Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says #orlando #hotels

#hospice news

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Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says

DALLAS The owner of a Dallas-area hospice ordered nurses to increase drug dosages for patients to speed their deaths and maximize profits, according to an FBI affidavit.

A copy of the affidavit for a search warrant obtained by KXAS-TV in Dallas-Fort Worth alleges Brad Harris ordered higher dosages for at least four patients at Novus Health Services in Frisco. It’s unclear whether any deaths resulted from overdoses of drugs like morphine.

Harris has not been charged. The FBI on Wednesday declined to say whether an investigation is ongoing.

The warrant refers to an FBI raid on the hospice in September. It alleges Harris sent text messages to workers such as, You need to make this patient go bye-bye. On another occasion, Harris told administrators during a lunch meeting that he wanted to find patients who would die within 24 hours.

In at least one instance, an employee refused to follow orders to increase a dosage, the warrant said.

The document explains that federal reimbursements can diminish the longer a patient receives care. A provider eventually can be forced to return federal payments.

A woman who answered the phone Wednesday at Novus declined to comment. Attempts to reach Harris for comment on Wednesday were unsuccessful. A working number for him could not be found; listings for a Brad Harris in the Dallas and Houston areas had either been disconnected or turned out not to be his. The Associated Press also sent a request for comment to two email addresses believed to be his.

Harris, 34, is an accountant who founded Novus in 2012, according to KXAS, citing state records.

Novus’ website says the company offers hospice and home health care services.

The FBI investigation of Novus, which included interviewing several employees, began in 2014 and initially focused on allegations that the company sought federal reimbursements for patients recruited by Novus who didn’t qualify for services, according to KXAS.





Loratadine Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings – Dosing #loratadine #oral,


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Loratadine Tablet,Disintegrating

Uses

Loratadine does not prevent hives or prevent/treat a serious allergic reaction (e.g. anaphylaxis ). Therefore, if your doctor has prescribed epinephrine to treat allergic reactions, always carry your epinephrine injector with you. Do not use loratadine in place of your epinephrine.

If you are self-treating with this medication, it is important to read the manufacturer’s package instructions carefully so you know when to consult your doctor or pharmacist. (See also Precautions section.)

Do not use this medication in children younger than 6 years unless directed by the doctor.

How to use Loratadine Tablet,Disintegrating

If you are using the over-the-counter product to self-treat, read all the directions on the product package before taking this medication. If your doctor has prescribed this medication, follow your doctor’s directions and the instructions on your prescription label. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist .

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor or the product package, usually once or twice a day. Remove the tablet from its foil pack immediately before taking and place the tablet on the tongue. It will dissolve quickly. You may swallow the dissolved medication with or without water. Dosage is based on your age, condition, and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take this drug more often than directed. Do not take more of this medication than recommended for your age.

Tell your doctor if your allergy symptoms do not improve after 3 days of treatment or if your hives last more than 6 weeks. Seek immediate medical attention if your condition worsens or you think you have a serious medical problem (e.g. very serious allergic reaction /anaphylaxis ).

Side Effects

This drug usually has no side effects. If you have any unusual effects, contact your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction. including: rash. itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue /throat), severe dizziness. trouble breathing .

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking loratadine. tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to desloratadine; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication. tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history. Do not self-treat with this medication without consulting your doctor first if you have certain medical conditions such as: kidney disease. liver disease.

Loratadine does not usually cause drowsiness when used at recommended doses. However, do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely.

If you have hives and your doctor has prescribed loratadine, or if you are considering using this drug to treat your own hives, tell your doctor right away if you have any of these other symptoms because they may be signs of a more serious condition: hives that are an unusual color, hives that look bruised or blistered, hives that do not itch.

This product may contain aspartame. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to restrict your intake of aspartame (or phenylalanine ), consult your doctor or pharmacist about using this drug safely.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially drowsiness, or confusion. These side effects can increase the risk of falling.

During pregnancy. this medication should be used only when clearly needed and as directed by your doctor. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor before taking this drug.

This medication passes into breast milk. However, it is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding .

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Loratadine is very similar to desloratadine. Do not use medications containing desloratadine while using loratadine.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including allergy skin testing ), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing. call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: severe drowsiness.

