Caring for Terminally ill Patients – The New Indian Express #last #minute

#care of terminally ill patient

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Caring for Terminally ill Patients

BENGALURU: When a person is diagnosed with a terminal illness, family members, friends and caregivers should be willing to listen to their concerns, say doctors.

Dr L Srinivasamurthy, medical director, Nightingales Home Care Service, says that in order to take care of patients with cancer and other life-threatening conditions such as liver and kidney failure, AIDS, old age senility and other mental illnesses during their terminally ill condition, a broad, multidisciplinary approach should be followed. In order to give effective palliative care family members should be supportive and make use of available community resources. This care can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited. Palliative care can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in people’s homes and for this, family members should listen or understand the needs of patients.

Palliative care improves the quality of life of terminally ill patients and their families by providing pain and symptomatic relief as well. It also provides spiritual and psychosocial support from the time of diagnosis to the end of patient’s life, he says.

What to expect from palliative care?

  • Provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
  • Affirms life and regards death as a normal process.
  • Intends neither to hasten nor postpone death.
  • Integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care.
  • Offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until their death.
  • Offers a support system to help the family members cope during the patient’s illness and in their own bereavement.
  • Uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families.

In most parts of the world, a majority of cancer patients are in advanced stages of cancer when they first seek medical help. For such patients, the only realistic treatment option is pain relief and palliative care. Effective approaches to palliative care are available to improve the quality of life for cancer patients. The WHO 3-step ladder for cancer pain is a relatively inexpensive yet effective method for relieving cancer pain in about 90 percent of the patients, says Dr Srinivasmurthy.

In the final stages of life-limiting illness, even the best possible care cannot extend life beyond a point, and hence the focus shifts to making the patient as comfortable as possible.

Depending on the nature of the illness and the patient’s circumstances, this final stage period may last from a matter of weeks or months to several years. During this time, palliative care measures can provide the patient with medication and treatments to control pain and other symptoms, such as constipation, nausea, or shortness of breath, says Dr Shoba Naidu, critical care consultant, Sagar Hospital

When to initiate palliative care on your loved ones:

  • The patient wishes to remain at home, rather than spend time in the hospital.
  • He/she stops receiving treatment for the disease.
  • The patient has made multiple trips to the emergency room, the condition has been stabilized, but the illness continues to progress significantly, affecting their quality of life.
  • If a patient has been admitted to the hospital several times within the last year with the same or worsening symptoms.

When caregivers, family members and loved ones are clear about the patient’s preferences for treatment in the final stages of their life, they’re free to devote their energy to care and compassion. To ensure that everyone in the family understands the patient’s wishes, it’s important for anyone diagnosed with a life-limiting illness to discuss their feelings with their near and dear ones before a medical crisis strikes, says Dr Shoba Naidu.

Experts also suggest that it is important to seek financial and legal advice while the terminally ill patient can still participate. Legal documents such as a living will, power of attorney, or advance directives can set forth a patient’s wishes for future healthcare so that the family members are all clear about his or her preferences.





Holistic Nursing Care Plan For Terminally Ill Patient – Essay – 1497

#care of terminally ill patient

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Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

  • Length: 5 pages
  • Sources: 5
  • Subject: Healthcare
  • Type: Essay
  • Paper: # 65372827

Note. Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Document:

Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

The objective of this study is to create a holistic nursing care plan for a terminally ill patient. This study will explain how perceptions about quality of life and health promotion might affect care for a dying patient with a lingering illness such as cancer and discuss strategies that could be used in the situation to improve the quality of life for the patient and her husband during this illness.

It is important that the nursing care plan for the terminally ill includes the reassurance that the patient will not be abandoned and that the nurse assist the patient in discussing their care wishes and goals. To assist patients such as the patient in this scenario it is important to understand the concepts and elements of end-of-life care and that the nurse be a skilled practitioner of the nursing arts. The end-of-life care if “patient goal-centered and should be provided for those who have a limited life expectancy.” (Norlander, nd, p.3) The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization states that Hospice:

” affirms the concept of palliative care as an intensive program that enhances comfort and promotes the quality of life for individuals and their families. When cure is no longer possible, hospice recognizes that a peaceful and comfortable death is an essential goal of health care. Hospice believes that death is an integral part of the life cycle and that intensive palliative care focuses on pain relief, comfort, and enhanced quality of life as appropriate goals for the terminally ill. Hospice also recognizes the potential for growth that often exists within the dying experience for the individual and his/her family and seeks to protect and nurture this potential.” (Norlander, nd, p. 4)

The holistic nursing practice is defined as “all nursing practice that has healing the whole person as its goal.” (Mariano, 2007, p.64) Holistic nursing care is a caring and healing relationship and values the cultural values and beliefs as well as the individuals’ spirituality in the nursing care. Holistic nursing care involves care of the individual’s physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual being with a focus on the individual’s comfort and relief from pain.

Because the patient is terminally ill and is in a great deal of pain one of the first considerations for this patient is relieving her pain so that she is able to function without a great deal of pain. Relieving the patient’s level of depression is also of great importance so that she does not spend the end of her life crying in bed as she is doing presently. The nurse should meet with the family members who are reluctant to visit and explain to them that they have a great role to play in the end-of-life care of this patient. The family members should be brought to the understanding that their role is critical.

Patient Emotional Health

Upon relieving the patient of the pain and depression through use of medication, the hospice-care nursing staff will be of great comfort to the patient through simply talking with the patient about her life and about her wishes for her end-of-life care. The patient should be highly active in determining any life support or alternatively lack of life support that she desires to receive. The patient should be assisted in thinking about her wishes for her funeral, the songs and music that will be used at the funeral and what she chooses to wear at the funeral.

Patient Spiritual Health

The patient’s spiritual affairs should be addressed as well so that the patient is both emotionally and spiritually prepared to deal with the ending of her life due to the progression of the cancer.

Patient Physical Care

Hospice Care is utilized by many patients who are terminally ill. Hospice Care involves nursing staff coming into the patient’s home and assisting them with bathing, dressing, their medication, monitoring the patient’s condition, counseling family members about what they can do to make the patient’s path of dying easier and more comfortable. The hospice philosophy is stated to be a holistic philosophy, is interdisciplinary in nature, and includes physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, volunteers, and staff assisting with grief of the family. It is reported that hospice care is ” synonymous with supportive care. Pain management and symptom control is state-of-the-art pain. Volunteers are available for respite care and companionship.

Factors Addressed By Hospice

The hospice team assists with the decisions and challenges that the patient and [continue]

Some Sources Used in Document:





How to Keep a Terminally Ill Patient at Home – making it

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Keeping The Terminally Ill Patient At Home
(Making It Happen)

If your loved one wishes to stay at home up till the very end, then you need to make that wish clearly known to your RN casemanager, the social worker, your physician and any other hospice staff who inquires about your wishes. If there are other family members available to help out, discuss this decision with each other, and make sure that all family members are working together toward your goal.

Hospices can provide services which help during part of the day. At the Routine Home Care Level of Care, the hospice would be sending out Home Health Aides to help with bathing, dressing, basic bedside care and activities of daily living. They can sometimes send out home service aides to help with housework or cooking and other tasks. Volunteers from the community who serve at your hospice can also spend time with your loved one, freeing up time for you to go out if needed, or just to get a break from caregiving. The RN casemanager and other nurses will be visiting periodically during the week to evaluate your loved one’s condition, monitor for any changes, and to make sure your loved one is getting the medications and services needed meet his or her needs.

