Safe Driving Tips for Teenage Drivers #teen #drivers, #teen #driver #safety, #car


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Safe Driving Tips For Teenage Drivers

It’s a fact: teenage drivers account for more auto accidents than any other age group.

However, by practicing safe driving techniques―such as driving defensively―you’ll increase the odds you’ll keep yourself (and your passengers) safe on the road and you’ll increase your changes of getting more affordable car insurance as you build a good driving record.

Safety Tips for Teen Drivers

Whether you’re just getting ready to hit the road or have been driving for months―or even years―take some time to review these 8 safe driving tips.

1) Keep Your Cell Phone Off

Multiple studies indicate using a cell phone while driving is the equivalent of driving drunk ―that’s even when using a hands-free phone.

NOTE . Your state may prohibit the use of cell phones while driving. An increasing amount of states are creating laws regarding cell phone use and texting. Often, younger drivers face stricter laws.

2) Don’t Text

Research shows texting―on average―causes a loss of focus on the road for 4.6 seconds. You can drive the length of a full football field in that time. A lot can go wrong while you drive the length of a football field without your eyes on the road.

Don’t try the “texting-while-stopped” approach, either, as many states ban texting while behind the wheel. And, when you have your head down, you won’t notice key developments that may occur. Remember, you still need to pay attention to the road when you’re stopped.

3) Turn on Your Headlights

Using your headlights increases your visibility and help other drivers see you, even when you feel like it’s light out.

In the early morning and early evening (dusk), you need to use your lights or other drivers might not see you, which can be disastrous.

4) Obey the Speed Limit

Speeding is a major contributor to fatal teen accidents. That’s especially true when driving on roads with lots of traffic or with which you’re not familiar.

Don’t feel pressured to keep up with traffic if it seems like everyone else is flying by you. Driving a safe speed helps ensure your well-being, and keeps you away from costly traffic tickets that can cause a sharp hike in your auto insurance premiums.

5) Minimize Distractions

It may be tempting to eat, drink, flip around the radio dial, or play music loudly while you’re cruising around town; however, all can cause your mind or vision to wander, even for a few seconds.

As an inexperienced driver, you are more apt to lose control of your car. Distractions can significantly increase the chances that you 1) not notice impending danger or notice it too late and 2) lose the ability to control the vehicle.

6) Drive Solo

Having a single teen passenger in your car can double the risk of causing a car accident. Adding additional teen passengers causes the risk to escalate.

7) Practice Defensive Driving

Always be aware of the traffic ahead, behind, and next to you, and have possible escape routes in mind. Stay at least one car length behind the car in front of you in slower speeds, and maintain a larger buffer zone with faster speeds.

Some car insurance companies will even give you a discount if you take an approved defensive driving course to improve your driving skills.

8) Choose a Safe Car

If possible, drive a safe car with the latest safety equipment (such as anti-lock brakes, electronic stability control, and air bags), and one with an excellent crash safety record.

Final Word: Teens Becoming Safe Drivers

There’s no substitute for driving experience and the wisdom that age brings, but by applying the above tips you’ll enhance the odds you won’t become a teenage driver accident statistic. Also, when you have a good driving record free of accidents, it’s easier to find cheap car insurance in the future.

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Adolescent Acute Residential Treatment (ART) Program #adolescent, #teen, #mclean #hospital, #art, #dual


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Adolescent Acute Residential Treatment (ART) Program

Access to Care Steps to Receiving Treatment

The Adolescent Acute Residential Treatment (ART) Program provides intensive, short-term, and highly focused psychiatric care for teens and young adults through age 19 with emotional and behavioral difficulties. With a length of stay between 10 and 14 days, this insurance-based residential program focuses on stabilizing adolescents in acute crisis.

At our two locations, McLean s main campus in Belmont, Massachusetts, and McLean SouthEast in Middleborough, Massachusetts, the coeducational program operates in unlocked settings, maximizing each individual s responsibility and capacity for self-control. The ART is a voluntary program so residents must be willing to participate in treatment.

For more information or to make a referral. call 617.855.2800 (Belmont) or 774.419.1100 (McLean SouthEast)

We specialize in treating teenagers who are struggling with psychiatric diagnoses such as ADHD, anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. We also offer a specialty track for those whose illness is complicated by a co-occurring substance use disorder.

Groups and structured activities involve skills training, team building, preparing meals, and recreational therapy. These pursuits enhance daily living skills, build self-mastery and esteem, and provide a sense of autonomy and membership in a community.

