Holistic Nursing Care Plan For Terminally Ill Patient – Essay – 1497

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Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

  • Length: 5 pages
  • Sources: 5
  • Subject: Healthcare
  • Type: Essay
  • Paper: # 65372827

Note. Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Document:

Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

The objective of this study is to create a holistic nursing care plan for a terminally ill patient. This study will explain how perceptions about quality of life and health promotion might affect care for a dying patient with a lingering illness such as cancer and discuss strategies that could be used in the situation to improve the quality of life for the patient and her husband during this illness.

It is important that the nursing care plan for the terminally ill includes the reassurance that the patient will not be abandoned and that the nurse assist the patient in discussing their care wishes and goals. To assist patients such as the patient in this scenario it is important to understand the concepts and elements of end-of-life care and that the nurse be a skilled practitioner of the nursing arts. The end-of-life care if “patient goal-centered and should be provided for those who have a limited life expectancy.” (Norlander, nd, p.3) The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization states that Hospice:

” affirms the concept of palliative care as an intensive program that enhances comfort and promotes the quality of life for individuals and their families. When cure is no longer possible, hospice recognizes that a peaceful and comfortable death is an essential goal of health care. Hospice believes that death is an integral part of the life cycle and that intensive palliative care focuses on pain relief, comfort, and enhanced quality of life as appropriate goals for the terminally ill. Hospice also recognizes the potential for growth that often exists within the dying experience for the individual and his/her family and seeks to protect and nurture this potential.” (Norlander, nd, p. 4)

The holistic nursing practice is defined as “all nursing practice that has healing the whole person as its goal.” (Mariano, 2007, p.64) Holistic nursing care is a caring and healing relationship and values the cultural values and beliefs as well as the individuals’ spirituality in the nursing care. Holistic nursing care involves care of the individual’s physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual being with a focus on the individual’s comfort and relief from pain.

Because the patient is terminally ill and is in a great deal of pain one of the first considerations for this patient is relieving her pain so that she is able to function without a great deal of pain. Relieving the patient’s level of depression is also of great importance so that she does not spend the end of her life crying in bed as she is doing presently. The nurse should meet with the family members who are reluctant to visit and explain to them that they have a great role to play in the end-of-life care of this patient. The family members should be brought to the understanding that their role is critical.

Patient Emotional Health

Upon relieving the patient of the pain and depression through use of medication, the hospice-care nursing staff will be of great comfort to the patient through simply talking with the patient about her life and about her wishes for her end-of-life care. The patient should be highly active in determining any life support or alternatively lack of life support that she desires to receive. The patient should be assisted in thinking about her wishes for her funeral, the songs and music that will be used at the funeral and what she chooses to wear at the funeral.

Patient Spiritual Health

The patient’s spiritual affairs should be addressed as well so that the patient is both emotionally and spiritually prepared to deal with the ending of her life due to the progression of the cancer.

Patient Physical Care

Hospice Care is utilized by many patients who are terminally ill. Hospice Care involves nursing staff coming into the patient’s home and assisting them with bathing, dressing, their medication, monitoring the patient’s condition, counseling family members about what they can do to make the patient’s path of dying easier and more comfortable. The hospice philosophy is stated to be a holistic philosophy, is interdisciplinary in nature, and includes physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, volunteers, and staff assisting with grief of the family. It is reported that hospice care is ” synonymous with supportive care. Pain management and symptom control is state-of-the-art pain. Volunteers are available for respite care and companionship.

Factors Addressed By Hospice

The hospice team assists with the decisions and challenges that the patient and [continue]

Some Sources Used in Document:





Home Care, Nursing and Personal Support in Toronto and Mississauga – Spectrum

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Best Practices for Charting – Nursing Link #all #inclusive #hotels

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Best Practices for Charting

Featured Author:

Kathy Quan, RN, BSN, PHN

Kathy Quan, RN, BSN. PHN. has over 30 years of experience in home health and hospice care. Teaching patients, caregivers, and other nurses has always been a passion of hers. She also loves to write and has several websites and blogs for nurses, caregivers, and patients. Kathy has also authored four books about nursing, the health care field and caring for aging parents.

More articles from this author:

Kathy Quan | NursingLink

Providing excellent patient care is the most important aspect of nursing. Moreover, taking credit for the care given is also an important responsibility. Most nurses hate the paperwork more than any other aspect of their job, but it’s critical that it be done, and be done well. As with every aspect of quality patient care, charting should be exceptional; it should never be taken lightly.

The chart is a legal medical record, communicating crucial information to other members of the health care team so that they can make informed decisions. An accurate chart is critical to assessing the patient’s health status, and determining future care and treatment methods.

State Facts, Not Opinions

One of the first lessons a nurse learns is that if she doesn’t chart something, it wasn’t done. As a nurse, you can argue to the death that you gave the right meds or checked the heart monitor, but if you neglected to chart it, there s no legal record of it.

That doesn t mean you should go chart-crazy, and jot down every minute detail. Stick to the facts! For example, don’t get caught in the habit of charting every two hours that a patient was “resting comfortably in bed” until you have actually checked on the patient and noted the exact time. And don t get ahead of yourself: making a comment or checking off a box even two minutes in advance can come back to haunt you. If that patient falls, has a request that someone else responds to, or should code just a minute or two before your recorded entry, your whole level of care could come into question.

Your patient may be a mean, nasty, curmudgeon, but that’s not for you to say. Neither is it right to say she’s a sweet, adorable old lady. Look for the facts (signs, symptoms, and statements ) as to the basis for the behavior. Is your patient in pain? Is he scared or fearful of a procedure or diagnosis? Is he depressed or anxious? Has he had some issues with family or caregivers? Is the sweet old lady being stoic? Does she understand her illness? Is she in denial? Or perhaps her symptoms have been well-controlled with the current medication regimen?

Patient A is experiencing 8/10 pain unrelieved by hydrocodone 500mg/5mg q 6 hours. Last dose given 1 hour ago. States he is in constant agony and exhibits angry behavior towards others.

Patient’s B’s wife confided that her husband is anxious about an upcoming lung biopsy and fears that he has cancer. His father had the same symptoms at his age and died from lung cancer.

Patient C states her pain is 0/10. States she hasn’t been pain-free in over a year now and is so grateful for her new care and treatment.

These are perfect examples of outstanding charting. Detailed and straightforward, these statements stick purely to observed behaviors, and medical facts, without any opinion or judgment stuck in.

Next: Chart as Soon as Possible





Emerald Coast Hospice thanks Chipola Nursing Students #cape #cod #hotels

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Emerald Coast Hospice thanks Chipola Nursing Students





Private duty nursing #gta #hotels

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