However, in some cases, you should be prepared for hospice staff who might attempt to convince you to bring your loved one to the hospice facility. While this may be appropriate for some patients, if you really want to keep your loved one home, you can. You, as patient or family/caregiver, have rights to choose to stay home, and nobody can force you to enter a facility against your will. However, if you do choose to stay home, then you need to mobilize all resources and assistance you can muster to help make it happen. A good first step would be to ask the hospice RN and the medical social worker if she or he knew of other community resources where you could get help to care for your loved one.

What can the family do to help keep their loved one home?

The family members can make a schedule of when each family member will be there to provide care so that all hours are covered.

You can ask for help from your local church or synogogue. Sometimes it is necessary to be willing to let others help out, if you are to succeed in keeping your loved one in the home.

You can ask for help from friend or acquaintances.

You can directly hire extra help. Help can come from nursing agencies or other sources. For example, if your loved one does not need nursing care all the time, then you could hire sitters from agencies or even directly hire people from the community. Some people put an ad in the newspaper letting people know that they would be hiring a helper and specifying the hourly wage they would directly pay to helpers. Many colleges and universities have employment centers for their students who are seeking part-time or full-time work. The students can often work hours that others may not be willing to take, and they usually do not need as high a wage as household bread-winners who are trying to support a household and family.

Whether you have the immediate family care for the patient or relatives, or close friends, you will probably need assistance of many sorts. If the family can come together and work together, that is the very best circumstance.

The hospice must meet the care needs of the patient and family unit. 1 The services which are required to be provided include family needs for support and counseling. If symptoms go out of control and the patient experiences uncontrolled severe pain or other symptoms, then the hospice must provide, in most circumstances, what is called continuous nursing care in your own home. which is around the clock nursing at home, provided by licensed nurses more than 50% of each day, with the rest of the care provided by home health aides. 2

A Registered Nurse (not an LPN) must personally visit the patient to assess his or her condition each day. If the patient’s symptoms are brought under control, then continuous care may be discontinued. However, if symptoms remain out of control, the RN may continue to have nursing staff provided around the clock in your home. After three days the hospice will re-evaluate whether continuous nursing care in the home can be continued. Continuous nursing care may also be provided when the patient is actively dying and very near the end.

The hospice will help you learn how to care for the patient at home. The Registered Nurse will teach you about the medications to be given and how to give them. If you have questions about your loved one’s care after normal business hours, you can always call the hospice’s on-call nurse. Whatever the situation, the hospice staff are experts in handling the types of situations that come up. There is much information available that can help you keep your loved one at home. Read whatever literature the hospice provides and ask questions. Discuss your wishes among yourselves as a family and with the hospice staff. The more you communicate, the better the outcome will be.

1 According to federal regulation 42 CFR 418.58(c) the hospice’s Plan of Care must state in detail the scope and frequency of services needed to meet the patient’s and family’s needs.

2 42 CFR 418.204 states that, Nursing care may be covered on a continuous basis for as much as 24 hours a day during periods of crisis as necessary to maintain an individual at home. A period of crisis is a period in which the individual requires continuous care to achieve palliation or management of acute medical symptoms. 42 CFR 418.82 states that Nursing services must be directed and staffed to assure that the nursing needs of patients are met. The hospice must meet your needs for nursing care!





Canada OKs Doctor-Assisted Suicide, for Terminally Ill Only #mountain #valley #hospice

#what is terminally ill

#

Canada OKs Doctor-Assisted Suicide, for Terminally Ill Only

Canada’s Senate on Friday passed a bill that would allow terminally ill people to end their lives with assistance from a doctor.

The bill passed easily, 44-28, ending a political deadlock between the upper and lower houses. It will become law after royal assent by the governor general, a step that is largely a formality.

The limitation of doctor-assisted suicide to those who are terminally ill had been a point of contention in lawmakers’ debates. Some senators wanted to broaden the criteria under which people could seek a doctor’s help to die, but the House, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, argued for strict limits.

The legislation also would allow medically assisted suicide only for those who qualify for government-funded health services in Canada — a measure to prevent people from traveling to Canada to die.

Canada’s Supreme Court struck down an old prohibition against doctor-assisted suicide in 2015 and gave the government one year to draft legislation regulating the practice.

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Terminally Ill Floridians Fall in Love, Marry in Hospice Care – ABC

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Sections

Shows

Local

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2016 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved.

Terminally Ill Couple Meet, Marry in Florida Hospice

WATCH Terminally Ill Couple Meet, Marry in Florida Hospice

Two terminally ill Floridians decided they wanted to spend the rest of their lives together, marrying in front of family and friends last week after falling in love at their hospice care facility.

Debbie Rivera, 54, and John Whaley, 58, are both suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. according to their nursing home. and Whaley, a triple-amputee, has also been diagnosed with stage three lung cancer. he said.

“We were both so tired of being alone and not having nobody except for family,” Whaley of Jacksonville, Florida told ABC News. “It makes me feel I got somebody here I can talk to and relate to.”

Whaley, who had been a patient Governors Creek Health and Rehabilitation Center for a few months, said he was introduced to Rivera while relaxing in the television room at the facility.

“We’d sit in there and talk and we started getting to know each other and started having feelings for each other,” he said. “We both like the same things and we both are in bad shape, so we hit it off.”

Although the two had fallen ill, Whaley, who decided to propose to Rivera, said he was thrilled when she agreed to spend the rest of her life with him.

Philip Slotin, general manager of Vitas Healthcare, which provides support and comfort to patients at Governors Creek, assisted in setting up the wedding day festivities for Whaley and Rivera.

The couple married in in Green Cove Springs, Florida on Saturday, May 23, 2015.

“When we found out they wanted to get married, we had one of our chaplains do the service,” he said. “It was really exciting that we could help this happen and have a nice celebration.”

Rivera, who donned a traditional white bridal gown during the May 23 ceremony, was given away by her son Scott under a gazebo where she and Whaley exchanged vows.

“She looked beautiful,” Whaley said. “Debbie cried. I was about to a couple of times. After, there was cake, crackers, teas, and stuff like that. We smiled for a bunch of pictures. My face was never so tired from smiling,” he said, laughing.

Governors Creek’s east wing manager Latoria Haile said the couple “seemed very happy.”

“The bride was like any other bride — very nervous and giddy,” she added. “They’re a cute couple.”

Following the reception, the couple left the facility to stay at Whaley’s home in Jacksonville.

“I don’t think I could be happier, honestly,” Whaley said.





Deutsche Bank – Goodie bags for terminally ill patients at Dover Park

#dover park hospice

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Goodie bags for terminally ill patients at Dover Park Hospice

June 2014 │ Singapore

15 Global Transaction Banking (GTB) Singapore staff visited Dover Park Hospice on June 6, 2014, to deliver sweet snacks and drinks to terminally ill patients and their families after their lunchtime meals.

Through the generosity of GTB staff, the volunteers raised donations which enabled them to assemble goodie bags with filled with bowls of ‘tau huay’ (soya beancurd) dessert, drinks, snacks and wet wipes for nearly 100 patients. The home-care patients were not forgotten either, with separate bags kept for staff to take on their next patient visits.

It was a touching visit for the volunteers, who felt that they could make a small difference for the patients they met, while gaining a tiny insight into the suffering and difficult times the patients were going through. That afternoon, the volunteers went away feeling that they might have been able to contribute at least a little to the hospice’s aim to “make every moment matter” for the patients.

Joey Han said, “It was comforting to see that patients at Dover Park Hospice are able to live the last days of their life in comfort and with dignity. The quality of care during this transition is made possible by the professional staff and volunteers at Dover Park Hospice.”

