Which Schools Have Online Physical Therapy Assistant Degree Programs? #physical #therapy #online

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Which Schools Have Online Physical Therapy Assistant Degree Programs?

Offered at the associate’s degree level, physical therapy assistant programs train students to successfully administer physical therapy treatments under the supervision of licensed physical therapists. Due to the clinical requirements, completely online physical therapy assistant degree programs do not exist. Schools offering Physical Therapy degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

Degree Program Information

Associate’s degree programs for physical therapy assistants are often available through vocational schools or community colleges. These programs usually take two years of study and include general education courses in addition to those in physical therapy. Because of the hands-on, clinical nature of the profession, fully online physical therapy assistant programs do not exist. Below are some of the schools that offer on-campus physical therapy assistant degree programs.

Important Information About Physical Therapy Assistant Programs

High school diploma or equivalent

Applied anatomy, tests measurements, pathophysiology

Physical therapist assistant, medical assistant (may require further education)

Bachelor’s programs are available; licensed physical therapy assistants may be required to complete continuing education coursework for licensure renewal

Whatcom Community College

Whatcom Community College offers a full-time program at their campus in Bellingham, WA, but students who cannot attend on-campus classes can opt for the part-time online/hybrid option. The program leads to an Associate in Science (A.S.) in Physical Therapy Assisting. This PTA degree features required prerequisite courses in general education topics such as math and English, and after completing these courses, students can study kinesiology, physical therapy, and PTA procedures.

Milwaukee Area Technical College

Milwaukee Area Technical College in Wisconsin awards an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Physical Therapist Assisting. This program emphasizes effective communication with patients and is designed to prepare students to secure jobs in nursing homes, rehabilitation centers and other health care facilities. Students are encouraged to fulfill their roles with sensitivity and respect. The program examines ways in which the delivery of physical therapy services may be properly documented.

Jefferson State Community College

An Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree in Physical Therapy Assisting is available through the program at Jefferson State Community College. The degree requires two years of study, with one year devoted to prerequisite coursework and the second year focusing on professional coursework. Once the student graduated program, he or she will be qualified to take the National Board Exam and receive professional state licensure.

Job Duties

Physical therapy assistants play an important role in the delivery of physical therapy services to patients trying to regain movement after illness or injury. They perform many of the same tasks as physical therapists, such as patient preparation, hydrotherapy, massage and heat pack application. Every state requires that physical therapy assistants be licensed and hold an associate’s degree from an accredited college program as well as pass a licensing exam.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

The schools below may include sponsored listings but are popular choices among our users.





PTSD and Substance Abuse in Veterans – PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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PTSD: National Center for PTSD

PTSD and Substance Abuse in Veterans

Substance Abuse Flyer

Some people try to cope with their Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms by drinking heavily, using drugs, or smoking too much. People with PTSD have more problems with drugs and alcohol both before and after getting PTSD. Also, even if someone does not have a problem with alcohol before a traumatic event, getting PTSD increases the risk that he or she will develop a drinking or drug problem.

Eventually, the overuse of these substances can develop into Substance Use Disorder (SUD), and treatment should be given for both PTSD and SUD to lead to successful recovery. The good news is that treatment of co-occurring (happening at the same time) PTSD and SUD works.

How common is co-occurring PTSD and SUD in Veterans?

Studies show that there is a strong relationship between PTSD and SUD, in both civilian and military populations, as well as for both men and women.

Specific to Veterans:

  • More than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD.
  • War Veterans with PTSD and alcohol problems tend to be binge drinkers. Binges may be in response to bad memories of combat trauma.
  • Almost 1 out of every 3 Veterans seeking treatment for SUD also has PTSD.
  • The number of Veterans who smoke (nicotine) is almost double for those with PTSD (about 6 of 10) versus those without a PTSD diagnosis (3 of 10).
  • In the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, about 1 in 10 returning soldiers seen in VA have a problem with alcohol or other drugs.

How can co-occurring PTSD and SUD create problems?

If someone has both PTSD and SUD, it is likely that he or she also has other health problems (such as physical pain), relationship problems (with family and/or friends), or problems in functioning (like keeping a job or staying in school). Using drugs and/or alcohol can make PTSD symptoms worse.

  • PTSD may create sleep problems (trouble falling asleep or waking up during the night). You might “medicate” yourself with alcohol or drugs because you think it helps your sleep, but drugs and alcohol change the quality of your sleep and make you feel less refreshed.
  • PTSD makes you feel “numb,” like being cut off from others, angry and irritable, or depressed. PTSD also makes you feel like you are always “on guard.” All of these feelings can get worse when you use drugs and alcohol.
  • Drug and alcohol use allows you to continue the cycle of “avoidance” found in PTSD. Avoiding bad memories and dreams or people and places can actually make PTSD last longer. You cannot make as much progress in treatment if you avoid your problems.
  • You may drink or use drugs because it distracts you from your problems for a short time, but drugs and alcohol make it harder to concentrate, be productive, and enjoy all parts of your life.

