What is Hospice? Crossroads Frequently Asked Questions #avalon #hospice

#hospice questions

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Frequently asked questions

There are many questions. and myths. about hospice. Below are answers to some the most common questions asked. They will give you get a better understanding of what hospice care is and how it can benefit your family.

Have more questions about hospice care? Please contact us now.

  • What is hospice care?
  • Is hospice only for people who are dying?
  • Who is best suited for hospice care?
  • Isn t using hospice the same as giving up ?
  • Should we wait for the doctor to suggest hospice?
  • When is the best time to start hospice care?
  • Who pays for hospice care?
  • Once you begin hospice care, you cannot leave the program?
  • Is hospice a place?
  • Does hospice only care for cancer patients?
  • Is hospice only for housebound or bed-ridden people?
  • Hospice “dopes people up” so they become addicted or sleep all the time?
  • What is hospice care?

    Hospice is a philosophy of care. It treats the person rather than the disease and focuses on quality of life. It surrounds the patient and family with a team consisting of professionals who not only address physical distress, but emotional and spiritual issues as well. Hospice care is patient-centered because the needs of the patient and family drive the activities of the hospice team .

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  • Is hospice only for people who are dying?

    Hospice is for people who have a limited life expectancy. (Actually, we all have a limited life expectancy, so it is more specific than that.) Hospice is for patients whose condition is such that a doctor would not be surprised if the patient died within the next six months. This doesn’t mean the patient is going to die in the next six months–it simply means that he or she has a condition that makes dying a realistic possibility.

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  • Who is best suited for hospice care?

    Hospice patients are those with very serious medical conditions. Usually they have diseases that are life threatening and make day-to-day living very uncomfortable—physically, emotionally, or spiritually. Some are in pain. Others experience difficult symptoms such as nausea, extreme fatigue, and shortness of breath. These symptoms may be caused by the disease, or they may have been caused by treatments intended to cure the disease. Often patients turn to hospice because they are anxious or depressed, or they are feeling spiritually distressed because of their medical condition. Hospice specializes in easing pain, discomfort, and distress on all levels. The care provided by hospice is often helpful for conditions such as cancer, heart disease, COPD (emphysema) and advanced dementia. Seriously ill patients who have decided that their priority is to have the best quality of life possible are the people who are best suited for hospice.

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  • Isn t using hospice the same as giving up ?

    Not at all! This is one of the most common questions about hospice but it is actually a misconception. Although your loved one’s condition may have reached a point that a cure is not likely—or not likely enough to be worth the side effects of treatment—that does not mean there is nothing left to do. In fact, an emphasis on quality of life and easing pain and distress often allows the patient to spend his or her last months focusing on the things that are ultimately the most important and meaningful. As one man put it, “I’d rather spend my time with my children and grandchildren than waste my limited time and energy driving to the treatment center and recovering beside the toilet bowl.” With the expert guidance of a nurse and case manager, as well as the assistance of bath aides, social workers, and chaplains, patients and families find they can focus on their relationships, healing old wounds and building wonderful memories together. Far from giving up, hospice helps families truly live well and support each other during a stressful, but, in the end, very natural family life passage.

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  • Should we wait for the doctor to suggest hospice?

    You can, but oddly enough, doctors often wait for families to bring it up. This is part of the reason that people often receive hospice care so late in the process. If you think your loved one and family might benefit from the support of weekly home visits from staff who specialize in pain control and the easing of distress, ask your doctor if hospice might be something to consider now, or in the near future. If, when you are truly honest with yourself, you realize that you would not be surprised if your loved one were to die in the next six to twelve months, ask the doctor if he or she would be surprised. If the answer is anything close to “No, I would not be surprised,” then maybe it’s a good time to begin a discussion about hospice. If you would like more information, please feel free to call us toll-free 1-888-603-MORE (6673). We would be happy to talk with you or to do an informational home visit—no obligation or strings attached.

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  • When is the best time to start hospice care?

    Most patients and families who receive hospice care say they wish they had known about it earlier, that they needed the help much sooner than they received it. Research has shown that hospice can increase both the quality of life and how long a patient lives. Families who receive hospice near the very end–just a few days to a week–have been shown to have a harder time adjusting during the bereavement period than do those whose loved one receives hospice care for weeks and months before passing on. If you even think that your family and the person you care for could benefit from pain or symptom management, assistance with bathing and grooming, emotional and spiritual support, and telephone access to caregiving advice, ask your physician if hospice might be a service to consider. Experts agree that at least two to three months of care is optimal. It is better to ask sooner rather than later so you do not regret having missed the support that hospice has to offer.

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  • Who pays for hospice care?

    Patients have several options when it comes to paying for the cost of hospice care. If the patient has Medicare and meets hospice eligibility requirements, then the government will pay as much as 100% of the cost. In such a case, there is no deductible and no copayment. Not only are the services of the hospice staff entirely covered, but medical supplies and prescriptions relating to pain and comfort management are also covered. Individuals who do not have Medicare coverage but have coverage from private insurance should talk with their insurance company to find out about eligibility and what deductibles and copayments may apply. Medicaid provides coverage, but it varies by state.

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  • Once you begin hospice care, you cannot leave the program?

    A person may sign out of the hospice program for a variety of reasons, such as resuming aggressive curative treatment or pursuing experimental measures. Or, if a patient shows signs of recovery and no longer meets the 6 month guideline, he or she can be discharged from hospice care and return to the program when the illness has progressed at a later time.

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  • Is hospice a place?

    Hospice is not just a place – it’s a service. Hospice brings physical, emotional, and spiritual care and support to wherever our patients call home.

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  • Does hospice only care for cancer patients?

    Hospice is not just for cancer patients. Crossroads Hospice cares for patients with any life-limiting illness. Among the illnesses our patients have had are cardiac and respiratory diseases, renal disease, and neurological illness including Alzheimer’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, AIDS, Cirrhosis, and others.

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  • Is hospice only for housebound or bed-ridden people?

    Hospice is not only for those who are housebound or bedridden; most are living their day-to-day lives. Care is given where ever the patient lives; in their home, long-term care facilities, assisted living or retirement communities, rest homes and hospitals.

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  • Hospice “dopes people up” so they become addicted or sleep all the time?

    When patients have a legitimate need for pain medication, they do not become addicted to it. Crossroads Hospice has the expertise to manage pain so that patients are comfortable yet alert and are able to enjoy each day to the fullest extent possible, given their medical condition.





Hospice Frequently Asked Questions #bury #hospice

#hospice care for cancer patients

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Any person facing the advancing stages of any terminal illness is eligible for care. Hospice care is appropriate when the following conditions are met:

The physician thinks that the patient will live 6 months or less if the disease runs its normal course; aggressive treatments are not working or providing relief to the patient; and the patient, family and physician agree and understand that the focus of care is on comfort (pain control and symptom management), not cure.

What patient care services does WWCH offer?

Hospice care can include a wide variety of services to relieve the patient and family of many of the burdens associated with a terminal illness. Hospice patients are cared for by a team of doctors, nurses, social workers, certified nursing assistants, clergy and volunteers. Each provides assistance based on his or her area of expertise. In addition, WWCH provides medications, supplies and equipment related to the terminal illness. A registered nurse is on call 24 hours per day, seven days a week.

How does hospice address pain management?

WWCH addresses physical, emotional and spiritual pain. Hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and techniques for pain and symptom relief. The success rate of hospice in managing pain is very high, and most patients can be kept comfortable.

Will medications prevent the patient from being able to talk or know what is happening?

Usually not. It is the goal of hospice to allow the patient to be pain free but alert. By continually consulting with the patient, hospices have been very successful in reaching this goal.

What is the role of the patient�s physician in hospice care?

Where is hospice care provided?

Hospice is a philosophy of care, not a place. Most hospice patients receive care at home or at the home of a relative or friend. Hospice care can also be provided in long term care facilities and nursing homes. Some hospices have residential units designed to provide a homelike setting for patient care. Walla Walla Community Hospice does not have an in patient facility.

How is hospice different from other types of home health?

Comfort vs. Cure: For most home health care providers, the goal is to make the patient well. With hospice care, the staff and family recognize that the patient will not get well. They focus on comfort and support rather than cure.

Interdisciplinary Team Approach: In hospice, all members of the care team � physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplain, nursing assistants and volunteers � work together to coordinate care.

Family Focus: Hospice care focuses on the entire family. The hospice team teaches the family how to be involved in their loved one�s care.

Grief Support: Hospice care does not end when a patient dies. Hospice support staff and volunteers maintain contact with the family for at least one year after the death of a patient.

Is there any special equipment or changes I have to make in the home before hospice care begins?

The hospice RN and social worker will assess your needs, recommend any equipment, and help make arrangements to obtain any necessary equipment. Often the need for equipment is minimal at first and increases as the disease gets worse. In general, hospice will assist in any way it can to make home care as convenient, clean and safe as possible.

How many family members or friends does it take to care for a patient at home?

There is no set number. One of the first things the hospice team will do is to prepare an individualized care plan that will address the amount of caregiving needed. Hospice staff visits regularly and are always accessible to answer medical questions and provide support.

Is hospice care only for cancer patients?

