novus declined to comment. Attempts to reach Harris for comment on Wednesday were unsuccessful. A working number for him could not be found; listings for a Brad Harris in the Dallas and Houston areas had either been disconnected or turned out not to be his. The Associated Press also sent a request for comment to two email addresses believed to be his.

Harris, 34, is an accountant who founded Novus in 2012, according to KXAS, citing state records.

Novus’ website says the company offers hospice and home health care services.

The FBI investigation of Novus, which included interviewing several employees, began in 2014 and initially focused on allegations that the company sought federal reimbursements for patients recruited by Novus who didn’t qualify for services, according to KXAS.





About NNU #mississippi #nurses #association


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About NNU

About National Nurses United

National Nurses United, with more than 150,000 members in every state, is the largest union and professional association of registered nurses in U.S. history.

NNU was founded in 2009 unifying three of the most active, progressive organizations in the U.S. and the major voices of unionized nurses in the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee, United American Nurses, and Massachusetts Nurses Association.

Combining the unparalleled record of accomplishments for nurses and patients embodied in the proud history of those nurses associations, which for some span more than 100 years, the establishment of NNU brought to life the dream of a powerful, national movement of direct care RNs.

At its founding convention in December, 2009, NNU adopted a call for action premised on the principles intended to counter the national assault by the healthcare industry on patient care conditions and standards for nurses, and to promote a unified vision of collective action for nurses with campaigns to:

  • Advance the interests of direct care nurses and patients across the U.S.
  • Organize all direct care RNs “into a single organization capable of exercising influence over the healthcare industry, governments, and employers.”
  • Promote effective collective bargaining representation to all NNU affiliates to promote the economic and professional interests of all direct care RNs.
  • Expand the voice of direct care RNs and patients in public policy, including the enactment of safe nurse to patient ratios and patient advocacy rights in Congress and every state.
  • Win “healthcare justice, accessible, quality healthcare for all, as a human right.”

In its first year, NNU made some spectacular achievements, including:

  • Organizing 6,500 RNs into NNU in Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Nevada, and Texas.
  • Sharing collective bargaining resources and experiences to support major collective bargaining campaigns in Minnesota, Washington DC, and other sites.
  • Sponsoring major national legislation to promote comprehensive reform for patient safety and professional nursing practice, including RN-to-patient ratios modeled on the successful California law sponsored by NNU affiliate CNA.
  • Strengthening the voice of RNs in the national healthcare reform debate, and in electoral campaigns from coast to coast.
  • Most notably, CNA/NNOC sponsored the nation s foremost RN patient safety law, in California, requiring minimum RN-to-patient ratios, the most effective solution in the U.S. for stemming the erosion of care standards in hospitals.

NNU affiliate members are renown as leading advocates of guaranteed healthcare by expanding and updating Medicare to cover all Americans, for negotiating many of the best collective bargaining contracts for RNs in the nation, and for sponsorship of innovative legislation and regulatory protections for patients and nurses.


VNA of Rhode Island Hospice Care – Visiting Nurses Association #fashion #store

#hospice ri

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OUR HOSPICE TEAM:

Our team members are professionals with a strong commitment to providing physical, emotional, social, and spiritual care.

It was the patient’s last wish to die at home. Without Hospice, this would have been impossible and a frightening experience. I appreciate all who helped through this difficult time.”
-Dorothy Allen

We take Medicare and Medicaid and some third-party payers. Donations we’ve received allow us to provide the extra services that are so important to patients and families.

ABOUT HOSPICE OF VNA Rhode island

Hospice of the VNA of Rhode Island provides specialized and individual supportive care to the patient and family.

We are a non-profit organization and have provided Hospice care in patients’ homes in Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts for many decades. The VNA of Rhode Island began in April of 1900, and a member of our team participated in the ground-breaking group of professionals who started Hospice in the United States.

Our home care agency, VNA of Rhode Island, also provides Palliative Care for terminally ill patients who want to continue curative treatments.

Our offices are centrally located in Warwick, but our clinicians travel from all over the state.

Meet our Palliative/Hospice Team of Health Care Professionals.

Our nurses, social workers, chaplain, physician, bereavement counselor, nurse practitioner and clinical supervisor are all trained in the special kind of care that is unique to our program. These are very special people.