Manish Thakur. another volunteer, summed up the experience: “Corporate Responsibility activities where we give back to society and community are always rewarding and blissful experiences. Dover Park Hospice is providing a noble service for the patients during the twilight of their life journey. As they say – There is a lot of difference between human being and being human. A few understand it.

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Caring for Terminally ill Patients – The New Indian Express #motels #in

#care of terminally ill patient

#

Caring for Terminally ill Patients

BENGALURU: When a person is diagnosed with a terminal illness, family members, friends and caregivers should be willing to listen to their concerns, say doctors.

Dr L Srinivasamurthy, medical director, Nightingales Home Care Service, says that in order to take care of patients with cancer and other life-threatening conditions such as liver and kidney failure, AIDS, old age senility and other mental illnesses during their terminally ill condition, a broad, multidisciplinary approach should be followed. In order to give effective palliative care family members should be supportive and make use of available community resources. This care can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited. Palliative care can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in people’s homes and for this, family members should listen or understand the needs of patients.

Palliative care improves the quality of life of terminally ill patients and their families by providing pain and symptomatic relief as well. It also provides spiritual and psychosocial support from the time of diagnosis to the end of patient’s life, he says.

What to expect from palliative care?

  • Provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
  • Affirms life and regards death as a normal process.
  • Intends neither to hasten nor postpone death.
  • Integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care.
  • Offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until their death.
  • Offers a support system to help the family members cope during the patient’s illness and in their own bereavement.
  • Uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families.

In most parts of the world, a majority of cancer patients are in advanced stages of cancer when they first seek medical help. For such patients, the only realistic treatment option is pain relief and palliative care. Effective approaches to palliative care are available to improve the quality of life for cancer patients. The WHO 3-step ladder for cancer pain is a relatively inexpensive yet effective method for relieving cancer pain in about 90 percent of the patients, says Dr Srinivasmurthy.

In the final stages of life-limiting illness, even the best possible care cannot extend life beyond a point, and hence the focus shifts to making the patient as comfortable as possible.

Depending on the nature of the illness and the patient’s circumstances, this final stage period may last from a matter of weeks or months to several years. During this time, palliative care measures can provide the patient with medication and treatments to control pain and other symptoms, such as constipation, nausea, or shortness of breath, says Dr Shoba Naidu, critical care consultant, Sagar Hospital

When to initiate palliative care on your loved ones:

  • The patient wishes to remain at home, rather than spend time in the hospital.
  • He/she stops receiving treatment for the disease.
  • The patient has made multiple trips to the emergency room, the condition has been stabilized, but the illness continues to progress significantly, affecting their quality of life.
  • If a patient has been admitted to the hospital several times within the last year with the same or worsening symptoms.

When caregivers, family members and loved ones are clear about the patient’s preferences for treatment in the final stages of their life, they’re free to devote their energy to care and compassion. To ensure that everyone in the family understands the patient’s wishes, it’s important for anyone diagnosed with a life-limiting illness to discuss their feelings with their near and dear ones before a medical crisis strikes, says Dr Shoba Naidu.

Experts also suggest that it is important to seek financial and legal advice while the terminally ill patient can still participate. Legal documents such as a living will, power of attorney, or advance directives can set forth a patient’s wishes for future healthcare so that the family members are all clear about his or her preferences.





What is terminally ill #cheap #hotel #prices

#what is terminally ill

#

Pro/Con; Do terminally ill patients have the right to die?

Pro: Terminally ill patients have the right to terminate their own life

On Nov. 1, 2014, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard took her own life with a pill. She died peacefully, surrounded by her family in her own home instead of losing her battle with cancer in a cold, sterile hospital room. Maynard’s decision to end her own life created a sense of dignity for her and her loved ones, a common experience for many who choose to go through with what is known as physician-assisted suicide.

Maynard was diagnosed with a stage four brain tumor in April and was told she had six months to live. Her tumor was so large that she would need full brain radiation.

“After months of research, my family and I reached a heartbreaking conclusion: There is no treatment that would save my life, and the recommended treatments would have destroyed the time I had left,” Maynard told a CNN reporter. “Because the rest of my body is young and healthy, I am likely to physically hang on for a long time. I probably would have suffered in hospice care for weeks or even months, and my family would have had to watch that.”

So that she could spend the finals months of her life doing what she loved with her family, Maynard and her husband moved from California to Oregon to take advantage of the state’s physician-assisted suicide, or euthanasia, laws. These laws allow those who are terminally ill to end their lives painlessly with the help of a physician. Only four states currently allow for health care centers to provide terminally ill patients with assistance with euthanasia. North Carolina is not one of these states.

With the legalization of assisted-suicide throughout the United States, far fewer terminally ill patients would die in unbearable pain and without dignity. They would be able to live the last days and weeks of their lives in a way they choose.

It is wrong for parents to have to watch their children linger in pain when medical professionals cannot provide a cure or remedy. In August 2014, a French couple asked doctors to allow their child to be euthanized after being born four months premature. If kept alive, the baby would be completely paralyzed on one side. Though the procedure is not currently legal in France and the couple’s request was denied, assisted-suicide for children has recently become legal in Belgium.

Without assisted suicide, many people die long and painful deaths in places where they may not be comfortable or may not be able to see their families. With assisted suicide, though, these people can die with dignity, feeling fulfilled and comforted.

By MaryKent Wolff

Con: Terminally ill patients don t have the right to terminate their own life

Terminally ill with glioblastoma, a rare brain cancer, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard was faced with the agonizing decision of choosing between fighting the futile battle with cancer or ending her life. Maynard, an advocate for death with dignity, requested and received lethal medication that she later ingested, taking her life.

Maynard’s story is tragic. Either path that she could have chosen to take would have been heartbreaking. But her recent decision to die raised a difficult-to-answer question: Do we have the right to die?

Euthanasia advocates describe assisted suicide as an option for “mentally competent, terminally ill patients” facing suffering. The idea is to give people power over their lives and dying on their own terms. But contrary to its intended purpose of self-empowerment, the mere existence of the fatal medication can pressure the disabled, depressed, elderly and sick to prematurely end their lives. Patients would be prone to lose the will to live or see death as the best option for the financial stability of their families. Euthanasia cuts treatment costs and therefore gives insurance companies and doctors the incentive to pressure the seriously ill to consider assisted suicide.

Although assisted suicide is not intended for people who are merely depressed, little is being done to prevent the drugs from getting in the hands of the suicidal. In Washington and Oregon, where physician-assisted suicide is legal, there are no requirements that patients receive psychological evaluation or treatment prior to receiving lethal drugs. In 2010, only one out of 65 patients in Oregon who died as a result of physician-assisted suicide was referred for psychiatric or psychological counseling.

Americans value human life. The religious and non-religious alike mourn the death of their loved ones. In times of tragedy, regardless of our differences, we as citizens band together to support those in trouble. We give our time, money, blood and tears for the sake of another life.

We don’t always realize how special this unity is. Life is sacred. We see countries on the news with exceedingly low life expectancies because of poverty and disease. History has shown extremist movements that have portrayed human life as expendable and no more than a political resource. We as Americans have been raised to believe differently, and suicide destroys the life we work so hard to preserve.

Assisted suicide is a slippery slope. Imperative precautions as safeguards for patients are not being taken. Under the current, careless procedure these drugs could so easily get into the wrong hands. Lethal medication will be dealt across the nation and abused. Even those who legally receive the medication may take it under the assumption that they will die soon, when most live long passed their diagnosed death date without pain due to misdiagnosis. We also have to take account of the life saving medical miracles that occur every day. Life is precious and should not be disposed of so casually.

