International credit insurance #aig, #aig #analyst #estimates, #aig #earnings #estimates, #aig #share


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American International Group Inc.

  • Jul. 27, 2017 at 9:02 a.m. ET
  • by Howard Gold

American International Group Inc. said it has named Peter Zaffino as its new chief operating officer, effective August 1. Zaffino comes to the role from Marsh LLC, a unit of insurance brokerage Marsh McLennan Cos. Inc. where he was chief executive. Zaffino has also done stints at Guy Carpenter Co. and at a GE Capital portfolio company. He will have a base salary of $1.25 million, a short-term annual bonus target of $3 million and an annual long-term incentive award of $4.25 million. The executive will also receive a signing-on bonus of $15 million, partly in the form of stock options. AIG shares were slightly lower premarket, but are down 3.8% in 2017, while the S P 500 has gained 8.7%.

  • Jul. 6, 2017 at 7:48 a.m. ET
  • by Ciara Linnane

AIG names Peter Zaffino COO effective Aug. 1

AIG names Peter Zaffino COO effective Aug. 1

  • Jul. 6, 2017 at 7:42 a.m. ET
  • by Ciara Linnane

AmTrust Financial Services Inc. said Monday it would replace chief financial officer Ronald Pipoly Jr. with Adam Karkowsky, another company insider. The beleaguered insurer said the move was an internal decision that stemmed from a desire to beef up its finance capacities and wasn t connected to any regulatory scrutiny.

  • Jun. 5, 2017 at 1:10 p.m. ET
  • by MarketWatch.com
  • May. 17, 2017 at 10:59 a.m. ET
  • by Ciara Linnane
  • May. 16, 2017 at 3:02 p.m. ET
  • by Jacob Passy

AIG upgraded to overweight at Morgan Stanley

AIG upgraded to overweight at Morgan Stanley

  • May. 16, 2017 at 8:44 a.m. ET
  • by Tomi Kilgore

American International Group Ltd. Hamilton Insurance Group Ltd. and Two Sigma Insurance Quantified LP, a unit of Two Sigma Investments LP, said Monday they have entered a memorandum of understanding to expand their partnership with the aim of boosting their role in data-driven underwriting. As part of the deal, AIG has agreed in principle to acquire Hamilton USA, the U.S. platform of Hamilton Insurance. The companies will expand the target market of their Attune platform, which they launched in September 2016 to serve the U.S. small to medium-sized commercial insurance market. Attune will now target companies with annual revenue of up to $35 million, a market the companies estimate is worth up to $150 billion in annual gross written premiums. AIG and Two Sigma will enter a partnership to advance the latter s data science and technology for AIG s commercial insurance business. Hamilton Re and AIG will enter a reinsurance partnership, in which Hamilton Re will participate in more of AIG s ceded reinsurance. Putting data science and technology to work in our industry has been on my agenda for some time, said AIG s new Chief Executive Officer Brian Duperreault, founder and ex-CEO of Hamilton Insurance. AIG shares were not yet active premarket, but have gained 23% in 2017, while the S P 500 has gained 7%.

  • May. 15, 2017 at 8:07 a.m. ET
  • by Ciara Linnane

AIG agrees in principle to acquire Hamilton USA as part of expansion

AIG agrees in principle to acquire Hamilton USA as part of expansion

  • May. 15, 2017 at 7:57 a.m. ET
  • by Ciara Linnane

AIG, Hamilton Insurance and Two Sigma Insurance to expand partnership

AIG, Hamilton Insurance and Two Sigma Insurance to expand partnership

  • May. 15, 2017 at 7:57 a.m. ET
  • by Ciara Linnane

Brian Duperreault. 70-year old founder and CEO of Bermuda-based Hamilton Insurance Group, will be new CEO of AIG.

