Palliative Care Patient Education Handouts #motel #rocks #uk

#palliative care education

#

Handouts for Patients and Families

Palliative Care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.

Palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work together with a patient s other doctors to provide an extra layer of support. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided along with curative treatment.

  1. Where do I receive palliative care?
    Palliative care is provided in a variety of settings including the hospital, outpatient clinics, home, hospice and long term care facilities.
  2. Does my insurance pay for palliative care?
    Most insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid, cover palliative care. If costs concern you, a social worker or financial consultant from the palliative care team can help you.
  3. How do I get palliative care?
    Ask for it! Tell your doctors, nurses, family and caregivers that you want palliative care.
  4. How do I know if palliative care is right for me?
    Palliative care may be right for you if you suffer from pain, stress or other symptoms due to a serious illness. Serious illnesses may include cancer, cardiac disease, respiratory disease, kidney failure, Alzheimer’s, HIV/AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis and more. Palliative care can be provided at any stage of illness and along with treatment meant to cure you.
  5. What can I expect from palliative care?
    The palliative care team works in partnership with your own doctor to provide an extra layer of support for you and your family. The team provides expert symptom management, extra time for communication and help navigating the health system.
  6. Who provides palliative care?
    Palliative care is provided by a team including palliative care doctors, nurses and social workers. Massage therapists, pharmacists, nutritionists and others might also be part of the team.
  7. How does palliative care work with my own doctor?
    The palliative care team works in partnership with your own doctor to provide an extra layer of support for you and your family. The team provides expert symptom management, extra time for communication and help navigating the health system.

Here s a PDF handout:

Access the Provider Directory

Sign Up for Our Blog

Copyright 2016, Center to Advance Palliative Care. All rights reserved.

GetPalliativeCare.org does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.





Derwentside Hospice Care Foundation – Willow Burn Hospice – Hospice Co Durham

#durham hospice

#

Win your Happily Eve. Local hospice, Willow Burn, based in Lanchester are offering one very lucky couple the c. Read More

Consett Shop celebra. On Thursday 5th May the staff in our Consett Shop held a party to celebrate the annivers. Read More

Fantastic Volunteers. Our fantastic volunteers Julia and Beryl, together with the help of their friends, are b. Read More

Willow Burn Wonsie W. On Wednesday 20th April, St. Pius RC Primary School in Consett took part in a Willow Bur. Read More

Consett Shop holds 1. On 5th May Consett Shop will be holding a Birthday Party to celebrate the anniversary of. Read More

Thank you to our Vol. We recently held a bucket collection on the streets of Chester-le-Street raising a fanta. Read More

In Celebration of Qu. South Causey Inn are holding a special event on Thursday 21st April 2016 in celebration. Read More

Spring Fair held Sat. Our Spring Fair was an enormous success this year making a fantastic total of £5,821.92. Read More

Exhibition with a Te. On Thursday, 7th April 7 Willow Burn Hospice held an open day to unveil an exhibition wi. Read More

TEENAGER MAKES SPORT. A champion gymnast, whose dreams were shattered by a devastating injury, is making a spo. Read More

Donate

Make a donation now and support a local charity who provides vital services to the community of Derwentside

Events

Find fundraising events at Willow Burn. Take part in our forthcoming events and help us to continue our vital work

Volunteer

Join us as a Willow Burn volunteer and know that you are making a difference to a local charity in your community

Newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter and stay in touch with the latest news and local events from Willow Burn

Website designed by Azure Graphic
Web Design Sunderland

Willow Burn is a registered charity, number 519659
and registered as a company limited by guarantee in the name of
Derwentside Hospice Care Foundation, number 2263960
Willow Burn is VAT registered, number 888918050.





Palliative Care – Lancaster University #hotels #reservations

#palliative care course

#

Palliative Care: Making it Work

0:11 Skip to 0 minutes and 11 seconds Dame Cicely Saunders, the pioneer of the hospice movement in the UK, said “You matter because you are you. And you matter until the end of your life. We will do all we can, not only to help you die peacefully but also to live until you die.” How we die is incredibly important, not only to the person approaching the end of their life but also to those around them. The modern-day palliative care movement aims to help people realise a good death. Every day, more than 150,000 people die across the world. And of those only a small minority receive palliative care services. And even in the most developed countries, these services need improvement.

1:00 Skip to 1 minute and 0 seconds A number of healthcare agencies are involved in the care of someone in the last year of life. But integrating these services for individual patients is challenging. Do you have a personal or professional interest in palliative care? Are you a patient, a carer, a healthcare professional, or an academic? If so, this course is for you. I am Dr Nancy Preston, a senior lecturer at the International Observatory on End of Life Care, which is a world leader in palliative care research at Lancaster University. I will be leading you through this course on Palliative Care– Making It Work. Drawing on research from five European countries, the course features guest speakers who will provide real-life examples of best practise in providing integrated palliative care.

1:50 Skip to 1 minute and 50 seconds In addition, we will discuss practical tips and strategies with professionals on how to successfully deliver palliative care. By taking part in this course, you will have the opportunity to explore and discuss the best ways to care for people who have advanced cancer, heart failure, or lung disease who are approaching the end of their life. Our aim is to improve end-of-life care, to enable more people to experience a good death. So please join us for this important course.

About the course

The modern day palliative care movement aims to help people live well in their last year of life and ultimately realise a good death. However, every day more than 150 thousand people die across the world and of those only a small minority receive palliative care services. Do you have a personal or professional interest in palliative care? If so this course is for you.

Understand what palliative care is

Over three weeks, you will be introduced to the concept of palliative care and how it can be integrated with other types of care. The course will feature examples of where this has been done well.

Learn how palliative care is managed across Europe

Drawing on research from the EU funded project InSup-C, we will learn how integrated palliative care is managed across five European countries. It will include international guest speakers to provide real-life examples of best practice in delivering integrated palliative care.

Explore the best ways to care for people approaching the end of life

The programme is co-ordinated by the International Observatory on End of Life Care, a world-leader in the field of palliative care. By taking part in this course, you will have the opportunity to explore and discuss the best ways to care for people who have advanced cancer, heart failure or lung disease who are approaching the end of life.

Educators





Veterinary Palliative Radiation Therapy #vna #hospice

#palliative radiation therapy

#

Veterinary Palliative Radiation Therapy

Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (VHUP)

Last Modified: June 5, 2013

Palliative therapy can be thought of as “comfort care”. It is treatment intended to maintain a good quality of life for patients in which long-term cancer control is not possible. Palliative radiation therapy can be used to control the symptoms associated with many localized tumors that cannot be treated by other methods (such as surgical removal). These symptoms include pain, bleeding, and decreased function. Radiation is usually combined with anti-inflammatory and pain medications to maximize the relief of cancer-related symptoms. The goals of palliative therapy are to provide symptom-relief, and not to increase survival time or cure the cancer. Radiation therapy is particularly useful in alleviating pain associated with tumors that are arising from, or invading into bone. About two thirds of patients have moderate to significant improvement, and the effects can last for a few weeks to several months. Decrease in symptoms can occur as quickly as several days after the first treatment, or it may take a few weeks before improvement is seen.

Palliative radiation involves delivering a few large doses of radiation over several weeks. The typical plan involves giving three treatments on days 0, 7, and 21 (in other words, two treatments a week apart, followed by a week of rest, and then a third treatment if indicated). In most cases, palliative radiation therapy is a one-time course of treatment and cannot be repeated. Each treatment requires light anesthesia because the patient must be completely still during the procedure—there is no pain or discomfort associated with delivery of the radiation. Your pet must have no food after 8 PM the night before each treatment (water is okay) to insure an empty stomach prior to anesthesia.

Patients are treated as outpatients, with each treatment requiring about 2-3 hours at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. This time includes preparation for anesthesia, treatment delivery, and recovery. The radiation is focused on the tumor, and the fur in this area will be clipped and pen marks used to outline the treatment area. A small area on a leg will also be clipped for an intravenous catheter (I.V.) used during the anesthesia. Your pet may be a little groggy or sedate for several hours after going home, and should be kept quiet and have limited food and water until fully recovered.

Side effects are minimal, and are limited to the area receiving radiation. They start after about three to four weeks from the first treatment and last for a few weeks. The radiated area will be pink to red and hairless and there may be some mild flaking or crusting of the skin. Treatments of these side effects include the use of topical medications and preventing your pet from licking, rubbing, or scratching at the treated area. Eventually the skin in this area will become very dark to black, and some sparse hair may regrow. Long term side effects (such as the risk of non-healing wounds) take many months or years to occur, and are typically not a problem because most patients undergoing palliative care have a life expectancy of less than one year due to their cancer.

To learn more about the specialty of veterinary radiation oncology, how to find a specialist and common questions; visit The American College of Veterinary Radiology .

Keywords

Click on any of these terms for more related articles





Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice #hospice #of #dayton #jobs

#hospice tampa

#

Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice

You’re not from hospice, are you?

They ask because they aren’t ready for hospice. They may equate it with death. They may not want to stop medical treatments meant to cure or prolong life, even if their suffering is intense.

Enter the palliative care movement — aimed at providing the comfort of hospice for people who aren’t yet at the end of life.

The distinction is important both to patients and the physicians seeking to help them. And while it is touted as a less expensive way to provide better care, it also represents a new line of business for health care facilities.

Farmer is the medical director of Chapters Health Palliative Care. It’s affiliated with LifePath Hospice, the major hospice provider in Hillsborough County.

Chapters Health Palliative Care started in 2006 for patients who need help managing their pain and other symptoms. Many of them are still getting curative treatment such as chemotherapy and radiation, which hospice patients — defined by Medicare as people with six months or less to live have usually abandoned.

Hospices around the country see a growing demand for palliative care, especially as b aby boomers age and develop chronic illnesses that require comfort care.

Hospitals, too, are expanding their palliative care services, often in coordination with hospice institutions, since research findings show that it improves patient outcomes. It is thought that patients who are less stressed by pain are better able to stabilize or even improve their health.

The palliative care program at the region’s largest hospital, Tampa General, served 1,300 patients last year. The hospital’s foundation is about halfway toward its goal of raising $320,000 to convert some hospital rooms into palliative care suites.

At Suncoast Hospice, the dominant provider in Pinellas County, new chief executive officer Rafael Sciullo plans to expand the palliative care program, which last year served nearly 1,730 people.

Suncoast already has a home-based palliative care program and a consult service to two hospitals, Mease Countryside Hospital and Mease Dunedin Hospital, said Sciullo. He wants to expand the consults to more hospitals, and increase marketing for home-based care.

We do want to dispel any myths that it’s all about dying, said Sciullo. Because it isn’t.

Pasco-Hernando Hospice has an in-home palliative care program for patients who don’t qualify for hospice. Gulfside Regional Hospice in New Port Richey started a spin-off company, Pasco Palliative Care LLC, which provides services to non-hospice patients at several facilities, including Morton Plant North Bay Hospital in New Port Richey and Medical Center of Trinity, said chief executive officer Linda Ward.

It’s really going to grow, said Ward. Many hospitals have come on board to recognize that palliative care helps prevent readmissions.

That’s important at a time when the Medicare program is penalizing hospitals whose patients are readmitted too soon.

Palliative care could also provide new Medicare income to hospices, who stand to lose money if the federal government clamps down on who qualifies for Medicare’s hospice benefit.

Why is Medicare eyeing hospice payments? Because most of Medicare spending on hospice in 2011 — $13.8 billion — was for patients who lived longer than six months, the trigger for the hospice benefit. While it’s often not possible to predict when a person will die, that large imbalance, critics say, indicates that some hospices are admitting people who should not qualify for the Medicare hospice benefit.

As a physician, Farmer says he sees every day how palliative care improves the lives of patients who face not only major illness, but also complicated treatment plans that can be difficult to navigate outside of the hospital. In fact, he said, LifePath’s parent company began its palliative program as a consult service at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Florida Hospital, both in Tampa. Patients were leaving the hospital and going on to live for years at home but without a coordinated plan to address their symptoms, he said.

Pain is just one issue. An emphysema patient, for instance, might also need low doses of morphine to help him deal with severe shortness of breath. The palliative team helps patients prepare advanced directives explaining what kind of health care they want as they reach the end of their lives.

What you find is a lot of these doctors know that (their patients) needed this type of care, but they just didn’t have the time, said Farmer.

Denise Alessandro is the sole caregiver for her 86-year-old mother, who has dementia, advanced arthritis and other ailments.

We didn’t feel Mom was quite ready at that point for hospice, but we wanted some direction, the Apollo Beach woman said. Farmer helped them with some small changes that made a huge difference, from getting them a hospital bed and wheelchair, to connecting Alessandro with caregiver support groups.