By Katie Farina

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Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life – Cancer,

#what is terminally ill

#

Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life

By Nicole Weisensee Egan

11/02/2014 AT 07:35 PM EST

Brittany Maynard. who became the public face of the controversial right-to-die movement over the last few weeks, ended her own life Saturday at her home in Portland, Oregon. She was 29.

“Goodbye to all my dear friends and family that I love. Today is the day I have chosen to pass away with dignity in the face of my terminal illness, this terrible brain cancer that has taken so much from me … but would have taken so much more,” she wrote on Facebook. “The world is a beautiful place, travel has been my greatest teacher, my close friends and folks are the greatest givers. I even have a ring of support around my bed as I type … Goodbye world. Spread good energy. Pay it forward!”

Doctors told Maynard she had six months to live last spring after she was diagnosed with a likely stage 4 glioblastoma. She made headlines around the world when she announced she intended to die under Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act by taking a fatal dose of barbiturates, prescribed to her by a doctor, when her suffering became too great.

“My glioblastoma is going to kill me and that’s out of my control,” she told PEOPLE last month. “I’ve discussed with many experts how I would die from it and it’s a terrible, terrible way to die. So being able to choose to go with dignity is less terrifying.”

On Oct. 6, she launched an online video campaign with Compassion Choices. an end-of-life choice advocacy organization, to fight for expanding death-with-dignity laws nationwide.

“For people to argue against this choice for sick people really seems evil to me,” she told PEOPLE. “They try to mix it up with suicide and that’s really unfair, because there’s not a single part of me that wants to die. But I am dying.”

A Heartbreaking Choice

Arriving at her decision was a gradual one, she said.

“It’s not a decision you make one day and you snap your fingers,” she told PEOPLE.

She said she began thinking about death with dignity in January when she was first diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor after coming across an article on it while researching possible treatments.

RELATED: PHOTOS: Brittany Maynard’s Life and Legacy

“Really, from the beginning, all the doctors said when you have a glioma you’re going to die,” she told PEOPLE. “You can just Google it. People don’t survive this disease. Not yet.”

Doctors removed as much of the tumor as they could, but it came back larger than ever two months later, she said.

After researching her options, she decided not to try chemotherapy or radiation.

“They didn’t seem to make sense for me,” she said, because of “the level of side effects I would suffer and it wouldn’t save my life. I’ve been told pretty much no matter what, I’m going to die and treatments would extend my life but affect the quality pretty negatively.”

In June, she moved to Oregon with her husband, Dan Diaz, 43, her mother, Debbie Ziegler, 56. and her stepfather, Gary Holmes, 72, so she could have access to the state’s Death with Dignity Act, which allows physicians to prescribe life-ending medication to certain terminally ill patients.

Maynard originally told PEOPLE she’d chosen Nov. 1 to end her life, but on Thursday she released a new video saying she might not do it that day.

“I still smile and laugh with my family and friends enough that it doesn’t seem like the right time now,” she said in the video recorded Oct. 13 and 14, “but it will come because I feel myself getting sicker; it’s happening each week.”

Brittany Maynard and Dan Diaz

Courtesy Brittany Maynard

Her Final Months

Maynard spent the last months of her life making the most of the time she had left. She traveled to Alaska, British Columbia and Yellowstone National Park with her loved ones and explored more local attractions like Olympic National Park in Washington.

On Oct. 21, she and her family took a helicopter ride to the Grand Canyon. a place she’d been longing to see before she died.

“It was breathtakingly beautiful,” she said in a statement.

The following morning, though, she had her “worst seizure” so far, she said: “The seizure was a harsh reminder that my symptoms continue to worsen as the tumor runs its course.”

Maynard said she was deeply touched by the “outpouring of support” she got after going public with her diagnosis and her decision.

RELATED: Inside Brittany Maynard’s Vibrant Life

“I want to thank people for that, for the words of kindness, for the time they’ve taken in personal ways,” she told PEOPLE.

“And then beyond that, to encourage people to make a difference,” she said. “If they can relate to my story, if they agree with this issue on a philosophical level, to get out there and do what we need to do to make a change in this country.”

Brittany Maynard and her mother, Debbie Ziegler, in Alaska in May

Courtesy Brittany Maynard

Maynard also talked to PEOPLE about her legacy.

“For me what matters most is the way I’m remembered by my family and my husband as a good woman who did my best to be a good wife and a good daughter,” she said.

“Beyond that, getting involved with this campaign, I hope to be making a difference here,” she said. “If I’m leaving a legacy, it’s to change this health-care policy or be a part of this change of this health-care policy so it becomes available to all Americans. That would be an enormous contribution to make, even if I’m just a piece of it.”

Before she died, Maynard asked her husband and her mother if they would carry on the work she started to get death with dignity passed in every state.

RELATED: Brittany Maynard Realizes a Wish: Inside Her Emotional Trip to the Grand Canyon

“I want to work on the cause,” Ziegler told PEOPLE last month. “I have so much admiration for people who are terminally ill and just fight and fight. They are so dignified and brave. This is a different choice, but it is also brave and dignified.”

She also shared with them her hopes and dreams for their future. Upstairs in the home she shares with her family are neatly wrapped Christmas and birthday gifts for her loved ones for the next year.

“She made it clear she wants me to live a good life,” Ziegler says.

In her second video, Maynard, who is an only child, said she hoped her mother does not “break down” or “suffer from any kind of depression.”

And for Diaz, “I hope he moves on and becomes a father,” she said. “There’s no part of me that wants him to live out the rest of his life just missing his wife.”

Brittany Maynard (third from left) and her family at the Grand Canyon Oct. 21

Courtesy Brittany Maynard

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Jimmy Savile: Abuse extended to hospice for the terminally ill #hotels #in

#uk hospices

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Jimmy Savile: Abuse extended to hospice for the terminally ill

The late entertainer will be accused of assaulting the sick and dying as well as hundreds of other people including children, when the police publish its report into the scandal later this week, according to The Sunday Times.

The Metropolitan Police is expected to reveal more details of the allegations that have poured in against Savile since revelations were first made public on a television documentary last October.

A report will list all the establishments, including hospital, prisons and schools where Savile preyed on his victims.

But it is also expected to reveal for the first time that Savile attacked the patients and staff of a hospice he visited under the guise of carrying out charity work.

Savile s association with Stoke Mandeville, Leeds General Infirmary and Broadmoor hospitals is well known, but it is thought he may have abused people in at least seven other institutions around the UK.

Related Articles

Some hospitals allowed him to wander the wards freely and in some cases he was even given keys allowing him to come and go as he pleased.

Peter Saunders, chief executive of the National Association for People Abused in Childhood, said: This will really shake people. There seems to be no end to the places where that guy attacked people.

Mark Williams-Thomas, the former detective, whose ITV documentary exposed the Savile allegations, added: There seems to be nowhere Savile went where he did not abuse people.

Police have already revealed that a total of 450 people have contacted detectives to report allegations against Savile.

Officers have already recorded 199 crimes in 17 police force areas in which the former BBC radio DJ and TV presenter is a suspect, among them 31 rape allegations in seven different parts of the country.

Some 82% of those who have come forward to report abuse to police are women, and eight out of ten of Savile s alleged victims were children at the time of his attacks.

Commander Peter Spindler, who is heading the inquiry, said the pattern showed that the star s offending peaked in the 1970s.

Ten people have now been questioned by police as part of Operation Yewtree, the investigation into historic sexual offences, which was set up in the wake of the Savile revelations.