No. Hospice care is for all terminally ill patients in the end-stage of any disease, including, but not limited to lung disease (emphysema, fibrosis, COPD, etc.), heart disease, neurological disease (ALS, Alzheimer�s) and AIDS.

There is also no age restriction. While most patients in Hospice are over 60 years of age, younger adults and children are also served.

Who can refer a patient to Walla Walla Community Hospice?

Although anyone can refer a patient to a hospice program, many referrals originate with the attending physician. To be admitted, a patient must agree to treatment aimed at comfort rather than cure and have an incurable disease resulting in a limited life expectancy as certified by a physician.

When should a decision about entering a hospice program be made, and who should make it?

At any time during a life limiting illness, it is appropriate to discuss all of a patient’s care options, including hospice. By law the decision belongs to the patient. Understandably, most people are uncomfortable with the idea of stopping an all out effort to beat the disease. Hospice staff members are highly sensitive to these concerns and are always available to discuss them with the patient and family.

When is it the right time to contact hospice?

It is important that services begin as soon as a patient qualifies for care. Hospice becomes an appropriate choice when curative treatments are no longer effective. Hospice can provide relief from physical and emotional pain so that the patient can live their remaining days in comfort and dignity.

What if my doctor does not mention hospice?

The patient and family should feel free to discuss hospice care at any time with their physician, other health care professionals, clergy or friends.





10 Questions to Ask When Hiring a Mobile App Developer #mobile,android,mobile #apps,technology,apps,app


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10 Questions to Ask When Hiring a Mobile App Developer

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If your company doesn t have a mobile app yet, you could be missing out on a golden opportunity to tap into new revenue streams. Smartphones and tablets are where today s consumers live. The majority of the 120 million smartphone owners in the U.S. use a shopping or retail app at least once a month, according to a recent Nielsen report. Yours could be one of them.

If you d like a mobile app that lets customers buy your products — or simply access products reviews, videos or coupons — you ll need to hire an experienced developer you trust to custom build it.

Here are 10 key questions to ask mobile app developers to help you choose the right one for the job:

1.Where can I find examples of mobile apps you ve developed?
Qualified candidates should be eager to provide you with a list of apps they are personally responsible for creating — or at least played a major role in developing — complete with links to each in Apple s iOS App Store, BlackBerry App World or Google Play, Google s Android app store.

That way you can begin to gauge whether or not they have the skills, experience and vision to produce the type of mobile app you re looking for, says Chad Mureta. CEO of App Empire, a San Francisco-based app development firm, and author of App Empire: Make Money, Have a Life, and Let Technology Work for You (Wiley, 2012).

2. May I have a list of your current and past clients?
Unlike reading movie credits, there s typically no way to tell who actually developed an app. This is why speaking directly with candidates current and former clients can be essential to verifying that the developers actually created the apps they claim to have worked on, Mureta says.

Checking references also gives you an opportunity to ask how reliable, responsive and results-oriented candidates are. For example, you might ask whether they delivered on deadline and within budget, and how well they work under pressure.

Candidates sometimes only offer references who have a favorable opinion of them, says Farhan Thawar, vice president of engineering at Xtreme Labs. an Ontario, Canada-based mobile strategy and product development firm. He suggests visiting a candidate s LinkedIn profile to see if you have any professional colleagues or former co-workers in common. If you do, contact your mutual connections and ask them about their impression of the candidate s experience, capabilities and work ethic.

3. What kind of smartphone do you use?
This question can provide insight into how passionate and knowledgeable a candidate is about specific mobile platforms, Thawar says. If you re telling me that you can build an app for an iPhone, then you should have an iPhone, you should be playing with the apps that you are building and also playing with other people s apps on a very regular basis. The same goes for Android and BlackBerry.

4. How can my app make money?
If your primary goal is to generate revenue with your app, the developer needs to know exactly how to build in features that will allow you to make money. You could opt for a pay-per-download revenue model, charging, say, between 99 cents and $4.99, depending on how many features your app offers.

If you opt for a free app, be sure the candidate is well versed in how to integrate mobile display ads, in-app purchases or paid subscription services.

5. How will we communicate during the development process?
The quality of your app often depends on how clearly and often you communicate your app design and functionality requirements throughout the development process.

Does your app developer prefer to chat in person or via phone, Skype, instant message or email — and how often? Or does he or she prefer to interact with you using a popular project and task management system like 37signals Basecamp. How often will he or she provide you with status updates?

6. What kind of special features can you create?
Apps rarely grab consumers attention without truly innovative and useful features. Figure out the bells and whistles you d like and then assess your developer s capabilities. For example, can your candidate add 3-D gaming, social media sharing, GPS check-ins or product coupon elements to your app?

7. Who will own the mobile app?
Typically the individual or company paying for a mobile app will own the finished product, Mureta says. To be sure you own all the rights to the app you commissioned, you and the app developer should sign a written copyright assignment or work made for hire contract. The document should establish confidentiality and state that you own the app s design, source code and all of its content.

8. How will you test my app?
Generally, the best way to test an app is simply to run it on the smartphone it will be used on. The candidate should provide a thorough explanation of how he or she conducts an extensive beta test to weed out any glitches. If bugs are found, how will the candidate fix them — and how quickly?

9. Will you submit my mobile app to app stores?
After you ve approved the beta-tested version of your app, the last step is for the developer to submit it to an app store for approval to be sold there. App submission is often a long, multi-step process that your developer should already know how to successfully navigate.

10. What are your fees and payment terms?
Draft a written agreement specifying that you will pay the developer by the hour or with a flat fee. Most developers, like Mureta, ask for a one-time fee upfront. Others require a deposit at the beginning of a project, often for up to half of the estimated total cost, with the balance due when the app is completed.

The most basic mobile apps can start between $1,000 and $5,000, but you could end up spending many times more if you pay a developer by the hour. More complicated mobile apps, including ones that are database driven or involve 3-D gaming, can cost thousands more.

Kim Lachance Shandrow


Hospice frequently asked questions and answers #hostel #booking

#what does hospice mean

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F REQUENTLY A sKED Q uESTIONS

Hospice is a service provided for people at the end of life. It is designed for comfort rather than a cure; it provides comprehensive and compassionate care for patients and their families. Hospice is offered in more than 3,000 programs across the country.

Any patient who is diagnosed with a terminal illness is eligible for the hospice palliative care. All U.S. citizens age 65 and older are entitled to Medicare coverage for hospice at the end of life.

Hospice care is provided in the patient’s home, wherever the home may be (their home, the home of a relative or a friend, a nursing home, or in the hospital) some hospices have residential units where hospice is provided, designed for a homelike setting.

Hospice is the only licensed health agency that focuses on the end-of-life care. Unlike most home health care providers, hospice recognizes that the patient will not get well and provides comfort and support, rather than a cure. Hospice care is provided by a team of interdisciplinary care givers. These professionals and specially trained volunteers attend to a wide range of physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Hospice care focuses on the entire family, and educates loved ones about caring for the patient. Hospice care does not end when the patient dies. Bereavement services are provided for family members for up to 13 months after the patient’s death.

Most physicians know about hospice. If your physician wants more information about hospice, it is available from the National Council of Hospice Professionals Physician Section. medical societies, state hospice organizations, or the National Hospice Helpline (1-800-658-8898). In addition, physicians and all others can also obtain information on hospice from the American Cancer Society. the American Association of Retired Persons. and the Social Security Administration. Your physician may also contact us .

Hospice is covered by most major insurers including, Medicare, Medicaid, Medi-Cal, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, HMO, and other private insurers. This includes medical equipment and illness-related medications. When insurance does not cover hospice care, Hospice Touch offers many services regardless of the ability to pay.

The patient and family should feel free to discuss hospice care at any time with their physician, other health care professionals, clergy, or friends.

Choosing hospice does not mean that you are giving up hope. It means that you have opted for treatments that will help manage various medical symptoms. Hospice allows you to feel comfortable and provides support in order for you to have control over your life.

One of the first things the hospice program will do is contact the patient’s physician to make sure he or she agrees that hospice care is appropriate for the patient at this time. (Most hospices have medical staff available to help patients who have no physician.) The patient will be asked to sign consent and insurance forms. These are similar to the forms patients sign when they enter a hospital.

The “hospice election form” says that the patient understands that the care is palliative (that is, aimed at pain relief and symptom control) rather than curative. It also outlines the services available. The form Medicare patients sign also tells how electing the Medicare hospice benefit affects other Medicare coverage.

Certainly! If the patient’s condition improves and the disease seems to be in remission, patients can be discharged from hospice and return to aggressive therapy or go on about their daily life. If the discharged patient should later need to return to hospice care, Medicare and most private insurance will allow additional coverage for this purpose.

Hospice is a choice, so a patient may choose to leave at any time.

The patient may receive hospice care indefinitely if the patient’s condition remains appropriate for care.

The hospice team is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week. A nurse is always one call away any day, at any hour, including holidays.

Caring for a dying loved one at home can be quite difficult but hospice provide services around the clock to manage the experience.

Your hospice provider will assess your needs, recommend any equipment, and help make arrangements to obtain any necessary equipment. Often the need for equipment is minimal at first and increases as the disease progresses. In general, hospice will assist in any way it can to make home care as convenient, clean, and safe as possible.