In recent weeks, Alessandro’s mother began qualifying for hospice care. As is the case in many families, the time in palliative care is making that transition easier to accept.

I think it’s a wonderful program, Alessandro said of palliative care. I wish more people knew about it.

Palliative care helps patients not ready for hospice 04/27/13 [Last modified: Saturday, April 27, 2013 9:14pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints





American Hospice – Hospice of New Jersey offering Hospice Care and Inpatient

#hospice of nj

#

Hover over date to view event details
Visit the Events Page

Hospice of New Jersey is the leading Hospice provider in delivering passionate, competent and comprehensive end-of-life care in New Jersey and the surrounding communities. For more than ten years Hospice of New Jersey has been devoted to easing the physical, emotional and spiritual pain and suffering that often accompanies terminal illness.

We provide comprehensive services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We have a very compassionate, experienced and well-trained hospice team of physicians, nurses, hospice aides, medical social workers, spiritual care specialists, clinical pharmacists, bereavement counselors and volunteers. We promise to always put patients and families first and strive to make every contact with you or your loved one meaningful.

Hospice of New Jersey accepts most private insurance and is a Medicare and Medicaid licensed provider. Both Medicare and Medicaid provide 100% coverage for care related to the terminal illness. This includes physicians, nurses, hospice aides, medical social workers, counselors, equipment, medications, oxygen, and medical supplies. Medicare and Medicaid patients will never receive a bill from us.

Please call us at (973) 893- 0818 to speak with one of our caring healthcare professionals about hospice. Learn if hospice is right for you, your loved one, or your patient. Also, feel free to browse our web site for additional information about our hospice, our locations, virtual tours of our facilities, and other useful information.





Texas Palliative Center #home #health #and #hospice

#hospice of el paso

#

Texas Palliative Center

Texas Palliative Center is the first and only facility built with the highest standards to provide palliative and hospice care in El Paso.

Palliative care has grown as an international movement which promotes quality care at the end of life. All of our services are based on collaborative knowledge and research and our activities are guided by ethical principles of autonomy, justice, truth and confidentiality.

Global Hospice is proud to have built this center for the El Paso community. End of life care decisions are hard. End of life is hard and can be painful. It is now when our loved ones need us. Now is the time to provide them with the best knowledgeable care. Call Texas Palliative Center today to learn more about our services and how we can help.

The Dying Process

The dying process may include pain, withdrawal, changes in appetite, elimination, breathing, changes in body temperature, disorientation, agitation, restlessness, agitation, surge of energy and other complicated symptoms. We make each person s dying experience comfortable and peaceful as each one is unique.

What Can You Do?

  • Take the opportunity to say what you need to say to your loved one. Even if he or she is not responding, your loved one is with you and he/she can still hear and feel your presence.
  • Listen to your heart and follow its guidance.
  • Many people choose this time to say I am sorry . Do it if necessary.
  • Others prefer to share expressions of gratitude for a wonderful life full of happiness and sorrow.
  • If you feel the need to hold the patient s hand, do it.
  • Always remember that tears are normal and part of a healthy ending of a lifelong relationship. Tears are also a sign of your love.

Work With Us!

The Texas Palliative Center adheres to high standards of professional ethics. We provide equal opportunity in employment regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, national origin, disability or any other condition or status protected by law. The Texas Palliative Center is a drug free company and therefore all employees are subject to pre-employment and random drug testing. All possible employees must be clear of any criminal charges.

24 hour admission services available. Call us today (915) 543-6060.

Our agency is licensed by the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services, certified by the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services and accredited to higher standards by The Joint Commission.

ALWAYS EXCEEDING STANDARDS
Texas Palliative Center

1817 Wyoming Ave.
El Paso Texas 79903

Tel: (915) 543-6060
Fax: (915) 543-9350

OFFICE HOURS: Monday – Friday 8:30am – 5pm

The international palliative concept brought to you by
Global Hospice Care





Hospice and Palliative Care Services #hotel #review

#hospice of santa barbara

#

Hospice/Palliative Care Support

Whether you are simply trying to relieve someone’s pain during a serious illness or whether you’re trying to provide end-of-life care, it can produce a lot of stress for everyone involved in caregiving.

Right at Home can give you a respite from the daily tasks that seem to build. From light housekeeping to meal preparation, Right at Home caregivers can provide support during trying times.

Skilled Nursing is also available in many areas as allowed by state law for the medical needs of palliative and hospice care.

We started working with Right at Home about a month ago to provide services for my mother who has Alzheimer’s and to provide support to my father (her primary caregiver) six days a week. So far we have had an excellent experience. The caregivers are supportive, caring people and have given my Dad a much deserved break as well as providing knowledgeable care for my Mom. I have also been impressed with the structures and processes put in place to insure that we get consistent, reliable care. Our relationship with Right at Home is still new but we couldn’t be happier.

Give us a call.

We’re always available to discuss your particular situation and needs. Just call us at the number below. We’re here to help however we can.





Palliative cancer care #hotels #in #edinburgh

#palliative cancer care

#

WHO Definition of Palliative Care

Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

  • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
  • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
  • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
  • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
  • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
  • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
  • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
  • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
  • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

  • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
  • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
  • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
  • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
  • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




Capital – Coast DHB Palliative Care Service – Healthpoint #metropark #hotel #kowloon

#hospice wellington

#

Capital Coast DHB Palliative Care Service

Description

What is Palliative Care?
Palliative care is care for people of all ages with a life-limiting illness, to support and help the person live as comfortably and fully as possible. A life-limiting illness is one that cannot be cured and may at some time result in the person dying, be that years, months, weeks or days away. For example: lung, heart, nerve or kidney diseases that get progressively more troublesome despite everything; cancers that can’t be cured but might still be responsive to drugs or radiation.

A palliative care approach aims to improve a person’s quality of life by addressing the person’s cultural, social, psychological and spiritual needs as well as physical needs such as managing pain and other distressing symptoms. It aims to support and comfort the individual’s family whanau, and other caregivers where needed, through the illness and after death.

When is Palliative Care Helpful?
Palliative care helps at all stages of life-limiting illness. It is often best introduced early on – sometimes even at the point it first becomes clear what is wrong. It can be helpful at any time, even when someone is having intensive treatments, for instance chemotherapy for cancer or renal dialysis for kidney failure. In other words, palliative care could be there to provide support, help and comfort at those times when illness is causing major problems or distress.

Palliative care is provided according to an individual’s need, and may be suitable whether death is days, weeks, months or years away,

Who Provides Palliative Care?
It is provided by all healthcare professionals, supported where necessary, by specialist palliative care services. General practitioners and District Nurses all have knowledge of, and ability to provide, palliative care. Hospices are the main providers of specialist palliative care services for people living in the community and who are not inpatients in a public hospital.

Where is Palliative Care Provided?
It aims to be available wherever the person may be – in the community in an outpatient setting or at home. Care may also be provided by the hospice or by a member of the hospital palliative care team when you are in the hospital.

What Services are Available through Hospice?
Mary Potter Hospice is a community-based service, providing specialist palliative care services to the people of Wellington, Porirua and Kapiti. Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients, and their whānau, facing problems associated with life threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.
The service is free to all patients accepted, and receiving, the service.
There are four teams: multidisciplinary community teams in Wellington, Porirua and Kapiti, and an inpatient unity in Wellington.
The hospice teams work closely with Primary Health Organisations, District Nurses, and other community based services.
Care is available in people’s homes, residential facilities, day unit, outpatient clinics, and as an inpatient at the hospice.

How Can Palliative Care Help When you are in Hospital?
The hospital palliative care team can often help out and offer you and your family support, relief, comfort, information, choice and expertise in many different situations. These might include:

  • times when your illness is causing discomfort, for example bothersome pain or shortness of breath, or nausea and vomiting. We may be able to help ease these symptoms and improve your comfort.
  • periods when your thoughts and feelings are distressing. Having someone to help you talk through and address these things can often make a major difference.
  • occasions when your illness may be having a big impact elsewhere in your life – maybe with your partner, children, whanau, work or perhaps financial affairs. Professional support and advice in these situations can often help you find solutions and resolve some of your concerns.
  • you may also be faced with decisions and choices that are confusing or difficult to make during your illness. The palliative care team may be able to help explain things to you, and help you find answers that you feel most comfortable with.
  • on leaving hospital you may need ongoing support and care. The palliative care team is often able to link in with the right services for you.

We also recognise that sometimes nature is stronger than any medical treatments we have on offer. When this happens and death is close, it is extremely important that you get the care in hospital that will support you and your family and whanau, meet your wishes and needs, and also keep you comfortable. The palliative care team may be involved in your care during these times too.

Who are the Hospital Palliative Care Team?
Our team consists of specially trained nurses and specialist doctors. We work together with the specialist who is in charge of your care and his or her team. That means we do not take over your care. Instead we work alongside both you and your primary hospital team during your stay in hospital.

Dr Jonathan Adler, Consultant and Clinical Leader

Dr Emma McMenamin, Consultant

Dr Anne MacLennan, Consultant (Part-time)

Alison Rowe, Nurse Practitioner,

Janice Tijsen, Clinical Nurse Specialist

Gabrielle Driscoll, Clinical Nurse Specialist

Barbara Eddy, Administrator

Who are the Mary Potter Hospice Community Palliative Care Team?

Dr Brian Ensor, Director of Palliative Care

Dr Annabel Dunn, Consultant in Palliative Care





Palliative Care Unit – St #super #eight #motels

#palliative care unit

#

Clinics Inpatient Care Units

Palliative Care Unit

The focus of the palliative care unit (PCU) is to manage distressing symptoms (pain, nausea, difficulty breathing) and ensure comfort when cure is no longer possible.

The PCU is a 10-bed unit comprised of three large semi-private rooms and four single rooms. The environment on PCU is structured for the comfort of patients and their families and friends. Facilities include an open concept kitchen/lounge/dining area, laundry facilities, a whirlpool bath, educational reading materials and small private meeting rooms.

  • Visiting hours are flexible.
  • Family and friends wishing to stay overnight with a patient may arrange a cot and sleeper chair with our staff.
  • Children are welcome to visit.
  • Pets are welcome to visit, with clearance from staff.
  • Open dialogue with our specially trained staff is encouraged at all times.
  • Trained volunteers are part of the team, and help to enrich the patient s quality of life.
  • All religions are respected, all personal spiritual advisors are encouraged to visit and a multi-faith meditation room and chapel are located in the Hospital.
  • All basic ward rooms and professional care are covered by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP).

Accessing Palliative Care

Applications to the palliative care unit are normally made by a member of the health care team caring for the patient.

Our criteria for admission:

  • The patient and family agree with a palliative plan of care. This means that a decision has been made by the patient and family to stop any further active treatment aimed at cure of the illness, and to focus instead on promoting patient comfort by managing symptoms.
  • A do not resuscitate (DNR) status has been discussed and agreed upon by the patient and the patient s family.
  • The patient should have an estimated life expectancy of three months or less. If the condition of the patient stabilizes or improves and the care team feels the patient may have a longer life expectancy than initially thought, we work with the patient and the patient s family to find a more appropriate care setting.

Tours of the unit are encouraged so patients and families can see the facility and have an opportunity to talk with our staff to answer any questions about palliative care.

Contact Us

Palliative Care Unit
Donnelly wing, fourth floor
St. Michael s Hospital
30 Bond Street
Toronto, Ontario
M5B 1W8, Canada
Phone: 416-864-5226 (nursing station, 24-hour direct line)
Fax: 416-864-5297

The easiest access is through the Queen Street entrance. Take the elevators on your immediate left.





Hospice care and palliative care: What – s the difference? #benefits #of

#palliative care versus hospice

#

Hospice care and palliative care: What s the difference?

I’ve talked to hundreds of people about the health care options and decisions they face at the end of life. It’s a challenging time and understandably many have little knowledge, while others have misconceptions, and some have bitter disagreements.

Here’s a basic primer for two common approaches: hospice and palliative care.

Two myths about hospice care are prevalent. First, many people believe hospice is provided in a place like a hospital. While it’s true many hospices have residential facilities, hospice care is usually given at home.

Second, people often believe that with hospice, there is no treatment but pain control. That’s not the case at all. Medical care will continue as before, except that further attempts to cure the major disease will stop. If a person gets a bladder infection, or pneumonia, for example, regular treatment will be available. If the person chooses to not go to a hospital for treatment of something like pneumonia, treatment at home will be offered. And if a breakthrough cure of the primary disease occurs, it will not be denied to the hospice patient.

Often I am the first one to bring up hospice care with the patient or their family. As geriatricians, my colleagues and I see many people with incurable and late stage disease. (It’s important to know that hospice care is available for all ages, though.) For patients and families, electing hospice care means extra help for the family, and occasionally the provision of helpful equipment. We bring up hospice care when we believe the patient or family will benefit from these extra services.

