Online Associates Degree in Health Physics: Program Overview #associate #degree #online #programs,


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Online Associates Degree in Health Physics: Program Overview

Essential Information

Online associate’s degrees in health physics are rare and usually take two years of study to complete. Degrees in this field are more commonly offered at the bachelor’s degree level or higher, and students with an associate’s degree will likely need further study in order to work in the field. Extensive lab components mean the program cannot be completed entirely online, but students may be able to complete some courses through distance learning. Online study allows them to view lectures and turn in assignments at any time, although there are established deadlines for completing work. Before enrolling in an online program, students may need to equip their computers with specific software.

Prospective students who seek the flexibility of a fully online program in a health-related field may instead choose an associate’s degree in healthcare administration. These programs prepare students for office work within medical facilities, so they do not have the science lab requirements of health physics programs.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Community Health and Preventive Medicine
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Physics
  • Health Services Administration
  • International Health
  • Maternal and Child Health
  • Medical Scientist
  • Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene
  • Public Health Education
  • Public Health Medicine, Treatment

Health Physics Associate’s Degree

Although more common at higher degree levels, a few schools do offer online associate’s degrees in health physics. Health physics programs aim to teach students how to protect the public from the damaging effects of radiation, particularly radiation used in medical treatment. Students learn fundamentals of nuclear physics, the effects of radiation on living organisms, safe handling techniques and use of radiation survey equipment. A high school diploma or GED certificate are the minimum admission requirements for an associate’s degree program.

Program Information and Requirements

Online associate’s degree programs in health physics often include a lab component that must be completed on site. These types of programs are considered hybrids and are common for many programs in science and medicine. In the online portion of a program, students access all course materials and submit assignments and exams via a school’s website. Online content is accessible at any time of day, but assignments must be completed by deadlines. Technical requirements include a personal computer and Internet access. Students may also be asked to purchase software and textbooks to compete specific courses. Associate’s degrees are typically earned in two years.

Common Courses

Associate’s degree programs in health physics include courses that cover the various areas of the life sciences, such as biology and chemistry. These courses help a student fulfill a program’s general education requirements.

Introduction to Health Physics

This course introduces students to the basic principles of atomic physics. Topics covered include radioactivity, the biological effects of ionizing radiation and safe handling of radioactive substances. Students are able to receive instruction through DVDs and online tutorials.

Radiation Biology

Students in this course conduct a more in-depth examination into the effects of ionizing radiation on human tissue. Cellular response, short-term damage and long-term chromosomal damage are among the topics covered. Students can communicate and get immediate feedback from students and instructors using instant messenger.

Nuclear Instrumentation

Students learn to operate portable radiation survey equipment in this course, including gamma ray spectroscopy, portable counters and liquid scintillation. Coursework emphasizes techniques to identify radioactive materials. Audio and video streaming are available through the Internet to educate students on these topics.

Career Information

Health physicists work for government laboratories and regulatory agencies, medical institutions, manufacturers and nuclear power plants. Graduates of an online associate’s degree program in health physics are likely to need further education to work in this field. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, most positions require a bachelor’s degree or higher. Employment of health physicists and other health and safety specialists is expected to grow 4% from 2014-2024 (www.bls.gov ). PayScale.com reports that health physics technicians earned between $43,826 and $83,198 as of October 2016.

Continuing Education Information

A bachelor’s degree or master’s degree in health physics opens up a wider range of career possibilities. While online bachelor’s degrees in health physics are rare, many schools offer online master’s degree programs in this subject.

There are a few hybrid-format associate’s degree programs in health physics that provide a basic introduction to the applications of radiation and nuclear technology to medicine while also requiring students to complete on-campus labs. Students can find more comprehensive programs in the field at higher degree levels.

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Does Death Exist? New Theory Says – No #science,mind.body.soul,brain,biocentrism,physics,albert #einstein,death,death # #amp;


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Does Death Exist? New Theory Says ‘No’

Many of us fear death. We believe in death because we have been told we will die. We associate ourselves with the body, and we know that bodies die. But a new scientific theory suggests that death is not the terminal event we think.

One well-known aspect of quantum physics is that certain observations cannot be predicted absolutely. Instead, there is a range of possible observations each with a different probability. One mainstream explanation, the “many-worlds” interpretation, states that each of these possible observations corresponds to a different universe (the ‘multiverse’). A new scientific theory – called biocentrism – refines these ideas. There are an infinite number of universes, and everything that could possibly happen occurs in some universe. Death does not exist in any real sense in these scenarios. All possible universes exist simultaneously, regardless of what happens in any of them. Although individual bodies are destined to self-destruct, the alive feeling – the ‘Who am I?’- is just a 20-watt fountain of energy operating in the brain. But this energy doesn’t go away at death. One of the surest axioms of science is that energy never dies; it can neither be created nor destroyed. But does this energy transcend from one world to the other?

