Hospice Care Options Detroit, Michigan (MI) – Henry Ford Hospital #motel #la

#hospice care options

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Hospice Care Options

Committed to ensuring the quality of life and respecting the choices of the patient and family, our team of hospice experts offers a wide variety of specialized services designed to meet the patient’s needs. The team works together to meet the unique physical, emotional and spiritual needs of each patient and family.

Care for the whole person

  • The patient drives their plan of care through personal choices.
  • Family and loved ones are taught how to safely care for the patient. They are given support throughout the end-of-life process.
  • The nurse case manager is an expert in pain and symptom management. The nurse will institute the plan of care, and continue to assess changing needs.
  • Our medical director is available for home visits and consultation with the patient’s physician and nurse.
  • A social worker addresses the psychological and emotional needs of the patient and family, assuring access to community resources.
  • Chaplains can provide for spiritual needs.
  • Home health aides assist with personal care and light housekeeping.
  • Trained volunteers provide companionship, friendly visits and support for caregivers.
  • A registered dietitian assists with dietary needs.
  • Physical, occupational, respiratory, and speech therapy are available when deemed necessary for the patient’s comfort by the team.
  • A bereavement counselor provides support for at least thirteen months after a patient’s death.
  • SandCastles Grief Support Program for Children and Families. offers open-ended support for children who have experienced the death of a loved one.

Where can we provide care?

The hospice plan of care, successful pain management and family support make it possible for most hospice patients to remain at home where their loved ones can care for them. Families learn basic caregiving skills and techniques from hospice team members who regularly visit the home. When home care is not an option, hospice care provided to patients in:

  • Nursing homes
  • Assisted living centers
  • Adult foster-care homes
  • Homes for the aged
  • Senior citizen apartments
  • Hospitals

Hospice admission

When a patient requests admission to the hospice program, the hospice staff will contact his or her primary physician to make sure admission is appropriate at the time of the request.

The patient will be asked to sign consent and insurance forms similar to the forms patients sign for hospital admission. An important form specific to hospice says that the patient understands that hospice care is aimed at pain relief and symptom management, not curative treatment. Additional forms outline hospice services being offered, and describe the Medicare hospice benefit.

The nurse case manager will assess the patient’s needs and assist with obtaining any medical equipment that may be necessary for safe and efficient home care. The hospice staff also will develop an individual care plan and set up a schedule for home visits by team members.

Your right to quality hospice care

Henry Ford Hospice is dedicated to providing compassionate care of the highest quality to all of their patients in the community, regardless of ability to pay and without discrimination. Hospice is less expensive than conventional end-of-life care because of the way it is administered. Family, friends and volunteers provide much of the day-to-day care in the patient’s home. Expenses are further held in check because less high-cost technology is used.

In Michigan, hospice is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, Health Alliance Plan, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan and other commercial and private insurance plans. Insurance coverage rarely provides for the full cost of care. To fill the gap between reimbursements and actual cost of care, Henry Ford Hospice relies on grants and community support for both donations and volunteer staff.





Tiaa cref annuity options #tiaa #cref #annuity #options


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Retirement

As an employee of the Lone Star College, individuals�are required to participate in a qualified retirement plan in lieu of the Social Security System. Any employee hired after April 1986 is required to contribute 1.45 percent monthly in the Medicare portion of the Social Security System.

Teachers Retirement System of Texas (TRS)

All non-contracted employees (Full-Time Support Professional Staff) are required to contribute to the Teachers Retirement System of Texas (TRS).� TRS is a state system in which the investment risks are absorbed by the state of Texas.�Member contributions, deposited each month into a personal account, are part of a large trust fund managed by investment professionals.�Investment decisions are made by the fund managers.�

TRS provides retirement benefits based on length of service and salary level after a minimum of ten years service or at age 55 with a minimum of 5 years of service.� Rights to benefits are vested upon completion of five years of creditable service. Currently a TRS member contributes�7.7 percent of their monthly salary to his/her TRS account.

Optional Retirement Program (ORP)

An eligible contractual employee (faculty, administrator) is given 90 days from the date of employment to make an irrevocable lifetime choice to become a participant in ORP in lieu of TRS. The ORP is a defined contribution plan that allows the participant to select a life insurance or other financial institution approved by the District where he/she wishes to deposit retirement funds. Premium contributions of both the employee and the State are sent to the financial institution for deposit in the participant�s account. The ORP is a self-directed retirement plan where the participant directs and manages the investment account. An employee is vested in ORP after one year and one day of participation in the plan. If employment is terminated prior to vesting, the State and District contributions are returned to the State and the District.

An employee can be eligible to elect ORP once only. Once participation has been selected, the employee can not elect TRS. The decision to participate in TRS or ORP is extremely important because the law provides almost no opportunity for changing back to TRS once enrolled in ORP. It is a one-time irrevocable decision that can affect the rest of the individual�s career in higher education. Prospective participants should consider all aspects carefully and obtain as much information as possible before making this important decision.

Important Tips About ORP:

  • Since ORP is an individual investment plan and purchased at the participant�s own risk, it is important to select the plan that best meets individual needs. Contributions made to the ORP are tax deferred until the tax year in which the funds are withdrawn.
  • ORP is called a �defined contribution plan� because the retirement benefit is based on the actual amount contributed to the participant�s account (and any return on investments). ORP benefits are dependent upon the contribution rate and total salary earned while a participant.
  • In ORP, �vesting� refers to a participant�s ownership rights to the employer portion of the contributions. Upon termination of employment in Texas public higher education, vested ORP participants can take both employee and employer contributions with them. ORP participants vest after one year one day of participation.
  • ORP participants have many options in selecting ORP companies and products. Maximum return depends on a number of interdependent factors, including choice of investment vehicles, performance, and settlement alternatives at retirement, investment rates and cost and charges assessed.
  • Currently an ORP member contributes 6.65 percent of their monthly salary to his/her ORP account. The state of Texas contributes 6.00 percent of the monthly salary.?

For more information regarding the benefits and provisions of ORP and 403(b) and 457(b) retirement savings accounts, read the Annual Retirement Benefits Guide for Lone Star College, prepared by TSA Consulting Group, Inc.

Teacher’s Insurance and Annuity Association and College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF)

Part-time employees are required to enroll in the Teacher’s Insurance and Annuity Association and College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF). New IRS rules issued in 1991 require LSC to implement a program for retirement plan participation by all employees not participating in TRS or ORP.