Grants – Visiting Nurses Foundation #hospice #chaplain

#hospice grants

#

Grants

Funding Request Guidelines

The mission of the Foundation is to create funding for education and assistance of Home Health and Hospice patients and their families. In pursuit of this mission, the Foundation raises funds for distribution to home health and hospice care organizations (we do not give grants to individuals) to help cover the costs of equipment, programs and uncompensated care for patients. We measure our success by our ability to raise and effectively distribute these funds.

The majority of the Visiting Nurse’s Foundation income comes from Foundation businesses. A portion of that income pays 100% of administrative expenses and the salaries of a minimal staff. The services of many hard working volunteers enables the remainder and 100% of all fund raisers, donations and memorials to go to benefit home health and hospice patients. The Foundation has a dedicated staff and active, all volunteer board, that works to increase funding to help meet a vital community need.

We are a unique partnership of donors and home healthcare providers, working together to insure that home health and hospice patients will not be denied medical care because of their inability to pay for those services. This relationship is based upon mutual respect and understanding.

The need to maintain a high level of accountability for contributed funds is basic to the partnership. As a condition of accepting funds, the agency in question should include in a year-end report, the number of unduplicated clients served with the funding, and the type of service(s) provided by the funds. They will provide at least three client stories that are representative of the patients helped by funds provided by the Foundation. Patients and communities benefiting from assistance given by the Foundation will be aware of this assistance.

We are aware the need for home health and hospice care, and the equipment and programs to support this care has increased dramatically over the last several years and that there has been an even greater increase in the number of patients who need and want the comfort and healing benefits of that care, but cannot afford it. The Foundation is committed to help home health and hospice care providers in their efforts to serve residents in need of care, regardless of the patients’ ability to pay.





Case Study: Ensuring welfare and safety of nurses while conducting home visits

#weldmar hospice

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Weldmar Hospicecare Trust of Dorset are now able to ensure the welfare and safety of their nurses with Crystal Ball’s Lone Worker Protection

Challenges

The Trust’s community nurses regularly conduct home visits on their own, so it is imperative that their welfare is monitored at all times.

Prior to May 2012, the Trust had a self-developed paper-based process in place to monitor and report on community nurses’ home visits. However, the system was no longer proving to be adequate and a subsequent internal review identified two clear objectives to replace the system.

Firstly, the existing welfare protection processes required some form of automation.

Secondly, the internal reporting capabilities needed to be improved in order to meet the Trust’s legal requirements to lone workers.

The Solution

Following careful consideration of other lone worker solutions on the market, WeldmarHospice Care Trust made the decision to implement Crystal Ball’s Mobile LWP solution in May 2012.

It provided a cost-effective remedy to all Weldmar’s key requisites, with additional features such as routine welfare checks and panic alarms appealing to management as a means of ensuring the safety of the community nurses.

Today, when the nurses visit patients at their homes, they use Mobile LWP to check in and check out of visits, ensuring their whereabouts can be traced if necessary. The lone worker app also sits discretely on the community nurses’ smartphones requiring minimal interaction to operate.

The Outcomes

The introduction of the system has enhanced the safety and welfare of the community nurses at Weldmar and addressed health and safety legislations.

Joanna Higgs is Head of IT for Weldmar:

“Being able to locate the nurses has been a huge benefit and the nurses feel much safer knowing that if something was to happen somebody would respond.”

She also comments on how the panic alarm feature has been a useful safety aspect:

”The alarms have gone off a couple of times and we have responded and phoned them straight away, this has made the nurses feel a certain sense of security”.

Weldmar has also found the history and audit trails beneficial on a number of occasions where specific incidents have happened, as it has allowed them to gain a greater understanding of these events. Furthermore, with Crystal Ball’s system
being completely web-based, Weldmar have access to the system across several sites simultaneously.





Nurses play vital role in care of terminally ill patients – UQ

#care of terminally ill patient

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Nurses play vital role in care of terminally ill patients

Nurses play a crucial role in decisions surrounding treatment of terminally ill patients.

10 November 2014

A University of Queensland study has found nurses play a crucial role in decisions surrounding treatment of terminally ill patients.

