How to Save Money on Gas (with Pictures) #money #saving #articles


#

How to Save Money on Gas

Gas prices keep going up, and the money in our wallet keeps evaporating more quickly. There are many ways you can spend less money on gas and reduce your overall fuel consumption. But, you must think it through and begin formulating new plans! One technique that has been around for a while but has drawn more attention recently is hypermiling. However, use your head because some hypermiling techniques are illegal and extremely dangerous.

Steps Edit

Change those spark plugs often! Platinum spark plugs may claim to last 100,000 miles (160,000 km), but they have been known to foul up at just 75,000 miles (121,000 km). [citation needed ] Spark plugs are relatively inexpensive and (depending on the vehicle) easy to replace. If you’re not that handy or mechanically inclined, read some auto repair books or be-friend a mechanic.

Limit your driving. This article includes ideas such as carpooling, combining trips and taking the first parking spot you find.

Find good gas prices . This article offers tips about making sure you are paying a competitive price for the gas you do buy. Be sure to recognize the value of the gas you spend to go out of your way.

Take care of your car . A properly maintained vehicle will run more efficiently and give you better mileage, which saves you money in gas.

Fill up efficiently. This involves three things:

  • Consider whether to fill your tank up full or halfway. Filling up your tank halfway will reduce your car’s weight, increasing your mileage slightly. However, if your nearest gas station is significantly out of the way of your daily route, make sure to take into account the gas spent driving to the station and the value of your time.
  • Don’t top up your tank between fills. It is wasted money and bad for the environment because it invariably forces liquid fuel into the evaporative emissions system, where it overwhelms circuits that route fuel tank vapors to the engine. [citation needed ]
  • Wait until you have a quarter tank, but don’t push this any further. Doing this can extend your gas mileage because you are hauling a lighter fuel load. It also gives you the opportunity to buy more gas if you run across a bargain. However, in cold weather, you run an increased risk of condensation in the fuel tank. Running a car with less than a quarter tank can shorten the life of the electric fuel pump, and running on empty will often destroy the pump.

Top off the air in the tires every few weeks to the car manufacturer’s recommended pressure. This is best done when the tires are cold (have not been driven on more than a mile or so). It is proper for them to have a few psi higher pressure after extensive driving, but filling them hot should generally be avoided unless they are very low on air to avoid inaccuracy. Excessive pressure adds very little efficiency and can cause bad handling and uneven tire wear. Some gas stations, notably Sheetz gas stations, have air pumps that are free to use and automatically inflate the tires to a pressure set on the pump. These are very convenient. (If an automatic pump seems to be adding an unexpectedly large amount of air, double-check its progress with a hand air gauge to avoid overfilling.)

  • In California, gas station operators are required to offer free air to customers who purchase fuel.

If you are always stuck in rush hour traffic after work anyway, try to find something to do near your work until the traffic dies down, rather than try to fight through it.

Learn how to coast between traffic lights, applying power only as needed to keep the car rolling (more or less) with traffic. Learn to judge terrain and use engine braking to its full potential to keep the car moving ‘for free’, and save more gas over time.

Most car modifications do not improve mileage. Extra wings add drag. Power improvements often hurt mileage. However, if your car is turbocharged, chiptuning may result in a mileage boost. The mileage boost will be canceled out if you drive more aggressively due to power improvements.

Keep meticulous records of what you spend and how many miles you drive so you can quickly spot changes in vehicle performance. It will also help focus you on the goal of saving.

A manual transmission saves an average $1000 on the cost of a new vehicle, and eliminates routine transmission maintenance that an automatic transmission requires (and most people never do this maintenance once the warranty is up – so a used car with an automatic can be a risky purchase). In some cases, a manual transmission gets slightly better mileage overall than an automatic transmission.