VA has made it easier to get help. It is important to know that treatment can help and you are not alone.

What treatments are offered for co-occurring PTSD and SUD?

Evidence shows that in general people have improved PTSD and SUD symptoms when they are provided treatment that addresses both conditions. This can involve any of the following (alone or together):

Talk with your provider about treatment for specific symptoms like pain, anger, or sleep problems.

What should I do if I think I have co-occurring PTSD and SUD?

The first step is to talk to a health professional and ask for more information about treatment options. Each VA medical center has an SUD-PTSD Specialist trained in treating both conditions to reach the best health outcomes. If there are signals you are at risk for both disorders, you will be encouraged to talk with a provider about how to best support your recovery. There are treatment resources at every VA medical center. The VA wants you to have the best possible care for co-occurring PTSD and SUD.

If you continue to be troubled or distracted by your experiences for more than three months or have questions about your drinking or drug use, learn more about treatment options. Life can be better! Talk to a VA or other health professional to discuss choices for getting started.

Date this content was last updated is at the bottom of the page.





Physical Therapy Benefits for Pain Treatment #physical #therapy, #pt, #physical #therapist, #pain

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Physical Therapy for Chronic Pain: What to Expect

Physical therapy is often one of the best choices you can make when you have long-term pain (also called chronic pain) or an injury. It can make you stronger and help you move and feel better.

Ask your doctor to recommend a physical therapist. You’ll probably need a series of visits, and you should practice some of the exercises at home for the best results.

Physical therapists have a lot of training. Still, it’s a good idea to ask them about their experience in working with people who’ve had conditions like yours. You can also ask them how many sessions you’ll need.

How Does Physical Therapy Treat Pain?

Physical therapists are experts not only in treating pain but also its source. Yours will look for areas of weakness or stiffness that may be adding stress to the places that hurt. And they will treat those areas with certain exercises to reduce pain and help you move better.

In a physical therapy session, you may do more than one of these things:

Low-impact aerobic training. These workouts will rev up your heart rate and still take it easy on your joints. For instance, you might walk fast or use a stationary bike to warm up, instead of running, before you do your strengthening exercises.

Strengthening exercises. You might use machines at your physical therapist’s office, resistance bands, or your own body weight (think lunges, squats, and push-ups). You may work on your core muscles (belly, glutes, and back), as well as other parts of your body.

Pain relief exercises. These moves target areas where you have pain, so you’re stronger and more flexible — which should make it easier to live your life.

Stretching. This will be gentle, and your therapist will make sure that you’re warmed up and you don’t stretch too far.

Your physical therapist may prescribe exercises to do at home.

What Else Might I Do?

During your sessions, your therapist may also use:

Heat and ice packs. Ice calms inflammation. Heat warms up your muscles so they move better. Both can lower pain.

© 2016 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.





What is Equine Therapy? #equine #therapy,what #is,assisted #therapy, #horse #therapy, #programs, #psychotherapy,

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Equine Psychotherapy

What is Equine Therapy?

Equine therapy is the discipline of using horses as a means to provide metaphoric experiences in order to promote emotional growth. The horses provide an excellent way for troubled youth to react when they are otherwise therapy resistant. Equine therapists will usually teach many lessons on ways in which horses learn, react, and follow instructions to the lives of youth themselves.

One example that is used often is when students are just beginning a horse therapy program, the instructor will have the horse stand in the middle of the arena. The youth are supposed to get the horse to move outside of a large circle without touching the horse at all. Many of the students often clap, whistle, yell all to no avail. Lessons are taught that when others, be it parents, friends, counselors or associates try and get us to do something the best way is probably not yelling, clapping, or forcing.

Students will also learn how to lead a horse. Most often they begin by trying to pull on a lead rope, standing in front of the horse. They learn that the best way to lead a horse is not in front or behind the horse, but by its side. A list of equine therapy programs can be found with information on their individual websites on their specific program details

Equine therapy should always be performed by a certified Equine-Assisted therapist. Many associations exists in order to provide certification or training in equine therapy. It has shown to be very effective with patients who manifest depression, attention-deficit, conduct disorders, dissociative disorders, anxiety, dementia, autism, and many other related disorders.

Why use equine therapy?