Notes

If your doctor has prescribed this medication for you, do not share it with others.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip themissed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Different brands/strengths of this medication may have different storage requirements. Read the package labeling or ask your pharmacist for the storage requirements for the product you are using. Protect from light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

Images


Heroin Detoxification #heroin #abuse,addiction,detox,treatment,rehab,overdose,recovery,withdrawal #symptoms,rapid #detoxification


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Heroin Detox. (800) 315-2391 Heroin Rehabilitation. (888) 565-6401 Heroin Addiction Hotline. (800) 303-2482

Heroin Detoxification

What is Detoxification?

Detoxification is a process that allows the body to get rid the drug that’s been abused while managing the symptoms of withdrawal that’s associated with the substance that’s been used. Detox is always the first step taken before addressing the user’s heroin addiction and working on their recovery.

Why Should a Heroin User Detox?

When heroin is abused it enters the brain and turns into morphine which then attach to opioid receptors in the brain and throughout the body. When a person is seeking treatment to overcome their addiction to heroin if they haven’t gotten rid of the chemicals that are still in their body they will continue to crave the drug and experience withdrawal. Until the chemicals are out of the body and withdrawal symptoms are managed it’s hard to focus on recovery. Detoxification can be very uncomfortable for anyone that’s abused heroin for any length of time. Due to the intense cravings and uncomfortable symptoms a person experiences during heroin detox, most people relapse before they’re able to complete this process if they attempt to detox on their own.

Because repeated heroin use also causes serious health conditions, it’s important to seek professional help from a qualified detox center or substance abuse treatment center instead of attempting detox on your own. The longer a person has abused heroin the more intense their cravings and withdrawal symptoms will also be.

Do I still Need Rehab Even Though I’m Going to Detox?

Detoxification is just the first step toward recovery from heroin abuse and addiction. The abuse of heroin doesn’t just cause physical dependence it affects a person mentally, emotionally and spiritually as well. Physical complications that heroin use has caused besides cravings and withdrawal have to be addressed if present, especially with long term use.

Many changes have to take place in a person’s life in order to maintain their abstinence and work toward recovery.

There is much more to recovering from heroin addiction than detoxification and without effective treatment after completing detox, most people go right back to using again in a short period of time.

What is Rapid Detox?

Rapid detoxification takes place under anesthesia and is performed by expert medical professionals and certified anesthesiologists. Rapid detox is a quick method of ridding the body of the drug that’s been abused eliminating cravings and withdrawal symptoms. This method of detox is not for everyone and extensive tests are done beforehand to make sure the patient is a good candidate for this form of detoxification.

Heroin Detox & Methadone Treatment Centers

  • Alabama (334) 649-3039
  • Arkansas (870) 277-4314
  • Connecticut (860) 986-7636
  • Florida (561) 859-0771
  • Idaho (208) 473-2876
  • Iowa (712) 266-3564
  • Louisiana (318) 935-6161
  • Massachusetts (617) 206-3810
  • Mississippi (662) 269-0154
  • Nebraska (402) 261-2767
  • New Jersey (732) 497-3463
  • North Carolina (828) 202-4176
  • Oklahoma (405) 253-5317
  • Rhode Island (401) 288-3581
  • Tennessee (423) 208-9047
  • Vermont (802) 428-4694
  • West Virginia (304) 915-0148
  • Alaska (480) 478-0599
  • California (626) 498-2948
  • Delaware (302) 342-8812
  • Georgia (678) 573-5007
  • Illinois (708) 248-8377
  • Kansas (785) 380-0231
  • Maine (207) 221-2169
  • Michigan (586) 439-0608
  • Missouri (636) 238-3492
  • Nevada (775) 473-9831
  • New Mexico (505) 435-9622
  • North Dakota (701) 355-6372
  • Oregon (541) 378-6675
  • South Carolina (843) 277-6472
  • Texas (281) 907-9551
  • Virginia (757) 512-7669
  • Wisconsin (920) 482-2915
  • Arizona (479) 439-8040
  • Colorado (970) 315-0226
  • District of Columbia (202) 509-9590
  • Hawaii (888) 565-6401
  • Indiana (317) 429-0449
  • Kentucky (859) 309-6039
  • Maryland (443) 569-6126
  • Minnesota (651) 964-3129
  • Montana (406) 322-3268
  • New Hampshire (603) 821-0292
  • New York (516) 252-1762
  • Ohio (513) 785-0842
  • Pennsylvania (717) 798-9650
  • South Dakota (605) 385-0105
  • Utah (801) 704-5012
  • Washington (425) 242-5130
  • Wyoming (307) 222-0334

Drugs: What to Know #drug, #upper, #downer, #addiction, #addicted, #tolerance, #drug #use,


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Drugs: What to Know

It’s not hard to find drugs, and sometimes it may seem like everyone’s doing them or wanting you to do them. But as with anything that seems too good to be true, there are downsides (and dangers) to taking drugs.