Deutsche Bank – Goodie bags for terminally ill patients at Dover Park

#dover park hospice

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Goodie bags for terminally ill patients at Dover Park Hospice

June 2014 │ Singapore

15 Global Transaction Banking (GTB) Singapore staff visited Dover Park Hospice on June 6, 2014, to deliver sweet snacks and drinks to terminally ill patients and their families after their lunchtime meals.

Through the generosity of GTB staff, the volunteers raised donations which enabled them to assemble goodie bags with filled with bowls of ‘tau huay’ (soya beancurd) dessert, drinks, snacks and wet wipes for nearly 100 patients. The home-care patients were not forgotten either, with separate bags kept for staff to take on their next patient visits.

It was a touching visit for the volunteers, who felt that they could make a small difference for the patients they met, while gaining a tiny insight into the suffering and difficult times the patients were going through. That afternoon, the volunteers went away feeling that they might have been able to contribute at least a little to the hospice’s aim to “make every moment matter” for the patients.

Joey Han said, “It was comforting to see that patients at Dover Park Hospice are able to live the last days of their life in comfort and with dignity. The quality of care during this transition is made possible by the professional staff and volunteers at Dover Park Hospice.”

Manish Thakur. another volunteer, summed up the experience: “Corporate Responsibility activities where we give back to society and community are always rewarding and blissful experiences. Dover Park Hospice is providing a noble service for the patients during the twilight of their life journey. As they say – There is a lot of difference between human being and being human. A few understand it.

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Caring for Terminally ill Patients – The New Indian Express #online #hotels

#care of terminally ill patient

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Caring for Terminally ill Patients

BENGALURU: When a person is diagnosed with a terminal illness, family members, friends and caregivers should be willing to listen to their concerns, say doctors.

Dr L Srinivasamurthy, medical director, Nightingales Home Care Service, says that in order to take care of patients with cancer and other life-threatening conditions such as liver and kidney failure, AIDS, old age senility and other mental illnesses during their terminally ill condition, a broad, multidisciplinary approach should be followed. In order to give effective palliative care family members should be supportive and make use of available community resources. This care can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited. Palliative care can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in people’s homes and for this, family members should listen or understand the needs of patients.

Palliative care improves the quality of life of terminally ill patients and their families by providing pain and symptomatic relief as well. It also provides spiritual and psychosocial support from the time of diagnosis to the end of patient’s life, he says.

What to expect from palliative care?

  • Provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
  • Affirms life and regards death as a normal process.
  • Intends neither to hasten nor postpone death.
  • Integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care.
  • Offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until their death.
  • Offers a support system to help the family members cope during the patient’s illness and in their own bereavement.
  • Uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families.

In most parts of the world, a majority of cancer patients are in advanced stages of cancer when they first seek medical help. For such patients, the only realistic treatment option is pain relief and palliative care. Effective approaches to palliative care are available to improve the quality of life for cancer patients. The WHO 3-step ladder for cancer pain is a relatively inexpensive yet effective method for relieving cancer pain in about 90 percent of the patients, says Dr Srinivasmurthy.

In the final stages of life-limiting illness, even the best possible care cannot extend life beyond a point, and hence the focus shifts to making the patient as comfortable as possible.

Depending on the nature of the illness and the patient’s circumstances, this final stage period may last from a matter of weeks or months to several years. During this time, palliative care measures can provide the patient with medication and treatments to control pain and other symptoms, such as constipation, nausea, or shortness of breath, says Dr Shoba Naidu, critical care consultant, Sagar Hospital

When to initiate palliative care on your loved ones:

  • The patient wishes to remain at home, rather than spend time in the hospital.
  • He/she stops receiving treatment for the disease.
  • The patient has made multiple trips to the emergency room, the condition has been stabilized, but the illness continues to progress significantly, affecting their quality of life.
  • If a patient has been admitted to the hospital several times within the last year with the same or worsening symptoms.

When caregivers, family members and loved ones are clear about the patient’s preferences for treatment in the final stages of their life, they’re free to devote their energy to care and compassion. To ensure that everyone in the family understands the patient’s wishes, it’s important for anyone diagnosed with a life-limiting illness to discuss their feelings with their near and dear ones before a medical crisis strikes, says Dr Shoba Naidu.

Experts also suggest that it is important to seek financial and legal advice while the terminally ill patient can still participate. Legal documents such as a living will, power of attorney, or advance directives can set forth a patient’s wishes for future healthcare so that the family members are all clear about his or her preferences.





Holistic Nursing Care Plan For Terminally Ill Patient – Essay – 1497

#care of terminally ill patient

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Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

  • Length: 5 pages
  • Sources: 5
  • Subject: Healthcare
  • Type: Essay
  • Paper: # 65372827

Note. Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Document:

Holistic Nursing Care Plan for Terminally Ill Patient

The objective of this study is to create a holistic nursing care plan for a terminally ill patient. This study will explain how perceptions about quality of life and health promotion might affect care for a dying patient with a lingering illness such as cancer and discuss strategies that could be used in the situation to improve the quality of life for the patient and her husband during this illness.

It is important that the nursing care plan for the terminally ill includes the reassurance that the patient will not be abandoned and that the nurse assist the patient in discussing their care wishes and goals. To assist patients such as the patient in this scenario it is important to understand the concepts and elements of end-of-life care and that the nurse be a skilled practitioner of the nursing arts. The end-of-life care if “patient goal-centered and should be provided for those who have a limited life expectancy.” (Norlander, nd, p.3) The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization states that Hospice:

” affirms the concept of palliative care as an intensive program that enhances comfort and promotes the quality of life for individuals and their families. When cure is no longer possible, hospice recognizes that a peaceful and comfortable death is an essential goal of health care. Hospice believes that death is an integral part of the life cycle and that intensive palliative care focuses on pain relief, comfort, and enhanced quality of life as appropriate goals for the terminally ill. Hospice also recognizes the potential for growth that often exists within the dying experience for the individual and his/her family and seeks to protect and nurture this potential.” (Norlander, nd, p. 4)

The holistic nursing practice is defined as “all nursing practice that has healing the whole person as its goal.” (Mariano, 2007, p.64) Holistic nursing care is a caring and healing relationship and values the cultural values and beliefs as well as the individuals’ spirituality in the nursing care. Holistic nursing care involves care of the individual’s physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual being with a focus on the individual’s comfort and relief from pain.

Because the patient is terminally ill and is in a great deal of pain one of the first considerations for this patient is relieving her pain so that she is able to function without a great deal of pain. Relieving the patient’s level of depression is also of great importance so that she does not spend the end of her life crying in bed as she is doing presently. The nurse should meet with the family members who are reluctant to visit and explain to them that they have a great role to play in the end-of-life care of this patient. The family members should be brought to the understanding that their role is critical.

Patient Emotional Health

Upon relieving the patient of the pain and depression through use of medication, the hospice-care nursing staff will be of great comfort to the patient through simply talking with the patient about her life and about her wishes for her end-of-life care. The patient should be highly active in determining any life support or alternatively lack of life support that she desires to receive. The patient should be assisted in thinking about her wishes for her funeral, the songs and music that will be used at the funeral and what she chooses to wear at the funeral.

Patient Spiritual Health

The patient’s spiritual affairs should be addressed as well so that the patient is both emotionally and spiritually prepared to deal with the ending of her life due to the progression of the cancer.

Patient Physical Care

Hospice Care is utilized by many patients who are terminally ill. Hospice Care involves nursing staff coming into the patient’s home and assisting them with bathing, dressing, their medication, monitoring the patient’s condition, counseling family members about what they can do to make the patient’s path of dying easier and more comfortable. The hospice philosophy is stated to be a holistic philosophy, is interdisciplinary in nature, and includes physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, volunteers, and staff assisting with grief of the family. It is reported that hospice care is ” synonymous with supportive care. Pain management and symptom control is state-of-the-art pain. Volunteers are available for respite care and companionship.