  • May. 15, 2017 at 7:51 a.m. ET
  • by Joann S. Lublin

Affordable Self Storage in Hampton, VA #affordable #self #storage, #reviews, #ratings, #recommendations,


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Affordable Self Storage

Information about this business (4 )

6 locations to serve you6 va locations to serve youavailable-boxes andceilings-truckscobbs creek shacklefordcontrolled unites-highgloucester matthews hampton poquoson safe-clean-climatethe friendlier morethe friendlier more affordable alternative 223910attr:climate controlledstorage household & commercial

Posted on May 08, 2015. Brought to you by localcom.

Affordable Storage Inc is located at the address 1635 W Pembroke Ave Ste A in Hampton, Virginia 23661. They can be contacted via phone at (757) 723-6551 for pricing, hours and directions.

Affordable Storage Inc has an annual sales volume of 0 – 500K. For more information contact Dan Bolkhel, Owner or go to www.affordablestorageva.com

Affordable Storage Inc provides Dry Storage Units, Self.

Posted on September 02, 2014. Brought to you by chamberofcommerce.

We offer self storage to keep your personal items safe while you are moving, haveing work done to the house, TDY, or just need a place to put your access items till you can make room for them. We are open 7 days a week and will stay later if needed to assist with your move in. We are the friendlier more affordable storage company.

Posted on July 20, 2014. Brought to you by facebook.

Posted by Anonymous on June 30, 2009. Brought to you by merchantcircle.

Average Rating 20

I rented a unit for one month back in July 2007. As of today, March 4, 2008, I have not received my $10.00 deposit. I have spoken to them several times. I will not stop until I get my money. Are there others who have not gotten their deposit?

Posted by jj9801 on March 03, 2008. Brought to you by localguides.

Business description (5) view all

Affordable Storage can be found at W Pembroke Ave 1635. The following is offered: Warehouse Storage. The entry is present with us since Sep 9, 2010 and was last updated on Nov 14, 2013. In Hampton there are 6 other Warehouse Storage. An overview can be found here.

Posted on September 20, 2015. Brought to you by opendius.

Business, Climate Controlled, Home, Packing Supplies, Personal

Posted on November 03, 2014. Brought to you by merchantcircle.


The Facts About Bisphenol A, BPA #bpa, #bisphenol #a, #bpa-free, #bpa #risks,


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The Facts About Bisphenol A

In 2008, the possible health risks of Bisphenol A (BPA) — a common chemical in plastic — made headlines. Parents were alarmed, pediatricians flooded with questions, and stores quickly sold-out of BPA-free bottles and sippy cups.

Where do things stand now? Have plastic manufacturers changed their practices? How careful does a parent need to be when it comes to plastics and BPA? Here’s the latest information we have about possible BPA risks.

BPA Basics

BPA is a chemical that has been used to harden plastics for more than 40 years. It’s everywhere. It’s in medical devices, compact discs, dental sealants, water bottles, the lining of canned foods and drinks, and many other products.

More than 90% of us have BPA in our bodies right now. We get most of it by eating foods that have been in containers made with BPA. It’s also possible to pick up BPA through air, dust, and water.

BPA was common in baby bottles. sippy cups, baby formula cans, and other products for babies and young children. Controversy changed that. Now, the six major companies that make baby bottles and cups for infants have stopped using BPA in the products they sell in the U.S. Many manufacturers of infant formula have stopped using BPA in their cans, as well.

According to the U.S. Department of Health, toys generally don’t contain BPA. While the hard outer shields of some pacifiers do have BPA, the nipple that the baby sucks on does not.

BPA Risks

What does BPA do to us? We still don’t really know, since we don’t have definitive studies of its effects in people yet. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration used to say that BPA was safe. But in 2010 the agency altered its position. The FDA maintains that studies using standardized toxicity tests have shown BPA to be safe at the current low levels of human exposure. But based on other evidence — largely from animal studies — the FDA expressed “some concern” about the potential effects of BPA on the brain. behavior, and prostate glands in fetuses, infants, and young children.

Continued

How could BPA affect the body? Here are some areas of concern.