Lone Star College selected TIAA-CREF as its retirement plan sponsor. Each eligible employee will be required to enroll in LSC’s part-time pension plan. A pre-tax deduction of 6.20 percent�(in addition to 1.45 percent�Medicare) and a 1.3 percent�Lone Star College match will be deposited into the tax deferred annuity (TDA) program. The TDA has no vesting requirements and the funds are available to the employee when employment terminates.

For further details, visit TIAA-CREF .

Optional Tax Deferred Annuity Program (TDA)

All full- and part-time employees of Lone Star College are eligible to participate in the Optional Tax Deferred Annuities (TDAs) Program. The same carriers that are approved for writing Optional Retirement Plans are also approved for writing TDAs.�Under these programs faculty and staff members may, through a salary reduction agreement, divert part of their compensation on a tax-free basis to the purchase of supplemental investment/annuity benefits.�

The Internal Revenue Service places limits on the amount of salary which can be sheltered from taxes. The agent for the carrier selected will assist in calculating the maximum amount which can be sheltered.

Current TDA Plan Limits:
Under 50 years of age: $18,000
Over 50 years of age: $6,000

Important Tips About TDA:

  • To initiate a tax deferred program, eligible employees must enter into a salary reduction agreement which shall continue in effect without change until terminated by either the employee or the District.
  • The employee is not permitted to make more than one salary reduction agreement with the District during a single calendar year.
  • The amount of reduction permitted in salary reduction is governed by applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and in general is 20% of “includable salary” multiplied by the number of years of service reduced by prior contributions; or $15,000, whichever is less.
  • Participation in the plan is only allowed through payroll deductions. Employees interested in participating should contact the Benefit Coordinator.
  • To terminate a salary reduction agreement, the participant needs to provide written notice of the date of proposed termination to the LSC Human Resources Benefits Office.
  • Because the tax breaks allowed under Section 403(b) of the Internal Revenue Code are designed to encourage people to save for retirement, the IRS restricts withdrawals from these accounts before age 59 1/2.

Compare hotels room options at Best Western Kelowna #hotels #for #cheap

#kelowna motels

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Rooms Suites Overview

Hotel Amenities

You will find everything you need to make your family vacation, weekend getaway or business trip enjoyable. Children 17 and under stay free! Don’t forget to bring along your four-legged-friends; Best Western Plus Hotel Suites is pet friendly.

We offer 176 rooms and suites with a variety of room types to suite your needs. Tower and Courtyard rooms. Spacious Deluxe Rooms. 1 2 Bedroom Kitchenette Wetbar Suites. Allergy friendly rooms with cork flooring . wheelchair accessible and pet friendly rooms. The beautiful bathrooms offer granite accents and the beds feature premium linens and duvets to make you feel right at home. All guest rooms are non-smoking and have a private patio or balcony with many overlooking our one acre garden courtyard.

Our friendly Guest Service Agents are ready to assist you in selecting a room or suite perfect for your needs.

Guest Room Features

  • Electronic locks for enhanced privacy and security
  • Individually controlled air-conditioning and heat control
  • Balconies or terraces
  • FREE Wireless and hardwire Fibre Optic high speed Internet access
  • HD TV with Sport and Entertainment Channels
  • 40″ LCD TVs
  • Personal Voice mail
  • Hair Dryer
  • Iron and Ironing Board
  • Fridge
  • Coffee and Coffee maker, Tea and Tea Kettle
  • Wheelchair Accessible rooms available
  • Adjoining rooms available
  • Bathroom amenities include soap, shampoo, conditioner, body lotion, cotton balls Q-tips, sewing kit and shoe buffer
  • Bathrobes Slippers
  • iPod/MP3 compatible clock radios
  • Free Local calls and toll free reservation line
  • 2 Telephones, 1 cordless for greater guest convenience
  • Free Newspaper delivered to your door
  • All guests may enjoy our Hot Breakfast Buffet
  • *Pet-friendly hotel rooms available*




Business Intelligence Analyst Jobs: Career Options and Requirements #business #intelligence #analyst #certification,


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Business Intelligence Analyst Jobs: Career Options and Requirements

  • Doctorate
      • DBA with an Emphasis in Data Analytics
      • Bridge (Doctor of Business Administration with an Emphasis in Data Analytics)
  • Master
      • Bridge to the M.S. in Information Technology Management
      • M.S. in Information Technology Management
      • M.S. in Instructional Technology
      • Master of Science in Cyber Security
      • Master of Science in Cyber Security (Bridge)
      • Master of Science in Business Analytics
  • Bachelor
      • B.S. in Information Technology
      • BS in Business Admin. – Business Intelligence
      • B.S. in Information Technology with an Emphasis in Cyber Security
      • Bachelor of Science in Applied Business Analytics
      • B.S. in Computer Programming

Get Started with Grand Canyon University

4 Colorado Technical University

Minimum eligibility requirements:
  • Must be a high school graduate or have completed GED
School locations:

Get Started with Colorado Technical University

5 Ashford University

Minimum eligibility requirements:
  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  • Programs offered by Ashford and listed below may not be related to the topic covered by the above article.
School locations:

  • DBA with an Emphasis in Data Analytics
  • Bridge (Doctor of Business Administration with an Emphasis in Data Analytics)
  • Bridge to the M.S. in Information Technology Management
  • M.S. in Information Technology Management
  • M.S. in Instructional Technology
  • Master of Science in Cyber Security
  • Master of Science in Cyber Security (Bridge)
  • Master of Science in Business Analytics
  • B.S. in Information Technology
  • BS in Business Admin. – Business Intelligence
  • B.S. in Information Technology with an Emphasis in Cyber Security
  • Bachelor of Science in Applied Business Analytics
  • B.S. in Computer Programming
  • View more

  • Opiate Abuse Symptoms, Signs and Addiction Treatment #opiate #treatment #options


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    Opiate Abuse

    What Are Opiates?

    Opiates cover a huge variety of drugs, ranging from legal drugs such as fentanyl. codeine. and morphine to illegal drugs such as heroin and opium.

    Examples of opiates include:

    • Heroin.
    • Morphine.
    • Oxycodone (trade names include: OxyContin and Percocet).
    • Hydrocodone (trade names include: Vicodin and Lortab).
    • Codeine.
    • Fentanyl.

    That sounds better. How about this: “You may hear the term “opioid” in reference to prescription opiates. Technically, the concept of “opiates” encompasses drugs naturally derived from the active narcotic components of the opium poppy, whereas the “opioid” label includes synthetic and semi-synthetic drugs that are modified versions of these opiate building blocks. “Opioid” is usually used in reference to prescription drugs. The terms “opiates” and “opioids” are often used interchangeably, however.