Factors Addressed By Hospice

The hospice team assists with the decisions and challenges that the patient and [continue]

Some Sources Used in Document:





Nurses play vital role in care of terminally ill patients – UQ

#care of terminally ill patient

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Nurses play vital role in care of terminally ill patients

Nurses play a crucial role in decisions surrounding treatment of terminally ill patients.

10 November 2014

A University of Queensland study has found nurses play a crucial role in decisions surrounding treatment of terminally ill patients.

UQ School of Social Science Associate Professor Alex Broom said dying patients who were told further treatment would be futile often turned to nurses for emotional support.

The transition to end-of-life care has traditionally been the doctor s decision, Dr Broom said.

The study shows how important nurses are in decisions about when life-prolonging treatments should end and in supporting patients and families in the process of accepting that they are dying.

Nurses often bear the brunt of patient and family grief as the end of life nears.

Nurses spend so much time with patients that they are often in a better position than doctors to know how patients are really coping with often highly toxic, technically life-prolonging treatments.

The study found that patients would often put on a brave face when their doctor was present and then ask the nurse to tell the doctor they d had enough.

This can put the nurse in a difficult position professionally, placing them as mediator between doctor, patient and often-panicked family members.

Nurses in the study said communicating with patients and families was much easier when doctors had already spoken openly and honestly with patients about the fact that it was time to stop active treatment.

A major problem for nurses is that some doctors avoid difficult conversations; even continuing patients on active treatment, while others were rushed or blunt, leaving the nurse to explain the situation and provide emotional support to patients and their families, Dr Broom said.

The study involved 20 Australian nurses from Brisbane hospitals, mostly consisting of cancer nurses.

The study explored their experiences of caring in the context of medical futility.

Nurses in the study emphasised the emotional toll of caring for patients and families at the end of life, the need to balance caring with protecting themselves from burnout, and the fact that there was very limited debriefing or counselling provided.

It s not uncommon for a nurse to have to walk out of a room where a patient they have known for months or years has just died, straight into a finance meeting or to treat another patient, without five minutes to themselves to reflect on the previous patient s death, Dr Broom said.

While the nurses discussed the rewards of being involved in the transition to end-of-life care, they emphasised the mounting pressures on the nursing profession to engage in technical, task-orientated work and how this could compromise their capacity to support patients nearing the end of life.

The results of the study show that nurses play a much greater role than previously thought in decisions about medical futility, and that their role as a crucial mediator and support provider in this context is increasingly challenged by the growing unrealistic expectations placed on nurses working in Australian hospitals, Dr Broom said.

Results of this study were published in the journal Qualitative Health Research in October.





What is terminally ill #hospice #care #centers

#what is terminally ill

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Pro/Con; Do terminally ill patients have the right to die?

Pro: Terminally ill patients have the right to terminate their own life

On Nov. 1, 2014, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard took her own life with a pill. She died peacefully, surrounded by her family in her own home instead of losing her battle with cancer in a cold, sterile hospital room. Maynard’s decision to end her own life created a sense of dignity for her and her loved ones, a common experience for many who choose to go through with what is known as physician-assisted suicide.

Maynard was diagnosed with a stage four brain tumor in April and was told she had six months to live. Her tumor was so large that she would need full brain radiation.

“After months of research, my family and I reached a heartbreaking conclusion: There is no treatment that would save my life, and the recommended treatments would have destroyed the time I had left,” Maynard told a CNN reporter. “Because the rest of my body is young and healthy, I am likely to physically hang on for a long time. I probably would have suffered in hospice care for weeks or even months, and my family would have had to watch that.”

So that she could spend the finals months of her life doing what she loved with her family, Maynard and her husband moved from California to Oregon to take advantage of the state’s physician-assisted suicide, or euthanasia, laws. These laws allow those who are terminally ill to end their lives painlessly with the help of a physician. Only four states currently allow for health care centers to provide terminally ill patients with assistance with euthanasia. North Carolina is not one of these states.

With the legalization of assisted-suicide throughout the United States, far fewer terminally ill patients would die in unbearable pain and without dignity. They would be able to live the last days and weeks of their lives in a way they choose.

It is wrong for parents to have to watch their children linger in pain when medical professionals cannot provide a cure or remedy. In August 2014, a French couple asked doctors to allow their child to be euthanized after being born four months premature. If kept alive, the baby would be completely paralyzed on one side. Though the procedure is not currently legal in France and the couple’s request was denied, assisted-suicide for children has recently become legal in Belgium.

Without assisted suicide, many people die long and painful deaths in places where they may not be comfortable or may not be able to see their families. With assisted suicide, though, these people can die with dignity, feeling fulfilled and comforted.

By MaryKent Wolff

Con: Terminally ill patients don t have the right to terminate their own life

Terminally ill with glioblastoma, a rare brain cancer, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard was faced with the agonizing decision of choosing between fighting the futile battle with cancer or ending her life. Maynard, an advocate for death with dignity, requested and received lethal medication that she later ingested, taking her life.

Maynard’s story is tragic. Either path that she could have chosen to take would have been heartbreaking. But her recent decision to die raised a difficult-to-answer question: Do we have the right to die?

Euthanasia advocates describe assisted suicide as an option for “mentally competent, terminally ill patients” facing suffering. The idea is to give people power over their lives and dying on their own terms. But contrary to its intended purpose of self-empowerment, the mere existence of the fatal medication can pressure the disabled, depressed, elderly and sick to prematurely end their lives. Patients would be prone to lose the will to live or see death as the best option for the financial stability of their families. Euthanasia cuts treatment costs and therefore gives insurance companies and doctors the incentive to pressure the seriously ill to consider assisted suicide.

Although assisted suicide is not intended for people who are merely depressed, little is being done to prevent the drugs from getting in the hands of the suicidal. In Washington and Oregon, where physician-assisted suicide is legal, there are no requirements that patients receive psychological evaluation or treatment prior to receiving lethal drugs. In 2010, only one out of 65 patients in Oregon who died as a result of physician-assisted suicide was referred for psychiatric or psychological counseling.

Americans value human life. The religious and non-religious alike mourn the death of their loved ones. In times of tragedy, regardless of our differences, we as citizens band together to support those in trouble. We give our time, money, blood and tears for the sake of another life.

We don’t always realize how special this unity is. Life is sacred. We see countries on the news with exceedingly low life expectancies because of poverty and disease. History has shown extremist movements that have portrayed human life as expendable and no more than a political resource. We as Americans have been raised to believe differently, and suicide destroys the life we work so hard to preserve.

Assisted suicide is a slippery slope. Imperative precautions as safeguards for patients are not being taken. Under the current, careless procedure these drugs could so easily get into the wrong hands. Lethal medication will be dealt across the nation and abused. Even those who legally receive the medication may take it under the assumption that they will die soon, when most live long passed their diagnosed death date without pain due to misdiagnosis. We also have to take account of the life saving medical miracles that occur every day. Life is precious and should not be disposed of so casually.

By Katie Farina

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Caring For a Terminally Ill Loved One – Power to Change #athlone

#what is terminally ill

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Caring For a Terminally Ill Loved One

Caring for a terminally ill loved one is overwhelming. To constantly bear witness to the ravages of the disease knowing you are powerless to stop it is a huge burden. We want and need to do something to help them but don’t know where to start. We refuse to believe that there is nothing that can save them and search for miracles only to find that there are none.