Hospice neither hastens nor postpones dying. Just as doctors and midwives lend support and expertise during the time of child birth, hospice provides its presence and specialized knowledge during the dying process.

Hospice believes that emotional and spiritual pain are just as real and in need of attention as physical pain, so it can address each. Hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and devices for pain and symptom relief. In addition, physical and occupational therapists can assist patients to be as mobile and self sufficient as they wish, and they are often joined by specialists schooled in music therapy, art therapy, massage, and diet counseling. Finally, various counselors, including clergy, are available to assist family members as well as patients.

No. While some churches and religious groups have started hospices (sometimes in connection with their hospitals), these hospices serve a broad community and do not require patients to adhere to any particular set of beliefs.





Salesforce Sample Papers, Platform Developer Sample Questions, Salesforce Certifications Questions #salesforce #certifications,


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Ph: +91 98110 50802

Note:
We only assist in Salesforce.com preperation. We are not authorized partners of Salesforce.com

Our advise to all Salesforce Certification aspirants is not to mug up for the exam. Instead do Salesforce exercises yourself and spend time on every step. Salesforce.com has the descrition to give you any set of 60 questions from it’s question bank. You cannot learn all questions and answers by heart.

There are several books available in the market these days, which give good pointers for preparation for the exam.

For the Salesforce Administrator Certification Exam, read the “Salesforce for Dummies” book. It is available for 10$ at Amazon.
For the Salesforce Developer Certification Exam (DEV 401), go through the Force.com Fundamentals book available on Salesforce.com Website. You can google for this and getyour free copy.

Practise a lot on practical examples before you go for the theorey topics.

My most important piece of advise to all of you is: if you know the right answer to a question, and why it is the right choice, you will pass.
Wish you luck.

Ph: +91 98110 50802

Note:
We only assist in Salesforce.com preperation. We are not authorized partners of Salesforce.com

Our advise to all Salesforce Certification aspirants is not to mug up for the exam. Instead do Salesforce exercises yourself and spend time on every step. Salesforce.com has the descrition to give you any set of 60 questions from it’s question bank. You cannot learn all questions and answers by heart.

There are several books available in the market these days, which give good pointers for preparation for the exam.

For the Salesforce Administrator Certification Exam, read the “Salesforce for Dummies” book. It is available for 10$ at Amazon.
For the Salesforce Developer Certification Exam (DEV 401), go through the Force.com Fundamentals book available on Salesforce.com Website. You can google for this and getyour free copy.

Practise a lot on practical examples before you go for the theorey topics.

My most important piece of advise to all of you is: if you know the right answer to a question, and why it is the right choice, you will pass.
Wish you luck.


Disability Benefits Frequently Asked Questions #workers #compensation #frequently #asked #questions


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Disability Benefits
(Off-the-Job Injury or Illness)

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q. What is a day of disability?
  • A. A day of disability is one on which the employee was prevented from performing work because of disability and for which he/she has not received regular wages or remuneration.
  • Q. If an employee engages in work for remuneration or profit, even if done at home, while disabled, is he/she eligible for disability benefits?
  • A. No. As long as he/she is performing any kind of work for remuneration or profit, he/she is ineligible to receive benefits.
  • Q. Are the costs of medical care included?
  • A. No. Costs of medical care are not included under the statutory provisions of the Disability Benefits Law. However, where an employer or a union or association plan has been accepted as complying with the law, the worker is entitled to the benefits as described by the plan. Contact your employer to find out if it provides or participates in such a plan.
  • Q. May an employer/insurance carrier have an employee claiming benefits examined by a health care provider designated by the employer/carrier?
  • A. Yes. The employee must submit him/herself at intervals, but not more than once a week, to such examinations if requested. Exams are not paid for by the employee and are held at a reasonable time and place. Refusal to submit to an exam may jeopardize a claimant’s benefits.
  • Q. After a claim is filed, how soon will it be paid?
  • A. If a claim is properly completed with the required statements, the first payment should arrive within four business days after the 14th day of disability or four business days after the receipt of the claim, whichever is later. Benefits are payable every two weeks during the period of disability.
  • Q. Can a claimant collect Unemployment Insurance and Disability Benefits for the same period of time?
  • A. No.
  • Q. If an employee quits his or her job, may that employee receive Disability Benefits?
  • A. Termination of employment may affect an employee’s right to Disability Benefits.
  • Q. Can a claimant collect Disability Benefits for disability caused by pregnancy?
  • A. Yes. If she is disabled because of pregnancy, she may be entitled to up to 26 weeks of benefits. Disability can occur at any time during pregnancy.
  • Q. What determines disability due to pregnancy?
  • A. Disability can only be determined and certified by a physician or certified nurse midwife through the submission of medical reports. If a claimant becomes disabled more than four to six weeks prior to the anticipated birth date, or is disabled more than four to six weeks after the actual birth date, more detailed information regarding the disability may be required. The medical reports should describe specific symptoms, rather than just general prognosis. Note. An elective sterilization procedure will not extend the payable period of disability, since benefits are not payable for any period an individual is unable to work due to elective surgery.
  • Q. Can an employee collect disability benefits if on maternity leave?
  • A. Yes. If she is on a leave of absence without pay (i.e. maternity leave), and becomes disabled within four weeks of the last day she actually worked, she is entitled to benefits from the employer/carrier (if otherwise eligible). If the disability begins more than four weeks from the last day actually worked and she is claiming/receiving Unemployment Benefits, she is entitled to disability benefits from the Special Fund for Disability Benefits (if otherwise eligible).
  • Q. Is there a limit on the number of weeks a claimant can receive benefits?
  • A. Yes. There is a limit of 26 weeks of benefits during a period of 52 consecutive calendar weeks or during any one period of disability. The amount of benefits a claimant receives is dependent upon the length of time he/she is actually disabled as certified by a physician. (If an employer has a separate Disability Benefits Plan, more than 26 weeks of benefits may be paid, if so specified).
  • Q. What if a claimant is still disabled, but benefits have stopped?
  • A. If he/she received less than 26 weeks of benefits, is still disabled, and has not received a Notice of Rejection, he/she must submit further medical evidence to his/her employer, insurance carrier or the Special Fund for Disability Benefits. If he/she has received a Notice of Rejection, the claimant may request a review of the rejection by completing its reverse side and mailing it to the Disability Benefits Bureau at the Workers’ Compensation Board.
  • Q. Is a claimant entitled to Disability Benefits for an injury incurred in an auto accident?
  • A. Yes. However, the amount of the disability benefits may reduce any no-fault insurance benefits the claimant is eligible to receive.
  • Q. If a claim is rejected or not paid, may it be reviewed?
  • A. Yes. If a claim is rejected or not paid, the employee should complete the reverse side of the Notice of Rejection (sent by the employer/carrier/the Special Fund, within 45 days of its receipt of the claim) and mail it within 26 weeks to the Disability Benefits Bureau. The address is located on the back of the rejection notice, and in the back of this brochure. Where necessary, the Board will obtain further information and may hold a hearing on the claim. Benefits will be paid if a claim is determined proper and valid.
  • Q. If a claimant is entitled to or receiving Social Security Retirement Benefits, may he/she still receive Disability Benefits?
  • A. Yes. If he/she is entitled to Disability Benefits, the fact that he/she is eligible for or receiving old-age insurance benefits under the Social Security Act does not affect his/her right to Disability Benefits.

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Medical Assistant Frequently Asked Questions #medical #assistant #faqs, #medical #assistant #program, #frequently


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FAQs About Medical Assistants

Here are several of the most frequently asked questions about Medical Assistant career training at Everest:

Q. How do I prepare for the Certified Medical Assistant test?

A. A variety of national and regional certified medical assistant (CMA)/ Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) test organizations exist, and many require the school to be accredited. At Everest, all of our schools are institutionally accredited while many of our Medical Assistant programs are programmatically accredited by either CAAHEP or ABHES approved. If a graduate wishes to become a CMA or a Registered Medical Assistant (RMA), such as through the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) with CAAHEP or ABHES or American Medical Technologists (AMT), the program must be CAAHEP or ABHES approved accredited in order for the graduate to take the test. Check with your local campus Admission Representative for more information as to which test your school’s program accreditation allows.

Q. How long does the medical assistant program take to complete?

A. The medical assistant program can be completed in under a year. Programs may vary by campus.

Q. What type of career can I expect?

A. Outpatient care centers and doctors’ offices are just a few of the venues where you can pursue entry-level employment. Your own hard work, attitude and experience will also play an important role in future employment opportunities.

Q. How comprehensive is the school’s support system?

A. Very. Everest is there every step of the way in helping students make the adjustment in pursuing a higher education.

Q. Will the school I choose help me find employment?

A. Everest is dedicated to helping you find employment in your field of choice. While employment is never guaranteed, Everest is committed in helping you make the best presentation possible with respect to your interviewing skills and cover letter and resume effectiveness.

Q. Is the school I wish to attend respected by the Industry?

A. Everest is accredited. This means programs and teaching facilities have been approved by the industry professionals who set the rules.