    Opiate addiction is a major issue in the U.S. with prescription opiate addiction being one of the biggest drug problems today. Opiate medications are surprisingly easy to obtain. In fact, an estimated 210 million prescriptions for opiates were dispensed in 2010 alone. Frighteningly, prescription opiate abusers are far more likely to eventually develop a heroin addiction than a non-opiate abuser, as heroin will offer a similar high at a cheaper price.

    Any long-term use puts you at risk of addiction. even if the substance is used as prescribed. Many people who use opiates will develop a tolerance to them–a phenomenon that can trigger the cycle of addiction. This means that the same amount of the drug no longer has the same effect as it once did. When this occurs, people routinely take more and more of the substance to elicit the desired response. This ever-increasing dosing places one at great risk for overdose.

    Video: The Deadly Truth About Opiates

    Effects of Opiate Abuse

    Often, the facts about the effects of opiate use are misleading because they may only focus on the short-term impact. For example, opiates often cause vomiting and diarrhea, sedation and delayed reactions in the short term.

    What’s not often mentioned, however, are the long-term symptoms. Long-term symptoms include:

    • Weakened immune system functioning.
    • Gastric problems ranging from the troublesome (e.g. constipation) to severe (e.g. intestinal ileus, bowel perforation).
    • A plethora of medical issues secondary to intravenous administration (e.g. localized abscesses, embolic events, systemic infection, contraction of bloodborne illnesses).
    • Significant respiratory depression; cumulative hypoxic end-organ injury.

    Opiate Abuse Treatment

    Opiate recovery typically starts with questions related to the nature of the addiction, such as:

    • How long have you taken the drug?
    • When was the last time you took the drug?
    • How do you usually get your supply?

    These questions will help the clinic to decide what treatment approach would be most appropriate.

    Three major options for opiate treatment include detoxification (or, simply, detox programs), inpatient rehabilitation, and outpatient therapy.

    Detox involves withdrawing from the drug, often slowly with the use of stabilizing and maintenance medication under the supervision of a medical treatment team. If you’re detoxing from powerful opiates, you might be prescribed methadoneor buprenorphine to make the transition more manageable. Detoxification is completed on an inpatient basis to maintain safety.

    Following the transition from detox, most will be referred for continued treatment via residential rehab or outpatient therapy depending on a number of factors. Influencing the decision for treatment type is the individual’s level of opiate use, the presence of any home or family supports, amounts of insurance coverage/resources to cover care, as well as taking into account any previous attempts at recovery. Rehab typically lasts anywhere from 30 to 90 days with much of the time being devoted to individual therapy, group therapy, and other activities that help promote recovery from opiates and other substances.

    During therapy. you will attend sessions with a therapist or counselor. This will help you to uncover the triggers of your addiction. It helps to impart effective coping skills to resist the temptation of drugs while seeking out helpful supports. It can also help you reconnect with your family and friends.

    In conjunction with outpatient treatment, some in recovery may require more support. For someone in recovery from opiate addiction, this might take the form of a halfway house or sober living facility. which gives former users the chance to get sober and rebuild their lives in a safe and supportive environment. Others may simply need a peer support group, such as Narcotics Anonymous .

    Opiate Statistics

    More than 210 million opiate prescriptions were filled in 2010, with close to 12 million people admitting to abusing these drugs by taking them for non-medical reasons.

    • Per the CDC, certain studies reveal that as many as three out of every four current heroin users were previously prescription opiate abusers.
    • The amount of painkillers prescribed in 2010 was enough to medicate every American 24 hours day a day for one month.
    • Deaths from opiate painkillers outnumber deaths from all illicit drugs combined.

    Opiate Abuse Quiz question 5

    Teen Opiate Abuse

    Teen opiate use tends to be focused on Vicodin and OxyContin. as these are the most relatively easy opiates for many teens obtain. Also, younger users will be more likely to use these substances due to misperceptions regarding risk. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. in 2014:

    • Only 1% of high school seniors used heroin in their lifetime.
    • 3% of high school seniors used OxyContin during the last year.
    • 8% of high school seniors used Vicodin during the last year.

    Teens are likely to combine an opiate with alcohol (another depressant), leading to more dangerous effects–including heightened risk of experiencing severe respiratory depression.

    Resources, Articles, and More Information

    The CDC has a number of articles on drug abuse, particularly with regard to prescription opiate abuse. In addition, NIDA has an article on treatments typically used for opiate addiction.

    You can also read the following articles for more information:

    Join the conversation and find a supportive community today in our Forum.

    Sources:

    • National Institute on Drug Abuse. (n.d.). Monitoring the Future Study: Trends in Prevalence of Various Drugs.
    • National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2016). What are opioids?
    • Centers for Disease Control. (2013). Prescription Painkiller Overdoses.
    • Centers for Disease Control. (2014). Vital Signs – Prescription Drug Overdose.

    What Are Opiates? Opiates cover a huge variety of drugs, ranging from legal drugs such as fentanyl, codeine, and morphine to illegal drugs such as heroin and opium. Examples of opiates include: Heroin. Morphine. Oxycodone (trade names include: OxyContin and Percocet). Hydrocodone (trade names include: Vicodin and Lortab). Codeine. Fentanyl. That sounds better. How about this:

    Stonewater Adolescent Recovery Center


    Va loan refinance options #va #loan #refinance #options


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    ATM Branch Locator

    Barksdale Federal Credit Union is your home loan headquarters. For qualified members, a Barksdale Federal home loan is fast, easy and convenient. We offer fixed rate and adjustable rate loans with terms to fit your needs. Rate information is subject to change daily.

    Before you start shopping for a new home, visit with one of Barksdale Federal s Home Lending Consultants (HLC) and get pre-qualified for your home loan. You ll be able to shop for a new home in the price range that best fits your budget. Call 800-647-2328, option 8, to visit with an HLC today.

    FHA, VA Conventional

    VA financing is designed to benefit veterans of the armed services, those currently in active duty or the reserves, and their spouses. In order to qualify for VA financing you must be eligible as defined by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Conventional Loans are Fixed in 10, 15, 20, or 30-year terms with the interest rate remaining fixed for the life of the loan.

    Refinance

    If you are interested in lowering your interest rates and payments, refinancing may be the option for you. We have refinance options up to 95% loan-to-value, fixed rate terms available, and local underwriting servicing.

    Interim/Permanent Construction

    You can receive financing during the construction phase with a permanent loan to payoff interim financing. This type of loan can be extremely helpful to those who may not be able to accurately anticipate the final costs.