Sometimes it’s a touchy subject. I’ve been angrily yelled at by family who want the patient to keep trying for cure, to keep taking chemotherapy, to try more radiation, to go for more surgery or to some other country for some unproven therapy. We frequently think these family members are either uninformed or in denial. We sometimes wish they could feel their loved one’s nausea, weakness and confusion from hopeless chemotherapy, or their desperate struggle for air in advanced lung disease.

Sometimes the cost of hospice is a concern. Medicare and most insurance companies cover hospice care. Hospice is covered under Medicare Part A. There is no deductible, and copayments are very low. The restriction is that care must be coordinated by the hospice team.

Hospice care is defined fairly clearly by Medicare and other insurers. “Palliative care” seems more ambiguous – there is no standard definition – and is often less understood than hospice care. Palliative care is focused on making patients as comfortable as possible with an emphasis on maximizing the quality of daily life. It is provided in different ways. In our Palliative Care Consult Service, we provide suggestions to the regular treating physician and to the family, usually about pain and other symptoms. Our consult service often includes a social worker and a faith community representative.

Bitter disagreements about end of life care come not only from family members but also from providers. About 15 years ago, when I was with the National Institute on Aging, I had a discussion with an oncologist who represented a professional society. He argued that there should be no limit on chemotherapy, up to the point of death. We discussed a new therapy that would add one month of life expectancy to a geriatric patient. His position was that regardless of the intense side effects it caused, it should be prescribed and encouraged. My position was it should be discussed with the patient, and if it is declined, that decision should be respected. Now years later, that controversy persists, not just among oncologists. Terminal care is also provided by pulmonologists, cardiologists, and generalists, for example, some of whom advocate intensive care to the end, while others respect the patient’s request for limited care.

This basic primer is like a map. “There is North America, and there is Europe.” They are separated by an ocean, yet they have much in common. North America is like hospice, with clear boundaries. Palliative care may be more like Europe, which merges into Asia (which may be like “usual care”). Where one stops and the other begins is mostly a political decision, just like the separation of palliative vs. usual care.

End of life care can be challenging, and the options may seem murky. In order to find their way, patients, family members and physicians might benefit from “GPS” systems, including helpful road side assistance to help them navigate these complex health care decisions. Definitions and primers are just the start of customizing this final journey.

James Cooper is Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Care, George Washington University. He blogs on the Prepared Patient Forum .

I apologize, but I m still a bit confused about the difference. Are the two types of care mutually exclusive? Or would hospices provide palliative care in addition to other services? If the latter, what additional services would a hospice provide?

Or, if palliative care is just focused on alleviating symptoms, is it appropriate for people not facing the end of their lives?

There are differences in the benefits you get with hospice vs palliative care. With hospice, the patient can receive help with home care (shopping, cleaning, laundry, etc.) without a skilled nursing need. With palliative care, that s not available unless there s a skilled nursing need (wound care, dressing changes, osteomy care, PT, OT, etc.) With hospice a physician must certify that in his/her opinion the life expectancy likely won t exceed 6 months (though there can be extensions). So, yes, hospice care does provide palliative care in addition to other services. The hospice approach is holistic and team based (as is palliative care). And home hospice refers to all of these services provided in the patient s home.

Do you think that hospice care has resulted from the futility of certain medical treatments? do you believe that hospice care offers a non- medicalized dying process? Under what conditions would hospice care merge with paliative care? Do you think that the crucial factor would be the state of disease of the patient? What if the person is merely physically disabled?

After almost 40 years as a respiratory therapist it has been my experience and those of many of my coworkers that the vast majority of family members are acting because of their own needs-frequently guilt or money. They think about how they feel, not how the patient feels. Even what the patient has specifically filled out a DNR order their family overrides it and the patient is subjected to days, weeks and sometimes even months of painful procedures that does not prolong life, it only prolongs death. Whoever wrote Americans think death is optional was so right

Leslie, I believe fear is the biggest factor as many people want to do something to help and change the situation or turn the clock back. The hospice team can help to manage the difficulties that families have. While many make decisions that are in line with what they want, we can t fault them for the suffering that they are enduring while witnessing the decline and loss of someone in their lives. The navigating of the dynamics that help the loved ones are the true skills of the hospice team in addition to the relief of suffering through good pain and symptom management.

I agree that people don t want this situation. I also agree that hospice people are wonderful and incredibly strong to do the stressful work that they do every day. I had hospice for my mother. I think that the physicians need to be more proactive in suggesting hospice. I think they need to eliminate the ideas that keeping a patient a full code will change the outcome. I m not saying that it is not difficult. I m saying that frequently it is difficult for the wrong reasons.





Palliative care: Toronto left with few residential hospice beds #discounted #hotels

#hospice toronto

#

Palliative care: Toronto left with few residential hospice beds

Every time a Perram House patient passed away, a staff member wrote that person s name and date of death on a small white card and placed it near a candle in the front entrance.

It was the 10-bed residential hospice s way of honouring the deceased, allowing their memory to remain in the heritage home s grand foyer, if only for a few more days.

One final card was written last month, but it didn t feature a patient s name. To the disappointment of those desperately needing palliative care in this city, it read: Perram House. April 10, 2013.

The hospice a yellow brick house at 4 Wellesley Place closed suddenly after nearly a decade of providing palliative care to Toronto residents from all walks of life.

Outraged staff accused board chair Frank McCrea of shutting down the union, which had recently organized to demand a wage increase. McCrea, meanwhile, blamed dwindling donations that had forced the charity to operate at a loss for months.

Article Continued Below

Whatever the reason, the closure of Perram House leaves Toronto with only two residential hospices.

To me, it s really shocking, said Bill O Neill, executive director of Kensington Hospice, where the phone has been ringing constantly since Perram House closed. There s a real discrepancy between Toronto and other cities.

Kensington Hospice in downtown Toronto and Dorothy Ley Hospice in Etobicoke are now the city s only residential hospices, providing a total of 20 hospice beds for a population of 2.6 million. (Casey House, which serves AIDS patients, is classified as a hospital.)

By contrast, Saint John, N.B. has 10 beds for a population of 70,063.

Residential hospices are relatively new across Canada, but palliative care experts say they are a crucial option for patients who do not need to be in hospital and cannot die at home. They combine a home-like environment with 24-hour medical care and psychological support.

There are about 193 palliative care beds in Toronto hospitals, but most have a vacancy rate of close to zero and limit stays to 15 days. Patients can stay in a residential hospice for three months or longer.

As for home care, Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) funds three visiting hospice programs. But for patients with complex needs or without a family caregiver, it is only a short-term option.

The vast majority of Canadians say they want to die at home or in a hospice, but about 70 per cent die in hospitals. In the 2011 fiscal year, nearly 5,000 people died in an acute-care hospital in Ontario while receiving palliative care.

When there are no beds available. the patient generally ends up in a higher-cost setting, said Dr. James Downar, a palliative care physician at Toronto General Hospital. Acute-care beds are the most expensive setting in the entire system.

The daily cost of an acute-care bed in a hospital is between $850 and $1,100, compared with about $439 for a residential hospice bed.

Hospice patients receive care free-of-charge, but advocates say the savings are significant for a province trying to balance its books and hospices aren t just more efficient, they re more humane.

Coline Bettson s mother suffered a sudden brain aneurysm in March and moved into Perram House. The first night, nurses brought Bettson hot tea and set up the bed so she could cradle her 96-year-old mom in her arms.

Everything I asked for and she wanted, they agreed to. They couldn t have been more kind and caring, she said. I was stunned and appalled when I heard (the hospice closed).

In 2005, the Ministry of Health announced $115 million in palliative-care funding, including plans to fund the care costs of 34 residential hospices across the province.

Eight years later, 24 of those hospices have been built and receive annual funding of $90,000 per bed. The remainder of hospice budgets between 20 and 50 per cent must be raised through donations.

McCrea, the former Perram House board chair, said fundraising had always been a struggle.

New Democrat health critic France G linas said the ministry should fully fund residential hospices, as it does long-term care.

It s been unacceptable from the beginning, she said. Hospices deal with vulnerable people in their last days of life. It s wrong to let them rely on donations.

Health Minister Deb Matthews said in an interview that the province had come a long way since before 2005, when hospices were entirely self-funded.

We are transforming how we deliver health care, Matthews said. We are committed to investing more in the community sector and getting people out of hospital who don t need to be in hospital.

She said the health ministry dedicated $260 million to community services, including hospice and home care, in the 2013 budget. The Toronto Central LHIN has convened a working group on palliative care access.

Rick Firth of Hospice Palliative Care Ontario said most hospices are able to fundraise successfully, but Perram House may have struggled because it prioritized marginalized and homeless people.

The donations from families don t come in at the same volume, he said. That may be something we need to look at in the future.

Firth said the loss of Perram House will be felt in Toronto for the time being. Two of the hospices promised funding in 2005 were supposed to be in the city, but neither has broken ground yet.

The Toronto Commandery Hospice finally acquired land last year in North York, but is awaiting approval of its zoning application. The Yee Hong Centre for Geriatric Care in Scarborough still has no timeline for opening a hospice.

But Emily s House a long-planned pediatric hospice at Gerrard St. E. and Broadview Ave. is nearing the end of construction at last and hopes to open its doors at the end of May.

As for Perram House, the stunning home of sweeping staircases and vaulted ceilings built by widower Mary Perram in 1887, it now occupies prime downtown real estate, on Wellesley Pl. between Jarvis and Sherbourne Sts.

McCrea owns the home but has said he hasn t made a decision about the property. As a designated heritage home, it would require city council approval to be demolished.

Pete Perram, Mary s 52-year-old great-great-grandson, said the worst-case scenario would be for it to be turned into a condo building.

Mary intended it to be for the good of the people, the good of the community, he said. I hope that, as a legacy to her and to our family, that continues.





SHC – Hospice – Palliative Care #what #does #hospice #care #mean

#hospice singapore

#

Benefits

What is Hospice?
Hospice offers comprehensive programs to patients and families facing life-threatening illness. Hospice, also known as palliative care, is a concept of care rather than a specific place of care. Hospice may therefore be given in the patient s home, in an independent in-patient hospice, in a hospice day care centre, in a palliative care clinic, or in the ward of a hospital.

Hospice is about caring and loving . It emphasizes the importance of quality of life. The focus is on providing relief of pain and other distressing symptoms, as well as ensuring emotional, spiritual and practical support for the patient and the family. Care is given by a multi-disciplinary team that includes nurses, doctors, social workers, religious counselors and trained volunteers.

Most patients are cared for at home. Hospice nurses and doctors visit regularly to give advice about medications and nursing care. Patients who attend hospice day care centres travel to the day care centre to participate in activities there during the day.

In-patient care is provided for those who do not have families to care for them at home, or who need special nursing or medical treatment.

Most of these services are funded by public donations with subsidies from the government.

Specially-designed to help patients and their families in a unique way
The issues and problems relating to life-limiting illnesses are very different from those relating to normal illnesses. So, when afflicted patients are not responding to curative treatments, their pain and discomfort need to be eased using other techniques which focus not just on the disease process, but also on the whole person and families.

Hospice and palliative care helps relieve patients pain and other unpleasant symptoms, and provides them with psychological and spiritual support where needed. It also advises and supports family members to help them cope as well as become more confident and effective caregivers during this difficult time. Its team of caregivers works with patients and their families to ensure the patient’s comfort and dignity, thus helping to maintain the highest possible quality of life for the time that remains.

Team of caregivers share family members caregiving responsibilities
Caring for a dying patient can be physically and emotionally draining. Putting such responsibilities on one or more family members who are not trained to manage the patient can cause undue stress to the patient and his family.

The hospice and palliative team caregivers comprise of trained and experienced professionals. With the team supporting the primary caregiver, the patients family can better manage their lives, and ensure quality care for and better time with the patient.

Flexibility to choose preferred level of support
Hospice and palliative care can be provided as a support to the primary caregiver (home care / day care) or full-time (in-patient care). These different levels of support cater to any situation, be it one where family members wish to provide most of the caregiving and need only assistance from professional expertise, or one where no family member is regularly available at all times to care for the patient.

Regardless of the chosen level of support, hospice and palliative care is available and is just a phone call away.

Bereavement support for grieving family members
Dealing with the loss or potential loss of a loved one is difficult. It is often hard to find sound advice and positive encouragement among grieving family and friends during such trying times. Hospice and palliative team of caregivers and volunteers can provide moral support in these circumstances and help ease the pain of the grieving process. Hospice care focuses not just on the patient, but also on supporting the patient’s family.





