Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve Costa Rica maps of trails, photos, sounds, weather,


Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve

Areas with poor drainages support swamp forests, while other parts dissected by deep, expansive gorges have numerous streams tumbling through, creating rapids, waterfalls and standstill pools. It is, however, not merely the forest and landscape that are so diversified.

The variable climate and large altitudinal gradient have helped to produce an amazingly heterogeneous set of creatures that live here. Some of these include the jaguar, ocelot, Baird s tapir, three-wattled bellbird, bare-necked umbrellabird, and the famously elusive resplendent quetzal.

History. In the early 1950s, a group of Quakers from the United States left their homes in Alabama and arrived in Monteverde at a time when the region was just beginning to be settled. The Quakers, fleeing the United States to avoid being drafted into the Korean War, established a simple life in Monteverde centered on dairy and cheese production. Some of these families helped establish the Monteverde and Santa Elena Cloud Forest Reserves some 20 years later.

In 1972, the Monteverde rainforest was threatened by local farmers looking to expand their property and homestead on certain forest sites. With this prospect in mind, visiting scientists George Powell and his wife joined forces with longtime resident Wildford Guidon to promote the establishment of a nature preserve. The Tropical Science Center, a non-governmental scientific and environmental organization, proved receptive to the efforts of the Powells and Guidon, and accepted institutional responsibility for ownership and management of the protected areas. An initial land purchase of 328 hectares formed the core of the Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve.

Following the preserve’s creation, the Tropical Science Center continued to secure the financial and human resources necessary to expand, consolidate, and properly protect the preserve s current 10,500 hectares. See more Monteverde photos .

Hours. For daily schedules and rates, please click the tour reservation options below. Children ages 6 and under are free.

Information. The restaurant, souvenir shop and art gallery are open from 7 AM to 4 PM. There are restrooms at the entrance but none on the trails.

Location. 3.6 miles (6 km) SE of Santa Elena, Monteverde. See Monteverde map for more information.

Getting there. Buses heading to the reserve leave from the Banco Nacional in Santa Elena at 6:15 AM, 7:20 AM and 1:15 PM. Return buses leave the reserve at 11:30 AM, 2:00 PM and 4:00 PM. Cost is $1 each way. Visitors can board the bus anywhere along the road between the town of Santa Elena and the entrance of the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve. Those that do not wish to take the bus can take a taxi either way, which costs around $10 (for up to five passengers) each way.

Hiking Trails in Monteverde. The trails here are well maintained. Regular shoes are fine, as long as you are able to walk comfortably. There is no need for rubber boots or hiking shoes for daily trips. You may, however, need this type of footwear if you plan on staying overnight in one of the huts.

Trails Description

Sendero Bosque Nuboso (Cloud Forest Trail): 1.2 miles (1.9 KM) long with an elevation gain of 213 feet (65 m), this trail generally takes around 1.5 hours to complete. A self-guided tour booklet of the trail available in both English and Spanish can be purchased at the entrance. This is one of the most popular trails because it’s extremely pretty and has good examples of strangler fig plants.

El Camino (The Road): 1.2 miles (2 km) long with an elevation gain of 131 feet (40 m), this trail generally takes around 1.25 hours to complete. It is wider and more open than other trails, allowing for more sunlight and thus more butterflies. This trail is also excellent for bird watching.

Sendero Pantanoso (Swamp Trail): 1 mile (1.6 km) long with an elevation gain of 131 feet (40 m), this trail takes around 1.25 hours to complete. It passes through a swamp forest while traversing along the Continental Divide, and is adorned with magnolias, plants bearing stilt roots, podocarpus (the only conifer tree in the preserve), and more.

Sendero El R o (River Trail): 1.2 miles (1.9 km) long with an elevation gain of 213 feet (65 m), this trail takes around 1.5 hours to complete. This trail leads along the Quebrada Cuecha and has a short side trail to a waterfall, where there are several zapote trees.

Sendero Chomogo: 1.1 miles (1.8 km) long with an elevation gain of 492 feet (150 m), this trail generally takes about 1.25 hours to complete. This is the highest trail in the preserve, reaching 5,510 feet (1,680 m) above sea level. Oak, bamboo and heliconia are common in the higher areas, and hot lip plants abound throughout most of the walk.

Sendero George Powell (George Powell Trail): 0.1 mile (0.2 km) long with an elevation gain of 66 ft (20 m), this trail takes about 10 minutes to complete. This trail, named after one of the preserve s founders, runs through second growth forest.

Sendero Brillante (Shining Trail): 0.2 miles (0.3 km) long with an elevation gain of 49 feet (16 m), this trail takes about 10 minutes to walk. You are led along the Continental Divide to La Ventana (The Window), an overlook with a wide view of an elfin forest below. Bamboo is common along much of this trail.

Sendero Roble (Oak Trail): 0.4 miles (0.6 km) long, this lovely trail is narrow and leads to a beautiful grove of heliconia trees.

Suspended Bridge. 300 feet (100 meters) high, this bridge has spectacular views of the canopy, bromeliads, orchids and more. For a tour of all five suspended bridges, see Sky Walk

Wilford Guindon. Named in honor of one of the preserve s founder, this trail rises and falls through patches of sunlight.