    Second Mortgage Refinance

    Unlock the equity in your home! Our fixed rate Equity Loan unlocks the equity in your home* for you to use for a variety of purposes such as education, vacation, home improvements, credit card consolidation, vehicles – you name it. It s your equity; use it for you!

    *$500.00 non refundable application fee on loans greater than $100,000.00.

    Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)

    A Barksdale Federal HELOC is a revolving line of credit with special FREE checks. When you use your HELOC, you literally write yourself a loan for whatever your special need may be. You may also access your funds through ACCESS24 (phone account access) and Global Access (internet account access). You can use your HELOC to:

    • Pay off higher interest rate credit cards
    • Purchase something special
    • Simply lower your monthly expenses by consolidating debt
    • Any other special need

    The benefits include:

  • You can borrow as little as $10,000 or as much as $100,000
  • No origination fee
  • No appraisal fee
  • No points
  • No annual fee*
  • Borrow up to 95% of the equity in your home*
  • Interest you pay may be tax deductible (consult a tax advisor)
  • *$300 Fee may apply if initial draw is less than $10,000.

    Land Loan

    Application Information

    Property Information

    • If purchasing, copy of Purchase Agreement
    • If refinancing, copy of mortgage and insurance declaration page
    • If construction, copy of plans and specifications
    • If you currently own property, copy of cash sale deed or mortgage

    Borrower Information

    • Copy of divorce documents
    • Copy of bankruptcy proceedings with status and explanation
    • Gift letter or explanation of sources of funds for closing costs

    Income Information

    • Most recent pay stubs showing year-to-date earnings and pay period
    • If self-employed, last two years federal tax returns and W-2 forms
    • Documentation of any other income (if using for qualification)

    Other Information

    • Name and address of landlord(s) for the past 2 years
    • Explanation letter for any late payments, judgments, liens, bankruptcy or foreclosure
    • Closing Statement from sale of current property
    • Copies of last two months bank statements
    • Due to the U.S. Patriot Act, you may be asked for documentation concerning your identity
    • If non-resident, copy of Certificate of Resident Alien Status (Green Card)

    800-647-2328 � 318-549-8240
    Routing #: 311175093


    Options Trading #call #options #trading


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    The first, and most important step in options trading. is to create a watchlist of highly-liquid, optionable stocks or ETFs. This will be the foundation of your all your trading endeavors. The reason you MUST only use highly-liquid stocks or ETFs is so that you can rely on pricing efficiency.

    The more liquid the option the tighter the bid/ask spread. This is extremely important because the bid/ask spread impacts the cost of using options. Wide bid/ask spreads eat into the potential profitability of your investment, and contribute to what is known as slippage .

    The easiest way to search for what we call tradeable options on ETFs or stocks Volume. We look for ETFs with an average volume over 1 million shares traded because we want liquid options. Sometimes the 1 million may not be enough, but it is certainly a good starting point. Again, liquidity directly translates into a reasonable bid/ask spread for options this is critical. It allows you to trade in and out with giving up much of an edge.

    Options Trading: Part II

    Sometimes, we receive emails asking me to look at a small-cap or penny stock with 50,000 shares traded. For one, most, if any, offer options. Remember, we use a probability-driven approach using various credit spreads in the Options Advantage service. This would be impossible to do with illiquid underlyings.

    Lack of volume is the main reason that we do not use individual stocks in our strategies. Most stocks do not offer liquid options. And the ones that do are subject to volatile moves due to unforeseen announcements, earnings surprises, etc. There is no need to take on this type of risk knowing that we can make consistent gains using highly-liquid ETF options.

    Also, by limiting the number of underlying stocks or ETFs, you have the ability to focus and become familiar with a select group that will aid in making your trade assumptions. Creating this watchlist will save you lots of time.

    Today I m going to make a big proposal: You could begin earning 3x to 6x more income from your favorite blue-chip stocks, including Altria (NYSE: MO), Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) and Wal-Mart Stores (NYSE: WMT). It may sound impossible. Let me prove to you it does work in this live trading event. In fact, I just Continue reading 7-Minute Video: Is This the Best Options Income Trade?

    Today’s training is focused on the #1 problem: managing trades and reducing risks. So, I’ll start by addressing this key issue that limits most people’s success.

    A Poor Man’s Covered Call is similar to a traditional covered call strategy, with one exception. Learn the steps to profit from the Poor Man’s Covered Calls.

    The alternative to the covered call is called the Poor Man’s Covered Call, and it’s the perfect strategy for people with smaller accounts. Get in on the 3-part income training series now.

    Coupling a long put with a covered call, a collar, provides the ultimate protective strategy. Why? Because, unlike buying a put for protection, you can insure a stock against a decline without the need to spend much capital.

    More Recent Options Trading Articles


    Care Options and Costs – Province of British Columbia #hotels #click

    #average cost of hospice care

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    Care Options and Costs

    In B.C. care and support are available from both publicly subsidized and private pay providers for people having difficulty coping with activities of daily living because of health-related problems or a life-threatening illness.

    To learn more about the differences between private pay options and publicly subsidized home and community care services offered through B.C. s health authorities, see:

    Below you will find brief descriptions of and links to detailed information about the types of publicly subsidized home and community care services offered through B.C. s health authorities.

    Types of Publicly Subsidized Care

    Publicly subsidized home and community care services are provided to people who are able to continue to live in their own homes and to people who require care in a supportive housing environment.

    Community Nursing

    Community nursing services are provided by a licensed nursing professional to clients in the community who require acute, chronic, palliative or rehabilitative support. Services include assessment and nursing interventions such as education, wound care, medication management, chronic disease management, care management, post-surgical care and palliative care. Generally, community nursing services will be provided on a short-term basis and community nurses assist clients and their families to be confident in taking over care at home.

    Community nursing services may be provided in a variety of settings such as clinics, the client s home, assisted living residences, family care homes, group homes, or other community settings.

    To learn more, see:

    Community Rehabilitation

    Community rehabilitation services are provided by a licensed physical therapist or occupational therapist to clients who require acute, chronic, palliative or rehabilitative support. The main goals of rehabilitation therapy are to help improve or maintain physical and functional abilities and to provide assessment and treatment to ensure a client s home is suitably arranged for their needs and safety. Generally, community rehabilitation services will be provided on a short term basis and community rehabilitation therapists assist clients and their families to be confident in taking over care at home.

    Community rehabilitation services may be provided in a variety of settings such as clinics, the client s home, assisted living residences, family care homes, group homes, or other community settings.

    To learn more, see:

    Adult Day Services

    Adult day services include an organized program of personal care, health care and therapeutic social and recreational activities in a group setting that meet client health care needs and/or caregiver needs for respite.