In time we come to accept that they are dying and begin grieving for the loss of them in our lives. Our grief is compounded by our sense of helplessness. There are so many frightening and unanswered questions. What is going to happen? When will it happen? Will there be much pain? Living in expectation of a loved one’s death is like sitting on a time bomb, knowing it is going to go off and being powerless to stop it.

The two year journey of my husband Brian’s diagnosis with terminal cancer has taught me many things, above all, the true meaning of love, and the strength of the human spirit. As I witnessed his incredible courage, it brought forth in me a fierce determination to ease his journey. Ours is a story of love and devotion, testament to the vows Brian and I pledged to each other on our wedding day, May 17 th ,1969. “In sickness and in health, until death us do part.” We meant every word.

I could not stop my husband from dying, but I could help him live.

My acceptance of my husband’s impending death came with a fierce determination to help him achieve quality of life for the remainder of his days. I knew that I needed to understand more about his disease in order to help him, so I sought knowledge. I asked questions about his disease, and studied the pain and symptoms he would experience as it progressed and ways by which to manage them. I learned a lot and through this I came to realize, that although I could not stop my husband from dying I could help him to live.

My knowledge allowed me to be one step ahead of the disease progression and gave me the opportunity to have medication and later, physical aids such as oxygen, wheelchair etc – on hand before Brian needed them. This alleviated much fear, pain and discomfort. My knowledge regarding pain management and symptom control, enabled me to take an active role in his care, working hand in hand with his doctors to obtain for him a quality of life few thought possible considering the nature of his disease.

Get the help you need to manage the pain

Whilst the majority of cancer patients do experience chronic pain, only a small percentage of them have adequate pain relief. This is often due to the common belief that large doses of medication, such as morphine and methadone (used for pain control in lung cancer sufferers), will sedate them and prevent them from functioning normally. Sadly many people suffer unnecessarily due to this misconception.

The object of pain management is to always be in front of the pain. Good communication with your loved one is imperative; so too is their honesty in relating to you, the nature and intensity of their pain. Encourage them not to brave it out by letting it reach debilitating levels before asking for relief. This results in a situation where they are chasing the pain instead of being in front of it. Untreated chronic and debilitating pain kills. It kills the will to live.

Despite his illness, there were times when Brian felt well and these were spent in the pursuit of his hobby, his passion, his true enjoyment in life fishing. I always had a supply of his medicine on hand so that I could keep him out of pain no matter how long we spent on the water. I constantly marvelled at his ability to keep pulling in fish despite his lack of strength. I believe his love of fishing transcended any pain, weakness or discomfort he experienced. For him, at these times, there was no thought of sickness and death. For me, watching him, loving him, the thought of death was always on my mind.

Deciding about chemotherapy

In time, Brian’s condition worsened until he could not even drink water. Dilatations were no longer an option and he was offered palliative chemotherapy to shrink the tumour. It was the only hope of prolonging his life.

Like many before him, Brian had vowed that he would not undergo chemotherapy. Having heard stories of chronic fatigue, nausea, and hair loss he was fearful of the treatment. But there is a lot of truth in the adage, “You never know, until it happens to you”. For Brian, where there was life, there was hope, and any means of prolonging that hope he grasped with both hands.

Palliative care (symptom control)

Despite a terminal diagnosis, there is still life, and survival may range from months to several years. Many people believe that Palliative Care is intended only for the end of life, and do not seek their help until the final stages of terminal illness. Due to this unfortunate belief the quality of life that could have been achieved through their services is not realized.

The Palliative Care Team. consisting of pain management specialists, nurses, doctors, chaplains and volunteers, work together, to provide the best possible pain and symptom control for the patient. whilst at the same time offering physical and emotional support to their families. I believe the services of these wonderful people should be embraced from the time of terminal diagnosis. Had Brian been in their care sooner, much of his suffering, and mine, would have been alleviated.

We have spoken of death. I asked Brian if he was frightened and he said, “No it will be nice to sleep”. We spoke of his parents and the hope that they would be waiting for him. When he asked me about his funeral, I told him of my plans for a seaside memorial. He was pleased with my decision. I have remained strong and I believe I am helping Brian to die well, just as I have helped him to live for these past two years. It comforts me that he is not afraid of dying. He knows that his long courageous battle is almost over; he has accepted it and is at peace.

Brian and I travelled many miles on our last journey together, miles of emotions, spirits, courage and strength. I thanked God for granting me the courage and the strength to walk beside him to his life’s end and for the peace I found in the knowledge that I definitely made a difference.

Take a look at your life. How would you describe it? Contented? Rushed? Exciting? Stressful? Moving forward? Holding back? For many of us it’s all of the above at times. There are things we dream of doing one day, there are things we wish we could forget. In the Bible, it says that Jesus came to make all things new. What would your life look like if you could start over with a clean slate?

Living with hope

If you are looking for peace, there is a way to balance your life. No one can be perfect, or have a perfect life. But every one of us has the opportunity to experience perfect grace through a personal relationship with God through His Son, Jesus Christ.

You can receive Christ right now by faith through prayer. Praying is simply talking to God. God knows your heart and is not so concerned with your words as He is with the attitude of your heart. Here’s a suggested prayer:

Lord Jesus, I want to know you personally. Thank you for dying on the cross for my sins. I open the door of my life to you and ask you to come in as my Savior and Lord. Take control of my life. Thank you for forgiving my sins and giving me eternal life. Make me the kind of person you want me to be.

Does this prayer express the desire of your heart? You can pray it right now, and Jesus Christ will come into your life, just as He promised.

Is this the life for you?

If you invited Christ into your life, thank God often that He is in your life, that He will never leave you and that you have eternal life. As you learn more about your relationship with God, and how much He loves you, you’ll experience life to the fullest.

Read Hazelle s Story: Cancer Took My Loved One

For more information about cancer please visit the Canadian Cancer Society or the American Cancer Society for a list of resources in your area.





Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life – Cancer,

#what is terminally ill

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Terminally Ill Woman Brittany Maynard Has Ended Her Own Life

By Nicole Weisensee Egan

11/02/2014 AT 07:35 PM EST

Brittany Maynard. who became the public face of the controversial right-to-die movement over the last few weeks, ended her own life Saturday at her home in Portland, Oregon. She was 29.

“Goodbye to all my dear friends and family that I love. Today is the day I have chosen to pass away with dignity in the face of my terminal illness, this terrible brain cancer that has taken so much from me … but would have taken so much more,” she wrote on Facebook. “The world is a beautiful place, travel has been my greatest teacher, my close friends and folks are the greatest givers. I even have a ring of support around my bed as I type … Goodbye world. Spread good energy. Pay it forward!”

Doctors told Maynard she had six months to live last spring after she was diagnosed with a likely stage 4 glioblastoma. She made headlines around the world when she announced she intended to die under Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act by taking a fatal dose of barbiturates, prescribed to her by a doctor, when her suffering became too great.

“My glioblastoma is going to kill me and that’s out of my control,” she told PEOPLE last month. “I’ve discussed with many experts how I would die from it and it’s a terrible, terrible way to die. So being able to choose to go with dignity is less terrifying.”

On Oct. 6, she launched an online video campaign with Compassion Choices. an end-of-life choice advocacy organization, to fight for expanding death-with-dignity laws nationwide.

“For people to argue against this choice for sick people really seems evil to me,” she told PEOPLE. “They try to mix it up with suicide and that’s really unfair, because there’s not a single part of me that wants to die. But I am dying.”

A Heartbreaking Choice

Arriving at her decision was a gradual one, she said.

“It’s not a decision you make one day and you snap your fingers,” she told PEOPLE.

She said she began thinking about death with dignity in January when she was first diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor after coming across an article on it while researching possible treatments.