Guided Tour Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve Times and Booking

The Energy Story – Chapter 3: Resistance and Static Electricity #renewable #energy


Chapter 3: Resistance and Static Electricity

As we have learned, some kinds of atoms contain loosely attached electrons. Electrons can be made to move easily from one atom to another. When those electrons move among the atoms of matter, a current of electricity is created.

Take a piece of wire. The electrons are passed from atom to atom, creating an electrical current from one end to the other. Electrons are very, very small. A single copper penny contains more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (1×1022) electrons.

Electricity “flows” or moves through some things better than others do. The measurement of how well something conducts electricity is called its resistance.

Resistance in wire depends on how thick and how long it is, and what it’s made of. The thickness of wire is called its gauge. The smaller the gauge, the bigger the wire. Some of the largest thicknesses of regular wire is gauge 1.

Different types of metal are used in making wire. You can have copper wire, aluminum wire, even steel wire. Each of these metals has a different resistance; how well the metal conducts electricity. The lower the resistance of a wire, the better it conducts electricity.

Copper is used in many wires because it has a lower resistance than many other metals. The wires in your walls, inside your lamps and elsewhere are usually copper.

A piece of metal can be made to act like a heater. When an electrical current occurs, the resistance causes friction and the friction causes heat. The higher the resistance, the hotter it can get. So, a coiled wire high in resistance, like the wire in a hair dryer, can be very hot.

Some things conduct electricity very poorly. These are called insulators. Rubber is a good insulator, and that’s why rubber is used to cover wires in an electric cord. Glass is another good insulator. If you look at the end of a power line, you’ll see that it is attached to some bumpy looking things. These are glass insulators. They keep the metal of the wires from touching the metal of the towers.

Another type of electrical energy is static electricity. Unlike current electricity that moves, static electricity stays in one place.

Try this experiment.

Rub a balloon filled with air on a wool sweater or on your hair. Then hold it up to a wall. The balloon will stay there by itself.

Tie strings to the ends of two balloons. Now rub the two balloons together, hold them by strings at the end and put them next to each other. They’ll move apart.

Rubbing the balloons gives them static electricity. When you rub the balloon it picks up extra electrons from the sweater or your hair and becomes slightly negatively charged.

The negative charges in the single balloon are attracted to the positive charges in the wall.

The two balloons hanging by strings both have negative charges. Negative charges always repel negative charges and positive always repels positive charges. So, the two balloons’ negative charges “push” each other apart.

Static electricity can also give you a shock. If you walk across a carpet, shuffling your feet and touching something made of metal, a spark can jump between you and the metal object. Shuffling your feet picks up additional electrons spread over your body. When you touch a metal doorknob or something with a positive charge the electricity jumps across the small gap from your fingers just before you touch the metal knob. If you walk across a carpet and touch a computer case, you can damage the computer.

One other type of static electricity is very spectacular. It’s the lightning in a thunder and lightning storm. Clouds become negatively charged as ice crystals inside the clouds rub up against each other. Meanwhile, on the ground, the positive charge increases. The clouds get so highly charged that the electrons jump from the ground to the cloud, or from one cloud to another cloud. This causes a huge spark of static electricity in the sky that we call lightning.

You can find out more about lightning at Web Weather for Kids –

You’ll remember from Chapter 2 that the word “electricity” came from the Greek words “elektor,” for “beaming sun” and “elektron,” both words describing amber. Amber is fossilized tree sap millions of years old and has hardened as hard as a stone.

Around 600 BCE (Before the Common Era) Greeks noticed a strange effect: When rubbing “elektron” against a piece of fur, the amber would start attracting particles of dust, feathers and straw. No one paid much attention to this “strange effect” until about 1600 when Dr. William Gilbert investigated the reactions of magnets and amber and discovered other objects can be made “electric.”

Gilbert said that amber acquired what he called “resinous electricity” when rubbed with fur. Glass, however, when rubbed with silk, acquired what he termed “vitreous electricity.”

He thought that electricity repelled the same kind and attracts the opposite kind of electricity. Gilbert and other scientists of that time thought that the friction actually created the electricity (their word for the electrical charge).

In 1747, Benjamin Franklin in America and William Watson in England both reached the same conclusion. They said all materials possess a single kind of electrical “fluid.” They didn’t really know anything about atoms and electrons, so they called how it behaved a “fluid.”

They thought that this fluid can penetrate matter freely and couldn’t be created or destroyed. The two men thought that the action of rubbing (like rubbing amber with fur) moves this unseen fluid from one thing to another, electrifying both.

Franklin defined the fluid as positive and the lack of fluid as negative. Therefore, according to Franklin, the direction of flow was from positive to negative. Today, we know that the opposite is true. Electricity flows from negative to positive. Others took the idea even further saying this that two fluids are involved. They said items with the same fluid attract each other. And opposite types of fluid in objects will make them repel each other.

All of this was only partially right. This is how scientific theories develop. Someone thinks of why something occurs and then proposes an explanation. It can take centuries sometime to find the real truth. Instead of electricity being a fluid, it is the movement of the charged particles between the objects. the two objects are really exchanging electrons.