    In some cases transportation is provided, while in others clients are responsible for their own transportation to and from the program. Many adult day service programs are connected with residential care facilities, while others operate independently.

    To learn more, see:

    Home Support

    Home support services are designed to help clients remain independent and in their own home as long as possible. Home support services are provided by community health workers to clients who require personal assistance with activities of daily living, such as mobilization, nutrition, lifts and transfers, bathing, cueing, grooming and toileting, and may include safety maintenance activities as a supplement to personal assistance when appropriate, as well as specific nursing and rehabilitation tasks delegated by health care professionals.

    To learn more, see:

    Choice in Supports for Independent Living (CSIL)

    Choice in Supports for Independent Living (CSIL) provides eligible home support clients (clients living with physical disabilities and who have high-intensity care needs) more flexibility in managing their home support services.

    CSIL clients, or a designated Representative or a client support group, receive funds directly for the purchase of home support services and assume full responsibility for arranging services, including recruiting, hiring, training, scheduling, supervising, and paying home support worker(s).

    To learn more, see:

    Caregiver Respite/Relief

    Many people receiving home and community care services are assisted by informal caregivers, often a friend or family member. Respite care can give the caregiver temporary relief from the emotional and physical demands of caring for a friend or family member. Respite may take the form of a service that is provided in an individual s home or a residential care facility, hospice or other community care setting such as an adult day centre.

    To learn more, see:

    End-of-Life Care Services

    End-of-life care is supportive and compassionate care that improves the quality of life for people and their families who are facing the end stages of a terminal or chronic illness, or preparing for death.

    End-of-life care addresses physical, psychological, and spiritual concerns and focuses on comfort, respect for decisions, and support for the family. It is provided wherever the client is living, whether in their home, in hospice, an assisted living residence or a residential care facility.

    To learn more, see:

    Assisted Living

    Assisted living services provide housing, hospitality services and personal care services for adults who can live independently and make decisions on their own behalf but require a supportive environment due to physical and functional health challenges.

    To learn more, see:

    Group Homes

    Group home services are provided in a non-licensed congregate housing arrangement where clients with disabilities or other unique conditions share personal care resources. These services are designed to maximize independence, and to support responsibility in areas such as household management, vocational pursuits and social relationships.

    Many communities have group homes, which are generally operated by non-profit societies. Homes range from single family dwellings to apartment complexes and usually accommodate four to six residents.

    To learn more, see:

    Family Care Homes

    Family care home services are provided in a single family residence that accommodates clients with specialized care needs that cannot be optimally met in a residential care facility.

    Family care homes provide a home-like atmosphere, nutritious meals, laundry and housekeeping services and supervision, along with any required assistance with daily living activities, such as bathing, grooming and dressing.

    Family care homes are unlicensed and can house no more than two clients.

    To learn more, see:

    Residential Care Services

    Short-Term

    Short-term residential care services are provided on a short-term basis (usually less than three months) and include convalescent care, residential hospice palliative care and respite care.

    • Respite care provides a client s main caregiver a period of relief, it can also provide a client with a period of supported care to increase their independence.
    • Convalescent care is provided to clients with defined and stable care needs who require a supervised environment for reactivation or recuperation prior to discharge home, most commonly following an acute episode of care.
    • Residential hospice palliative care is provided to clients who require support with comfort, dignity and quality of life in the final days or weeks of their lives, and is distinct from end-of-life care provided to residential care clients who become palliative.

    To learn more, see:

    Long-Term

    Residential care services are provided in facilities that provide 24-hour professional care and supervision in a protective, supportive environment for people who have complex care needs and can no longer be cared for in their own homes or in an assisted living residence.

    To learn more, see:

    How to Arrange for Care

    If you are ready to apply for home and community care services for yourself or someone else, you will find contact information and instructions in:

    Choosing a Residential Care Facility

    How do you decide which residential care facility is best for you? This booklet has information and examples of things to consider when choosing a residential care facility:

    Are You Eligible?

    Are you eligible for subsidized home and community care services? Find out what the general eligibility criteria are:





    Tesla unveils discreet new rooftop solar panels #tesla, #tesla #solar #panels, #new


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    Tesla unveils discreet new rooftop solar panels

    Elon Musk s solar roof tiles won t fit the bill for every home. Some homeowners won t want to replace their entire roofs. but Tesla. of course, already has a solution. They re now marketing sleek, low-profile solar panels that are easy to install and better blend in with roofs than traditional panels.

    Leave it to Tesla to offer an elegant alternative to traditional solar panels. They updated the Energy section of their website over the weekend to include new images of their solar panels. The seamless look of the new technology is thanks to integrated front skirts and no visible mounting hardware according to Tesla s website. Electrek said these features come from Zep Solar. a mounting equipment company SolarCity acquired before Tesla s acquisition. Zep Solar engineers designed the rail-less system Solar City employed to slash solar installation times in half.

    Tesla says their panels exceed industry standards for durability and lifespan on their website. Panasonic will be manufacturing the exclusive panels at the Gigafactory 2 in Buffalo, New York. There aren t many specifics available for the new solar panels yet, but Electrek said they will be 325-watt panels. They noted Panasonic sells other 325 watt panels, and those have a 25-year power output warranty and a 21.76 percent module efficiency.

    Tesla and before that SolarCity used to install solar panels from multiple suppliers as many solar companies do, but told Electrek once these new panels go into production, Tesla will use them for all residential projects in the future. It seems Elon Musk aims at offering solar solutions with better aesthetics for those who have been hesitant to go solar in the past with the bulky rooftop options.

    Anyone interested right now can request a custom quote on Tesla s website. The company told Electrek production should begin this summer.


    Hospice and End-of-Life Options and Costs #inpatient #hospice

    #hospice care costs

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    Hospice and End-of-Life Options and Costs

    End-of-life decisions are among the most difficult to make. They can affect the patient s family for years to come, both financially and emotionally. Still, decisions involving end-of-life care are made by Americans every day: in 2011 alone, 2,513,171 Americans died. Many received professional medical care in hospitals, nursing homes or even in their own homes.

    It s important to make end-of-life decisions based not only on a patient s needs but also on financial capabilities. Here are some common choices.

    Options for End-of-Life Care

    Options for end-of-life care include hospitals, nursing homes, a patient s own home and hospice facilities.

    Hospitals

    Hospitals offer around-the-clock medical care from doctors and nurses, a full range of treatment choices, modern medical equipment, teams of specialists, and the ability to receive tests and life-saving procedures.