  • Hormone levels. Some experts believe that BPA could theoretically act like a hormone in the body, disrupting normal hormone levels and development in fetuses, babies, and children. Animal studies have had mixed results.
  • Brain and behavior problems. After a review of the evidence, the National Toxicology Program at the FDA expressed concern about BPA’s possible effects on the brain and behavior of infants and young children.
  • Cancer . Some animal studies have shown a possible link between BPA exposure and a later increased risk of cancer .
  • Heart problems. Two studies have found that adults with the highest levels of BPA in their bodies seem to have a higher incidence of heart problems. However, the higher incidence could be unrelated to BPA.
  • Other conditions. Some experts have looked into a connection between BPA exposure and many conditions — obesity. diabetes. ADHD. and others. The evidence isn’t strong enough to show a link.
  • Increased risk to children. Some studies suggest that possible effects from BPA could be most pronounced in infants and young children. Their bodies are still developing and they are less efficient at eliminating substances from their systems.

Although this list of possible BPA risks is frightening, keep in mind that nothing has been established. The concern about BPA risks stems primarily from studies in animals.

A few studies in people have found a correlation between BPA and a higher incidence of certain health problems, but no direct evidence that BPA caused the problem. Other studies contradict some of these results. Some experts doubt that BPA poses a health risk at the doses most people are exposed to.

BPA: Governmental Action

The federal government is now funding new research into BPA risks. We don’t know the results of these studies yet. Recommendations about BPA could change in the next few years.

For now, there are no restrictions on the use of BPA in products. The Food and Drug Administration does recommend taking “reasonable steps” to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply. The FDA has also expressed support for manufacturers who have stopped using BPA in products for babies and for companies working to develop alternatives to the BPA in canned foods.

A number of states have taken action. Connecticut, Maryland, Minnesota, Washington, Wisconsin, and Vermont have laws restricting or banning the sale of certain products containing BPA, like bottles and sippy cups. So have cities like Chicago and Albany, as well as a few counties in New York. Similar laws are likely to pass in New York and California, and state legislatures are considering restrictions in many other states.

Continued

BPA Risks: What Can Parents Do?

Although the evidence is not certain, the FDA does recommend taking precautions against BPA exposure.

Trying to eliminate BPA from your child’s life is probably impossible. But limiting your child’s exposure — and your own — is possible. It doesn’t even have to be hard. Here are some tips on how to do it.

  • Find products that are BPA-free. It isn’t as hard as it once was. Many brands of bottles, sippy cups, and other tableware prominently advertise that they are BPA-free.
  • Look for infant formula that is BPA-free. Many brands no longer contain BPA in the can. If a brand does have BPA in the lining, some experts recommend powdered formula over liquid. Liquid is more likely to absorb BPA from the lining.
  • Choose non-plastic containers for food. Containers made of glass, porcelain, or stainless steel do not contain BPA.
  • Do not heat plastic that could contain BPA. Never use plastic in the microwave, since heat can cause BPA to leach out. For the same reason, never pour boiling water into a plastic bottle when making formula. Hand-wash plastic bottles, cups, and plates.
  • Throw out any plastic products — like bottles or sippy cups — that are chipped or cracked. They can harbor germs. If they also have BPA, it’s more likely to leach into food.
  • Use fewer canned foods and more fresh or frozen. Many canned foods still contain BPA in their linings.
  • Avoid plastics with a 3 or a 7 recycle code on the bottom. These plastics might contain BPA. Other types of numbered plastic are much less likely to have BPA in them.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on December 22, 2015

Sources

Harvey Karp, MD, pediatrician, author of The Happiest Baby on the Block and The Happiest Toddler on the Block; assistant professor of pediatrics, UCLA School of Medicine.

American Nurses Association.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Environmental Working Group.

Food and Drug Administration.

George Mason University’s Statistical Assessment Service (STATS.)

Healthy Child Healthy World.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Ryan, B. Toxicological Sciences. March 2010.

Sharpe, R. Toxicological Sciences. March 2010.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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