Q. What can I do with a diploma in medical assisting?

A. An Everest medical assistant diploma means you’ve met the training standards that qualify you to pursue entry-level employment in your field.

Q. What is a medical assistant and what exactly does one do?

A. Medical assistants help health care professionals by attending patients and providing front or back end office support. Contact a school representative to find out about additional career possibilities.

Q. How much do medical assistants make?

A. Medical assistant salaries or wages may vary depending on location, experience and work ethic. An Everest representative can be of help in providing more information.

We know you may have a lot more questions, please contact us by calling or filling out our contact form. We will occasionally update this page with more questions and answers as we get more of your questions!

2017 Zenith Education Group, Inc.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at http://www.everest.edu/disclosures .


RESEARCH FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS – WORKERS COMPENSATION LAW IN OHIO #research #frequently


RESEARCH FAQs:
WORKERS’ COMPENSATION
LAW IN OHIO

The Law Library Staff prepares “Research Frequently Asked Questions” (FAQs) for the convenience of our users to provide access to a variety of sources addressing particular points of law. These are general legal information sources, and are not to be construed as a substitute for personal legal advice from an attorney. Please seek legal counsel to help you determine the applicability of any of the information in these resources to your specific situation. The Law Library makes no recommendation as to whether you should purchase any services offered by the websites contained in this FAQ.

  • Ohio Government Agencies

    • For information on Workers’ Compensation, including how to apply for Workers’ compensation benefits, information for businesses and medical providers, link to: Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation
  • Law Firm Websites with Workers’ Compensation Information:

    • Gruhin Gruhin Attorneys: BWC claim deadlines chart ; descriptions of the various types of compensation, for example temporary total disability, permanent partial disability, permanent total disability; discusses payments for medical bills and wage loss.
  • Jaffy Law Firm. Has a Workers’ compensation guide, recent Workers’ compensation cases and more.

    The Cleveland Law Library makes no recommendation as to whether you should hire these firms for legal representation.

  • NOLO Q A. Can I be laid off while on Workers’ compensation leave?

  • WorkersCompensation.Com. Information for employees, employers, insurers, adjusters, medical providers and attorneys. Forms, news and legislative updates.
  • Books, Journals Recent Articles:

  • Workers’ Compensation Journal of Ohio

  • Avila, Janine T. The dual-capacity doctrine: one way to slay the workers’ compensation immunity dragon. 12 Ohio Trial 29 (Issue 2, 2002)

  • Avila, Janine T. Kissing cousins: the relationship of the dual-capacity doctrine to workers’ compensation. 21 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 61 (Nov./Dec. 2006)

  • Bartman, Douglas, Workplace violence: does it fit within the intentional tort exception to workers’ compensation exclusivity. 76 Clev. Bar J. 28 (Apr. 2005)

  • Crosby, Elizabeth, The not-so-predictable costs of workers’ compensation. 77 Clev. Bar J. 32 (Nov. 2005)

  • Elliott, Linda U. et al. Is retrospective rating returning to fashion?. 21 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 49 (Sept./Oct. 2006)

  • Fabian, John Matthew Antoinette F. Gideon, The law and psychology in workers’ compensation claims. 83 Law Fact 22 (July 2007)

  • Fulton, Philip J. Substantial aggravation: the more things change. . 17 Ohio Trial 7 (Spr. 2007)

  • Goodman, Jonathan, Workers’ compensation and gradual onset injuries. 15 Ohio Trial 15 (Summer 2005)

  • Gray, David E. “Proximate cause” in the workers’ compensation universe. 21 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 28 (May/June 2006)

  • Harrelson, Laura G. Subrogation rights under Ohio workers’ compensation law. 24 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 32 (Jul./Aug. 2009)

  • Mackin, Kerry M. Employer’s perspective: the substantial aggravation standard: an update. 25 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 21 (May/June 2010)

  • Merlino, Michael R. Medicare’s role in workers’ compensation cases. 21 Ohio Lawyer 10 (May/June 2007)

  • Roach, Megan K. Joan M. Verchot, Employer’s perspective: the real workers’ compensation reform. 22 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 22 (July/Aug. 2007)

  • Reid, Lisa, et al. Ward. v. Kroger Co. defining the court’s 4123.512 jurisdiction. 77 Clev. Bar. J. 20 (Nov. 2005)

  • Ross, William L. S. Injuries can send workers’ comp rates soaring: a different perspective. 22 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 13 (Mar./Apr. 2007)

  • Starkoff, Jack R. The Coolidge conundrum: can an employee be terminated while on workers’ comp leave?. 78 Clev. Bar J. 14 (May 2007)

  • Stewart, Laura M. Joan M. Verchot, Faulty interpretation: The Ohio Supreme Court’s recent decision in Gross v. Industrial Commission raises questions about the no-fault system in Ohio workers’ compensation law. 22 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 5 (Jan./Feb. 2007)

  • Termination for misconduct may terminate temporary total disability compensation. 1 Ohio Bus. L. J. 33 (Jan./Feb. 2007)

  • Verchot, Joan M. Employer’s perspective: gross injustice? The Ohio Supreme Court “voluntarily abandons” its decision in Gross I–but does Gross II solve the problem or just create new ones?. 22 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 41 (Sept./Oct. 2007)

  • Verchot, Joan M. Laura M. Stewart, Industrial Commission raises questions about the no-fault system in Ohio workers’ compensation law. 22 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 5 (Jan./Feb. 2007)

  • Volpini, Laura L. Do you know the consequences of terminating an employee on temporary total disability?. 1 Tort L. J. of Ohio 105 (Jan./Feb. 2007)

  • Wilkinson, George B. Bureau finalizes 2009 rating changes. 24 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 9 (Mar./Apr. 2009)

  • Wilkinson, George B. Current issues facing the BWC. 23 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 12 (Mar./Apr. 2008)

  • Wilkinson, George B. Group rating-“Take Two,” 23 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 17 (May/June 2008)

  • Wilkinson, George B. Ohio workers’ compensation costs compare favorably to other states. 26 Workers’ Comp. J. of Ohio 1 (Jan./Feb. 2011)
  • Created on: May 21, 1999 –


    Questions to ask when interviewing hospice programs #cheap #hotels #deals

    #hospice questions

    #

    Interviewing a Hospice Agency- What Questions Should I Ask?

    Hospice programs are independent from one another and the level of services provided are not the same. For that reason, it’s essential that you interview hospice agencies prior to signing on for care and allowing them into your home.

    1. Is the hospice licensed?

    2. Is the hospice Medicare certified?

    3. Is the hospice non-profit or for profit?

    4. Has the hospice been caught committing insurance fraud? (we suggest Googling Medicare hospice fraud or the name of the hospice and Medicare fraud)

    5. How many counties does the hospice serve?

    6. Can I meet with or speak via phone with the hospice administrator prior to a hospice admission?

    7. Can I meet the staff who will be providing care prior to admission?

    8. In detail, what types of services are provided?

    9. How often will each of these services be provided to me or my loved one?

    10. Will services be provided by the same individuals throughout the course of my care?

    11. What kind of support is available to my family/caregivers?

    12. How are services provided after hours? How long may it take for an on-call nurse to respond to my call? How long may it take for an on-call nurse to get to my home?

    13. What do hospice volunteers do? Am I eligible for volunteer services?

    14. Can the hospice provide care in a nursing home or personal care home/assisted living?

    15. Must someone be with me at all times?

    16. Must I commit to a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) status?

    17. Can I receive IV fluids and tube feedings?

    18. Will I receive a bill for expenses not covered by insurance?

    19. What should I do first if I am having a problem with the care my hospice is providing?

    20. What should I do if I feel the hospice hasn’t addressed my concerns adequately?





    Solar Power Questions – Learn from IPS Integrated Power Systems #solar #power


    #

    Solar Power Questions


    Welcome to our newsletter blog: Solar Power Questions Learn from IPS.

    Our goal is to help you understand the basics of solar power systems, so you may make informed and educated choices.

    With 24 years of experience designing and installing solar power systems , we get a lot of the same questions over and over again, but one of the most common and important questions people ask us is about net metering.

    “If you have a solar powered system, how does the billing work? Or in other words how do BC Hydro and FortisBC calculate net metering?

    Both BC Hydro and Fortis BC calculate net metering based on 2 time frames: Billing periods annual reconciliation.

    1. Billing Periods
    During a billing period, if your system produces more energy than you use, then a kW credit will carry through to the next billing period.

    Example: Your solar power system produces 2600kW and you consume only 1600kW in a billing period. You will not be charged for any power usage.

    A credit of 1000kW will carry forward to the next billing period.

    During the next billing period, if the weather turns ugly and you produce only 500kW, but use 2500kW, the previous credit of 1000kW would be subtracted and you would only be billed for 1000kW of power consumption.

    2. Annual Reconciliation

    Once a year, on the anniversary date of your Grid-Tie system start-up, the utility company will add up how many kW’s your system produced and subtract your energy usage.

    If you have a credit and depending on the utility company, you may be issued a check.

    Now of course this leads to the next question that most people ask us:

    Question: What are the differences between how BC Hydro and Fortis, and do they pay back customers equally for power credits?