    High-intensity hospital care includes Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and Coronary Care Units (CCUs). Approximately 60 percent of Americans die in acute care hospitals, with 20 percent spending their last days in an ICU.

    Nursing Homes

    Nursing homes, also known as skilled nursing facilities, offer around-the-clock nursing care, although a doctor is not always present. There are more than 15,000 nursing homes in the country, housing more than 1.6 million residents.

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 4.2 percent of the country s 40.3 million, 65-plus aged population lives in a nursing home. Residency ratios increase with age: 50 percent of those older than 95 live there. Overall, 20 percent of deaths in the United States take place in nursing homes.

    A Patient s Home

    Studies show that while 80 percent of Americans prefer to die at home, only about 20 percent do. This gap is largely due to the difficulties and costs of caring for a terminally ill patient at home; in most cases, nursing care and special equipment is required.

    Hospice

    Hospice offers pain management and palliative care for patients who are terminally ill. Hospice is not tied to a particular place. It can be offered at home or in an assisted living facility nursing home, hospital or hospice center.

    Nearly 42 percent of terminally ill Americans receive some sort of hospice care; 83 percent of them are older than 65, and more than one-third are older than 85.

    In 2010, approximately 1.58 million patients received hospice care in more than 3,500 Medicare-certified hospice agencies: 58 percent were freestanding or independent; 21.3 percent were part of a hospital system; 19.2 percent were home health care-based; and about 1.5 percent were skilled nursing facility-based. In addition, there are a few hundred agencies that are not certified by Medicare.

    Who Pays for End-of-Life Care?

    About 85 percent of end-of-life care costs are covered by various government entities, including Medicare, Medicaid, and health care programs sponsored by the Veterans Administration (VA) and the Department of Defense (DoD); and private medical and long-term care insurance.

    In 2010, hospice costs were paid for in the following manner: Medicare – 83.8 percent; Medicaid – 4.9 percent; managed care or private insurance 7.9 percent; other (including charity and self-pay) – 3.4 percent.

    Medicare

    Medicare is required to pay for all medically necessary hospital and doctor care under Parts A and B, regardless of cost or the condition of the patient. Of the 2.5 million Americans who died in 2011, 80 percent were Medicare beneficiaries at the time of death.

    Medicare s hospice benefit has been in place since 1982. It pays for hospice care and services for anyone with a serious illness whose doctor certifies that he or she has six months or less to live, and who agrees to forgo life-saving or potentially curative treatment.

    Medicare s hospice coverage includes a broad range of services:
    • Nursing care
    • Medical social worker services
    • Physician services
    • Counseling (including dietary, pastoral and other types)
    • Inpatient care
    • Hospice aide and homemaker services
    • Medical appliances and supplies (including drugs and biologicals)
    • Physical and occupational therapies
    • Speech-language pathology services
    • Bereavement services for families

    Medicare provides care for two 90-day periods in hospice, followed by an unlimited number of 60-day periods. At the start of each period of care, a doctor must re-certify that the patient has six months or less to live.

    Medicaid

    Children with disabilities or adults who meet Medicaid s financial eligibility criteria are fully covered for end-of-life care. Medicare beneficiaries who are dual-eligible for both programs (approximately 20 percent of all Medicare beneficiaries) can have Medicaid cover costs that Medicare doesn t cover, such as outpatient prescription drugs and long-term care.

    Medicaid and Medicare s hospice eligibility requirements are almost identical: A patient must be certified to have six months or less to live and must receive services from a Medicare-certified hospice facility or agency. However, Medicaid policies can vary from state to state.

    In addition to covering hospice services, Medicaid also pays at least 95 percent of room and board costs for hospice patients in a nursing home. Funds are allocated to the hospice agency, which then pays the nursing facility.

    Private Insurance

    Private health insurance plans vary widely in terms of coverage. If the policy includes hospice, end-of-life care or palliative care, it will cover most of those costs.

    Not all plans pay for hospice care, although most do since it is typically much less expensive than hospital treatment. Some policies that cover hospice care may have limits on hospice expenses.

    Other Payers

    TRICARE is a health care program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense that provides health benefits for active military personnel and retirees, and their dependents. Hospice care is covered through this program.

    CHAMPVA (Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs) is a health care program sponsored by the Veterans Administration that insures eligible beneficiaries of certain deceased or disabled veterans. It covers most medically necessary care, including hospice.

    Individuals without private health insurance, and who are not covered by a government policy, must pay for end-of-life care themselves. Some hospice care can be paid on a sliding scale, or through charitable or other donations.

    Costs for End-of-Life Care

    In 2009, Medicare paid $55 billion for doctor and hospital bills incurred during the last two months of patients lives. Hospital inpatient charges exceed $6,200 per day, and costs to maintain someone in an ICU can reach up to $10,000 per day. Skilled nursing facilities were reimbursed at a rate of approximately $622 per day.

    In comparison, total hospice spending for Medicare in 2010 was $13 billion, with an average cost of approximately $10,700 per patient. Medicare does not limit payments for hospice care for individuals, but enforces an aggregate cap for agencies of about $24,500 per beneficiary.

    Medicare paid an average of $153 per day, per person, in 2010 to cover hospice care, in the following categories:
    • Routine home care $146.63 per day for services that patients need on a day-to-day basis.
    • Continuous home care $855.79 per day for services during crises or at least eight hours a day to manage acute symptoms.
    • Inpatient respite care $151.67 per day to relieve unpaid caregivers on an occasional basis for no more than five days at a time.
    • General inpatient care $652.27 per day for care that cannot be provided in other settings.

    Hospice services represent a relatively small part of total Medicaid payments.

    In 2006, state Medicaid programs spent $1.639 billion on hospice, paying different rates depending on the level of care provided:
    • Routine home care $102 per day.
    • Continuous home care $595 per day.
    • Inpatient respite care $110 per day.
    • General inpatient care $453 per day.

    Patients may be responsible for co-payments for outpatient prescription drugs, care in an emergency room or inpatient facility, room and board in a nursing home, etc.

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    Fine Hotel Options in Bar Harbor Maine, Bar Harbor Hotels – operator

    #bar harbor motel

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    Great Rooms with Modern Amenities

    Fine Dining with Outstanding Ocean View

    World Class Luxury Spa & Fitness Room

    Rated �Superior First Class� by Official Hotel Guide

    Bar Harbor�s best oceanfront location, with great in-town convenience. Eight acres of lush lawns/gardens embraced by a serene � mile shore path. Elegant rooms and suites, most rooms with waterfront balconies. Superior hotel amenities from complimentary deluxe continental breakfast, luxury robes and high-speed internet, to homemade cookies on arrival.