How Drugs Work

Drugs are chemicals or substances that change the way our bodies work. Some are medicines that help people when doctors prescribe them. Many have no medical use or benefits.

When taken (usually by swallowing, inhaling, or injecting), abused drugs find their way into the bloodstream. From there, they move to the brain and other parts of the body. In the brain, drugs may intensify or dull the senses, change how alert or sleepy people feel, and sometimes decrease physical pain.

Because of the way these drugs work on the brain, they affect the ability to make healthy choices and decisions. Even drinking makes people more likely to get involved in dangerous situations, like driving under the influence or having unprotected sex .

How drugs affect people depends on lots of things:

  • the kind of drug taken
  • how much is taken
  • how often someone uses it
  • how quickly it gets to the brain
  • what other drugs, food, or substances are taken at the same time
  • the person’s body size, shape, and chemistry

Although substances can feel good at first, they can do a lot of harm to the body and brain. Drinking alcohol, smoking or using tobacco. taking illegal drugs, even sniffing glue all damage the human body.

Why People Take Drugs

Just as there are many kinds of drugs available, there are as many reasons for trying or using them. People take drugs for the pleasure they believe they can bring. Or maybe someone else talked them into it, making them think they’ll have a better time if they take drugs. Often people try to talk friends into taking drugs just because they don’t want to be the only ones doing them.

Some people believe drugs will help them think better. be more popular, or become better artists or athletes. Others are curious. And some people want to fit in and take drugs because of peer pressure .

Many people use drugs because they’re depressed or think drugs will help them escape their problems. But drugs just mask feelings and problems, they don’t solve them. People find that when a drug wears off, the feelings and problems remain and might even be worse. This can put people on the hamster wheel of chasing a high just to feel better.

Commonly abused drugs include:

Getting Help

If you think you or a friend may be addicted to drugs, talk to a parent, your doctor. school counselor. or nurse. They can help you get the help you need.

Several kinds of treatment are available for drug addiction. The two main types are behavioral (helping a person change behaviors) and pharmacological (treating a person by using medicine).

Experts in drug treatment teach people how to live without drugs dealing with cravings, avoiding situations that could lead to drug use, and preventing and handling relapses.

It can be hard to overcome drug addiction without professional help and treatment. It takes time and isn’t something that can be done alone everyone needs support. Experts who help people with addictions are trained to help, not judge. To find a drug treatment center in your area, search online, check out the SAMHSA Treatment Locator. or ask a doctor or counselor for advice.

Date reviewed: October 2016


Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says #motels #florida

#hospice news

#

Texas hospice owner ordered nurses to overdose patients, FBI says

DALLAS The owner of a Dallas-area hospice ordered nurses to increase drug dosages for patients to speed their deaths and maximize profits, according to an FBI affidavit.

A copy of the affidavit for a search warrant obtained by KXAS-TV in Dallas-Fort Worth alleges Brad Harris ordered higher dosages for at least four patients at Novus Health Services in Frisco. It’s unclear whether any deaths resulted from overdoses of drugs like morphine.

Harris has not been charged. The FBI on Wednesday declined to say whether an investigation is ongoing.

The warrant refers to an FBI raid on the hospice in September. It alleges Harris sent text messages to workers such as, You need to make this patient go bye-bye. On another occasion, Harris told administrators during a lunch meeting that he wanted to find patients who would die within 24 hours.

In at least one instance, an employee refused to follow orders to increase a dosage, the warrant said.

The document explains that federal reimbursements can diminish the longer a patient receives care. A provider eventually can be forced to return federal payments.