Teens and young adults can be referred to the program from home or any level of care, including inpatient, partial hospital, and outpatient. We offer a full range of services, including assessment and consultation, group therapy, skills training, education, medication evaluation and management, and family therapy. As part of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. the program offers access to care and services throughout McLean Hospital.

At McLean SouthEast we also offer day program services, the McLean SouthEast Adolescent Partial Hospital Program, for teens who require intensive, structured treatment but are able to manage living at home.

Our staff is composed of a multidisciplinary group of board-certified psychiatrists, licensed psychologists and clinical social workers, registered nurses, and expressive therapists. The ART staff specializes in making sophisticated assessments, diagnoses, and recommendations in complex situations.


How to Apply for a Maryland #mva, #motor #vehicle #administration, #dmv, #maryland


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How to Apply for a Maryland:

Proof of identity and residency are required of all applicants for a new Maryland driver’s license, learner’s permit or identification (ID) card; please use the online document guide to assist you with what to bring to the MVA.

The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration will verify the information provided on your application to determine eligibility.

All applicants for a driver’s license are checked with the National Driver Registry. If your license is suspended, revoked, canceled or refused, you are not eligible for a Maryland driver’s license.

Drivers must meet certain vision requirements. Visit the MVA’s vision requirements page for additional information.

The Maryland Department of Transportation’s Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) is now printing/mailing one of the most secure driver’s licenses, learner’s permits and identification (ID) cards in the nation. All cards are now delivered through the mail within 7-10 business days. The new cards incorporate cutting-edge security features to help protect against identity theft and fraud. The new cards also meet all state and federal standards and are REAL ID compliant. As always, we encourage customers to Skip the Trip and renew their driver’s license or ID card via web, kiosk and mail. The MVA’s online services can be found here. Much more information on our new secure cards, including how to expedite delivery of the new products, can be found here .

Immigrants with temporary lawful status in the U.S. will be issued a limited term driver’s license or ID card, valid for the duration of their lawful status in the U.S.

If you are seeking a Maryland driver’s license and have a foreign license that is not suspended or revoked, please complete the 3-hour alcohol and drug education program and present the license before taking your driving skills test. If you do not have a foreign license, you will need to obtain a learner’s permit, complete the Maryland Driver Education Program and meet other requirements before taking your driving skills test.

Immigrants, presenting foreign documentation without valid accompanying United States Citizenship and Immigration Services documentation, can obtain a federally noncompliant Maryland driver’s license or ID card. Please visit the online document guide for more detailed instructions.

RENEWALS FOR ELIGIBLE DRIVERS

To improve customer service and reduce wait times, customers under the age of 40, who are eligible, must renew their driver’s license here. or by mail or MVA Kiosk. Your renewals will no longer be completed at an MVA branch office counter.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS OR LICENSE CORRECTION

To request a change of address card, a corrected driver’s license or ID card, please complete the transaction online here or by MVA kiosk.

An additional fee applies for new, corrected licenses or ID cards. A change of address card is sent at no extra cost, as an attachment, which should be stored with the license or ID card. The new license, ID card or attachment card will be mailed.

DUPLICATE DRIVER’S LICENSE OR ID CARD

Please request a duplicate driver’s license or ID card online with the new online option here or by MVA kiosk. These transactions are no longer handled over the counter and the duplicate driver’s license or ID card is mailed to the address on record at the MVA.

MEDICAL ADVISORY BOARD REFERRALS

For the safety of all drivers, the MVA’s Medical Advisory Board must consider your medical status as part of your license request. Please be assured that all medical information is kept confidential and is only reviewed by the MVA’s Medical Advisory Board physician.

All drivers are required to report medical conditions to the MVA, including:

1. Diabetes that has caused a low blood sugar episode requiring assistance from another person in the last 6 months

4. A heart condition that has caused a loss of consciousness in the past 6 months

6. A condition that causes you to have dizzy spells, fainting, or blackouts

7. Sleep apnea or narcolepsy

8. A history of traumatic brain injury

9. A condition that causes weakness, shaking, or numbness in the arms, hands, legs, or feet that may affect your ability to drive

10. A hand, arm, foot, or leg that is absent, amputated, or has a loss of function that may affect your ability to drive

11. An eye problem which prevents a corrected minimum visual acuity of 20/70 in at least one eye or binocular field of vision of at least 110 degrees

12. Alcohol use problem

13. Drug use problem

14. A mental health condition that may affect your ability to drive