    95 Deluxe Air-conditioned Rooms

    King or Queen Beds

    Deluxe Continental Breakfast

    Large Heated Pool and Jacuzzi

    Children under 12 stay free!

    Modern Amenities such as High Speed Internet

    Bar Harbor�s most accommodating hotel. Well-maintained grounds and recreational area. Other amenities include: HBO, guest laundry, refrigerators, free local calls, irons, hair dryers. Located one mile to downtown, 300 yards from ferry to Canada and minutes from Acadia National Park. Packages include deluxe rooms, fabulous dinners at the Bar Harbor Inn and area activities.




    The Atlantic Oceanside Hotel offers:

    New or recently remodeled rooms

    Indoor Outdoor Pools

    Fitness center, pebble beach

    Event Conference for up to 350

    1 mile to Downtown Bar Harbor

    The Atlantic Oceanside Hotel Conference Center is located on the ocean in beautiful Bar Harbor, Maine. Twelve acres of lawns, gardens, and incredible views of Maine’s scenic coast set this resort apart from the ordinary. Formerly the estate of Klondike billionaire, Sir Harry Oakes, we are located near the entrance to Acadia National Park and quietly located a few minutes from downtown Bar Harbor.




    Free Continental Breakfast

    Heated Outdoor Pool

    Direct Access trail into Acadia from the property

    Nestled beside Acadia National Park and convenient to all Bar Harbor shops, restaurants and attractions. We are located just 1 mile from the center of town and a short 1 mile from the main entrance to Acadia National Park. Guests can walk or ride trail bikes directly into Acadia National Park on our access trail.




    Quality Gold Award Winner

    Heated Swimming Pool Hot Tub

    AAA 3-Diamond Rating

    Free Continental Breakfast

    Units with Kitchenettes

    Free Wireless Internet, Microwave, Refrigerator

    Bar Harbor�s Quality Inn, walking distance to downtown. Additional hotel amenities: guest laundry, complimentary paper, heated pool and Hot Tub, Cable TV with HBO, free local calls. Short walk to the waterfront, shopping, and restaurants; and located near Acadia National Park. Special Value Packages available that include meals and unforgettable activities.




    70 Superior Rooms & 2 Bedroom Suites

    Complimentary Continental Breakfast

    Oversized Beds with Premium Bedding

    Refrigerators and Coffee Makers

    DVD Players, DVD Library, Voice Mail

    Internet access, A/C. and much more

    Bar Harbor’s newest hotel in the heart of downtown. Additional hotel amenities: guest laundry, hair dryers, irons, heated pool, free local calls. Short walk to the waterfront, shopping, and restaurants; and just a few minutes drive to the wonders of Acadia National Park. Special Value Packages available that include meals and unforgettable activities.




    Best Western – Acadia Park Inn
    Quiet, peaceful and affordable
    Close to Acadia National Park:

    Free Continental Breakfast

    Over Sized Beds

    Heated Outdoor Pool

    Wireless Internet access

    The Bar Harbor Best Western Inn is close to Acadia National park and just 4 miles from downtown Bar Harbor. Nestled in a quiet location yet close to Bar Harbor and all the attractions of coastal Maine. Additional hotel amenities: guest laundry, in room coffee, free local calls. Special Value Packages available that include meals and unforgettable activities.




    63 non-smoking, air conditioned rooms

    Most convenient downtown location

    Complimentary Grab Go continental breakfast

    Eco-friendly solar heated outdoor pool

    Complimentary wireless internet

    Children under 12 stay free!

    2 miles from Acadia National Park

    The Bar Harbor Villager Motel is located on Main Street in downtown Bar Harbor, within a 5 minute walk to shopping, restaurants, boat tours, the waterfront. Amenities include: Serta Silver Suite mattresses, mini fridge, in-room coffee, 32 flat screen TV with cable, free WIFI, ironing facilities, hairdryer, clock radio, free local calls. Inquire about our special vacation packages which include fabulous meals unforgettable activities.








    Abramson Center for Jewish Life Hospice Care Options #hotels #in #amsterdam

    #jewish hospice

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    Compassionate hospice care services for end-of-life needs

    Service Highlights

    • Compassionate end-of-life care, guidance, support
    • Individualized care plans
    • Pain management and symptom control
    • 24-hour on-call support
    • Spiritual support for patients and loved ones
    • Care provided wherever the patient prefers

    Our Philadelphia hospice programs and options are for those with limited life expectancy due to serious illnesses for which they are no longer seeking curative treatments. At the Abramson Center for Jewish Life’s Hospice, we understand how difficult this time can be. Our experienced Hospice staff will provide support, guidance, and compassionate care every step of the way. We focus on addressing the unique physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of your loved one, helping them to live free of pain and worry.

    Service Options of Our Hospice Care Program

    Your loved one can remain under the care of his or her primary physicians while receiving hospice. Our care team will also provide physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, certified nursing assistants, and dietitians, as well as trained volunteers.

    Our hospice care options include:

    • Skilled nursing care for pain management and symptom control
    • Specialized pharmacy services and medications
    • Medical equipment and supplies related to the hospice care
    • 24-hour on-call support by a hospice-registered nurse
    • Personal care by trained hospice aides
    • Spiritual support by chaplains
    • Counseling and emotional support for patients and their loved ones
    • Physical, occupational, and speech therapy for comfort and safety, as needed
    • Trained hospice volunteers for companionship, friendly visiting, and other patient needs
    • Bereavement services including counseling and support groups

    Important Questions about our Philadelphia Hospice Program

    How do you qualify for hospice care?
    You are eligible for hospice care options if your physician determines that you have a life expectancy of six months or less if your illness follows its usual course, and that you may benefit from hospice care. Hospice care can continue beyond six months, or as long as your physician certifies that your condition remains terminal.

    Where is hospice care provided?
    We provide care where patients live. That could be in their own homes, senior communities, nursing centers or during hospital stays. For more information, please call 215-371-1393 .

    Is hospice care covered by insurance?
    Hospice caring services are covered by Medicare, if eligible, and most other health insurers. Our program is Medicare-certified and licensed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

    How do I get a referral for hospice care?
    Anyone can refer an individual to our Jewish hospice program. You may ask your physician, nurse or a clergy member to make a formal referral request, or you or a family member may call our hospice program directly at 215-371-1393. Individuals seeking hospice care will be evaluated by us free of charge.

    What happens after I receive a referral to Abramson Hospice?
    Upon referral, our hospice staff will meet with you, your family, and your loved one in need to discuss the Abramson Hospice philosophy, available services and your expectations. Pain and comfort levels, support systems, financial and insurance resources, medications, and equipment needs will also be reviewed. With your permission, we will then speak with your personal physician and our hospice medical director about your needs. An individualized hospice plan of care will be developed and regularly reviewed and revised as needed.