    We will tackle that very question and take an in-depth look into the differences between BC Hydro and Fortis in the next edition of. Solar Power Questions Learn from IPS.
    We look forward to your questions and comments and please feel free to share this post if you think it might be helpful to someone you know.


    Questions For Your Hospice Evaluation #home #health #service

    #hospice evaluation

    #

    Questions For Your Hospice Evaluation

    February 24, 2014 | By Casa de la Luz

    A hospice evaluation might seem overwhelming to you, but preparing a list of questions in advance can help the appointment go smoothly. Casa de la Luz Hospice provides free hospice evaluations with a registered nurse, and can be requested by a healthcare professional, a friend or family member, or the patient. An individual might be appropriate for hospice care if he or she has a terminal diagnosis, is not pursuing curative treatments, and has a life expectancy of six months or less.

    If you are eligible for care, and choose to sign up for hospice services, you are trusting the hospice provider and their staff to care for you in your own home. When meeting with the nurse, keep these questions in mind so you can make sure the hospice is the right fit for you.

    • When was the hospice established? How long have they been providing care?
    • How soon did the hospice respond to your request for an evaluation?
    • How many physicians are on staff, and how involved are they in care planning?
    • Can the chaplains connect us to our preferred faith community?
    • If the level of care my loved one needs exceeds what can be provided in the home, where will the hospice provide inpatient care? Do they provide inpatient care in their own facility, or are they contracted with another facility?

    If you or someone you love would like more information about hospice care in Tucson, contact Casa de la Luz Hospice at (520) 544-9890.

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    (520) 544-9890 | Fax (520) 544-9894 | 7740 N. Oracle Road | Tucson, Arizona 85704
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    Hospice Frequently Asked Questions #cransley #hospice

    #hospice care for cancer patients

    #

    Any person facing the advancing stages of any terminal illness is eligible for care. Hospice care is appropriate when the following conditions are met:

    The physician thinks that the patient will live 6 months or less if the disease runs its normal course; aggressive treatments are not working or providing relief to the patient; and the patient, family and physician agree and understand that the focus of care is on comfort (pain control and symptom management), not cure.

    What patient care services does WWCH offer?

    Hospice care can include a wide variety of services to relieve the patient and family of many of the burdens associated with a terminal illness. Hospice patients are cared for by a team of doctors, nurses, social workers, certified nursing assistants, clergy and volunteers. Each provides assistance based on his or her area of expertise. In addition, WWCH provides medications, supplies and equipment related to the terminal illness. A registered nurse is on call 24 hours per day, seven days a week.

    How does hospice address pain management?

    WWCH addresses physical, emotional and spiritual pain. Hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and techniques for pain and symptom relief. The success rate of hospice in managing pain is very high, and most patients can be kept comfortable.

    Will medications prevent the patient from being able to talk or know what is happening?

    Usually not. It is the goal of hospice to allow the patient to be pain free but alert. By continually consulting with the patient, hospices have been very successful in reaching this goal.

    What is the role of the patient�s physician in hospice care?

    Where is hospice care provided?

    Hospice is a philosophy of care, not a place. Most hospice patients receive care at home or at the home of a relative or friend. Hospice care can also be provided in long term care facilities and nursing homes. Some hospices have residential units designed to provide a homelike setting for patient care. Walla Walla Community Hospice does not have an in patient facility.

    How is hospice different from other types of home health?

    Comfort vs. Cure: For most home health care providers, the goal is to make the patient well. With hospice care, the staff and family recognize that the patient will not get well. They focus on comfort and support rather than cure.

    Interdisciplinary Team Approach: In hospice, all members of the care team � physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplain, nursing assistants and volunteers � work together to coordinate care.

    Family Focus: Hospice care focuses on the entire family. The hospice team teaches the family how to be involved in their loved one�s care.

    Grief Support: Hospice care does not end when a patient dies. Hospice support staff and volunteers maintain contact with the family for at least one year after the death of a patient.

    Is there any special equipment or changes I have to make in the home before hospice care begins?

    The hospice RN and social worker will assess your needs, recommend any equipment, and help make arrangements to obtain any necessary equipment. Often the need for equipment is minimal at first and increases as the disease gets worse. In general, hospice will assist in any way it can to make home care as convenient, clean and safe as possible.

    How many family members or friends does it take to care for a patient at home?

    There is no set number. One of the first things the hospice team will do is to prepare an individualized care plan that will address the amount of caregiving needed. Hospice staff visits regularly and are always accessible to answer medical questions and provide support.

    Is hospice care only for cancer patients?

    No. Hospice care is for all terminally ill patients in the end-stage of any disease, including, but not limited to lung disease (emphysema, fibrosis, COPD, etc.), heart disease, neurological disease (ALS, Alzheimer�s) and AIDS.

    There is also no age restriction. While most patients in Hospice are over 60 years of age, younger adults and children are also served.

    Who can refer a patient to Walla Walla Community Hospice?

    Although anyone can refer a patient to a hospice program, many referrals originate with the attending physician. To be admitted, a patient must agree to treatment aimed at comfort rather than cure and have an incurable disease resulting in a limited life expectancy as certified by a physician.

    When should a decision about entering a hospice program be made, and who should make it?

    At any time during a life limiting illness, it is appropriate to discuss all of a patient’s care options, including hospice. By law the decision belongs to the patient. Understandably, most people are uncomfortable with the idea of stopping an all out effort to beat the disease. Hospice staff members are highly sensitive to these concerns and are always available to discuss them with the patient and family.

    When is it the right time to contact hospice?

    It is important that services begin as soon as a patient qualifies for care. Hospice becomes an appropriate choice when curative treatments are no longer effective. Hospice can provide relief from physical and emotional pain so that the patient can live their remaining days in comfort and dignity.

    What if my doctor does not mention hospice?

    The patient and family should feel free to discuss hospice care at any time with their physician, other health care professionals, clergy or friends.





    Frequently Asked Hospice Questions – All Care VNA #hospice #charity

    #hospice qualifications

    #

    FREQUENTLY ASKED HOSPICE QUESTIONS

    How does someone qualify for Hospice?

    Patients must meet two qualifications for Hospice:

    1. Two physicians, the attending physician and the hospice medical director, must certify the patient is terminally ill, with a six-month or less life expectancy if the disease takes its normal course.
    2. The patient and/or family must be aware of the prognosis and elect palliative or comfort care, rather than active curative measures.

    Where is hospice care provided?

    Hospice services are available wherever the patient resides: the patient s own home, family members home, assisted living facility, skilled nursing and long term care facilities, or hospital.

    Who is on the Hospice Team?

    • Your physician
    • Hospice-trained nurses
    • Hospice Medical Director
    • Social workers
    • Chaplains
    • Grief counselors
    • Home health aides
    • Volunteers

    Patients keep their own physician who works closely with the All Care Hospice Medical Director to plan and carry out care.

    Do patients only receive hospice care for a limited amount of time?

    The Medicare benefit, and most private insurance companies, pays for hospice care as long as the patient continues to meet the criteria necessary. Patients may come on and off hospice care, and re-enroll in hospice care, as needed.

    Does hospice mean that the patient will die soon?

    Receiving hospice care does not mean giving up hope or that death is imminent. The earlier an individual receives hospice care, the more opportunity there is to stabilize a patient s medical condition and address other needs. Some patients can improve and may be discharged from hospice care.

    Is hospice just for the patient?

    Hospice focuses on comfort, dignity, and emotional support. The quality of life for the patient, but also family members and others, who are caregivers, is top priority.

    What bereavement services are available through All Care Hospice?

    All Care s bereavement counselor meets with family members and friends to provide support for up to thirteen months after experiencing a loss.





    Can I get my bachelors degree online? #yahoo, #answers, #questions, #education #&


    #

    Can I get my bachelors degree online?

    You should definitely consider attending an online college. Although some might say an online degree will be easier to earn, or will not be respected by employers, that is simply not the case.

    Your degree will be identical to the degree conferred upon traditional brick-and-mortar students. When you hang your Penn State or Syracuse degree on the wall or list it on your resume, you will get the same amount of respect as someone who attended classes in person. And as an online student myself, I can assure you, the programs are every bit as rigorous!

    There are over 950 colleges with online programs, so there is definitely a program out there that should meet your needs. In fact, dozens of well-known, respected universities ranked in the Top 100 by U.S. News offer online programs (Penn State, Syracuse, Boston U, University of Illinois, and so on). Even Ivy League universities are catching on (see my blog below to find out which schools have programs).

    Unfortunately, when you type in online college in a search engine, most of the time, all you see are the for-profit schools because they pay big bucks out in advertising. Don t settle for a for-profit school, attend a state school or well-known university instead.

    About the classes.

    The best feature of an online degree is flexibility. I have attended traditional classes and online classes, and I prefer the online format.

    As an online student, I am able to work full-time and carry a full-time course load. You can also afford to be picky about your program of study. For example, I attend Columbia College and they offer 8 week terms. In a single year, I can earn 30 hours, just like a regular student attending campus. In fact, if you carry a high GPA, you can apply for an academic overload and earn up to 45 hours per year. Throw some CLEP or DSST exams into the mix and you ll have your degree in no time.