Every MPH faster yields you less advantage than the last one. Going 10 mph (16 km/h) is a big difference over 5 mph (8.0 km/h), but there is very little difference between 55 mph (89 km/h) and 60 mph (97 km/h), unless you are on a very long trip. Many people mindlessly speed wherever they go, and gain absolutely nothing but a heftier fuel bill. Assuming everything goes perfectly (and when does it?) going 5 mph (8.0 km/h), even 15 mph (24 km/h) faster on a highway for a short trip will yield nothing but aggravation as you keep catching up to slower traffic.

Many of these tips change slightly if your engine is turbocharged or diesel. For instance, diesel engines use almost no fuel while idling. Diesel trucks will often be left idling all night to provide heat or power for the trucker inside the cab, at the cost of relatively little fuel.

Get a smartphone app that helps to find the cheapest gas.

Often the right-most lanes keep moving more than the left-most in areas prone to traffic-jams. Vehicles continue to exit, which keeps leaving ‘gaps’ to fill in.


Zafira not starting, ignition goes on, but no clicks from starter FIXED


#

Welcome to the MSE Forums

Forum Social Team

Zafira not starting, ignition goes on, but no clicks from starter FIXED 14th Jul 12 at 5:23 PM

Wife’s Zafira is not starting again.
The last 2 times this happened it was the starter, replaced and all was OK.

The difference between the last 2 times and this time is that the solenoid on the starter is not clicking (still clicking before)
And when I took the starter off it was still free. (was jammed before)

Also checked the old starter at the 2 live connections while off the car.
1) starter starts to spin OK
2) the solenoid clicks OK

Tried a new starter anyway but same symptoms.

The other symptoms is that the central locking is sluggish, and feels like the battery is quite low – however same symptoms as when the starter did go previously.
When trying to start all the dashboard lights go out. (or is that normal)

I have checked the earth wire from the starter to the battery earth and no resistance – so OK here
The battery was tested with Gunson’s Start check battery tester and was 75-100% so seems OK here too.
Battery has been smart charged anyway just in case.

It would appear that the solenoid is not getting power to get the starter spinning.

Any mechanics here that know what to check now, or what the likely cause is ?

Last edited by JesseJames; 17-07-2012 at 8:19 PM. Reason: set title to FIXED

Glad you like it!

If your dash lights are going out and theres barely enough juice to activate the central locking, while I’d check all major connections, I’d bet the battery is just about to give up the ghost.
Modern batteries appear to be all or nothing and can go off very suddenly.
Check the voltage across the battery terminals and if its less than 10.5 – 11 volts, it’s very tired. Get it started with a jump, check across the terminals again and make sure it’s at least 13v with the engine running, ideally around 14-14.5 volts to make sure the alternator is fine. Anything higher is just as much a problem too!

Glad you like it!

Users saying Thanks (1)

It ended up being the battery – a shorted cell.

What threw me was that it initially was showing OK.
After charging it was not showing OK and 10.6 volts
I checked it an hour later to confirm readings and checked out OK with around 12.5 volts – so intermittent readings.

So wasted my time and effort changing the starter motor twice, and that’s not easy to do on a Zafira.

Glad you like it!

Sorry!

There are currently no thanks for this post.

Sorry, thread closed.

This thread is closed, therefore you are unable to respond.

Sign up for MoneySaving Emails

Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Byebye! I’m about to stop work twitter, to instead spend glorious time with Mrs mini MSE. Wishing u a lovely summer. See u in 10 days.

WARNING Did you start Uni in or after 2012? The interest’s rising to 6.1%; yet it doesnt work like you think. See https://t.co/IQ8f0Vyetu RT

12 rail firms agree to refund passengers who pay too much for tickets

  • Want a special edition ‘Buy and Keep’ film from Sky? Your DVD may not have all the bells and whistles

  • A new app for railcards is en route

  • Lloyds, Halifax and Bank of Scotland to pay �283 million compensation for mortgage arrears

  • Co-op Energy offers customers up to �150 to stick with it � but is it worth it?