Equine therapy has shown to have many positive benefits when correctly taught by certified therapists. Some of them include:

  • Confidence
  • Self-Efficacy
  • Self-Concept
  • Communication
  • Trust
  • Perspective
  • Decreased Isolation
  • Self-Acceptance
  • Impulse Control
  • Social Skills
  • Boundaries
  • Spiritual Connection

Equine Therapy usually includes instruction in horse care, grooming procedures, saddlery, and basic equitation. Safety is the number one priority for all participants in equine therapy. Participants often wear helmets and other protective gear should they fall from a horse during a therapeutic session.

Request Information





Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) #ota #schools #online, #ota #occupational #therapy #assistant #allied

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Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA)

Occupational Therapy Assistant

Skills for the job of living.

The OTA program has been in existence since 1988 and has maintained accreditation through the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education. Students enrolled in this curriculum of study learn to assist in providing occupational therapy to many different individuals with a variety of medical and psychosocial diagnoses. They may also learn to work with toddlers, school age children, and the elderly.

Program

Occupational Therapy Assistants can provide treatment intervention in:

  • Motor skills to enable someone to perform their self care/personal hygiene
  • Fine motor/hand skills to perform all of the educational activities expected of a school age child or college student
  • Skills to enable someone to live independently (e.g. cooking, cleaning, paying bills, shopping)
  • Home modification to support someone aging in place.
  • Provision of adaptive equipment/construction of splints to facilitate independence
  • Skills required to engage in productive occupations

Graduates of this program can work in:

  • Hospitals
  • Community based health care centers
  • Nursing facilities
  • School systems
  • Inpatient/Outpatient mental health programs
  • Rehabilitation centers

Accreditation

This program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE s telephone number c/o AOTA is 301.652.AOTA and its web address is www.acoteonline.org. This program has been granted re-accreditation through the year 2016/2017.





Home – VCU Massey Cancer Center #virginia #commonwealth #university #physical #therapy

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Top 4% in the nation

Massey re-designated by the National Cancer Institute for the 42nd year; was first cancer center in Virginia to receive this prestigious distinction


  • Cutting-edge therapies

    Massey is the only cancer care provider in Richmond and one of a handful in the state to offer heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), a complex procedure used to treat advanced abdominal cancers.


  • For a world without cancer

    Massey is getting closer to a future without cancer. one heartbeat at a time, one breath, one more life, saved.


  • Precision medicine

    Massey becomes the first cancer care provider in Virginia to perform next-generation genome sequencing for precision cancer treatment.


  • Her laugh is the best sound in the world

    Mackenzie was just 20 months old when the team at VCU Massey Cancer Center removed a peach-sized tumor from her brain. This Christmas, she s celebrating her 11 th birthday.


  • Discovering new treatments

    Massey’s clinical trials offer first access to the latest promising cancer therapies and help doctors and scientists discover medical breakthroughs.

    Spotlight

    Massey was the first in the world to successfully implant CivaSheet, a bio-absorbable, internal radiation device, to treat early stage pancreatic cancer. More

    Cancer types

    At Massey, our patients are treated by multidisciplinary teams focused on specific cancer types. That means not one expert, but an entire team of experts from multiple disciplines subspecialized in your type of cancer is working together to help you with your cancer care.

    With this collaborative approach, you’re getting more experience and more insight in the evaluation of your diagnosis, highly coordinated care that ensures the ideal combination and sequence of treatment, and a care plan customized to you. Learn more about your treatment options at Massey by selecting your cancer type from the drop down list above.

    News Advances

    • Massey study suggests that it could be possible to use genetic testing to identify more breast cancer patients who would benefit from hormone therapy as an alternative to chemotherapy
    • New combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy developed at Massey shows promising results in eradicating breast cancer recurrence
    • Massey physicians named Richmond’s “Top Docs”




  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Treatment for Children #adhd #treatment, #adhd #medication,

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    ADHD Treatment in Children

    Treatment can help your child with ADHD in school, social situations, and at home. The right plan can help with all three of the major components of ADHD. inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity control. The goal of treatment is to help your child follow rules, concentrate, and have good relationships with parents, teachers, and peers.

    These treatment options are all considered safe, but no two children are alike, and what works for some kids may not work as well for yours.

    Together with the doctor, you’ll develop a plan that meets your child’s specific needs. It may take time to figure out what works best. The plan may include medications. behavioral therapy, or both.

    Medications

    The main medications used to treat ADHD are stimulants and nonstimulants. Sometimes antidepressants are also used.

    Stimulants are the most common treatment in children and teens. This is usually the type of medication a doctor may try first. Stimulants have been used for a long time and are well-tested. They help the brain control impulses and control behavior and attention.

    Kids with certain medical conditions shouldn’t take stimulants. Make sure the doctor knows your child’s medical history before he prescribes any medication.