UQ School of Social Science Associate Professor Alex Broom said dying patients who were told further treatment would be futile often turned to nurses for emotional support.

The transition to end-of-life care has traditionally been the doctor s decision, Dr Broom said.

The study shows how important nurses are in decisions about when life-prolonging treatments should end and in supporting patients and families in the process of accepting that they are dying.

Nurses often bear the brunt of patient and family grief as the end of life nears.

Nurses spend so much time with patients that they are often in a better position than doctors to know how patients are really coping with often highly toxic, technically life-prolonging treatments.

The study found that patients would often put on a brave face when their doctor was present and then ask the nurse to tell the doctor they d had enough.

This can put the nurse in a difficult position professionally, placing them as mediator between doctor, patient and often-panicked family members.

Nurses in the study said communicating with patients and families was much easier when doctors had already spoken openly and honestly with patients about the fact that it was time to stop active treatment.

A major problem for nurses is that some doctors avoid difficult conversations; even continuing patients on active treatment, while others were rushed or blunt, leaving the nurse to explain the situation and provide emotional support to patients and their families, Dr Broom said.

The study involved 20 Australian nurses from Brisbane hospitals, mostly consisting of cancer nurses.

The study explored their experiences of caring in the context of medical futility.

Nurses in the study emphasised the emotional toll of caring for patients and families at the end of life, the need to balance caring with protecting themselves from burnout, and the fact that there was very limited debriefing or counselling provided.

It s not uncommon for a nurse to have to walk out of a room where a patient they have known for months or years has just died, straight into a finance meeting or to treat another patient, without five minutes to themselves to reflect on the previous patient s death, Dr Broom said.

While the nurses discussed the rewards of being involved in the transition to end-of-life care, they emphasised the mounting pressures on the nursing profession to engage in technical, task-orientated work and how this could compromise their capacity to support patients nearing the end of life.

The results of the study show that nurses play a much greater role than previously thought in decisions about medical futility, and that their role as a crucial mediator and support provider in this context is increasingly challenged by the growing unrealistic expectations placed on nurses working in Australian hospitals, Dr Broom said.

Results of this study were published in the journal Qualitative Health Research in October.





Nurses Care Inc #gold #coast #motels

#home health care nurse

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Friendly and Compassionate Care

Professional home health care

Certified health care services

Wide range of skilled services

Welcome to Nurses Care Inc.

Rely on our skilled professionals.

Quality Health Care From Highly Qualified Professionals

Nurses Care has won the 2016 Eclipse Integrity Award by the judges of the BBB award! Businesses in the area are nominated if they show integrity in the way they conduct business contribute to the well being of the community. To be chosen is quite an honor! We are very proud of this want to thank all of Nurses Care’s staff who make Nurses Care a great place to work contribute to our impeccable reputation in the communities we serve! Great job Nurses Care. the agency that cares!

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Nurses Care Inc. | Health Care | Miamisburg, OH





VNA of Rhode Island Hospice Care – Visiting Nurses Association #home #medical

#hospice ri

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OUR HOSPICE TEAM:

Our team members are professionals with a strong commitment to providing physical, emotional, social, and spiritual care.

It was the patient’s last wish to die at home. Without Hospice, this would have been impossible and a frightening experience. I appreciate all who helped through this difficult time.”
-Dorothy Allen

We take Medicare and Medicaid and some third-party payers. Donations we’ve received allow us to provide the extra services that are so important to patients and families.

ABOUT HOSPICE OF VNA Rhode island

Hospice of the VNA of Rhode Island provides specialized and individual supportive care to the patient and family.

We are a non-profit organization and have provided Hospice care in patients’ homes in Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts for many decades. The VNA of Rhode Island began in April of 1900, and a member of our team participated in the ground-breaking group of professionals who started Hospice in the United States.

Our home care agency, VNA of Rhode Island, also provides Palliative Care for terminally ill patients who want to continue curative treatments.

Our offices are centrally located in Warwick, but our clinicians travel from all over the state.

Meet our Palliative/Hospice Team of Health Care Professionals.

Our nurses, social workers, chaplain, physician, bereavement counselor, nurse practitioner and clinical supervisor are all trained in the special kind of care that is unique to our program. These are very special people.