Hospice Palliative Care Volunteer Job Description – Madawaska Valley Hospice Palliative Care

#hospice volunteer duties

#

Hospice Palliative Care Volunteer Job Description

The Volunteers are an integral part of the Palliative Care Team. They enhance the quality of life of the patient in many ways. They provide compassionate support for patients and their families in home, hospital, Long Term Care Home, and Hospice.

The importance of our volunteers to the program cannot be overstated. Without volunteers we could provide neither the kinds nor the scope of services which are so urgently needed to enhance the quality of the lives of our patients and their families.

As members of the Palliative Care Team, there are specific functions and responsibilities expected of the Palliative Care Volunteer.

Reports to: Volunteer Coordinator or designate

  • To provide support to a patient who has a life-threatening or terminal conditon and their family.
  • To assist the health care team to provide optimum quality of life to the patient who is dying and their family.
  • To support other Hospice Palliative Care volunteers and staff.

Responsibilities: These may include

  • Provide companionship and support to the patient and family
  • Provide transportation to appointments, shopping, etc.
  • Provide simple comfort measures for a patient
  • Preparing light meals or carrying out light household tasks
  • Giving reminders of medication schedules but NOT administering medications
  • Maintaining confidentiality
  • Observing and reporting changes in the patient s condition to volunteer coordinator or designate
  • Writing letters, or reading to the patient
  • Maintaining records of visits day time – travel
  • Attend Volunteer training program and facility orientation programs
  • Attending regular volunteer meetings
  • Advising volunteer coordinator of sick leave or vacation
  • Using telephone support when needed




Care Partners Hospice and Palliative Care #motels #tauranga

#hospice of spokane

#

Welcome to
Care Partners
Hospice Palliative

Care to Dance?

Welcome to Care Partners Hospice Palliative

Choose an Experienced Partner


Choose the area s local nonprofit hospice and palliative care provider. For over 30 years Care
Partners has encircled patients and families facing serious illness with unprecedented levels
of care and support. It s never too early to call and ask questions.

Call now (503) 648-9565

WE ARE AVAILABLE day or night. Care Partners is on call around-the-clock with palliative care physicians, nurses,
certified nurses aides, social workers and chaplains.
From medications to medical supplies and equipment to bring comfort and manage symptoms, we supply it all.

Gratitude

your team was remarkable

“Overall, your team was remarkable. They helped through a very difficult time. Thank you.”

For over 30 years, Care Partners Hospice & Palliative has provided uniquely personal and exceptionally compassionate care and support to thousands of patients and their families.

Honoring Your Choice and Your Priorities, Care Partners emphasizes quality of life, rather than extending life by any means. We are here to help patients and their families learn how to live life to the fullest and as comfortably as possible.

Phone/24 Hour Referral Line:

2015 CarePartners Hospice & Palliative.
All Rights Reserved. I PRIVACY POLICY I WEBMAIL





Pikes Peak Hospice – Palliative Care – Hospice – 2550 Tenderfoot Hill

#pikes peak hospice

#

Pikes Peak Hospice Palliative Care

This isn t the easiest place to write a review of because I just lost my dad there a couple days ago. But for anyone else that might have to go through something that hard, this place is amazing.

It s located on the 4th floor of the Medical Center and has an incredible staff, many of whom are volunteers with personal experiences there. The social worker and chaplain that came to speak with my mom were absolutely incredible and made things so much easier for her. They even help to set up things for after someone passes, which I know I appreciated because I had no idea what to do.

My sister and I spent a lot of time walking around the floor and there are beautiful pieces of art everywhere along with two sitting areas, each with a piano and small aviary (with finches and doves in it). It was just before Christmas so they also had trees and decorations up.

There is a cafeteria on the 5th floor (check the hours because it s not open all the time) that gives a discount to family members of someone in the hospice. And they have a pretty good selection of food too.

I had to telecommute while I was there, and the hospice offers a wifi just for family members to use. You just have to ask the front desk for the password.

These are a great bunch of people that made the hardest day of my life much easier to deal with. In the end when you re loved one passes, they even place a rose on the door. It s a small thing, but means a lot at the time.

Was this review ?

Situations like this always leave me wishing there was a ZERO star rating. I had a terrible experience with Pikes Peak Hospice. There are some great nurses there, Tangee is really, really compassionate and knowledgeable. Several other day shift folks are great. BUT, if you stay the night with your loved one you will see a night shift that could care less if you end up being the one to care for your loved one. They certainly won t move at anything more than a snails pace to respond to a call light. They were deplorable.

However, it s the saleswoman Mimi that was really despicable. She put on a high pressure sales pitch that used car salesmen would be in awe of. She mentioned on numerous occasions that right now we have a bed open , making it sound like at any moment they might fill up and a bed would not be available any longer. She also refused to let us call and talk to the charge nurse and ask some detailed questions to someone who actually knew what kind of care was provided. Once we got in, there were probably 12 beds available, so it was abundantly clear that she was preying on us in order to close a deal. Here we are, with our father in the hospital on his way to dying and all Mimi cares about is selling us a bed. Enjoy that commission Mimi, I hope it buys you a lot of fans as you rot in hell.

Was this review ?

From the business

Specialties

Hospice
Palliative Care
Children s Grief Support

History

Established in 1980.

Pikes Peak Hospice Palliative Care has been the community leader in hospice and palliative care for 35 years. We are the only nonprofit, community-based hospice in El Paso County. Every year, we provide relief, comfort and control to more than 1,800 patients and their families. We believe that every day of life matters, and that every patient and family deserves consistent expert care and compassionate personal attention. Here are just a few things that set Pikes Peak Hospice Palliative Care apart: Comprehensive team of hospice and palliative experts including our physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses and certified nursing assistants, counselors, chaplains, pharmacists and administrative professionals. More than 550 trained volunteers. only dedicated inpatient hospice in El Paso county. The only hospice-owned pharmacy in the region–specializing in hospice and palliative needs. A comprehensive grief counseling program, including specialized care for children and teens.





What does a Palliative Care Nurse do? (with pictures) – mobile wiseGEEK

#palliative nurse

#

wiseGEEK: What does a Palliative Care Nurse do?

A palliative care nurse is a health care professional who provides treatment and counsel to patients who are dying of incurable illnesses. Nurses work with physicians and other medical professionals to diagnose, treat, and care for individuals with progressive terminal conditions. They help patients and their family members cope with very difficult circumstances by providing information, counseling, and support. An experienced palliative care nurse may also conduct research about terminal diseases and advanced care practices, develop new policies regarding patient care, advocate public awareness, and teach nursing courses at hospitals and colleges.

Patients who are diagnosed with incurable diseases often struggle to find the strength and hope to enjoy their last moments. It is the duty of a palliative care nurse to ensure that such patients receive the best possible treatments to relieve their pain and symptoms. Professionals often become close companions with their patients, providing counsel, empathy, and friendship when they need it the most. The nature of the job can be very physically and emotionally demanding, and nurses must be capable of dealing with loss and tragedy on a regular basis.

Besides administering direct care to patients, palliative care nurses frequently meet with friends and family members to help them cope with the situation and discuss the options for end-of-life treatment. Many nurses engage in research to develop new public policies and determine the best methods for administering palliative care. Professionals often take part in hospital or community discussions to present their findings and suggest ways to improve procedures.

A prospective palliative care nurse is usually required to complete a four-year bachelor’s degree program in nursing as well as a two-year master’s program to gain nurse practitioner credentials. Most new nurses intern for at least one year in an emergency room or hospital setting to gain practical experience and prepare for their eventual careers in palliative care. Individuals are usually required to pass extensive written examinations administered by a nationally recognized organization to become certified palliative care nurses. In the United States, certification is available through the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA). Most other countries rely on organizations similar to the HPNA to ensure that individuals are sufficiently prepared for the job.

Most palliative care nurses work about 40 hours a week, though their schedules are rarely regular. The times and days a palliative care nurse works depends on the condition of his or her patients. A nurse may be required to work weekend, overnight, or double shifts when a patient nears the end of life in order to provide constant care. Many nurses continue to meet with family members after the passing of a loved one in order to provide encouragement and emotional support.

Article Discussion

4) I’m thinking of studying to be a palliative care nurse. I have been researching a lot about what the job involves and I’m not sure if it may be too emotional?

I’m a senior care assistant at present and have to deal with supporting individuals and families with death so I have a slight understanding of what the job would involve.

My only worry is be that I have a young child and am thinking about having another one. I know the training takes years to complete but if the job is going to effect my children then perhaps the job isn’t for me.

Any comments or suggestions for me would be welcome.

3) My grandmother lived with a terminal illness for many years, and I bless the nurse who provided this service for her. I don’t know what exactly is written in a nurses job description, but she went above and beyond, and made my gran truly live her last years to the fullest.

The job is not easy, but it’s mostly more emotionally draining than depressing. It isn’t something that you really want to come home and talk about though. This is partly out of respect for your patient, partly to shield your partner from endless tales of lives ending.

Part of my nurse education in this field covered the need for a neutral person to be sought out and be there for you to offload onto. I know I will have this structured into my week, but the person who provides this outlet is a counselor.

It sounds as if your girlfriend may not have this option, or may not be using it. She could also be burning out, and need to take a break. You could try talking to her about her feelings, and suggest she needs someone to talk to. Hope it works out for you.

1) I’ve recently started dating a wonderful woman who is a palliative care nurse practitioner. Even though it’s early days in our relationship I can see it becoming more serious. The problem is that I don’t know how best to support her.

There’s no issue for me if she has to work long hours or cancel dates because of work. I know a job in nursing isn’t ever going to be about working social hours. I guess I’m struggling with the emotional side of it.

She seems unwilling to talk about work and let her feelings out, so more and more we’re spending time in silence. I have no idea what to say and her mind seems to be elsewhere. Should I push her to speak to me?





Lifepath Hospice and Palliative – Community Service #end #stage #copd #hospice

#lifepath hospice

#

Lifepath Hospice and Palliative

This organization has done so very much, for so many people, that it just kind of blows your mind. Anyone that has had the pleasure of working with or receiving services from this compassionate, spiritual institution is truly a better person.
Granted they are usually in our lives during the most difficult, trying and emotional times we may ever experience. Due to their organization, empathy, services provided and just plain well run organization, these trying times can be managed and coped with, with grace, courage and compassion.
If I had all the money in the World I could never repay them for their tireless efforts, preparedness, true concern, professionalism and just being there. I hear people in passing comment on their great experiences with Hospice, but when the life altering event has come to an end, it appears that they forget who sat and talked to them night after night or perhaps it is too painful to want to remember.
I want to go on record as being forever grateful to the staff and volunteers of Hospice. And now I feel it is my time to pay it forward. They are always in need of volunteers, to do any variety of things to help others and their families face and conquer trying and final days with loved ones. Anything and everything that can be done to assist them in continuing to do a service, that is like no other, should be done. Trust me when I say, I hope you never need their services, but if you do, be calmer in knowing you have an agency at your side 24/7 that has the experience, wisdom and resources to help you during this most difficult and confusing time. This organization is 5* all the way and in every aspect of life and death that they address. We are all certainly better off knowing there is a service such as this available, if we should unfortunately have the need for them.
Did you know they do a summer camp for any child of certain ages? They bring in pets to brighten ones day? Daily they call frail individuals who are alone, because the individual is fearful they will pass and won t be found, for a period of time? They honor our veterans with a simple ceremony and pin a flag on them, just to thank them for their service? Did you know 1 in 4 deaths is a Veteran? These are one of the topics we as a society usually don t discuss, but we all face more times than we would ever dream of in reality. it is part of life.
What s a girl to do? Always pay your debts and try to pay them forward.

Was this review ?

Business info summary

Today 9:00 am – 5:00 pm Closed now

Work here? Claim this business

Hours

More business info

Accepts Credit Cards No

Browse nearby

Work at Lifepath Hospice and Palliative? Claim your business

  • Respond to reviews and customer messages
  • Claiming is free, and only takes a minute

Claim This Business





Advanced Certification: Hospice Palliative Chaplain Certification – The National Association of Catholic

#hospice chaplain certification

#

Advanced Certification:
Hospice Palliative Chaplain Certification

About Advanced Certification of Hospice Palliative Chaplaincy (ACHPC)

Palliative Medicine is a discipline that cultivates in each practitioner (nurse, physician, chaplain, social worker etc.) a servant’s heart and a sage’s mind. One’s effectiveness in this specialty can never be adequately assessed within a set of competencies and/or prescribed guidelines but rather in the human crucible of an integrated, interdisciplinary practice that draws equally from each one’s soulfulness as well as from each one’s skill and life experiences.