    More News

    • A year of fighting to break the link between mental illness and money problems�

    • How to make a tweet/Facebook post go viral � 7 lessons from �You don�t need your polling card�

    • Do I need to show my boarding pass at airport shops? (video & guide)

    • When will your student loan be written off?

    • Should you buy euros/dollars now, before the general election?


    What is oscilloscope? Definition from #saving #rate #definition


    #

    oscilloscope

    An oscilloscope is a laboratory instrument commonly used to display and analyze the waveform of electronic signals. In effect, the device draws a graph of the instantaneous signal voltage as a function of time.

    A typical oscilloscope can display alternating current (AC ) or pulsating direct current (DC) waveforms having a frequency as low as approximately 1 hertz (Hz ) or as high as several megahertz (MHz ). High-end oscilloscopes can display signals having frequencies up to several hundred gigahertz (GHz ). The display is broken up into so-called horizontal divisions (hor div) and vertical divisions (vert div). Time is displayed from left to right on the horizontal scale. Instantaneous voltage appears on the vertical scale, with positive values going upward and negative values going downward.

    The oldest form of oscilloscope, still used in some labs today, is known as the cathode-ray oscilloscope. It produces an image by causing a focused electron beam to travel, or sweep, in patterns across the face of a cathode ray tube (CRT ). More modern oscilloscopes electronically replicate the action of the CRT using a liquid crystal display (liquid crystal display ) similar to those found on notebook computers. The most sophisticated oscilloscopes employ computers to process and display waveforms. These computers can use any type of display, including CRT, LCD, and gas plasma.

    In any oscilloscope, the horizontal sweep is measured in seconds per division (s/div), milliseconds per division (ms/div), microseconds per division (s/div), or nanoseconds per division (ns/div). The vertical deflection is measured in volts per division (V/div), millivolts per division (mV/div), or microvolts per division (?V/div). Virtually all oscilloscopes have adjustable horizontal sweep and vertical deflection settings.

    The illustration shows two common waveforms as they might appear when displayed on an oscilloscope screen. The signal on the top is a sine wave ; the signal on the bottom is a ramp wave. It is apparent from this display that both signals have the same, or nearly the same, frequency. They also have approximately the same peak-to-peak amplitude. Suppose the horizontal sweep rate in this instance is 1 s/div. Then these waves both complete a full cycle every 2 s, so their frequencies are both approximately 0.5 MHz or 500 kilohertz (kHz ). If the vertical deflection is set for, say, 0.5 mV/div, then these waves both have peak-to-peak amplitudes of approximately 2 mV.

    These days, typical high-end oscilloscopes are digital devices. They connect to personal computers and use their displays. Although these machines no longer employ scanning electron beams to generate images of waveforms in the manner of the old cathode-ray scope, the basic principle is the same. Software controls the sweep rate, vertical deflection, and a host of other features which can include:

    • Storage of waveforms for future reference and comparison
    • Display of several waveforms simultaneously
    • Spectral analysis
    • Portability
    • Battery power option
    • Usability with all popular operating platforms
    • Zoom-in and zoom-out
    • Multi-color displays

    This was last updated in September 2005

    Continue Reading About oscilloscope

    Related Terms

    fiber optics (optical fiber) Fiber optics, or optical fiber, refers to the medium and the technology associated with the transmission of information as light. See complete definition infrared radiation (IR) Infrared radiation (IR), sometimes referred to simply as infrared, is a region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum where. See complete definition microcontroller A microcontroller is a compact integrated circuit designed to govern a specific operation in an embedded system. See complete definition


    The Energy Story – Chapter 3: Resistance and Static Electricity #renewable #energy


    #

    Chapter 3: Resistance and Static Electricity

    As we have learned, some kinds of atoms contain loosely attached electrons. Electrons can be made to move easily from one atom to another. When those electrons move among the atoms of matter, a current of electricity is created.

    Take a piece of wire. The electrons are passed from atom to atom, creating an electrical current from one end to the other. Electrons are very, very small. A single copper penny contains more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (1×1022) electrons.