Learn about Electrical Circuits and electrons in Chapter 4.

Commercial Weed Control & Prevention UK #weed #control #north #east, #commercial #weed


Request a callback

Work with Us

Subscribe to the complete group

Please enter your email address below to receive the latest news and offers from Complete Weed Control

Complete news.

  • 14/02/2017 09:54AM New Complete Weed Control team for East Midlands Complete Weed Control, the UK’s largest weed control contractor, has announced Conor Flynn as its newest franchisee to operate in the East Midlands. Conor is the latest to join Complete Weed Control and after working with cars for the majority of his working career, he decided that it was time for a change of direction. When the opportunity arose to join Complete Weed Control he decided to learn more about the company, which ultimately played a major factor in his decision to alter his career path. “I’ve worked with cars all my life, whether it is sales, events or driving around a track. Cars are my passion but when the chance arose to join Complete Weed Control I think the opportunity was just too good to ignore. “I met with managing director Ian Graham, to find out more on the company and learn about what would be involved in the daily running of the business – and that made my mind up.” Conor spent a year learning the business inside out by working under David Cocks, who had been in charge of the East Midlands area since 2000. Having recently just taken over the full day-to-day running of the business, Conor feels he is now ready to push on and grow the business. “I’ve got some great clients and work at some fabulous places, which includes golf courses and sports clubs and I’m really enjoying it so far. My plan is to keep growing and building on the relationships that David has built up over the past 16 years.” Since its beginnings in 1972, Complete Weed Control has gone from strength to strength and has built a reputation as the most professional and relied upon weed control contractor in the UK. The CWC group has been complimented by its hugely successful business model. Every inch of the UK is now occupied by a Complete Weed Control operative and also has a growing presence in Ireland. “It’s an incredibly progressive and forward thinking company, says Conor. “Head office is always on hand to provide you with support and everyone has a high ambition which is a great motivation. “I’m really looking forward to the road ahead with Complete Weed Control. It is great to be a part of this company.” For more information, please contact Complete Weed Control’s national office on 01325 324 277. Read More
  • 06/02/2017 12:25PM Statement regarding BTME and SALTEX In a company statement, Ian Graham – managing director of Complete Weed Control has announced that the company will no longer exhibit at BTME or SALTEX. “Historically both shows have been successful events which have resulted in good levels of interest. However, BTME and SALTEX enquiry numbers and values have been in steady decline. As a consequence our continuing presence has become a topic of conversation each year. “We have attended the two exhibitions since 1983 and therefore our decision to withdraw has not being an easy one. Overall, the budget for both shows, including stand space, time and all other associated costs, runs into many tens of thousands of pounds. We are very confident that this sum of money will be better diverted into digital and online channels where we have seen an increase in enquiry levels over the same period.” “It is also our intention to put together a series of regional events where we can invite existing and potential clients along to discuss the various services we can provide. Our opinion is that trade shows in general are becoming obsolete as a consequence of the success of digital platforms. Customers can find information quickly and at their own convenience whilst vendors are far more willing to visit a client for bespoke demonstration of their equipment or services. We will continue to attend both shows in the capacity of visitors and wish both BTME and SALTEX the very best for the future.” Read More

read all news

Complete weed control have worked for and are trusted by.

the complete group

Complete Weed Control Ltd registered in England and Wales. Company Nº 2832234. Registered Office: Unit 16, Hurworth Road, Newton Aycliffe, County Durham DL5 6UD

Spring Attendee Homepage – Atlanta Home Show – Georgia s Largest Home


The 39th Annual Spring Atlanta Home Show – March 24-26, 2017 – Cobb Galleria Centre

The largest Home Show in Georgia! Hundreds of participating companies! For THREE days only March 24-26, the Cobb Galleria transforms into a one-stop-shop for all your home improvement needs! For 39 years the Spring Atlanta Home Show has been improving home lifestyles and adding value to your largest single investment, your home. We’re proud of our ability to produce a family friendly environment and welcome you to our home.

Experience exciting and interactive sessions that can inspire you in your yard, with your decor and save you a great deal of time and money on your next remodeling job. » Click here to read more.

This year’s grand prize is a 7 LED fixture outdoor lighting package provided by Outdoor Lighting Perspectives of Atlanta. No purchase necessary – read more for all the details. » Click here to read more.

Georgia Landscape presents the Red Hare Backyard Beer Garden! Come learn about landscape design, services and products ranging from grass to fire, flowers to water, patios to recreation areas. You can chat with area experts about local landscape and options for every type of backyard. This is an interactive, educational area designed to give you the information you need to turn your backyard into an outdoor living area to enjoy for years! If all that were not enough, for a $5 donation to Hope Atlanta – the programs of Travelers Aid you can taste your way through this feature. Marietta’s own Red Hare Brewing Company will have SIX of their handcrafted brews available for your approval! Cabot Creamery will also have a sampling of cheeses. So bring your friends, enjoy some great beer and help a worthy cause! » Click here to read more.

Thanks to PMC Building Materials, members of the home improvement trade receive FREE admission to the show on Friday March 24! » Click here to read more.