This specialty certification IS NOT about acquiring greater power or prestige, or mastering a particular set of skills/competencies or securing additional letters after one’s name, or delivering a stellar performance at the time of the interview.

This certification IS a special invitation for an individual candidate to go more deeply in one’s own spiritual life and to learn the way of the wounded healer – the way of authenticity, compassion, forgiveness, and healing. This disposition of mind and heart is cultivated from the inside out and flourishes in an environment where honesty, humility, and courage are in ample supply.

This certification process invites the candidate to befriend the blessing of paradox and begin to weave a tapestry of harmony within oneself (in solitude) and with others (in community). This process builds upon the foundational belief that “the patient and I are essentially the same” and in this actual ministering of one to the other (patient, family, staff, team members etc.) blest and broken, we become sacrament for each other and a living sign of God’s healing redemptive love in our world. Facilitation of this part of the certification assessment process will invite each candidate to draw from a living palette that evokes a blend of head and heart and is reflective of the human experience – both of the candidate and of those he/she serves.

The interview team will be interdisciplinary and will be specifically assessing the candidate for indications of ones’ personal integration and ongoing formation, as demonstrated by:

  • Major loss integration
  • Self-awareness understanding
  • Human to human availability
  • Understanding of relevant concepts
  • Team collaboration, leadership and education contributions

The interview team will discern together each applicant’s desire and capability to be a leader/innovator in recognizing and fostering an Interdisciplinary Team’s (IDT) continuing development in the areas of team respect, openness to new ideas and perspectives, and compassion for all involved in the palliative care/hospice arena. At the completion of the interview, the Interview Team votes to recommend or not to recommend the Applicant to the Certification Commission for certification. It is the decision of the Certification Commission to certify or not to certify.

PREREQUISITES

  • You must be a full member in good standing with the NACC.
  • You must be Board Certified as an NACC Chaplain or Supervisor.
  • You must have at least 500 hours of documented direct spiritual care ministry dedicated to palliative care or hospice (e.g. patient and family visits, ethics consultations, family conferences, medical record documentation).
  • You must have completed extensive education in the field of palliative care, hospice philosophy and/or thanatology.
  • You must have ten hours (not in succession) of direct clinical supervision or professional consultation regarding one’s personal and professional growth in palliative care or hospice ministry (conducted by the CPE supervisor or other member of the interdisciplinary team that provides supervision).

Upon contacting the office for you will receive:

  • The application for Advanced Certification as a Hospice Palliative Chaplain
  • The Checklist for Supportive Materials required for Advanced Certification as a Hospice Palliative Chaplain
  • NACC Certification Procedures Manual for Advanced Certification as Hospice Palliative Chaplain

The National Association of Catholic Chaplains advocates for the profession of spiritual care and educates, certifies, and supports chaplains, clinical pastoral educators, and all members who continue the healing ministry of Jesus in the name of the Church.





Hospice and palliative care certification #hospice #training

#hospice and palliative care certification

#

Certification for Hospice and Palliative Medicine Specialists

Today, physicians specializing in hospice and palliative medicine have several certifications available to them beyond their primary board certification: ABMS, AOA, and HMDCB.

Since 2008, member boards of ABMS and AOA have certified physicians in the specialty-level practice of hospice and palliative medicine. There are 6,952 ABMS/AOA CAQ physicians in hospice and palliative medicine.

In 2012, AAHPM recommended the creation of the Hospice Medical Director Certification Board (HMDCB) to administer a certification that is complimentary to ABMS and AOA certification but specific to the practice of hospice medicine. The HMDCB examination assesses additional expertise in the unique competencies to perform the role of a hospice medical director, such as regulatory, administrative, legal, ethical competencies, and clinical skills appropriate for hospice patients.

Maintenance

AAHPM is committed to providing information and support for

Information for HMDCB’s recertification will be available when it is developed. A number of educational opportunities and resources are offered for both for preparation and continuing education.

History of Certification

Certification is widely considered the gold standard of expertise in medicine because of its unique physician-directed approach for assessing qualifications. While medical licensure sets the minimum competency requirements, board certification demonstrates a physician’s expertise in a particular specialty and/or subspecialty of medical practice.

Although certification is sought and earned by physicians on a voluntary basis, it is recognized by government, healthcare systems, insurers, and patients themselves as an essential tool to judge that a physician has the knowledge, experience, and skills for providing quality health care within a given specialty or subspecialty.

ABHPM

AAHPM has supported certification by its members since 1996. The creation of the American Board of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (ABHPM) provided an independent organization charged with certifying physicians practicing hospice and palliative medicine.

In October 2006, ABHPM offered its last certification exam in Hospice and Palliative Medicine and phased out recertification and support of existing certifications when the field was officially recognized as a subspecialty by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) in 2006 and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) in 2007. AAHPM maintains the ABHPM certification database and provides verification (upon request) for diplomates through 2017.

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 847.375.4712.

AAHPM Elevate

A collection of supplemental web-based, on-demand programs offered through AAPL at a special rate for AAHPM members.





Cancer palliative care #hotels #in #london

#cancer palliative care

#

WHO Definition of Palliative Care

Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

  • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
  • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
  • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
  • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
  • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
  • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
  • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
  • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
  • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

  • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
  • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
  • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
  • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
  • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




Oklahoma Hospice and Palliative Care Association #hotels #in #rome

#hospice care association

#

2016 Keynote Speakers

Dr. Miller serves as the Executive Director of San Francisco’s Zen Hospice Project since 2011, a unique residential home and educational organization for end-of-life care. Along with his staff and volunteer caregivers, BJ has been providing individuals and their loved ones the comfort, connection, and healing that are much needed but often overlooked or unsupported by the healthcare.

Ms. Spears specializes in developing leaders, inspiring teamwork and enhancing inter-office communications. The innovative content in her “What Exceptional Leaders Know” workshop is taken directly from the best-selling book, and has been adapted successfully for diverse audiences.

Wednesday and Thursday
October 19-20, 2016
9:00am – 4:45pm

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino
777 West Cherokee Street,
Catoosa, OK

Early Bird Full Registration
OHPCA Members $280
Non-Members $320

Early Bird One Day Conference
OHPCA Members $140
Non-members $170

PAYMENT MUST BE RECEIVED PRIOR TO THE CONFERENCE!

Registration and Payment Deadline is October 17, 2016
No refunds after October 17, 2016!





Pain Medications for Palliative Care #providence #hospice

#palliative drugs

#

Palliative Care Center

If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with a life-threatening illness, one of the first things you may wonder about is pain. How much pain are you likely to be in? How will you cope with it? What can your doctors do about it?

The good news is that there is a lot that you and your doctors can do to keep pain at bay. You have multiple options, one of which is medication.

When it comes to medications for pain management, there are two broad categories: opioids. which dull pain systemically, throughout the body; and adjuvant analgesics, or helper medications that can target specific types of pain. often by fighting inflammation .

Opioids

Opioid medications are available only by prescription. There are several opioid drugs that palliative care physicians most commonly prescribe for moderate to severe pain in the context of a serious, life-threatening illness. They are known as opioid analgesics:

These drugs can be taken in a number of different ways. If the person can swallow, all can be given by mouth. If the person can no longer swallow, some medications can be given intravenously, and some by subcutaneous injection.

There are other options, as well. “With a compounding pharmacist’s support, we can mix an opioid with a gel to deliver it topically, through the skin ,” says Muir. “There are also formulations of fentanyl, for example, that can be delivered by patch or through a cheek film that crosses the mucous membranes in the mouth .”

Although opioids are excellent in controlling pain, they do have side effects. Among the most common are:

  • Constipation . This is the one you can’t get around. Most people who take an opioid experience some degree of constipation. and it doesn’t tend to go away as your body gets accustomed to the medication. But as a preventive measure, regularly taking a stool softener and laxative can keep most constipation under control. Also, the drugs lubiprostone (Amitiza ), methylnaltrexone (Relistor) and naloxegol (Movantik) are approved to treat constipation specifically due to opioid use in those with chronic pain not caused by cancer .
  • Nausea . Nausea is a common side effect of opioid medications. About 30% of people get nauseated as a result of taking opioids. Most of the nausea is from the drugs’ slowing effect on the bowels. If you keep the bowels moving, you’re less likely to be nauseated. In many cases, the nausea induced by opioid medications will abate after a few days on a new drug. If not, there are also other medications that palliative care specialists can prescribe to help with nausea.
  • Extreme sedation: Confusion, Sleepiness, and Breathing Problems . Many people worry about becoming mentally foggy or constantly sleepy when on medication for chronic pain. Sedation commonly occurs when first initiating an opioid medication. The sedation usually improves and often resolves in 3 to 4 days unless the dosage of the opioid medication is too high.




Working at Midwest Palliative – Hospice CareCenter #bangkok #hotels

#midwest palliative & hospice carecenter

#

Midwest Palliative & Hospice CareCenter

I applied through other source. The process took 5 days. I interviewed at Midwest Palliative & Hospice CareCenter (Glenview, IL (US)) in September 2011.

Standard. Was in another position and they reached out to me. Previous position was a recommendation by a then current employee. Connected with a manager who conducted an in-person interview with me.

  • Standard; what were my qualifications and how would I be a good fit in the company. Answer Question

Midwest Palliative Hospice CareCenter 2015-07-30 09:13 PDT

Midwest Palliative Hospice CareCenter Awards Accolades

Let us know if we’re missing any workplace or industry recognition Add Awards

Work at Midwest Palliative Hospice CareCenter? Share Your Experiences

Midwest Palliative Hospice CareCenter Logo

Midwest Palliative Hospice CareCenter

  • Star Very Dissatisfied
  • Star Dissatisfied
  • Star Neutral ( OK )
  • Star Satisfied
  • Star Very Satisfied




Midwest Palliative – Hospice Care Center Careers and Employment #hospice #physician #salary

#midwest palliative & hospice carecenter

#

About Midwest Palliative Hospice Care Center

Premier provider of Palliative medicine and supportive care.

You have the opportunity to be part of a historic partnership between three of the area’s most respected community-based, nonprofit palliative and end-of-life care providers ─ Horizon Hospice Palliative Care, JourneyCare and Midwest Palliative Hospice CareCenter.

These mission‐based more. organizations are joining together to form the premier palliative and end‐of‐life care provider in the region. Collectively, we offer more than 100 years of expertise in caring for the seriously ill in our communities, and each of our mission‐based organizations has deep roots and a strong reputation in the communities we serve. Moving forward together means we will be able to diversify and expand our services, and provide compassionate, mission‐based care to even more patients and families. Integrating these unique strengths allows us to leverage our combined infrastructure and expertise, while at the same time supporting patients, families and clinicians who rely on this expertise.

• 5 state-of-the-art inpatient hospice centers located in Barrington, Woodstock, Arlington Heights, Glenview and Chicago.
• 40 acute-care hospital affiliations and numerous post-acute partnerships
• Palliative Medicine Supportive Care for over 1,200 patients and families
• Hospice Care for 1,200 patients and families
• The largest pediatric hospice and palliative care program in Illinois, serving more than 200 children and their families
• Our program includes partnerships with some of Chicago s top medical centers and healthcare systems, and we also train fellows in palliative medicine. less

Reviews

Midwest Palliative Hospice Care Center

Overall Rating

Based on 5 reviews

5 stars 4 stars 3 stars 2 stars 1 star

Work/Life Balance 4.5 Compensation/Benefits 4.3 Job Security/Advancement 3.8 Management 3.3 Culture 4.3

Featured Review

CNA – Certified Nursing Assistant, Glenview, IL – August 31, 2016

I really enjoyed working here, i was on call/ as needed basis but the few times I got called in my time would go by fast. We were constantly busy and the patients were lovely to work for. Getting them comfortable was our goal.





Palliative Care Journal Articles #singleton #motels

#journal of palliative care

#

Palliative Care Journal Articles

  • Healthcare-Associated Infections in the Elderly: What’s New From infection prevention to appropriate antibiotic administration, find out the current thinking regarding healthcare-associated infections in long-term care residents.

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases. September 2016

  • Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health Care Professionals Burnout is an issue faced by many health care workers, particularly those in the critical care field. The Critical Care Societies Collaborative aims to raise awareness of this important issue.

    American Journal of Critical Care. September 2016

  • Prevention of Alcohol and Other Drug Use in the Digital Age This systematic review summarizes recent substance abuse prevention programs delivered by computers and the Internet. What’s effective, and what’s not?

    Current Opinion in Psychiatry. August 2016

  • Case Series of Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication These cases highlight the potentially life-threatening toxicity associated with synthetic cannabinoid exposure.

    Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health. August 2016

  • Chronic Critical Illness in Infants and Children What can ICU clinicians do to help improve the care of pediatric patients with prolonged ICU stays?