    In terms of academics, as I mentioned previously, classes are every bit as challenging as traditional classes. In fact, I would say I work harder as an online student than I ever did when I was attending night classes.

    If you shop around, online colleges can be more economical than traditional schools. I earned my first two years at a community college in Texas offering online classes (Central Texas College). My classes were just $50 per credit hour (apx. $150 per course). Then, I transferred to Columbia College where I pay $205 per credit hour (which is about the same as what I would pay at the university in my city).

    Since I m an online student, I keep a blog about online classes. some of my posts might be able to help you out. http://www.online-college-blog.com


    Frequently Asked Questions About Hospice and Palliative Care #hospice #careers

    #hospice and palliative care

    #

    Frequently Asked Questions About Hospice and Palliative Care

    Q. What is palliative medicine?

    A. Palliative medicine is a medical subspecialty provided by doctors who offer palliative care for people who are seriously ill. Palliative care relieves suffering and improves quality of life for people of any age and at any stage in a serious illness, whether that illness is curable, chronic, or life-threatening.

    Q. What’s the difference between palliative care and hospice care?

    A. Palliative care is whole-person care that relieves symptoms of a disease or disorder, whether or not it can be cured. Hospice is a specific type of palliative care for people who likely have 6 months or less to live. In other words, hospice care is always palliative, but not all palliative care is hospice care.

    Q. Who provides palliative care?

    A. Palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team that may include a doctor who specializes in palliative medicine. a nurse, pharmacist, social worker, dietitian, and volunteers.

    Q. What does a palliative doctor do that’s different from what my other doctors do?

    A. Your other doctors focus on your general health or treating your disease or condition. Palliative doctors concentrate on preventing and alleviating suffering, improving your quality of life, and helping you and your loved ones cope with the stress and burden of your illness.

    Q. Shouldn’t all my doctors be concerned with alleviating my suffering and improving my quality of life?

    A. Yes, of course. But palliative doctors have special training and expertise in pain management and symptom control, and specialize in helping patients and their families cope with the many burdens of a serious illness, from the side effects of a medical treatment to caregiver stress to fears about the future. Palliative doctors can assist you with difficult medical decisions, helping you weigh the pros and cons of various treatments.

    Q. If I receive palliative or hospice care, will I still be able to see my personal doctor?

    A. Absolutely. Your palliative doctor coordinates care with your other doctors and helps you navigate the often-complex healthcare system.

    Q. Is it true that once you enter a hospice program, you must stay in hospice care until you die?

    A. No. Insurers and Medicaid agencies will provide coverage for hospice care if your doctors determine you likely have 6 months (in some cases a year) or less to live if your illness follows its normal course. However, it is your own choice to enter or leave hospice care. If your illness improves or you wish to seek curative treatment, you may leave hospice care, returning if and when you choose to.

    Q. Is hospice just for the last few days or weeks of life?

    A. You are eligible for hospice care if you likely have 6 months or less to live (some insurers or state Medicaid agencies cover hospice for a full year). Unfortunately, most people don’t receive hospice care until the final weeks or even days of life, possibly missing out on months of helpful care and quality time.

    Q. If I agree to palliative care, does that mean I’m “giving up?”

    A. Not at all. The goal of palliative care is to make you comfortable and help you achieve the best possible quality of life. You can have palliative care while you are undergoing treatments that may cure or reverse the effects of your illness. In fact, palliative care can help you cope with aggressive treatments by getting your pain and symptoms under control to help you fight the disease.

    Q. How can I find palliative care?

    A. Palliative care can be provided at a hospital, a nursing home, an assisted-living facility, or at home. There are a number of ways to find a doctor who specializes in palliative medicine, including asking your personal doctor to refer you to a palliative doctor or asking your local hospital if they have a palliative specialist.

    Q. Could I become addicted to the medication used for my pain and symptoms?

    A. Addiction to medication prescribed for pain relief is a common fear but does not frequently occur. Palliative doctors are experts in preventing problems and side effects of strong pain medications. They also can help patients with addictions get pain relief.

    Q. Could taking pain medicine hasten my death?

    A. Appropriately prescribed medicine will not hasten death. Your palliative doctor has the expertise to devise a medication plan that makes you comfortable and is safe.

    Q. How do I know that I’m receiving the most beneficial or appropriate treatment?

    A. Palliative doctors are concerned about you as a whole person—not just the part of you that is sick. They understand that people with serious illnesses can be frightened and unsure of themselves when making medical decisions. They also understand that there is not always one right or wrong answer and that your needs and wishes may change over time. Palliative doctors consider all of this when they help you develop your treatment plan .

    Q. Does insurance cover palliative care or hospice?

    A. Many private insurance companies and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) offer palliative care and hospice benefits. Medicare (mostly for people 65 and older) offers hospice benefits. and the extra Medicare plan (Part B) offers some palliative care benefits. Medicaid coverage of hospice and palliative care for people of limited incomes varies by state.

    Make a Plan

    It’s important to make a plan to live well. Let us help you get started.





    Questions About Hospice #hotel #click

    #hospice

    #

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. When should a decision about entering a hospice program be made and who should make it?

    At any time during a life-limiting illness, it�s appropriate to discuss all of a patient�s care options, including hospice. By law the decision belongs to the patient. Most hospices accept patients who have a life-expectancy of six months or less and who are referred by their personal physician.

    2. Should I wait for our physician to raise the possibility of hospice, or should I raise it first?

    The patient and family should feel free to discuss hospice care at any time with their physician, other health care professionals, clergy or friends.

    3. Is all hospice care the same?

    No. Many communities have more than one hospice. Medicare requires certified hospices provide a basic level of care but the quantity and quality of all services can vary significantly from one hospice to another. To find the best hospice for your needs, ask your doctor, healthcare professionals, clergy, social workers or friends who have received care for a family member. You may want to call or meet with the hospices and ask questions about their services.

    4. Can a hospice patient who shows signs of recovery be returned to regular medical treatment?

    Certainly. If the patient�s condition improves and the disease seems to be in remission, patients can be discharged from hospice and return to aggressive therapy or go on about their daily life. If the discharged patient should later need to return to hospice care, Medicare and most private insurance will allow additional coverage for this purpose.

    5. What does the hospice admission process involve?

    One of the first things the hospice program will do is contact the patient�s physician to make sure he or she agrees that hospice care is appropriate for this patient at this time. (Most hospices have medical staff available to help patients who have no physician.) The patient will be asked to sign consent and insurance forms. These are similar to the forms patients sign when they enter a hospital. The form Medicare patients sign also tells how electing the Medicare hospice benefit affects other Medicare coverage.

    6. Is there any special equipment or changes I have to make in my home before hospice care begins?

    Your hospice provider will assess your needs, recommend any equipment, and help make arrangements to obtain any necessary equipment. Often the need for equipment is minimal at first and increases as the disease progresses. In general, hospice will assist in any way it can to make home care as convenient, clean and safe as possible.

    7. How many family members or friends does it take to care for a patient at home?

    There�s no set number. One of the first things a hospice team will do is to prepare an individualized care plan that will, among other things, address the amount of caregiving needed by the patient. Hospice staff visit regularly and are always accessible to answer medical questions.

    8. Must someone be with the patient at all times?

    In the early weeks of care, it�s usually not necessary for someone to be with the patient all the time. Later, however, since one of the most common fears of patients is the fear of dying alone, hospice generally recommends someone be there continuously. While family and friends do deliver most of the care, hospices may have volunteers to assist with errands and to provide a break and time away for primary caregivers.

    9. What specific assistance does hospice provide home-based patients?

    Hospice patients are cared for by a team consisting of a physician, a nurse, social workers, counselors, home health aides, clergy, therapists, and volunteers. Each one provides assistance based on his or her own area of expertise. In addition, hospices provide medications, supplies, equipment, and other services related to the terminal illness.

    10. Does hospice provide care 24 hours a day, 7 days a week?

    Hospice staff is on call for emergencies 24 hours a day. Hospice care does not include a nurse in the home 24/7. If you require more care than can be provided in the home, some hospices have their own inpatient facilities. Most communities have nursing homes, inpatient residential centers and hospitals with hospice care options.

    11. Does hospice do anything to make death come sooner?

    Hospice neither hastens nor postpones dying. Just as doctors and midwives lend support and expertise during the time of child birth, hospice provides its presence and specialized knowledge during the dying process.

    12. Is caring for the patient at home the only place hospice care can be delivered?

    No. Hospice patients receive care in their personal residences, nursing homes, hospital hospice units and inpatient hospice centers.

    13. How does hospice �manage pain�?

    Hospice believes that emotional and spiritual pain are just as real and in need of attention as physical pain, so it can address each. Hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and devices for pain and symptom relief. In addition, physical and occupational therapists can assist patients to be as mobile and self sufficient as they wish, and they are sometimes joined by specialists schooled in music therapy, art therapy, massage and diet counseling. Finally, various counselors, including clergy, are available to assist family members as well as patients.

    14. What is hospice�s success rate in battling pain?

    Very high. Using some combination of medications, counseling and therapies, most patients can attain a level of comfort they consider acceptable.