    Electricity “flows” or moves through some things better than others do. The measurement of how well something conducts electricity is called its resistance.

    Resistance in wire depends on how thick and how long it is, and what it’s made of. The thickness of wire is called its gauge. The smaller the gauge, the bigger the wire. Some of the largest thicknesses of regular wire is gauge 1.

    Different types of metal are used in making wire. You can have copper wire, aluminum wire, even steel wire. Each of these metals has a different resistance; how well the metal conducts electricity. The lower the resistance of a wire, the better it conducts electricity.

    Copper is used in many wires because it has a lower resistance than many other metals. The wires in your walls, inside your lamps and elsewhere are usually copper.

    A piece of metal can be made to act like a heater. When an electrical current occurs, the resistance causes friction and the friction causes heat. The higher the resistance, the hotter it can get. So, a coiled wire high in resistance, like the wire in a hair dryer, can be very hot.

    Some things conduct electricity very poorly. These are called insulators. Rubber is a good insulator, and that’s why rubber is used to cover wires in an electric cord. Glass is another good insulator. If you look at the end of a power line, you’ll see that it is attached to some bumpy looking things. These are glass insulators. They keep the metal of the wires from touching the metal of the towers.

    Another type of electrical energy is static electricity. Unlike current electricity that moves, static electricity stays in one place.

    Try this experiment.

    Rub a balloon filled with air on a wool sweater or on your hair. Then hold it up to a wall. The balloon will stay there by itself.

    Tie strings to the ends of two balloons. Now rub the two balloons together, hold them by strings at the end and put them next to each other. They’ll move apart.

    Rubbing the balloons gives them static electricity. When you rub the balloon it picks up extra electrons from the sweater or your hair and becomes slightly negatively charged.

    The negative charges in the single balloon are attracted to the positive charges in the wall.

    The two balloons hanging by strings both have negative charges. Negative charges always repel negative charges and positive always repels positive charges. So, the two balloons’ negative charges “push” each other apart.

    Static electricity can also give you a shock. If you walk across a carpet, shuffling your feet and touching something made of metal, a spark can jump between you and the metal object. Shuffling your feet picks up additional electrons spread over your body. When you touch a metal doorknob or something with a positive charge the electricity jumps across the small gap from your fingers just before you touch the metal knob. If you walk across a carpet and touch a computer case, you can damage the computer.

    One other type of static electricity is very spectacular. It’s the lightning in a thunder and lightning storm. Clouds become negatively charged as ice crystals inside the clouds rub up against each other. Meanwhile, on the ground, the positive charge increases. The clouds get so highly charged that the electrons jump from the ground to the cloud, or from one cloud to another cloud. This causes a huge spark of static electricity in the sky that we call lightning.

    You can find out more about lightning at Web Weather for Kids – www.ucar.edu/40th/webweather/

    You’ll remember from Chapter 2 that the word “electricity” came from the Greek words “elektor,” for “beaming sun” and “elektron,” both words describing amber. Amber is fossilized tree sap millions of years old and has hardened as hard as a stone.

    Around 600 BCE (Before the Common Era) Greeks noticed a strange effect: When rubbing “elektron” against a piece of fur, the amber would start attracting particles of dust, feathers and straw. No one paid much attention to this “strange effect” until about 1600 when Dr. William Gilbert investigated the reactions of magnets and amber and discovered other objects can be made “electric.”

    Gilbert said that amber acquired what he called “resinous electricity” when rubbed with fur. Glass, however, when rubbed with silk, acquired what he termed “vitreous electricity.”

    He thought that electricity repelled the same kind and attracts the opposite kind of electricity. Gilbert and other scientists of that time thought that the friction actually created the electricity (their word for the electrical charge).

    In 1747, Benjamin Franklin in America and William Watson in England both reached the same conclusion. They said all materials possess a single kind of electrical “fluid.” They didn’t really know anything about atoms and electrons, so they called how it behaved a “fluid.”