    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. August 2016

  • Mainstream or Extinction: Saving Geriatrics Is there a future for geriatrics? This commentary examines what’s wrong with current strategies and suggests changes to increase the survival of geriatrics as a specialty.

    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. August 2016

  • Living With Dying in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit This new article provides insight into the experience of providing palliative care to children — from the perspective of pediatric ICU nurses.

    American Journal of Critical Care. August 2016

  • Gender Differences in ED Visits, Detox Referrals for Opioids What role does gender play in opioid-related ED visits and subsequent referrals to detox programs?

    Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health. August 2016

  • Acute Poisonings From Synthetic Cannabinoids, U.S. 2010-2015 How common is acute intoxication by synthetic cannabinoids? This report examines the demographics and the trends in the use of these potentially life-threatening drugs.

    Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report. August 2016

  • Decision Making for Infants at the Threshold of Viability The authors describe a new prognosis-based guideline to help clinicians and parents make decisions regarding the care of extremely premature infants.

    Journal of Perinatology. Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association. August 2016

  • Transitional Palliative Care for End-Stage HF Patients What benefits could home-based transitional palliative care offer patients with end-stage heart failure?

    Heart. July 2016

  • Communicating Findings of Delayed Diagnostic Evaluations Are secure emails better than telephone calls for alerting primary care physicians about ‘red flag’ findings?

    Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. July 2016

  • When Families Pressure Patients to Change Their Wishes This case highlights the challenges faced by seriously ill patients experiencing compromised autonomy due to family coercion.

    Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. July 2016

  • Safe Emergency Oxygen Therapy for Patients With COPD A survey including the general public, patients, and medical personnel provides insight into the knowledge and attitudes regarding the emergent use of oxygen for COPD patients.

    BMJ Open Respiratory Research. July 2016

  • Life-Sustaining Therapy in Intracranial Hemorrhage Patients The authors describe an algorithm that may help clinicians with the decision of when to withdraw support for patients who may not benefit from life-sustaining therapy.

    Critical Care Medicine. June 2016

  • Palliative Pharmacotherapy: State-of-the-Art Management Managing symptoms of advanced cancer can greatly improve patient quality of life. This review describes the latest therapy for cachexia, anorexia, fatigue, delirium, and dyspnea.

    Cancer Control: Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center. June 2016

  • When a Patient Discusses Assisted Dying End-of-life concerns and assisted dying are difficult topics for patients and clinicians to discuss. Will these strategies and resources help?

    Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. May 2016

  • The Value of Uncertainty in Critical Illness This study explores patterns of the decision-making processes during critical care, and pinpoints sources of conflict and resolution.

    BMC Anesthesiology. May 2016

  • Conflict Management Strategies in the ICU Differ A new study provides some insight into the differences in conflict management styles between palliative care specialists and intensivists over end-of-life care in the ICU.

    Critical Care Medicine. May 2016

  • Low-Dose Morphine vs Weak Opioids in Moderate Cancer Pain Does low-dose morphine reduce pain intensity better than weak opioids in patients with moderate cancer pain?

    Journal of Clinical Oncology. May 2016





  • The Palliative Care Program #best #deal #hotels

    #palliative care at home

    #

    Interim HealthCare Palliative Care

    Hospice care is meant for people in the final months of life. Non-hospice palliative care, on the other hand, is available at any time during your illness. Unlike hospice, you can also receive palliative care at the same time as you re receiving treatments to cure you.

    Here s what you can expect from palliative care. The Interim HealthCare Palliative Care team will assist you in managing your condition and your treatments so that you can experience improved:

    • Relief from symptoms including pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, constipation, nausea, loss of appetite, numbness and problems with sleep
    • Strength to carry on with your daily life
    • Ability to tolerate medical treatments
    • Understanding of your condition and your choices for medical care

    Palliative Care Makes All the Difference

    The Hospice Palliative Care team includes physicians, nurses, social workers and spiritual counselors. Together with your own doctor, they make sure you receive:

    • Expert treatment of your pain and symptoms
    • Close communication about your illness and treatment choices
    • Coordination of your care among all of your healthcare providers
    • Emotional support for you and your family
    • Referral and coordination of home care and hospice services
    • 24-hour support

    You Can Begin Palliative Care Early

    Palliative care can occur at the same time as all other treatments for your illness. It does not depend upon your prognosis so there is no reason you need to wait for services to begin. Pain and other symptoms affect your quality of life, and the stress associated with them can have a big impact on your family. The palliative care team can help.

    Your Insurance Will Likely Cover the Cost of Palliative Care

    Most insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid, cover palliative care services. These services are handled like other medical services, such as oncology or cardiology.

    Getting Palliative Care is Easy. Just Ask For It.

    You may already have been referred to a palliative care team, but if not, it s important to ask your doctor for a referral. Interim HealthCare Palliative Care teams work together with primary physicians, so individuals do not have to give up their own doctors.





    Trinity Palliative Care Services and Brian House Children – s Hospice #hotels

    #trinity hospice blackpool

    #

    Trinity Palliative Care Services and Brian House Children s Hospice

    Join the Trinity Palliative Care Services and Brian House Children s Hospice community

    Trinity Hospice and Palliative Care Services and Brian House Children s Hospice provides specialist palliative care to the adults and children of Blackpool, Fylde and Wyre and much needed support for their families. Our services are available free of charge, however the Hospice only received limited government funding and therefore approximately 4m needs to be raised each year from the community. Your support is greatly appreciated.

    Trinity Palliative Care Services and Brian House Children s Hospice Registered charity number 511009

    Donation message

    “Thank you for the amazing care you gave to my friends lively dad in his final days xxx”

    10.00 + 2.50 Gift Aid

    Donation message

    “Sponsorship money for the colour splash x”

    Louise Harvey donated

    147.00 + 0.00 Gift Aid

    Donation message

    “In memory of Joy Kennedy”

    $50.00 + $0.00 Gift Aid

    Donation message

    “For the colour splash.”

    30.00 + 0.00 Gift Aid

    Donation message

    “In memory of the late Mary Bernadette ( Bernie ) Wright”

    Eamonn, Siobhan, Liam donated

    Donation message

    “Well done Ella on Colour Splash, you looked VERY colourful! “

    Nan/Mum :o) donated

    10.00 + 2.50 Gift Aid

    iLiv to Trek – National 3 Peaks Challenge

    I m cycling Lands End to John O Groats in 9 days for Robert Kearsley because we all want to support this fantastic facility.

    I m We are holding lots of different events! for Danielle Taylor because

    Mark Merrick has raised 4,855.00 so far

    I m cycling from Lands End to John O Groats for Mark Merrick because they do amazing work with very sick kids.

    Jo Lyon has raised 4,450.00 so far

    I m not running a marathon, or in fact any distance, for Jo Lyon because my mum always said it was bad for your joints.





    Palliative Care WA #motels #perth

    #palliative care team

    #

    Palliative Care WA State Conference 2016

    SAVE THE DATE! The Palliative Care WA State Conference 2016 will be held on 29-30 NOVEMBER 2016 at Joondalup Resort, Country Club Boulevard, Connolly. The theme is Communities: Connections, Capacity and Care Choices. To register your interest and receive conference updates sign up here http://palliativecarewa.asn.au/site/2016-palliative-care-wa-state-conference/ Conference Updates

    Palliative Caring

    The new, revised edition of our popular booklet Palliative Caring is easy to read and full of information for familiy and friends caring for a person with a life limiting illness or condition.

    Download Palliative Caring, Western Australian edition – August 2014. here (PDF, 7.8 MB, 48 pages). Call or fax our office on 1300 551 704 or contact us to order a printed booklet.

    You are invited to the Annual Commeration 2016

    A special event for anyone who is bereaved Sunday 16th October 3.30pm Winthrop Hall, UWA Crawley Campus The Annual Commemoration offers a space for reflection and celebration of life, accompanied by beautiful live music and spoken word performances. Light a candle for a loved one and seek comfort from the experience of others and seek hope for the future. Please contact us for more information and if you would like to attend.

    Latest News





    Hospice palliative and end of life care #roosevelt #hotel

    #hospice end of life care

    #

    Hospice, Palliative and End-of-life Care

    What is hospice care?

    Hospice care aims to improve the lives of people whose illness is no longer curable. It helps them to live as fully as possible to the end. It seeks to relieve the physical symptoms of illness while equally addressing the patient’s emotional and spiritual needs. Hospice care also provides support to families and those who are important to the patient, and extends its reach into bereavement.

    Hospice care can be provided in various care settings, such as a hospice, people s homes, a hospital or a nursing home.

    What is palliative care?

    The terms hospice care and palliative care are sometimes used interchangeably. Palliative care is the term generally used by those working in the health service.

    Palliative Medicine is a recognised medical specialty in Ireland. A doctor specialising in this area is known as a Consultant Physician in Palliative Medicine or Palliative Care Consultant. Specially trained nurses working in hospices or as part of a specialist palliative care team in a hospital or in the community are Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) in Palliative Care.

    Click here for the World Health Organisation s definition of palliative care.

    What is end-of-life care?

    Understanding of the term ‘end-of-life care’ is not universal. In the Irish Hospice Foundation we use this term to refer to all aspects of the care provided to a person with a life-limiting illness, from the time of diagnosis through the last months of life, up to and including the final hours. We consider end of life to be a continuum rather than a point of time.

    For more detailed information on these and other terms as used by the Irish Hospice Foundation, see Definitions.





    Directions – Saint Barnabas Hospice and Palliative Care Center – New Jersey

    #st barnabas hospice

    #

    SAINT BARNABAS HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE CENTER (SBHPCC)


    95 Old Short Hills Road, West Orange, NJ 07052 – Telephone: 973-322-4800

    SBHPCC is located in the Saint Barnabas Corporate Building, opposite the Saint Barnabas Medical Center emergency room. We are conveniently accessible from either South Orange Avenue or Northfield Avenue. The guard will direct you straight past the desk to our offices.

    From Garden State Parkway(North and South).

    Take Exit 145 – The Oranges-Route 280 West.

    From 280 West, take Exit 6A – Laurel Avenue.

    From the exit, continue straight on Laurel Avenue (which eventually becomes Shrewsbury Drive, then East Cedar).

    SBHPCC is 3.3 miles from Exit 6A, and will be on your left.

    From New Jersey Turnpike(North and South).

    Take Exit 15W to Route 280 West.

    Take Exit 6A – Laurel Avenue, and follow the directions above.

    Alternately, individuals may wish to exit at Route 78 West, then follow directions below.

    From Route 287(North and South).

    Exit at Route 10.

    Follow east to Livingston traffic circle and follow blue and white hospital signs to the Saint Barnabas Medical Center. SBHPCC is opposite the Medical Center.

    From Route 80 East .

    Exit at Route 280 East.

    Take Exit 6A – Laurel Avenue, and follow the directions above.

    Take Exit 47 for Route 24 West.

    Take Exit 7 and continue to JFK Parkway, following signs to Livingston.

    Turn right at the light onto South Orange Avenue.

    Turn left at second traffic light onto Old Short Hills Road.

    SBHPCC will be on your right at the next traffic light.

    Exit near the Short Hills Mall onto Route 24 West.

    Take Exit 7C to JFK Parkway, following signs to Livingston.

    Turn right at the light onto South Orange Avenue.

    Turn left at second traffic light onto Old Short Hills Road.

    SBHPCC will be on your right at the next traffic light.





    Palliative Care Billing #hotels #in #hong #kong

    #hospice billing

    #

    Membership

    CAPC makes sure you never have to reinvent the wheel because we are the hub for palliative care training, best practices, tools, technical assistance and metrics. We are also a vibrant community and convener of professionals dedicated to advancing the field of palliative care. Call CAPC to enroll your organization today.

    • Training Technical Assistance
    • Metrics
    • Connection

    National Palliative Care Registry

    Enter your data to improve performance, prove value and influence leadership with The National Palliative Care Registry™. The Registry is the central resource for comparative data, reporting, metrics and recent research on the operational features of palliative care programs across settings. FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

    Take me to
    the Registry

    Palliative Care Billing

    Full access to CAPC tools and technical assistance for billing is reserved for members. Read more below, or Log in now if you’re from a member institution. To learn more about membership. please call Rosie Aponte, Membership Associate, at 212-824-9574.

    Palliative Care Billing: Bill for the Work You Do

    Phil Santa-Emma, MD, FAAHPM, Medical Director of the Palliative Care Program at Mount Carmel in Columbus, Ohio offers advice on how to effectively bill for palliative care services.