RELATED: PHOTOS: Brittany Maynard’s Life and Legacy

“Really, from the beginning, all the doctors said when you have a glioma you’re going to die,” she told PEOPLE. “You can just Google it. People don’t survive this disease. Not yet.”

Doctors removed as much of the tumor as they could, but it came back larger than ever two months later, she said.

After researching her options, she decided not to try chemotherapy or radiation.

“They didn’t seem to make sense for me,” she said, because of “the level of side effects I would suffer and it wouldn’t save my life. I’ve been told pretty much no matter what, I’m going to die and treatments would extend my life but affect the quality pretty negatively.”

In June, she moved to Oregon with her husband, Dan Diaz, 43, her mother, Debbie Ziegler, 56. and her stepfather, Gary Holmes, 72, so she could have access to the state’s Death with Dignity Act, which allows physicians to prescribe life-ending medication to certain terminally ill patients.

Maynard originally told PEOPLE she’d chosen Nov. 1 to end her life, but on Thursday she released a new video saying she might not do it that day.

“I still smile and laugh with my family and friends enough that it doesn’t seem like the right time now,” she said in the video recorded Oct. 13 and 14, “but it will come because I feel myself getting sicker; it’s happening each week.”

Brittany Maynard and Dan Diaz

Courtesy Brittany Maynard

Her Final Months

Maynard spent the last months of her life making the most of the time she had left. She traveled to Alaska, British Columbia and Yellowstone National Park with her loved ones and explored more local attractions like Olympic National Park in Washington.

On Oct. 21, she and her family took a helicopter ride to the Grand Canyon. a place she’d been longing to see before she died.

“It was breathtakingly beautiful,” she said in a statement.

The following morning, though, she had her “worst seizure” so far, she said: “The seizure was a harsh reminder that my symptoms continue to worsen as the tumor runs its course.”

Maynard said she was deeply touched by the “outpouring of support” she got after going public with her diagnosis and her decision.

RELATED: Inside Brittany Maynard’s Vibrant Life

“I want to thank people for that, for the words of kindness, for the time they’ve taken in personal ways,” she told PEOPLE.

“And then beyond that, to encourage people to make a difference,” she said. “If they can relate to my story, if they agree with this issue on a philosophical level, to get out there and do what we need to do to make a change in this country.”

Brittany Maynard and her mother, Debbie Ziegler, in Alaska in May

Courtesy Brittany Maynard

Maynard also talked to PEOPLE about her legacy.

“For me what matters most is the way I’m remembered by my family and my husband as a good woman who did my best to be a good wife and a good daughter,” she said.

“Beyond that, getting involved with this campaign, I hope to be making a difference here,” she said. “If I’m leaving a legacy, it’s to change this health-care policy or be a part of this change of this health-care policy so it becomes available to all Americans. That would be an enormous contribution to make, even if I’m just a piece of it.”

Before she died, Maynard asked her husband and her mother if they would carry on the work she started to get death with dignity passed in every state.

RELATED: Brittany Maynard Realizes a Wish: Inside Her Emotional Trip to the Grand Canyon

“I want to work on the cause,” Ziegler told PEOPLE last month. “I have so much admiration for people who are terminally ill and just fight and fight. They are so dignified and brave. This is a different choice, but it is also brave and dignified.”

She also shared with them her hopes and dreams for their future. Upstairs in the home she shares with her family are neatly wrapped Christmas and birthday gifts for her loved ones for the next year.

“She made it clear she wants me to live a good life,” Ziegler says.

In her second video, Maynard, who is an only child, said she hoped her mother does not “break down” or “suffer from any kind of depression.”

And for Diaz, “I hope he moves on and becomes a father,” she said. “There’s no part of me that wants him to live out the rest of his life just missing his wife.”

Brittany Maynard (third from left) and her family at the Grand Canyon Oct. 21

Courtesy Brittany Maynard

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YahooNews

Terminally ill death with dignity advocate dies

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A terminally ill woman who renewed a nationwide debate about physician-assisted suicide has ended her young life with the lethal drugs available under Oregon’s Death With Dignity Law. Brittany Maynard was 29.

Maynard, who had brain cancer, died peacefully in her bedroom Saturday “in the arms of her loved ones,” said Sean Crowley, a spokesman for the advocacy group Compassion Choices.

Weeks ago, Maynard had said she might use the lethal drugs Nov. 1, just a couple weeks short of her 30th birthday. Last week, she said she might delay the day. But she went ahead with her original plan.

Crowley said Maynard “suffered increasingly frequent and longer seizures, severe head and neck pain, and stroke-like symptoms. As symptoms grew more severe, she chose to abbreviate the dying process by taking the aid-in-dying medication she had received months ago.”

Before dying, Maynard tried to live life as fully as she could. She and her husband, Dan Diaz, took a trip to the Grand Canyon last month — fulfilling a wish on Maynard’s “bucket list.”

Maynard has been in the national spotlight for a month since publicizing that she and her husband had moved to Oregon from California so that she could take advantage of this state’s Death With Dignity Law. The law allows terminally ill patients to end their lives with lethal drugs prescribed by a doctor.

The debate over physician-assisted suicide is not new, but Maynard’s youth and vitality before she became ill brought the discussion to a younger generation.

Working with Compassion Choices, Maynard used her story to speak out for the right of terminally ill people like herself to end their lives on their own terms.

Maynard’s choice to end her life has not been without controversy. Some religious groups and others opposed to physician-assisted suicide have voiced objections.

Janet Morana, executive director of the group Priests for Life, said in a statement after hearing of Maynard’s death: “We are saddened by the fact that this young woman gave up hope, and now our concern is for other people with terminal illnesses who may contemplate following her example. Our prayer is that these people will find the courage to live every day to the fullest until God calls them home. Brittany’s death was not a victory for a political cause. It was a tragedy, hastened by despair and aided by the culture of death invading our country.”

Maynard told The Associated Press last month that she and her husband and other relatives accepted her choice.

“I think in the beginning my family members wanted a miracle; they wanted a cure for my cancer.” she said. “When we all sat down and looked at the facts, there isn’t a single person that loves me that wishes me more pain and more suffering.”

Oregon was the first U.S. state to make it legal for a doctor to prescribe a life-ending drug to a terminally ill patient of sound mind who makes the request. The patient must swallow the drug without help; it is illegal for a doctor to administer it.

More than 750 people in Oregon used the law to die as of Dec. 31, 2013. The median age of the deceased is 71. Only six were younger than 35.

The state does not track how many terminally ill people move to Oregon to die. A patient must prove to a doctor that they are living in Oregon. Some examples of documentation include a rental agreement, a voter registration card or a driver’s license.

Oregon voters approved the Death with Dignity Act in 1994, then reaffirmed it with 60 percent of the vote in 1997.

Four other states — Washington, Montana, Vermont and New Mexico — allow patients to seek aid in dying.

Maynard was born Nov. 19, 1984. She received an undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s in education from UC Irvine.

Maynard had an adventuresome spirit. She taught at orphanages in Nepal and also spent time in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Costa Rica. She climbed Kilimanjaro a month before marrying Diaz in September 2012.

She was diagnosed with brain cancer on New Year’s Day of this year and was told she had six months to live.

Follow Steven DuBois at http://twitter.com/pdxdub .





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Careers

At Hospice El Paso, we improve the quality of life for patients facing terminal illnesses and provide support for their loved ones.

If one of your goals is to make a difference with your work and you think hospice work is for you, come and join our team of caregivers, registered nurses, physicians, home healthcare aides, social workers, chaplains, bereavement counselors and trained volunteers.

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