    They thought that this fluid can penetrate matter freely and couldn’t be created or destroyed. The two men thought that the action of rubbing (like rubbing amber with fur) moves this unseen fluid from one thing to another, electrifying both.

    Franklin defined the fluid as positive and the lack of fluid as negative. Therefore, according to Franklin, the direction of flow was from positive to negative. Today, we know that the opposite is true. Electricity flows from negative to positive. Others took the idea even further saying this that two fluids are involved. They said items with the same fluid attract each other. And opposite types of fluid in objects will make them repel each other.

    All of this was only partially right. This is how scientific theories develop. Someone thinks of why something occurs and then proposes an explanation. It can take centuries sometime to find the real truth. Instead of electricity being a fluid, it is the movement of the charged particles between the objects. the two objects are really exchanging electrons.

    Learn about Electrical Circuits and electrons in Chapter 4.


    Cheap Hotel Bookings – Saving up to 80% on Worldwide Hotels #motels

    #hotelbooking

    #

    CheapHotelBookings.com offers you the choice of thousands of hotels all over the world with our search and compare tool. We guarantee you’ll find the best hotel rates in any town or city we feature. We regularly experience up to 80% savings on hotel rooms because we compare prices from hundreds of travel sites such as Expedia, Laterooms, Hotels.com, EasyToBook and many more. With our clear descriptions and nightly room rates we make the hotel booking easy.

    With superb hotel reviews from past guests you can be assured that you’re getting the best hotel room in the right location at the right price for you. So whether you’re travelling abroad or staying in the UK, need a family room or a reservation for a single night business trip, from the exclusive hotel chains to the boutique hotels, we will find the best accommodation for you.

    CheapHotelBookings.com makes it easy to find a hotel with the hotel facilities like a free breakfast or gym, spa, function rooms, entertainment or even a golf course.
    Search, compare and book great hotels at up to 80% discount and make your trip pay with CheapHotelBookings.com

    HOTEL DEALS

    We feature Hotel deals and bargains from around the world. Let us send you the best in our newsletter.

    Or why not join us socially and share the news

    SITE LINKS

    Copyright 2013 ASAP Ventures Ltd
    All rights reserved
    Registered in England and Wales
    Company number 4278063

    Registered office address
    1 The Square, Lightwater, Surrey, GU18 5SS





    Spring Attendee Homepage – Atlanta Home Show – Georgia s Largest Home


    #

    The 39th Annual Spring Atlanta Home Show – March 24-26, 2017 – Cobb Galleria Centre

    The largest Home Show in Georgia! Hundreds of participating companies! For THREE days only March 24-26, the Cobb Galleria transforms into a one-stop-shop for all your home improvement needs! For 39 years the Spring Atlanta Home Show has been improving home lifestyles and adding value to your largest single investment, your home. We’re proud of our ability to produce a family friendly environment and welcome you to our home.

    Experience exciting and interactive sessions that can inspire you in your yard, with your decor and save you a great deal of time and money on your next remodeling job. » Click here to read more.

    This year’s grand prize is a 7 LED fixture outdoor lighting package provided by Outdoor Lighting Perspectives of Atlanta. No purchase necessary – read more for all the details. » Click here to read more.

    Georgia Landscape presents the Red Hare Backyard Beer Garden! Come learn about landscape design, services and products ranging from grass to fire, flowers to water, patios to recreation areas. You can chat with area experts about local landscape and options for every type of backyard. This is an interactive, educational area designed to give you the information you need to turn your backyard into an outdoor living area to enjoy for years! If all that were not enough, for a $5 donation to Hope Atlanta – the programs of Travelers Aid you can taste your way through this feature. Marietta’s own Red Hare Brewing Company will have SIX of their handcrafted brews available for your approval! Cabot Creamery will also have a sampling of cheeses. So bring your friends, enjoy some great beer and help a worthy cause! » Click here to read more.

    Thanks to PMC Building Materials, members of the home improvement trade receive FREE admission to the show on Friday March 24! » Click here to read more.