    Palliative care clinicians can bill for Part B Professional Services for direct patient care services. Revenue from billing often covers a substantial portion of direct costs (costs of staff time). This ratio of cost coverage is heavily impacted by:

    • Quality of documentation by clinicians billing process by billing staff
    • Mix of providers – who is on the team, and who is counted in direct costs
    • Contracts with payers and payer mix
    • Proportion of team time spent on direct patient care vs. other activities that may impact patient care but not be billable

    CAPC continues to compile overview documents and tools to assist palliative care teams as they strive to improve billing practices and outcomes. Key topics for consideration include:

    • Ensuring that palliative care clinicians are credentialed in hospice and palliative medicine, so that their claims will be processed appropriately
    • Documentation tips that increase consistency and efficiency of documentation
    • Evaluation of options for billing for complexity vs. billing for time
    • Special topics such as billing appropriately for “extended time” codes and interpreting the “face to face” rules
    • Suggested priorities for billing reports and review of performance
    • Working with payers
    • Using data to help improve team consistency and performance

    CAPC does not give specific advice about billing, and all advice and examples provided by faculty and by participating organizations is provided for example and illustration only. Programs must seek specific interpretation and advice from their local billing staff and regional payer and CMS administrators.

    Our support will help you identify issues of special interest to palliative care clinicians, incorporate sound management approaches into your practice, and help you set reasonable goals for billing in your budget. Overview information and examples will also prepare you to ask good questions, interpret results and set reasonable expectations when working with local billing experts.

    If you have additional questions and you are a CAPC member, please go to CAPC Central and access our discussion forum. The NOW forum is a resource for members who want to share information, exchange ideas, and get advice from their colleagues on operational issues affecting their palliative care programs.





    Hospice Care and Palliative Care servicing the Inland Empire #motels #cheap

    #arbor hospice

    #

    For inquiries, call us now:
    1-855-900-2842

    Restoring Comfort, Dignity

    Hospice Level

    Insurance

    CONTACT INFORMATION

    We Serve the Areas of:

  • Alhambra
  • Altadena
  • Arcadia
  • Baldwin Park
  • Bell Gardens
  • Bellflower
  • Burbank
  • Carson
  • Cerritos
  • City of Industry
  • Commerce
  • Culver City
  • Downey
  • Duarte
  • Eagle Rock
  • East Los Angeles
  • El Monte
  • El Segundo
  • Glendale
  • Huntington Park
  • Irwindale
  • La Crescenta
  • La Puente
  • Lakewood
  • Los Angeles
  • Lynwood
  • Monrovia
  • Montebello
  • Monterey Park
  • North Hollywood
  • Pasadena
  • Pico Rivera
  • Rosemead
  • San Fernando
  • San Gabriel
  • San Marino
  • South El Monte
  • South Pasadena
  • Torrence
  • West Hollywood
  • West Los Angeles
  • Whittier
  • San Bernardino List of Cities
  • Adelanto
  • Apple Valley
  • Barstow
  • Chino
  • Chino Hills
  • Colton
  • Crestline
  • Fontana
  • Grand Terrace
  • Hesperia
  • Highland
  • Loma Linda
  • Lucerne Valley
  • Montclair
  • Ontario
  • Rancho Cucamonga
  • Redlands
  • Rialto
  • San Bernardino
  • Twentynine Palms
  • Upland
  • Victorville
  • Yucaipa
  • Banning
  • Beaumont
  • Calimesa
  • Canyon Lake
  • Cathedral City
  • Coachella
  • Corona
  • Desert Hot Springs
  • Eastvale
  • Hemet
  • Indian Wells
  • Indio
  • Jurupa Valley
  • Lake Elsinore
  • La Quinta
  • Menifee
  • Moreno Valley
  • Murrieta
  • Norco
  • Palm Desert
  • Palm Springs
  • Perris
  • Rancho Mirage
  • Riverside
  • San Jacinto
  • Temecula
  • Wildomar
  • Anaheim
  • Brea
  • Buena Park
  • Costa Mesa
  • Cypress
  • Fountain Valley
  • Fullerton
  • Garden Grove
  • Huntington Beach
  • Irvine
  • La Habra
  • Orange
  • Placentia
  • Santa Ana
  • Stanton
  • Tustin
  • Villa Park
  • Westminster
  • Yorba Linda
  • Pages

    Welcome to Arbor Vitae Hospice Care, Inc.

    Our Mission Statement

    Arbor Vitae Hospice Care, Inc. is guided by a tradition of personal, clinical and technological excellence. We believe that serving patients in the community setting is the most important activity of the organization.
    We are dedicated to providing the highest quality of patient care with compassion and respect for each person.

    Non Discrimination Policy

    Pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Right Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and their implementing regulations Arbor Vitae Hospice Care, Inc. does not discriminate in the provision of services and employment because of race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual preferences, national origin, disability, and age.





    American Hospice – Embracing Hospice of Georgia offering Hospice Care and Inpatient

    #embracing hospice

    #

    Hover over date to view event details
    Visit the Events Page

    Embracing Hospice is the leading Hospice provider in delivering passionate, competent and comprehensive end-of-life care in Atlanta and the surrounding communities. For more than ten years Embracing Hospice has been devoted to easing the physical, emotional and spiritual pain and suffering that often accompanies terminal illness.

    We provide comprehensive services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We have a very compassionate, experienced and well-trained hospice team of physicians, nurses, hospice aides, medical social workers, spiritual care specialists, clinical pharmacists, bereavement counselors and volunteers. We promise to always put patients and families first and strive to make every contact with you or your loved one meaningful.

    Embracing Hospice accepts most private insurance and is a Medicare and Medicaid licensed provider. Both Medicare and Medicaid provide 100% coverage for care related to the terminal illness. This includes physicians, nurses, hospice aides, medical social workers, counselors, equipment, medications, oxygen, and medical supplies. Medicare and Medicaid patients will never receive a bill from us.

    Please call us at (404) 659-0110 to speak with one of our caring healthcare professionals about hospice. Learn if hospice is right for you, your loved one, or your patient. Also, feel free to browse our web site for additional information about our hospice, our locations, virtual tours of our facilities, and other useful information.





    Palliative Care for Clinicians #palliative #care #at #home

    #criteria for hospice care

    #

    For Clinicians

    Is your patient appropriate for a palliative care referral? A palliative care consultation will assist you in managing complex pain, symptoms, comorbidities, patient/family communication and other issues. Palliative care teams will also save you time.

    The following general referral criteria have been developed to help you assess whether a palliative care consultation would be beneficial to you and your patient. One or more of the following may indicate the need for referral to the palliative care team:

    Presence of a Serious, Chronic Illness

    • Declining ability to complete activities of daily living
    • Weight loss
    • Multiple hospitalizations
    • Difficult to control physical or emotional symptoms related to serious medical illness
    • Patient, family or physician uncertainty regarding prognosis
    • Patient, family or physician uncertainty regarding goals of care
    • Patient or family requests for futile care
    • DNR order conflicts
    • Use of tube feeding or TPN in cognitively impaired or seriously ill patients
    • Limited social support and a serious illness (e.g. homeless, chronic mental illness)
    • Patient, family or physician request for information regarding hospice appropriateness
    • Patient or family psychological or spiritual distress

    Intensive Care Unit Criteria

    • Admission from a nursing home in the setting of one or more chronic life-limiting conditions (e.g. dementia)
    • Two or more ICU admissions within the same hospitalization
    • Prolonged or difficult ventilator withdrawal
    • Multi-organ failure
    • Consideration of ventilator withdrawal with expected death
    • Metastatic cancer
    • Anoxic encephalopathy
    • Consideration of patient transfer to a long-term ventilator facility
    • Family distress impairing surrogate decision making

    Oncology Criteria

    • Metastatic or locally advanced cancer progressing despite systemic treatments with or without weight loss and functional decline;
      • Karnofsky 50 or ECOG 3
      • Progressive brain metastases following radiation
      • New spinal cord compression or neoplastic meningitis
      • Malignant hypercalcemia
      • Progressive pleural/peritoneal or pericardial effusions
      • Failure of first or second-line chemotherapy
      • Multiple painful bone metastases
      • Consideration of interventional pain management procedures
      • Severe prolonged pancytopenia in the setting of an untreatable hematological problem (e.g. relapsed leukemia)

    Emergency Department Criteria

    • Multiple recent prior hospitalizations with same symptoms/problems
    • Long-term-care patient with Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) and/or Comfort Care (CC) orders
    • Patient previously enrolled in a home or residential hospice program
    • Patient/caregiver/physician desires hospice but has not been referred
    • Consideration of ICU admission and or mechanical ventilation in a patient
      • with metastatic cancer and declining function
      • with moderate to severe dementia
      • with one or more chronic diseases and poor functional status at baseline

    Ten Steps for What to Say and Do

    Additional resources on palliative care:

    For information on the development of palliative care teams, visit the Center to Advance Palliative Care at www.capc.org .

    For the National Consensus Project (NCP) Guidelines, go to www.nationalconsensusproject.org .

    For the National Quality Forum (NQF), National Framework and Preferred Practices for Palliative and Hospice Care Quality, go to www.qualityforum.org .





    Meaning of palliative care #cransley #hospice

    #meaning of palliative care

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    What does palliative mean? definition, meaning and pronunciation (Free English Language Dictionary)

    #what does palliative care mean

    #

    PALLIATIVE

    Dictionary entry overview: What does palliative mean?

    PALLIATIVE (noun)
    The noun PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

    1. remedy that alleviates pain without curing

    Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as a noun is very rare.

    PALLIATIVE (adjective)
    The adjective PALLIATIVE has 1 sense:

    1. moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

    Familiarity information: PALLIATIVE used as an adjective is very rare.

    Dictionary entry details

    PALLIATIVE (noun)

    palliative [BACK TO TOP]

    Remedy that alleviates pain without curing

    Nouns denoting man-made objects

    Hypernyms ( palliative is a kind of. ):

    PALLIATIVE (adjective)

    palliative [BACK TO TOP]

    Moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear

    moderating (lessening in intensity or strength)

    Learn English with. Proverbs of the week

    Beer before liquor, you’ll never be sicker, but liquor before beer and you’re in the clear. (English proverb)

    Complete idiot who can keep silent, to a wise man is similar (Breton proverb)

    The arrogant army will lose the battle for sure. (Chinese proverb)

    Where there’s a will, there is a way. (Dutch proverb)

    PALLIATIVE: related words searches

    Page delivered in 0.0837 seconds

    AudioEnglish Definitions. Just One Click Away!
    Now you can lookup any word in our dictionary, right from the search box in your browser! Click here to add the AudioEnglish.org dictionary to your list of search providers.





    Advanced Hospice and Palliative Care Plans #6 #motel

    #hospice care plans

    #

    Here with Dignity

    Honoring Your Wishes

    Advanced Care Planning

    Know your Options and document your decisions.

    Hospice is here to help educate you and your family about advance directives and advance care planning. We can also help you take the right steps toward having difficult conversations with your loved ones and making your healthcare wishes known.

    A Health Care Proxy will ensure your wishes are honored if and when you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

    Your decision to accept or reject medical treatment, including life-sustaining procedures, ultimately depends upon your personal wishes, values, and beliefs. Using an Advance Directive form, such as a Health Care Proxy, will help your family and friends understand your wishes and will give both you and them peace of mind.

    Everyone over the age of 18 needs to appoint a Health Care Proxy* for these two situations:

    1. Temporary inability to make healthcare decisions can happen no matter what your age. That’s because unexpected events can happen at any time. And, during those events there are often times when a healthcare decision needs to be made, even if you’re not able to voice those decisions for yourself. (For example, when having an outpatient surgical procedure and are under general anesthesia.) If you have a Health Care Proxy, decisions will be made according to your wishes — even if you are temporarily unable to make your own requests. Once you become conscious, the Health Care Proxy no longer has any authority to act.

    2. Permanent inability to make healthcare decisions. This would arise if you were comatose from a terminal illness, in a persistent vegetative state, suffered from an illness that left you unable to communicate or, if elderly, suffered from senile dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

    If you don’t have a Health Care Proxy, all appropriate medical treatments would be provided to you. If you’ve appointed a Health Care Proxy, that person would represent your voice and act on your behalf in making healthcare decisions for you according to your pre-determined wishes or best interests.

    *The New York Health Care Proxy Law allows you to appoint someone you trust — such as a family member or close friend — to make healthcare decisions for you if you lose the ability to make decisions yourself. Appointing a health care agent and discussing your wishes with them helps ensure that healthcare providers follow your requests.