A woman who answered the phone Wednesday at Novus declined to comment. Attempts to reach Harris for comment on Wednesday were unsuccessful. A working number for him could not be found; listings for a Brad Harris in the Dallas and Houston areas had either been disconnected or turned out not to be his. The Associated Press also sent a request for comment to two email addresses believed to be his.

Harris, 34, is an accountant who founded Novus in 2012, according to KXAS, citing state records.

Novus’ website says the company offers hospice and home health care services.

The FBI investigation of Novus, which included interviewing several employees, began in 2014 and initially focused on allegations that the company sought federal reimbursements for patients recruited by Novus who didn’t qualify for services, according to KXAS.





Roxanol – Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol #titanic #hotel #turkey

#roxanol hospice

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Roxanol

Roxanol is a prescription medication used to treat moderate to severe pain. Roxanol belongs to a group of drugs called opioid narcotics. Opioid narcotics bind to receptors throughout the body which works to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Roxanol comes in an oral solution and the dose will be individualized.

Common side effects of Roxanol include constipation. nausea, itchiness, and sleepiness. Do not drink alcohol or any foods or medications containing alcohol while taking Roxanol as alcohol increases the risk that you will experience breathing problems or other serious, life-threatening side effects.

Patient Ratings for Roxanol

How was your experience with Roxanol?

Roxanol Cautionary Labels

Uses of Roxanol

Roxanol is a prescription medication used to treat moderate to severe pain. This medication is indicated for the relief of acute and chronic pain in opioid-tolerant patients.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.





Drugs: What to Know #drug, #upper, #downer, #addiction, #addicted, #tolerance, #drug #use,


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Drugs: What to Know

It’s not hard to find drugs, and sometimes it may seem like everyone’s doing them or wanting you to do them. But as with anything that seems too good to be true, there are downsides (and dangers) to taking drugs.

How Drugs Work

Drugs are chemicals or substances that change the way our bodies work. Some are medicines that help people when doctors prescribe them. Many have no medical use or benefits.

When taken (usually by swallowing, inhaling, or injecting), abused drugs find their way into the bloodstream. From there, they move to the brain and other parts of the body. In the brain, drugs may intensify or dull the senses, change how alert or sleepy people feel, and sometimes decrease physical pain.

Because of the way these drugs work on the brain, they affect the ability to make healthy choices and decisions. Even drinking makes people more likely to get involved in dangerous situations, like driving under the influence or having unprotected sex .

How drugs affect people depends on lots of things:

  • the kind of drug taken
  • how much is taken
  • how often someone uses it
  • how quickly it gets to the brain
  • what other drugs, food, or substances are taken at the same time
  • the person’s body size, shape, and chemistry

Although substances can feel good at first, they can do a lot of harm to the body and brain. Drinking alcohol, smoking or using tobacco. taking illegal drugs, even sniffing glue all damage the human body.

Why People Take Drugs

Just as there are many kinds of drugs available, there are as many reasons for trying or using them. People take drugs for the pleasure they believe they can bring. Or maybe someone else talked them into it, making them think they’ll have a better time if they take drugs. Often people try to talk friends into taking drugs just because they don’t want to be the only ones doing them.

Some people believe drugs will help them think better. be more popular, or become better artists or athletes. Others are curious. And some people want to fit in and take drugs because of peer pressure .

Many people use drugs because they’re depressed or think drugs will help them escape their problems. But drugs just mask feelings and problems, they don’t solve them. People find that when a drug wears off, the feelings and problems remain and might even be worse. This can put people on the hamster wheel of chasing a high just to feel better.

Commonly abused drugs include:

Getting Help

If you think you or a friend may be addicted to drugs, talk to a parent, your doctor. school counselor. or nurse. They can help you get the help you need.

Several kinds of treatment are available for drug addiction. The two main types are behavioral (helping a person change behaviors) and pharmacological (treating a person by using medicine).

Experts in drug treatment teach people how to live without drugs dealing with cravings, avoiding situations that could lead to drug use, and preventing and handling relapses.

It can be hard to overcome drug addiction without professional help and treatment. It takes time and isn’t something that can be done alone everyone needs support. Experts who help people with addictions are trained to help, not judge. To find a drug treatment center in your area, search online, check out the SAMHSA Treatment Locator. or ask a doctor or counselor for advice.

Date reviewed: October 2016