    15. Will medications prevent the patient from being able to talk or know what�s happening?

    Usually not. It is the goal of hospice to have the patient as pain free and alert as possible. By constantly consulting with the patient, hospices have been very successful in reaching this goal.

    16. Is hospice affiliated with any religious organization?

    No. While some churches and religious groups have started hospices (sometimes in connection with their hospitals), these hospices serve a broad community and do not require patients to adhere to any particular set of beliefs.

    17. Is hospice care covered by insurance?

    Hospice coverage is widely available. It is provided by Medicare nationwide, by Medicaid in 47 states, and by most private insurance providers. To be sure of coverage, families should, of course, check with their employer or health insurance provider.

    18. If the patient is eligible for Medicare, will there be any additional expense to be paid?

    The Medicare Hospice Benefit covers the full scope of medical and support services for a life-limiting illness. Hospice care also supports the family and loved ones of the person through a variety of services. This benefit covers almost all aspects of hospice care with little expense to the patient or family.

    19. If the patient is not covered by Medicare or any other health insurance, will hospice still provide care?

    The first thing hospice will do is assist families in finding out whether the patient is eligible for any coverage they may not be aware of. Barring this, some hospices will provide for anyone who cannot pay using money raised from the community or from memorial or foundation gifts.

    20. Does hospice provide any help to the family after the patient dies?

    Most hospices provide continuing contact and support for caregivers for at least a year following the death of a loved one. Many hospices also sponsor bereavement groups and support for anyone in the community who has experienced a death of a family member, a friend, or similar losses .





    Frequently Asked Hospice Questions – All Care VNA #paris #hotel

    #hospice qualifications

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    FREQUENTLY ASKED HOSPICE QUESTIONS

    How does someone qualify for Hospice?

    Patients must meet two qualifications for Hospice:

    1. Two physicians, the attending physician and the hospice medical director, must certify the patient is terminally ill, with a six-month or less life expectancy if the disease takes its normal course.
    2. The patient and/or family must be aware of the prognosis and elect palliative or comfort care, rather than active curative measures.

    Where is hospice care provided?

    Hospice services are available wherever the patient resides: the patient s own home, family members home, assisted living facility, skilled nursing and long term care facilities, or hospital.

    Who is on the Hospice Team?

    • Your physician
    • Hospice-trained nurses
    • Hospice Medical Director
    • Social workers
    • Chaplains
    • Grief counselors
    • Home health aides
    • Volunteers

    Patients keep their own physician who works closely with the All Care Hospice Medical Director to plan and carry out care.

    Do patients only receive hospice care for a limited amount of time?

    The Medicare benefit, and most private insurance companies, pays for hospice care as long as the patient continues to meet the criteria necessary. Patients may come on and off hospice care, and re-enroll in hospice care, as needed.

    Does hospice mean that the patient will die soon?

    Receiving hospice care does not mean giving up hope or that death is imminent. The earlier an individual receives hospice care, the more opportunity there is to stabilize a patient s medical condition and address other needs. Some patients can improve and may be discharged from hospice care.

    Is hospice just for the patient?

    Hospice focuses on comfort, dignity, and emotional support. The quality of life for the patient, but also family members and others, who are caregivers, is top priority.

    What bereavement services are available through All Care Hospice?

    All Care s bereavement counselor meets with family members and friends to provide support for up to thirteen months after experiencing a loss.





    Hospice frequently asked questions and answers #hotels #in #kl

    #what does hospice mean

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    F REQUENTLY A sKED Q uESTIONS

    Hospice is a service provided for people at the end of life. It is designed for comfort rather than a cure; it provides comprehensive and compassionate care for patients and their families. Hospice is offered in more than 3,000 programs across the country.

    Any patient who is diagnosed with a terminal illness is eligible for the hospice palliative care. All U.S. citizens age 65 and older are entitled to Medicare coverage for hospice at the end of life.

    Hospice care is provided in the patient’s home, wherever the home may be (their home, the home of a relative or a friend, a nursing home, or in the hospital) some hospices have residential units where hospice is provided, designed for a homelike setting.

    Hospice is the only licensed health agency that focuses on the end-of-life care. Unlike most home health care providers, hospice recognizes that the patient will not get well and provides comfort and support, rather than a cure. Hospice care is provided by a team of interdisciplinary care givers. These professionals and specially trained volunteers attend to a wide range of physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Hospice care focuses on the entire family, and educates loved ones about caring for the patient. Hospice care does not end when the patient dies. Bereavement services are provided for family members for up to 13 months after the patient’s death.

    Most physicians know about hospice. If your physician wants more information about hospice, it is available from the National Council of Hospice Professionals Physician Section. medical societies, state hospice organizations, or the National Hospice Helpline (1-800-658-8898). In addition, physicians and all others can also obtain information on hospice from the American Cancer Society. the American Association of Retired Persons. and the Social Security Administration. Your physician may also contact us .

    Hospice is covered by most major insurers including, Medicare, Medicaid, Medi-Cal, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, HMO, and other private insurers. This includes medical equipment and illness-related medications. When insurance does not cover hospice care, Hospice Touch offers many services regardless of the ability to pay.

    The patient and family should feel free to discuss hospice care at any time with their physician, other health care professionals, clergy, or friends.

    Choosing hospice does not mean that you are giving up hope. It means that you have opted for treatments that will help manage various medical symptoms. Hospice allows you to feel comfortable and provides support in order for you to have control over your life.

    One of the first things the hospice program will do is contact the patient’s physician to make sure he or she agrees that hospice care is appropriate for the patient at this time. (Most hospices have medical staff available to help patients who have no physician.) The patient will be asked to sign consent and insurance forms. These are similar to the forms patients sign when they enter a hospital.

    The “hospice election form” says that the patient understands that the care is palliative (that is, aimed at pain relief and symptom control) rather than curative. It also outlines the services available. The form Medicare patients sign also tells how electing the Medicare hospice benefit affects other Medicare coverage.

    Certainly! If the patient’s condition improves and the disease seems to be in remission, patients can be discharged from hospice and return to aggressive therapy or go on about their daily life. If the discharged patient should later need to return to hospice care, Medicare and most private insurance will allow additional coverage for this purpose.

    Hospice is a choice, so a patient may choose to leave at any time.

    The patient may receive hospice care indefinitely if the patient’s condition remains appropriate for care.

    The hospice team is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week. A nurse is always one call away any day, at any hour, including holidays.

    Caring for a dying loved one at home can be quite difficult but hospice provide services around the clock to manage the experience.

    Your hospice provider will assess your needs, recommend any equipment, and help make arrangements to obtain any necessary equipment. Often the need for equipment is minimal at first and increases as the disease progresses. In general, hospice will assist in any way it can to make home care as convenient, clean, and safe as possible.

    Hospice neither hastens nor postpones dying. Just as doctors and midwives lend support and expertise during the time of child birth, hospice provides its presence and specialized knowledge during the dying process.

    Hospice believes that emotional and spiritual pain are just as real and in need of attention as physical pain, so it can address each. Hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and devices for pain and symptom relief. In addition, physical and occupational therapists can assist patients to be as mobile and self sufficient as they wish, and they are often joined by specialists schooled in music therapy, art therapy, massage, and diet counseling. Finally, various counselors, including clergy, are available to assist family members as well as patients.

    No. While some churches and religious groups have started hospices (sometimes in connection with their hospitals), these hospices serve a broad community and do not require patients to adhere to any particular set of beliefs.





    Questions – Answers – STATE of the HEART CARE #what #is #hospice

    #hospice questions

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    Questions Answers

    The modern-day American hospice movement began in 1974 with establishment of the Connecticut Hospice in New Haven. It was founded on the model of care best identified with Dame Cicely Saunders, MD, who opened her now-famous Saint Christopher’s Hospice in 1967 in Sydenham, England. This center became the model for comprehensive whole person and family care at the end of life.

    Hospice programs have been at the forefront of efforts in America to involve and include families in providing quality end-of-life care.

    2. What is hospice care?

    Considered to be the model for quality, compassionate care at the end-of-life, hospice care involves a team-oriented approach to expert medical care, pain management, and emotional and spiritual support expressly tailored to the patient’s needs and wishes. Support is extended to the patient’ s loved ones, as well. At the center of hospice is the belief that each of us has the right to die pain-free and with dignity, and that our families will receive the necessary support to allow us to do so. The focus is on caring, not curing and, in most cases, care is provided in the patient’s home. Hospice care also is provided in freestanding hospice facilities, hospitals, and nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. Hospice services are available to patients of any age, religion, race, or illness.

    3. How does hospice care work?

    Typically, a family member serves as the primary caregiver and, when appropriate, helps make decisions for the terminally ill individual. Members of the hospice staff make regular visits to assess the patient and provide additional care or other services. Hospice staff are on-call 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    The hospice team develops a care plan that meets each patient’s individual needs for pain management and symptom control. The team usually consists of:

    • The patient and family/caregiver;
    • The patient’s personal physician;
    • Hospice physician (or medical director);
    • Nurses;
    • Hospice aides;
    • Social workers;
    • Clergy or other counselors;
    • Trained volunteers; and
    • Speech, physical, and occupational therapists, if needed.

    The plan also outlines the medical and support services required such as nursing care, personal care (dressing, bathing, etc.), social services, physician visits, counseling, and homemaker services. It also identifies the medical equipment, tests, procedures, medication and treatments necessary to provide high-quality comfort care.

    4. How does the hospice work to keep the patient comfortable?

    Many patients experience pain and other distressing symptoms as illness progresses. Hospice staff receive special training to effectively anticipate, assess, treat, and prevent all types of physical symptoms that cause discomfort and distress. Because symptom management, especially pain, is such an important component of hospice care, many hospice programs have developed ways to measure how well they do in this area through surveys and studies. Hospice staff work with the patient’s physician to make sure that medication, therapies, and procedures are designed to achieve the goals outlined in the patient’s care plan. That plan is evaluated frequently to reflect changes and new goals.

    5. What kinds of services should I expect from a hospice?

    Hospice services are available to patients with life-threatening illnesses who can no longer benefit from curative treatment and usually have life expectancies of six months or less, as determined by a physician. Hospice services typically include:

    • Physician services for the medical direction of the patient’s care, provided by either the patient’s personal physician or a physician affiliated with a hospice program;
    • Regular home care visits by registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to monitor the patient’s condition and to provide appropriate care and maintain patient comfort;
    • Hospice aide and homemaker services attending to the patient’s personal needs;
    • Chaplain services for the patient and/or loved ones, if desired;
    • Social work and counseling services;
    • Bereavement counseling to help patients and their loved ones with grief and loss;
    • Medical equipment (e.g. hospital beds);
    • Medical supplies (e.g. bandages and catheters);
    • Drugs for symptom control and pain relief;
    • Volunteer support to assist loved ones;
    • Physical, speech, and occupational therapy; and
    • Dietary counseling.

    6. Is hospice available after hours?

    Hospice care is available “on-call” after the administrative office has closed, seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Most hospices have nurses available to respond to a call for help within minutes, if necessary. Some hospice programs have chaplains and social workers on call, as well.

    7. Can I be cared for by hospice if I reside in a nursing home or other type of long-term care facility?

    Hospice services can be provided to a terminally ill person whose place of residence is a nursing home. This means the patient receives specialized visits from hospice nurses, hospice aides, chaplains, social workers, and volunteers, in addition to other care and services provided by the nursing home. The hospice and the nursing home should have a written agreement in place in order for hospice to serve residents.

    8. How does hospice care begin?

    Accessing our hospice care is simple. It only takes one phone call. We meet patient needs and make it easy for everyone to get the care to which they are entitled. Hospice care is available to patients with an advanced illness. Anyone can call State of the Heart Hospice to receive information about hospice services. We offer support to patients and families 24 hours a day, seven days a week. State of the Heart Hospice will also contact your physician to ensure that the patient is eligible for the hospice benefit.

    9. What kind of support is available to the family/caregiver?

    In many cases, family members are the patient’s primary caregivers. Additionally, hospice recognizes that loved ones have their own special needs for support. As a relationship with the hospice begins, hospice staff will want to know about the primary caregiver’s priorities. They will also want to know how best to support the patient and family during this time. Support can take many different forms, including visits with the patient and family members; telephone calls to loved ones, including family members who live at a distance, about the patient’s condition; and the provision of volunteers to assist with patient and family needs.

    Counseling services for the patient and loved ones are an important part of hospice care. After the patient’s death, bereavement support is offered to families for at least one year. These services can take a variety of forms, including telephone calls, visits, written materials about grieving, and support groups. Individual counseling may be offered by the hospice or the hospice may make a referral to a community resource.

    10. What role does the physician play?

    It is important to find out what the role of the patient’s primary doctor will be once the patient begins receiving hospice care. Most often, hospice patients can choose to have their personal doctor involved in the medical care. Both the patient’s physician and the hospice medical director may work together to coordinate the patient’s medical care, especially when symptoms are difficult to manage. Regardless, a physician’s involvement is important to ensure quality hospice care.

    The hospice medical director is also available to answer questions you or the patient may have regarding hospice medical care.

    11. Will I be the only hospice patient that the hospice staff serves?

    Every hospice patient has access to a registered nurse, social worker, hospice aide, and chaplain. Typically, full-time registered nurses provide care to about a dozen different families. Social workers usually work with about twice that number. If needed, hospice aides, who provide personal care to the patient, will visit most frequently. All visits, however, are subject to the patient and family needs as described in the care plan, and the condition of the patient during the course of the illness. The availability and frequency of spiritual care is often dependent upon the family request. Travel requirements and other factors may cause some variation in how many patients the hospice staff can serve effectively.

    12. What role does the hospice volunteer serve?

    Hospice volunteers enhance quality of life and help reduce the burden of caregiving. They are generally available to provide different types of support to patients and their loved ones including running errands, preparing light meals, staying with a patient to give family members a break, lending emotional support and companionship to patients and family members, and helping out with light housekeeping.

    Because hospice volunteers spend time in patients’ and families’ homes, it is important for a hospice program to have some type of application and interview process. In addition, hospice programs should have an organized training program for their patient care volunteers. Areas covered by these training programs often include confidentiality, listening skills, signs and symptoms of approaching death, working with families, loss and grief, and bereavement support.





    Questions About Home Healthcare – Visiting Nurse Service- Rochester, NY #jersey #shore

    #home healthcare nurse

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    Frequently Asked Questions

    What is home healthcare?

    Home healthcare can help you live independently in your home. We can assist with and provide
    comprehensive care for you, all delivered in your home environment under the direction of your personal
    physician. Services and programs are provided if you have a medical condition that can be:

    • Helped by the skill of a nurse, including: recovery from an illness, accident or surgery, wound care, help with medications and/or injections, physical, occupational and speech-language rehabilitation, therapy services, clinical management of a chronic disease and/or monitoring a serious illness
    • Patient and caregiver education

    Home healthcare requires a skilled need that a nurse or physical therapist can provide. Nursing care by VNS is provided with a teamwork approach involving the patient first, physician, family, caregivers, and members of the healthcare team.

    Personal care (or private duty care) is usually provided by a home health aide and does not require a nurse, but is necessary when you need help at home with bathing, dressing, moving around or meal preparation.

    Who pays for home healthcare?

    • Home healthcare can be covered through a variety of sources if your care is medically necessary and you meet certain coverage requirements: Medicare – traditional Medicare pays 100% of the cost for home healthcare if you are 65 years of age or over or permanently disabled
    • Medicaid – Medicaid health insurance helps those with limited income who can’t afford medical care, and will pay for some or all of their medical bills
    • HMO’s (Health Maintenance Organizations) – companies have contracts with doctors and other healthcare providers and are directly involved in your medical treatment. HMO health insurance plans are generally the cheapest kind of coverage available, but also the most restrictive. Benefits vary per policy and verification of benefits is required
    • Workers Compensation Insurance – “Workers comp” covers you if you are injured on the job, whether hurt on the workplace or elsewhere, in an auto accident while on business, and covers work-related illnesses/medical and rehabilitation services
    • Private Pay – an option for services not covered as outlined above; you may choose to pay out of pocket
      for services

    When insurance does not cover a needed service, fees are adjusted based on your ability to pay. Our Patient Account Representatives can help you find out what your insurance will cover. Call 585.787.2233 for more information.

    Why do I need home healthcare?

    • Illness, surgical procedure, injury, or any number of life events may require you to have in-home healthcare as you recover
    • As hospital stays decrease, you may need highly skilled services when you return home
    • If you need continued care that can’t easily or effectively be provided by family members
    • Services are available with 24 hour on call nurses to assist seven days a week

    What are the requirements for home health care?

    • You must be considered homebound
    • You are under the care of a physician who manages and authorizes the need for services
    • You require some type of skilled nursing services or need therapy from a Physical, Occupational, and/or
      Speech Therapist

    What is the definition of homebound?

    In general, you are homebound if:

    • You have an illness or injury that restricts your ability to leave home unless you have help, or if it takes a considerable and taxing effort to leave home (if you need a wheelchair, special transportation, or other assistance)
    • Absences from the home must be infrequent or for a short period of time, as in only leaving your home for medical care
    • Trips out cannot last longer than one to two hours or occur more often than one to two times per week for activities like grocery shopping, attending a worship service or going to a hair appointment

    You are not considered homebound if:

    • You are able to drive
    • You leave your home for reasons other than receiving medical treatment
    • The absences are long and frequent, such as frequent shopping trips or visits to friends

    How often are visits made?

    A home health nurse comes as often as needed. Everyone’s needs are different and visits are coordinated and scheduled according to your specific needs.

    What about home medical equipment and supplies?

    We can coordinate and arrange delivery for all your home medical equipment, including:

    • Wheelchairs, walkers, bedside commodes, bathroom safety equipment
    • Oxygen, nebulizers, respiratory supplies

    How do I choose a home care agency?

    You can get started by visiting the free “Home Health Compare” tool online – the official U.S. government site for Medicare benefits information, located at http://www.medicare.gov/HHCompare. Here you can compare both certified and licensed home healthcare agencies in our area, see what types of programs and services they offer, and see the quality of care they provide, including patient outcomes. Home Health Compare also provides the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of each agency in your area, along with other important information.