    We’re here to help you communicate your wishes

    We’re here to help. Your wishes should be written down in an Advance Directive so that others know your decisions. That’s why we encourage documentation of your hospice and palliative care plan according to your wishes. Our team of experts can help facilitate and adhere to your end of life requests by using an Advance Directive. Two Advance Directive forms commonly used in New York State include the Health Care Proxy and Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST). MOLST is intended for patients with serious health conditions who:
    • Want to avoid receiving any or all life-sustaining treatment
    • Reside in a long-term care facility or require long-term care services
    • Might die within the next year

    Become an advocate for Advance Care Planning

    You must install Adobe Flash to view this content.

    Designate a Health Care Proxy Today!

    Ask your doctor for your MOLST form, inform your chosen Health Care Proxy of your decision, and discuss your wishes today. We’re here with answers if you have any questions about Advance Care Planning, or if you would like a representative to speak to your group or organization ,





    Optum Palliative and Hospice Care in Denver, Colorado #spectrum #health #hospice

    #the denver hospice

    #

    Our Services

    Optum Palliative and Hospice Care is a CHAP-accredited hospice provider, bringing clinical excellence and compassionate care to patients and their loved ones facing serious illness. Hospice care is delivered where patients live by our provider-led, interdisciplinary team, who helps reduce suffering for the patient and loved ones.

    Optum also provides palliative care consultation. specialized care that supplements curative therapies for patients with a serious illness. Through these services, Optum helps patients and their families find the right care at the right time to continue to live each day to the fullest.

    Optum is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you believe a patient or loved one is ready for our care services. please call 303-714-2400.

    Bereavement Services

    Optum provides community-based bereavement services to help grieving families and loved ones find peace and comfort as they journey through their grief process. Through our bereavement program, bereaved clients receive grief education, individual support, connection to local resources and other support materials that are helpful during this time.

    To learn more or to be added to our bereavement support mailing distribution list, contact us. Optum bereavement services are available to anyone who is experiencing grief in the community.

    Volunteer Opportunities

    With varied life experiences, individual strengths and unique personalities, volunteers are a vital part of the hospice team, serving as inspiration to patients, families and staff. In return, many people who volunteer with Optum Palliative and Hospice Care find it brings meaning and purpose to their lives.

    To learn about our volunteer opportunities, contact us .

    Business Office

    6455 S Yosemite Street, 6th Floor, Englewood, CO 80111

    Our Team

    Here are some of the many compassionate and talented individuals on our care team.

    Bill Miles, Executive Director

    Merideth Brennan, Office Supervisor

    Dr. Robert Howe, Medical Director

    Dr. Ivan Geller, Associate Medical Director

    Dr. Roderic Gottula, Associate Medical Director

    Dr. Jeannae Dergance, Associate Medical Director

    Denise Riley, Nurse Practitioner

    Karen Charland, Nurse Practitioner

    Teresa Bane, Clinical Services Manager

    Carla Becker, Clinical Services Manager

    Ashley Bjorkman, Account Manager

    Darci Davis, Account Manager

    James Taylor, Bereavement Coordinator

    Tyler Teague, Volunteer Coordinator





    Palliative care cancer #bury #hospice

    #palliative care cancer

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Home – Palliative Pain & Symptom Management #palliative #care #hospice

    #dorothy ley hospice

    #



    Palliative care dying #end #of #life #care

    #palliative care dying

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Palliative care courses #childrens #hospice

    #palliative care courses

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Definition of palliative care #cosmopolitan #hotel

    #definition of palliative care

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.




    Latest Palliative Care jobs – JobisJob Australia Mobile #average #cost #of #hospice

    #palliative care jobs

    #

    Social Worker Palliative Care SA Health – Mount Gambier, SA 5290 Indicative Total Remuneration: $83,975 – $97,090 – Temp F/T (up to 28/07/2017) – AHP2 South East Regional Community Health Service, Mount Gambier 601327 Social Worker Palliative Care.pdf 7 days ago

    Palliative Care Registered Nurse Western NSW Local Health District – Bourke; Walgett The palliative Care Service provided from a healtyh facility situated in the north-west region of the LHD is available to people in all locations including home, hospital and residential aged care facilities. 8 days ago

    Clinical Nurse Consultant in Palliative Care Hammond Care Health and Hospitals – Prairiewood liaise with Nursing, Medical and Allied Health staff in planning and implementing care plans within the specialty participate and coordinate research and quality activities within the specialty Friendly. 9 days ago

    Casual Social Worker – Aged Care, Rehabilitation & Palliative Care SA Health – Modbury, SA 5092 Appointment will be subject to a satisfactory Criminal History Check. $29.93 p/hr – $44.89 p/hr – Casual – AHP1/2 7 days ago

    Palliative Care Nurse Hunter New England Local Health District – Maitland Provide safe, compassionate person centred care within a Palliative Care Team ensuring care is delivered in collaboration with patients/families/carers and a multidisciplinary team to achieve identified. 12 days ago

    Social Worker Palliative Care Hunter New England Local Health District – Cessnock Provide a high quality specialist Social Work service to patients and carers of the Hunter Valley Sector Palliative Care service to ensure the provision of optimal healthcare outcomes for patients of the. 12 days ago

    Full-Time Care Coordinator – Townsville Healthcare Australia Knowledge of legislative requirements of community care including the Aged Care Act (Commonwealth 1997) and Disability Service Act 2006 (QLD) and Workplace Health and Safety requirements and regulations. 16 days ago

    Enrolled Nurse Palliative Care – Wauchope – Perm/Part Time Mid North Coast Local Health District – Wauchope Fostering an atmosphere conducive to open communication, problem solving and team building. 5 days ago

    Registered Nurse – Palliative Care – P/T 32hpw South Western Sydney Local Health District – Fairfield Work in collaboration with the Nursing Unit Manager (NUM), Community Health Nurses (CHNs) and Palliative Care Clinical Nurse Consultant (CNC) to provide community palliative care nursing services to residents. 8 days ago

    Registered Nurse – Aged Care – Full Time – Gympie Redstone Group – Fantastic training and opportunities to progress your career – Evidence of right to work in Australia, NO SPONSORSHIP OPTIONS – Supportive Facility Manager and Care Manager – Current AHPRA Nursing registration. 9 days ago

    Receive the latest jobs by email





    Working in a Hospice: Palliative Care Specialist #lowest #hotel #rates

    #working for hospice

    #

    Last Updated. April 9, 2013

    Dr. Elisabeth Kubler Ross, author of the book “On Death and Dying,” also considered to be the founder of the death with dignity and hospice care movement said, “There is no joy without hardship. If not for death, would we appreciate life? Those who learn to know death, rather than to fear and fight it, become our teachers about life.” The entire philosophy behind end-of-life care, often called hospice or palliative care, is about love, kindness, and dignity—and learning to appreciate life. Helping to ease the pain and grief that comes with death is the role of those rare individuals that are willing to work with the dying; the palliative care specialist.

    Physician assistants are an integral part of a hospice team; if you are currently pursuing a degree in an online allied health program and are interested in one of the top paying health care careers, consider the available careers in hospice health care. It is a labor of love, and a field where a physician s assistant can really help patients and their families, and is a unique allied health specialty.

    What is Palliative (Hospice) Care?

    Palliative Care tackles both the physical and the psychological aspects of the end of life. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), palliative care is “an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.” Those that work in hospices are palliative care specialists.

    The WHO goes on to list the following to describe hospice care:

    • Provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms
    • Affirms life and regards dying as a normal process
    • Intends neither to hasten or postpone death
    • Integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care
    • Offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death
    • Offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement
    • Uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counseling, if indicated
    • Will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness
    • Is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    What Comprise a Hospice Team?

    Working in hospices you will find physicians, nurses, home care aids, social workers, therapists and counselors, and the family of the dying individual. Hospice care is often provided both in the home and in a hospice center.

    Because of our aging population, hospice care is in high demand, and there is a critical shortage of those special people that can work in the hospice field. Home Care Aids are especially in high demand in the hospice field, and this allied health career offers stability and substantial personal and financial reward.

    How Do I Work in Hospice Care?

    Palliative care specialists are obviously physicians and nurses, but there are many careers in hospice health care available that also help provide this important care. Home Care Aids are a large part of a hospice care team, offering the kind of intimate care that is needed for the very sick.

    Most community, career, and vocational college offer Home Care Aid certification programs. In order to work in the Medicare system, specific guidelines must be met, and home care aids must pass a specific test. Most programs are between one and two years.

    A Special Gift: A Peaceful Passing

    Working in hospice care requires a special person. Because the focus is on comfort rather than cure, most patients in hospice care are in their last six months of life. Hospice care provides patients with pain and symptom relief as well as emotional support for the patients and their families.

    If you want to give the gift of death with dignity and an absence of pain, perhaps working in hospice care if right for you. Helping ease the end for the terminally ill is quite a gift indeed.

    Related Articles:

    1. Health Care Careers: What to Know When you think of professions in health care naturally the first people that leap to.
    2. Allied Health Salaries: What You Should Make With A Health Care Professional Salary Allied Health—also known as the Health Care Related Professions—is used to identify a cluster of.
    3. The Art of Medicine: Understanding the Ropes of the Health Industry Practicing medicine is truly an art form. Doctors, nurses and others in the health care.
    4. 10 Hot Careers in the Health Industry Everyone knows that the health industry has career options that provide exceptional pay and superb.




    Palliative performance scale #manly #paradise #motel

    #palliative performance scale

    #

    Before We Begin

    This module has been created to educate health care providers about the Palliative Performance Scale.

    There are a number of questions in this first version of the module to assist Lee Ann Fox RN, BScN, CON(C), CHPCN(C), graduate student University of Victoria, in her research to understand the needs of providers in these area.

    This module will take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

    Objectives

    After completing this module you will be able to:

    explain the components of the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS)

    apply the PPS to a variety of clinical examples

    describe the utility and risks of using a communication tool like the PPS

    Palliative Care

    The sunflower is the international symbol of hospice care. Hospice is not a place but a philosophy of care and may be more familiar to you as palliative care.

    The Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association defines Hospice Palliative Care as “care that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of living and dying.”[1]





    The Palliative Performance Scale #vegas #hotels

    #palliative performance scale

    #

    The Palliative Performance Scale

    The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) is a valid, reliable functional assessment tool developed by Victoria Hospice that is based on the Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS ) [3] and is incorporated into the collaborative care plans in the Palliative Care Integration Project that began in Kingston. This tool provides a framework for measuring progressive decline in palliative patients.

    In the PPS[4]. physical performance is measured in 10% decremental levels from fully ambulatory and healthy (100%) to death (0%). These levels are further differentiated by five observable parameters:

    the degree of ambulation

    ability to do activities/extent of disease

    ability to do self care

    level of consciousness

    “Stronger” performance indicators are located on the left, and “softer” ones on the right. In determining the patient’s PPS then, we would first find the level that fits with the patient’s ambulation level. From that we would work across the scale keeping in mind that the leftward indicators have more value than those on the right. We can not choose between levels (e.g. 45%). Simply make your best assessment to determine the PPS.

    PPS Stages





    Who Pays For Palliative Care #ascot #motel

    #who pays for hospice

    #

    Who Pays For Palliative Care

    Who pays for palliative care is a good question to ask when speaking to your doctor about starting palliative care. It is often handled much like a referral to a cardiologist, neurologist or other specialist and may be covered by Medicare, Medicaid or your private insurance.

    Some illnesses and diagnosis may limit the ability to access care out of the home. In these cases, palliative care can be provided in the home by skilled nurses and therapists. Talk to your doctor to request a referral for home-based palliative care which is covered by Medicare under some circumstances.

    Medicare

    If you have Medicare Part B (medical insurance), it may cover some treatments and medications that provide palliative care, including visits from doctors, nurse practitioners, and social workers. Medicare does not use the term palliative, so coverage is provided by standard Medicare Part B benefits. The palliative care provider (the organization offering you the services) will bill Medicare for services provided, but be sure you understand what co-pays or fees, if any, you will be asked to pay. Ask about your responsibility for fees and request a fee schedule before agreeing to receive services.

    Medicaid

    If you are covered by Medicaid, a health insurance plan for people with low income and few assets, it may cover some palliative care treatments and medications, including visits from doctors. Medicaid does not use the term palliative, so coverage is provided by standard Medicaid benefits. The palliative care provider (the organization offering you the services) will bill Medicaid for services provided, but be sure you understand what co-pays or fees, if any, you will be asked to pay. Ask about your responsibility for fees and request a fee schedule before agreeing to receive services.

    Private insurance, HMOs, managed care programs

    Many private health insurance plans provide some coverage for palliative care as part of their hospice or chronic care benefits. If you own a long-term care policy, there may be palliative care benefits provided by that policy. Check with your health insurance or long-term care insurance representative.

    Start The Conversation

    A public education initiative by Vermont’s non-profit VNAs and Home Health and Hospice Agencies. In partnership with VT Ethics Network.