Consider an experiment that was recently published in the journal Science showing that scientists could retroactively change something that had happened in the past. Particles had to decide how to behave when they hit a beam splitter. Later on, the experimenter could turn a second switch on or off. It turns out that what the observer decided at that point, determined what the particle did in the past. Regardless of the choice you, the observer, make, it is you who will experience the outcomes that will result. The linkages between these various histories and universes transcend our ordinary classical ideas of space and time. Think of the 20-watts of energy as simply holo-projecting either this or that result onto a screen. Whether you turn the second beam splitter on or off, it’s still the same battery or agent responsible for the projection.

According to Biocentrism, space and time are not the hard objects we think. Wave your hand through the air – if you take everything away, what’s left? Nothing. The same thing applies for time. You can’t see anything through the bone that surrounds your brain. Everything you see and experience right now is a whirl of information occurring in your mind. Space and time are simply the tools for putting everything together.

Death does not exist in a timeless, spaceless world. In the end, even Einstein admitted, “Now Besso” (an old friend) “has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me. That means nothing. People like us. know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.” Immortality doesn’t mean a perpetual existence in time without end, but rather resides outside of time altogether.

This was clear with the death of my sister Christine. After viewing her body at the hospital, I went out to speak with family members. Christine’s husband – Ed – started to sob uncontrollably. For a few moments I felt like I was transcending the provincialism of time. I thought about the 20-watts of energy, and about experiments that show a single particle can pass through two holes at the same time. I could not dismiss the conclusion: Christine was both alive and dead, outside of time.

Christine had had a hard life. She had finally found a man that she loved very much. My younger sister couldn’t make it to her wedding because she had a card game that had been scheduled for several weeks. My mother also couldn’t make the wedding due to an important engagement she had at the Elks Club. The wedding was one of the most important days in Christine’s life. Since no one else from our side of the family showed, Christine asked me to walk her down the aisle to give her away.

Soon after the wedding, Christine and Ed were driving to the dream house they had just bought when their car hit a patch of black ice. She was thrown from the car and landed in a banking of snow.

“Ed,” she said “I can’t feel my leg.”

She never knew that her liver had been ripped in half and blood was rushing into her peritoneum.

After the death of his son, Emerson wrote “Our life is not so much threatened as our perception. I grieve that grief can teach me nothing, nor carry me one step into real nature.”

Whether it’s flipping the switch for the Science experiment, or turning the driving wheel ever so slightly this way or that way on black-ice, it’s the 20-watts of energy that will experience the result. In some cases the car will swerve off the road, but in other cases the car will continue on its way to my sister’s dream house.

Christine had recently lost 100 pounds, and Ed had bought her a surprise pair of diamond earrings. It’s going to be hard to wait, but I know Christine is going to look fabulous in them the next time I see her.

Robert Lanza, MD is considered one of the leading scientists in the world. He is the author of “Biocentrism,” a book that lays out his theory of everything.


Access: Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching: Nature #nature, #science, #science #news, #biology,


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Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching

Victoria Gomez-Roldan 1. Soraya Fermas 2. Philip B. Brewer 3. Virginie Puech-Pag s 1. Elizabeth A. Dun 3. Jean-Paul Pillot 2. Fabien Letisse 4. Radoslava Matusova 5. Saida Danoun 1. Jean-Charles Portais 4. Harro Bouwmeester 5. 6. Guillaume B card 1. Christine A. Beveridge 3. 7. 8. Catherine Rameau 2. 8 Soizic F. Rochange 1. 8

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence that carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 shoot branching mutants of pea are strigolactone deficient and that strigolactone application restores the wild-type branching phenotype to ccd8 mutants. Moreover, we show that other branching mutants previously characterized as lacking a response to the branching inhibition signal also lack strigolactone response, and are not deficient in strigolactones. These responses are conserved in Arabidopsis. In agreement with the expected properties of the hormonal signal, exogenous strigolactone can be transported in shoots and act at low concentrations. We suggest that endogenous strigolactones or related compounds inhibit shoot branching in plants. Furthermore, ccd8 mutants demonstrate the diverse effects of strigolactones in shoot branching, mycorrhizal symbiosis and parasitic weed interaction.

  1. Universit de Toulouse; UPS; CNRS; Surface Cellulaire et Signalisation chez les V g taux, 24 chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
  2. Station de G n tique et d Am lioration des Plantes, Institut J. P. Bourgin, UR254 INRA, F-78000 Versailles, France
  3. ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  4. CNRS, UMR5504, INRA, UMR792 Ing nierie des Syst mes Biologiques et des Proc d s, INSA de Toulouse, F-31400 Toulouse, France
  5. Plant Research International, PO Box 16, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands
  6. Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4, 6703 BD Wageningen, the Netherlands
  7. School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
  8. These authors contributed equally to this work.

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