    How do I contact Abramson Hospice?
    If you are interested in learning more about hospice caring services for you or a loved one, or if you would like to make a referral to our program, please call 215-371-1393 or Contact Us .

    Have Questions About Hospice?

    Our specialists are here to help. Complete the form below* to get discreet and timely answers to your hospice care questions.
    _____________________________

    *All information is kept private and secure within the Abramson Center.





    Care Options and Costs – Province of British Columbia #motels #in #lancaster

    #average cost of hospice care

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    Care Options and Costs

    In B.C. care and support are available from both publicly subsidized and private pay providers for people having difficulty coping with activities of daily living because of health-related problems or a life-threatening illness.

    To learn more about the differences between private pay options and publicly subsidized home and community care services offered through B.C. s health authorities, see:

    Below you will find brief descriptions of and links to detailed information about the types of publicly subsidized home and community care services offered through B.C. s health authorities.

    Types of Publicly Subsidized Care

    Publicly subsidized home and community care services are provided to people who are able to continue to live in their own homes and to people who require care in a supportive housing environment.

    Community Nursing

    Community nursing services are provided by a licensed nursing professional to clients in the community who require acute, chronic, palliative or rehabilitative support. Services include assessment and nursing interventions such as education, wound care, medication management, chronic disease management, care management, post-surgical care and palliative care. Generally, community nursing services will be provided on a short-term basis and community nurses assist clients and their families to be confident in taking over care at home.

    Community nursing services may be provided in a variety of settings such as clinics, the client s home, assisted living residences, family care homes, group homes, or other community settings.

    To learn more, see:

    Community Rehabilitation

    Community rehabilitation services are provided by a licensed physical therapist or occupational therapist to clients who require acute, chronic, palliative or rehabilitative support. The main goals of rehabilitation therapy are to help improve or maintain physical and functional abilities and to provide assessment and treatment to ensure a client s home is suitably arranged for their needs and safety. Generally, community rehabilitation services will be provided on a short term basis and community rehabilitation therapists assist clients and their families to be confident in taking over care at home.

    Community rehabilitation services may be provided in a variety of settings such as clinics, the client s home, assisted living residences, family care homes, group homes, or other community settings.

    To learn more, see:

    Adult Day Services

    Adult day services include an organized program of personal care, health care and therapeutic social and recreational activities in a group setting that meet client health care needs and/or caregiver needs for respite.

    In some cases transportation is provided, while in others clients are responsible for their own transportation to and from the program. Many adult day service programs are connected with residential care facilities, while others operate independently.

    To learn more, see:

    Home Support

    Home support services are designed to help clients remain independent and in their own home as long as possible. Home support services are provided by community health workers to clients who require personal assistance with activities of daily living, such as mobilization, nutrition, lifts and transfers, bathing, cueing, grooming and toileting, and may include safety maintenance activities as a supplement to personal assistance when appropriate, as well as specific nursing and rehabilitation tasks delegated by health care professionals.

    To learn more, see:

    Choice in Supports for Independent Living (CSIL)

    Choice in Supports for Independent Living (CSIL) provides eligible home support clients (clients living with physical disabilities and who have high-intensity care needs) more flexibility in managing their home support services.

    CSIL clients, or a designated Representative or a client support group, receive funds directly for the purchase of home support services and assume full responsibility for arranging services, including recruiting, hiring, training, scheduling, supervising, and paying home support worker(s).

    To learn more, see:

    Caregiver Respite/Relief

    Many people receiving home and community care services are assisted by informal caregivers, often a friend or family member. Respite care can give the caregiver temporary relief from the emotional and physical demands of caring for a friend or family member. Respite may take the form of a service that is provided in an individual s home or a residential care facility, hospice or other community care setting such as an adult day centre.

    To learn more, see:

    End-of-Life Care Services

    End-of-life care is supportive and compassionate care that improves the quality of life for people and their families who are facing the end stages of a terminal or chronic illness, or preparing for death.

    End-of-life care addresses physical, psychological, and spiritual concerns and focuses on comfort, respect for decisions, and support for the family. It is provided wherever the client is living, whether in their home, in hospice, an assisted living residence or a residential care facility.

    To learn more, see:

    Assisted Living

    Assisted living services provide housing, hospitality services and personal care services for adults who can live independently and make decisions on their own behalf but require a supportive environment due to physical and functional health challenges.

    To learn more, see:

    Group Homes

    Group home services are provided in a non-licensed congregate housing arrangement where clients with disabilities or other unique conditions share personal care resources. These services are designed to maximize independence, and to support responsibility in areas such as household management, vocational pursuits and social relationships.

    Many communities have group homes, which are generally operated by non-profit societies. Homes range from single family dwellings to apartment complexes and usually accommodate four to six residents.

    To learn more, see:

    Family Care Homes

    Family care home services are provided in a single family residence that accommodates clients with specialized care needs that cannot be optimally met in a residential care facility.

    Family care homes provide a home-like atmosphere, nutritious meals, laundry and housekeeping services and supervision, along with any required assistance with daily living activities, such as bathing, grooming and dressing.

    Family care homes are unlicensed and can house no more than two clients.

    To learn more, see:

    Residential Care Services

    Short-Term

    Short-term residential care services are provided on a short-term basis (usually less than three months) and include convalescent care, residential hospice palliative care and respite care.

    • Respite care provides a client s main caregiver a period of relief, it can also provide a client with a period of supported care to increase their independence.
    • Convalescent care is provided to clients with defined and stable care needs who require a supervised environment for reactivation or recuperation prior to discharge home, most commonly following an acute episode of care.
    • Residential hospice palliative care is provided to clients who require support with comfort, dignity and quality of life in the final days or weeks of their lives, and is distinct from end-of-life care provided to residential care clients who become palliative.

    To learn more, see:

    Long-Term

    Residential care services are provided in facilities that provide 24-hour professional care and supervision in a protective, supportive environment for people who have complex care needs and can no longer be cared for in their own homes or in an assisted living residence.

    To learn more, see:

    How to Arrange for Care

    If you are ready to apply for home and community care services for yourself or someone else, you will find contact information and instructions in:

    Choosing a Residential Care Facility

    How do you decide which residential care facility is best for you? This booklet has information and examples of things to consider when choosing a residential care facility:

    Are You Eligible?

    Are you eligible for subsidized home and community care services? Find out what the general eligibility criteria are: