UCLA Anderson School of Management – Acceptance Rate #business, #b #school, #b

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UCLA Anderson School of Management Located in Los Angeles, California

  • Among the toughest schools to get in (17.8% acceptance rate)
  • One of the top GMAT scores (714 average)
  • Very high undergrad GPA (3.50 average)
  • One of the largest entering classes (354 students)
  • Significantly male dominant school (70% male – 30% female)
  • Average prior work experience (5 years on average)
  • Most common previous industry: Finance
  • Extremely high in-state total cost ($96,966 USD)
  • Extremely high out-of-state total cost ($109,540 USD)
  • Very high salary ($111,000 USD average)
  • Most common industry entered: Technology
  • Public institution
  • Programs offered:
    • Full-Time MBA
    • Part-Time MBA
    • Evening/Weekend MBA
    • Executive MBA
  • Relatively small endowment ($80 million USD)
  • Parent Institution: University of California – Los Angeles (UCLA)
  • Very warm winter weather (56.2°F)
  • Very cool summer weather (68.4°F)

Why Is UCLA Anderson School of Management Ranked #6?

StartClass has developed a ranking system for business school MBA programs by analyzing the statistics relevant to the quality of the institution and how it prepares graduates. The following breakdown explains how this school stacks up against all other business schools for data the school has reported.

  • Better than Average
    • Post-Graduation Salary: $111,000 USD (top 20%)
    • Acceptance Rate: 17.8% (top 10%)
    • Average GMAT: 714 (top 10%)
    • Average Undergraduate GPA: 3.50 (top 20%)
  • Average
    • Previous Work Experience: 5 years

Similarly Ranked Business Schools

Admissions

Applying

Admissions Statistics

Difficult to Get In, Lower Than Average Percent Yield

UCLA Anderson School of Management extends offers to 17.8% of applicants. This is one of the lowest compared to all business schools (average: 56.6%). Of those that get offers, 48.2% enroll in this school, which is below the average percent yield (60.8%).

Difficult to Get In, Lower Than Average Percent Yield

UCLA Anderson School of Management extends offers to 64.1% of part-time applicants. This is lower than average compared to all business schools (76.9%). Of those that get offers, 71.9% enroll in this school, which is below the part-time average percent yield (76.7%).

Acceptance Rate (Part-Time)

Percent Yield (Part-TIme)

GMAT

Higher than Average GMAT

Students enrolling in UCLA Anderson School of Management have an average GMAT of 714, which is one of the highest compared to all business schools (average: 613).

Undergraduate GPA

Average Undergrad GPA

Higher than Average Undergraduate GPA

The entering class of UCLA Anderson School of Management has an average undergraduate GPA of 3.50. This is much higher than average compared to all business schools (3.35).

Adjust the numbers on the left to find out how well an MBA at UCLA Anderson School of Management pays off.

Assuming it takes 2 years and you earn $60,000 annually before attending, obtaining your MBA means forgoing a salary of $120,000. Combining this opportunity cost with the total nonresident program cost of $109,540 USD (not including food, rent, etc.) gives a total of $229,540.

The 10-year ROI is 279% and the total 10-year gain is $411,933. ROI takes the cumulative 10-year salary difference and divides by the total cost (MBA program and lost wages). The gain takes that 10-year salary difference and subtracts the total cost. Post-MBA salary is assumed to be the average for this school ($111,000 USD) and pre-MBA and post-MBA salaries are assumed to grow at a rate of 5%. Numbers are not inflation-adjusted and do not take into account sign-on bonuses and other compensation or qualitative gains such as networking and skills. Cost does not consider loan interest.

Similarly Ranked Business Schools with Lower Costs

In-State Total Program Cost

StartClass is an education site that uses Graphiq’s semantic technology to deliver deep insights via data-driven articles, visualizations and research tools.

Employment

Full-Time Industry vs. Average

Education/ Government/ Nonprofit

Pharma/ Biotech/ Health Care

UCLA Anderson School of Management

All Business Schools

More Graduates Go Into Tech Compared to Average

Looking at the industries graduates go into compared to the average for all business schools, those from UCLA Anderson School of Management more often go into tech. On the other hand, a smaller percentage than average go into manufacturing. All schools have different naming conventions, but StartClass has normalized them into common buckets to help guide prospective MBA students towards programs that cater to the industries they desire. The rest of the employment section gives further details on the industries and functions graduates and interns enter to the extent that the school makes this data available.

Full-Time Employment by Industry

Percent of Employed Graduates

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Education/ Government/ Nonprofit

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Percent of Employed Graduates

Education/ Government/ Nonprofit

Education/ Government/ Nonprofit

Percent of Employed Graduates

Mean Signing Bonus

Education/ Government/ Nonprofit

Full-Time Employment by Function

Percent of Employed Graduates

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Business/ Corporate Development

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Operations/ Logistics/ Supply Chain

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Percent of Employed Graduates

Business/ Corporate Development

Operations/ Logistics/ Supply Chain

Percent of Employed Graduates

Mean Signing Bonus

Business/ Corporate Development

Operations/ Logistics/ Supply Chain

Intern Employment

Percent of Employed Interns

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Internet Services/ E-Commerce

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Investment Banking/ Brokerage

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Health Care Products

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Consumer Products – Beverages/ Food

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Private Equity/ Venture Capital

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Consumer Products – Household/ Personal

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Multimedia Products & Services

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Technology Equipment/ Hardware/ Networking

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Energy/ Utilities (incl. Alternative Energy)

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Percent of Employed Interns

Internet Services/ E-Commerce

Investment Banking/ Brokerage

Health Care Products

Consumer Products – Beverages/ Food

Percent of Employed Interns

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Corporate Finance/ FP ?>

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management #business, #b #school, #b #schools,

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Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management Located in Nashville, Tennessee

Why Is Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management Ranked #40?

StartClass has developed a ranking system for business school MBA programs by analyzing the statistics relevant to the quality of the institution and how it prepares graduates. The following breakdown explains how this school stacks up against all other business schools for data the school has reported.

  • Better than Average
    • Post-Graduation Salary: $100,513 USD (top 45%)
    • Acceptance Rate: 41.3% (top 30%)
    • Average GMAT: 688 (top 20%)
    • Previous Work Experience: 5.2 years (top 30%)
  • Worse than Average
    • Average Undergraduate GPA: 3.3 (bottom 45%)

Similarly Ranked Business Schools

Admissions

Applying

Application Deadline. May 3

Admissions Statistics

Difficult to Get In, Lower Than Average Percent Yield

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management extends offers to 41.3% of applicants. This is lower than average compared to all business schools (56.6%). Of those that get offers, 46% enroll in this school, which is below the average percent yield (60.8%).

GMAT

Higher than Average GMAT

Students enrolling in Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management have an average GMAT of 688, which is much higher than average compared to all business schools (613).

Undergraduate GPA

Average Undergrad GPA

Lower than Average Undergraduate GPA

The entering class of Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management has an average undergraduate GPA of 3.3. This is lower than average compared to all business schools (3.35).

Adjust the numbers on the left to find out how well an MBA at Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management pays off.

Assuming it takes 2 years and you earn $60,000 annually before attending, obtaining your MBA means forgoing a salary of $120,000. Combining this opportunity cost with the total nonresident program cost of $100,089 USD (not including food, rent, etc.) gives a total of $220,089.

The 10-year ROI is 232% and the total 10-year gain is $289,479. ROI takes the cumulative 10-year salary difference and divides by the total cost (MBA program and lost wages). The gain takes that 10-year salary difference and subtracts the total cost. Post-MBA salary is assumed to be the average for this school ($100,513 USD) and pre-MBA and post-MBA salaries are assumed to grow at a rate of 5%. Numbers are not inflation-adjusted and do not take into account sign-on bonuses and other compensation or qualitative gains such as networking and skills. Cost does not consider loan interest.

Similarly Ranked Business Schools with Lower Costs

In-State Total Program Cost

StartClass is an education site that uses Graphiq’s semantic technology to deliver deep insights via data-driven articles, visualizations and research tools.

Employment

Full-Time Industry vs. Average

Education/ Government/ Nonprofit

Pharma/ Biotech/ Health Care

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

All Business Schools

More Graduates Go Into Consulting Compared to Average

Looking at the industries graduates go into compared to the average for all business schools, those from Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management more often go into consulting. On the other hand, a smaller percentage than average go into finance. All schools have different naming conventions, but StartClass has normalized them into common buckets to help guide prospective MBA students towards programs that cater to the industries they desire. The rest of the employment section gives further details on the industries and functions graduates and interns enter to the extent that the school makes this data available.

Full-Time Employment by Industry

Percent of Employed Graduates

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Entertainment/ Media/ Lodging

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Percent of Employed Graduates

Entertainment/ Media/ Lodging

Health Care Services

Pharma/ Biotech/ Health Care

Health Care Services/ Health Care Providers

Pharma/ Biotech/ Health Care Devices

Pharma/ Biotech/ Health Care Products

Entertainment/ Media/ Lodging

Percent of Employed Graduates

Entertainment/ Media/ Lodging

Full-Time Employment by Function

Percent of Employed Graduates

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Percent of Employed Graduates

Percent of Employed Graduates

Intern Employment

Percent of Employed Interns

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Media/ Entertainment/ Hospitality

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Percent of Employed Interns

Percent of Employed Interns

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

Percent of Employed Interns

Student Body

Gender

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management

All Business Schools

Higher than Average Percentage of Male Students

Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management has 70% male students, above the average across all business schools (63%).

This university is situated in Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee, which is 475.93 mi² in size and has a population of 634,512 people.

  • This city is tagged as lower middle class. In other words, a disproportionately large percentage of its households earn between $25,000 and $50,000 per year.
  • Rental properties typically cost between $500 and $1,000 per month.
  • About 7.2% of the labor force is unemployed which is 0.2% higher than the average unemployment rate (7.0%).

Average Monthly Temperature

References

Frequently Asked Questions

Related Business Schools

Business School Websites. Forecast (R Package). American Community Survey. AACSB. Dun & Bradstreet. and NCES. Show details Hide details





What – s an apartment Guarantor #apartment, #ranking, #review, #rating, #houses #for

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What’s an apartment Guarantor/ Co-Signer?

Landlords and apartment management want one basic thing: renters that are financially stable so that they can and will pay on time. They look to your credit and rental history, your income, and your job to determine if they think that they can trust you. If they can’t, then you might need a rent guarantor to sign on your lease.

What is a Guarantor?

A Rent Guarantor is the legal term for an apartment co-signer, or a person that agrees to be legally responsible for the apartment, its condition, and the money owed for rent.

Landlords want responsible renters, yet often due to history or a lack of experience, it can be hard to justify that they will be good renters. So, they have a guarantor sign the apartment lease agreement stating that they are legally and financially responsible for the apartment. So, if the renter is unable to pay, the landlord can legally collect money from the guarantor.

Most co-signer agreements result from a young adult moving out for the first time into an apartment. Because they often do not have credit or rental history, it’s difficult for a landlord to know that they can trust them, so guardians tend to be the ones that sign the lease.

Being a co-signor/guarantor can be risky, so it is best to do so with very close friends or family members.

The Three Most Common Reasons why you need a Guarantor/Co-Signer

  1. Low Income: One of the rules of smart apartment living is living under the 1:3 ratio (see our rent calculator to determine your budget). In order to have a comfortable lifestyle with the ability to save, you want to find a rent that is under 1/3 of your monthly income.

Landlords recognize this as well. If your rent is going to cost more than 1/3 of your monthly income. your landlord may request a guarantor on your lease. Although this is the norm, there are exceptions. For example, in cities with uniquely high costs of living such as San Francisco or New York, many landlords expect renters to have to pay more.

  • Poor Rental History: If you are renting for the first time you are most likely going to need a guarantor on your lease, since your landlord has little idea of what kind of renter you are. Often college students renting for the first time need one of their parents to act as the guarantor.
    On the other side of the coin, if you have a poor reputation as a renter, you may be in trouble for future apartment search and might need someone to sign for you. If previous landlords have given you poor ratings whether it be from eviction to not paying rent on time, you will have a hard time explaining how your latest landlord can trust you.
  • Poor Credit: Last but not least, having poor or little credit history are common reasons for needing a guarantor on your lease. Having little credit history tends to go along with renting for the first time and can eventually be overcome by just making regular payments.

    Poor credit, on the other hand, is more difficult to overcome. While larger apartment communities will have stricter rules on poor credit, landlords of small apartment complexes may be more lenient if you can present a good case.

  • What to do if you are Unable to Find a Guarantor/Co-Signer:

    If you have no one to turn to for help, here are a few options to consider.

    1. Go local: Look for a smaller apartment complex or locally-owned room for rent. These tend to have slightly more flexible rules than the larger, corporate apartment complexes.
    2. Present Your Case: Do you have bad credit because of medical bills or the recession? You aren’t the only one. Many people end up with bad credit because of legitimate situations. If you can present yourself well to a landlord, you have a better chance of persuading them.
    3. Pay up front with cash: If you have a poor rental history, you may just have to offer a larger security deposit. Meanwhile, if your monthly income worries the landlord, offer to pay several months in advance.
    4. Look for Low Income Housing and Section 8 Housing. If your income is the prime reason for being unable to rent an apartment, research available low income housing and section 8 housing your area.

    Find apartments within your budget

    Leave A Comment





    Triton College – Nursing Ranking 2015 #triton #college, #nursing, #ranking, #rankings, #ratings,

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    Triton College
    Nursing Ranking 2015

    in the USA Triton College is a medium-sized public college offering a number of disciplines along with nursing programs and located in River Grove. Illinois. This school was founded in 1964 and is currently offering certificates and associate’s degrees in 3 nursing programs.

    Triton College is affordable: depending on the program, tuition varies around $12,000 per year. It is reported that Triton College area is relatively safe – the school is reported to have a fair rating for on-campus crime.

    Triton College nursing program ranks #1,032 (out of 2704; top 40%) in the United States and #57 in Illinois. Major competing nursing schools for this school are Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion and Loyola University Chicago in Chicago. Check the details about all twelve competitors and list of available nursing majors and minors below.

    Nursing programs ratings 2014-2015:

    Overall school rankings 2015:

    Ranked #57 Nursing School in Illinois
    Ranked #310 Nursing School in The Midwest
    Ranked #1,032 Nursing School in USA

    Programs rankings 2015:

    State of Illinois Ranking

    The Midwest Regional Ranking

    USA National Ranking

    Ranked #119 Nursing Assistance School
    View USA National Ranking

    More program rankings:

    You might be interested in other options to get accepted at Triton College:

    Contact information:

    Triton College
    2000 5th Ave
    River Grove, IL 60171-1995
    Phone: (708) 456-0300

    Nursing majors offered:

    Less than one year certificate

    Nursing Assistant, Aide and Patient Care Assistant

    One but less than two years certificate

    Licensed Practical and Vocational Nurse Training

    Associate’s degree

    Local competitors:

    Marion, IN, 10 nursing programs

    Chicago, IL, 21 nursing programs

    Iowa City, IA, 20 nursing programs

    Davenport, IA, 10 nursing programs

    Chicago, IL, 5 nursing programs

    Madison, WI, 5 nursing programs

    Muncie, IN, 6 nursing programs

    Romeoville, IL, 6 nursing programs

    Allendale, MI, 6 nursing programs

    Milwaukee, WI, 6 nursing programs

    Joliet, IL, 11 nursing programs





    Part Time Masters of Business Administration MBA – Aberdeen Business School #mba,

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    Master of Business Administration MBA

    Master of Business Administration

    1. Overview

    Aberdeen Business School is recognised both nationally and internationally for its corporate and management education.

    The MBA has been developed to ensure that it meets the highest international standards and is of direct relevance to the real world. Th part-time MBA course is ideal for you if you would like to continue your education and further your career, but are unable to commit to full time study.

    Our School has had AMBA accreditation since 1999 and is one of only 40 of the UK’s 120 Business Schools that have so far been accredited in all three modes of delivery.

    2. What you will study

    Semester 8
    Choose 1 option module from the following group:

    Modules and delivery order may change for operational purposes.

    The University regularly reviews its courses. Course content and structure may change over time. See our course disclaimer for more information.

    3. How you will learn

    Part-time Study
    Our part-time delivery mode combines aspects of distance learning and on-campus delivery. You will benefit from the support of the virtual learning environment but also face-to-face interaction with tutors and classmates.

    The University’s virtual learning environment, CampusMoodle. gives you access from home/remotely to your learning materials (including videos, e-books and journals).

    During the course of your degree you are required to attend a 10 day leadership week which takes place in the last week of May in your second year.

    You will need to factor in the cost for travel, accommodation and subsistence for these 10 days.

    This event brings together a number of speakers from academia and industry. During the event there will be a mix of academic and practical workshops. Each session will explore a different aspect of leadership and aims to enhance students skills and provide an opportunity to network.

    The event will be hosted in the modern facilities at Aberdeen Business School, Garthdee.

    4. Entry requirements

    • hold a 2:2 undergraduate honours degree or its equivalent
    • have at least 3 years of full-time professional work experience.

    Applicants with a lower degree classification and/or relevant work experience will be considered on a case by case basis.

    English Language

    Applicants whose first language is not English should have an IELTS of 6.5 overall, with no component lower than 5.5, or an equivalent.

    We accept a variety of in-country and secure English language tests, find out more:

    * All entry requirements listed here should be used as a guide and represent the minimum required to be considered for entry. A small number of courses require higher levels, but this will be stated explicitly on your offer letter.

    5. Placements and accreditations

    The course is accredited by Association of MBAs. It is regarded as the international authority on the development of business leaders and the guardian of MBA quality standards. It plays a unique role in supporting business schools to develop business leaders and provides a network for MBAs, business schools and employer.

    Robert Gordon University is one of only a handful of institutions worldwide that have been accredited in respect of every form of the MBA.

    6. Student Funding

    Alumni Discount

    Robert Gordon University is delighted to offer a 20% loyalty discount on course fees for all alumni who have graduated from RGU, further information available via the Alumni page.

    7. Course Fees





    Ranking 37th #hospice #buffalo #jobs

    #health care organization

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    Ranking 37th — Measuring the Performance of the U.S. Health Care System

    Evidence that other countries perform better than the United States in ensuring the health of their populations is a sure prod to the reformist impulse. The World Health Report 2000, Health Systems: Improving Performance, ranked the U.S. health care system 37th in the world 1 — a result that has been discussed frequently during the current debate on U.S. health care reform.

    The conceptual framework underlying the rankings 2 proposed that health systems should be assessed by comparing the extent to which investments in public health and medical care were contributing to critical social objectives: improving health, reducing health disparities, protecting households from impoverishment due to medical expenses, and providing responsive services that respect the dignity of patients. Despite the limitations of the available data, those who compiled the report undertook the task of applying this framework to a quantitative assessment of the performance of 191 national health care systems. These comparisons prompted extensive media coverage and political debate in many countries. In some, such as Mexico, they catalyzed the enactment of far-reaching reforms aimed at achieving universal health coverage. The comparative analysis of performance also triggered intense academic debate, which led to proposals for better performance assessment.

    Despite the claim by many in the U.S. health policy community that international comparison is not useful because of the uniqueness of the United States, the rankings have figured prominently in many arenas. It is hard to ignore that in 2006, the United States was number 1 in terms of health care spending per capita but ranked 39th for infant mortality, 43rd for adult female mortality, 42nd for adult male mortality, and 36th for life expectancy. 3 These facts have fueled a question now being discussed in academic circles, as well as by government and the public: Why do we spend so much to get so little?

    Comparisons also reveal that the United States is falling farther behind each year (see graph Probability of Death for Boys and Men 15 to 60 Years of Age in Sweden, Australia, and the United States, 1970–2007. ). In 1974, mortality among boys and men 15 to 60 years of age was nearly the same in Australia and the United States and was one third lower in Sweden. Every year since 1974, the rate of death decreased more in Australia than it did in the United States, and in 2006, Australia’s rate dipped lower than Sweden’s and was 40% lower than the U.S. rate. There are no published studies investigating the combination of policies and programs that might account for the marked progress in Australia. But the comparison makes clear that U.S. performance not only is poor at any given moment but also is improving much more slowly than that of other countries over time. These observations and the reflections they should trigger are made possible only by careful comparative quantification of various facets of health care systems.

    The current proposals for U.S. health care reform focus mostly on extending insurance coverage, decreasing the growth of costs through improved efficiency, and expanding prevention and wellness programs. The policy debate has been overwhelmingly centered on the first two of these elements. Achieving universal insurance coverage in the United States would protect households against undue financial burdens at the same time that it was saving an estimated 18,000 to 44,000 lives. 4,5 However, narrowing the gap in health outcomes between the United States and other high-income countries or even slowing its descent in the rankings would require much more than insurance expansion. Given the vast number of preventable deaths associated with smoking (465,000 per year), hypertension (395,000), obesity (216,000), physical inactivity (191,000), high blood glucose levels (190,000), high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (113,000), and other dietary risk factors, there are huge opportunities to enact policies that could make a substantial difference in health system performance — and in the population’s health. 4 More investments that are targeted at promoting proven strategies — including tobacco taxation and smoking-cessation programs, screening and treatment for high cholesterol and blood pressure, banning of trans fat, creating incentives for people to engage in physical activity, and subsidizing the cost of consumption of n−3 fatty acids — could dramatically reduce mortality and enhance the performance of the U.S. health care system.

    Of course, international comparisons are not the only rankings that should inform the debate about reforming the health care system. Within the United States, there are dramatic variations among regions and racial or ethnic groups in the rates of death from preventable causes. While aiming to provide solutions to the problems of incomplete insurance coverage and inefficiency of care delivery, health care reformers have given insufficient attention to the design, funding, and evaluation of interventions that are tailored to local realities and address preventable causes of death. The big picture — the poor and declining performance of the United States, which goes far beyond the challenge of universal insurance — will inevitably get lost if we do not routinely track performance and compare the results both among countries and among states and counties within the United States.

    Although many challenges remain, the available methods and data are better now than they were when the World Health Organization’s rankings were determined. As part of its reform efforts, the U.S. government should support and participate in international comparisons while commissioning regular performance assessments at the state and local levels.

    Experience has shown that whenever a country embarks on large-scale reform of its health care system, periodic evaluations become a key instrument of stewardship to ensure that initial objectives are being met and that midcourse corrections can be made in a timely and effective manner. To be valid and useful, such evaluations cannot be an afterthought that is introduced once reform is under way. Instead, scientifically designed evaluations must be an integral part of the design of reform. For instance, the recent Mexican reform adopted from the outset an explicit evaluation framework that included a randomized trial to compare communities that were introducing insurance in the first phase of reform with matched communities that were scheduled to adopt the plan later. This external evaluation was coupled with internal monitoring meant to enable policymakers to learn from implementation.

    In addition to its technical value, the explicit assessment of reform efforts contributes to transparency and accountability. Such assessments can also boost popular support for reform initiatives that inevitably stir up fears of the unknown. In the polarized political climate surrounding the current U.S. health care reform debate, the prospect of periodic evaluations may help reformers to counter many objections by offering a transparent and timely way of dealing with unintended effects. Built-in evaluations may be the missing ingredient that will allow us to finally reform health care in the United States.

    Financial and other disclosures provided by the authors are available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.

    This article (10.1056/NEJMp0910064) was published on January 6, 2010, at NEJM.org.