    If the first drug the doctor prescribes doesn’t seem to help with symptoms, he may raise the dosage, suggest a different medication, or suggest your child take another drug along with the stimulant.

    Nonstimulants aren’t as well tested. They work in different ways than stimulants, but they can help with concentration and impulse control. For some kids, they may be a better option than stimulants, but they’re often used along with stimulants.

    These nonstimulants are FDA-approved for ADHD in children and teens:

    Antidepressants aren’t specifically approved to treat ADHD, but they can help with inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. They’re an option for children who haven’t done well on a stimulant alone. Taking an antidepressant along with a stimulant seems to work well for children who have ADHD along with a mood disorder such as depression or anxiety.

    Continued

    There are several types of antidepressants.

    Tricyclic antidepressants. These affect chemicals in the brain.

    Examples of tricyclic antidepressants include:

    Bupropion (Wellbutrin ). The doctor may prescribe this if your child doesn’t do well with stimulants.

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These are the most commonly prescribed antidepressants for people with depression. These have been tried for ADHD:

    Venlafaxine (Effexor ). This drug also affects chemicals in the brain. It helps improve mood and concentration in children and teens.

    Side Effects

    All these drugs can cause side effects. They usually happen when a child first starts treatment. They’re usually mild and go away fairly soon. Before your child starts any new medication, talk to his doctor about what to expect.

    If you become concerned about side effects while your child is on a medication, call the doctor. Don’t make changes in the treatment without talking to him.

    Behavioral Therapy

    This type of therapy uses positive reinforcement for good behavior and negative reinforcement for unwanted behaviors. A mental health professional — a psychologist, social worker, or family therapist — works with you and your child’s teachers to set up a program to improve your child’s behaviors.

    Behavioral therapy is often used along with ADHD medications. but it can also be used alone.

    Other Treatments

    Some studies have shown that omega-3 supplements may be helpful for some children with ADHD. In fact, there are prescription omega-3 supplements available. Some kids with ADHD may benefit from changes in diet, such as going gluten-free or avoiding certain food dyes and additives. Talk to your child’s doctor about the best options for him.

    Sources

    National Resource Center on AD/HD: “Behavioral Treatment for Children and Teenagers with AD/HD.”

    National Resource Center on AD/HD: “Complementary and Alternative Treatments.”

    American Academy of Family Physicians: “ADHD: What Parents Should Know.”

    National Resource Center on AD/HD: “Managing Medication for Children and Adolescents with AD/HD.”

    National Resource Center on AD/HD: “Managing Medication for Adults with AD/HD.”

    American Academy of Family Physicians: “ADHD Medicines.”

    Medscape: “Once-Daily Guanfacine Approved to Treat ADHD.”

    Intuniv web site.

    Attention Deficit Disorder Resources: “Medication Management for Adults with ADHD.”

    Strattera web site.

    National Institute of Mental Health: “Questions Raised about Stimulants and Sudden Death.”

    HelpGuide.org: “ADD ADHD Medications.”

    News release, Pfizer.





    What is a PT #lower #manhattan #physical #therapy

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    What is a PT/OT modality?

    A modality is a type of electrical, thermal or mechanical energy that causes physiological changes.

    It is used to relieve pain, improve circulation, decrease swelling, reduce muscle spasm, and deliver medication in conjunction with other procedures. Typical types of modalities include electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, heat, ice, and traction.

    • High frequency sound waves that produce a form of deep tissue heating
    • For relief of pain and muscle spasm
    • Promotes circulation
    • Relaxes tight muscles/soft tissue prepares tissues for stretching
    • Use of ultrasound to drive in topical medications through the skin
    • Medications are usually a form of cortisone and xylocaine
    • For treatment of localized inflammations, eg. Heel spurs, tendonitis
    • Use of different forms of electrical current through surface electrodes that cause muscles to contract and relax
    • For relief of muscle spasm, pain and swelling
    • For muscle re-education and strengthening
    • Use of electrical current to drive topical medications through the skin
    • For treatment of localized inflammation, scar softening, reduction in joint calcium deposits
    • A longitudinal pull or distraction of spinal segments for the relief of nerve irritation (radicultis) or muscle spasm by use of a machine on the cervical (neck) spine with the use of a neck halter or lumbar (low back) spine with the use of a pelvic belt attached to a patient lying down
    • Can also be done manually

    Transcutaneous Nerve Stimulation (TENS) :

    • Use of low voltage electrical current through surface electrodes that overrides the sensation of pain
    • Small unit (slightly larger than a beeper) worn throughout the day for pain control that the patient can apply a needed

    Moist Heat (Hydrocollator)

    • Produces a deeper heat than a dry heating pad
    • Increases circulation, reduces swelling, relaxes muscles/soft tissue, prepares tissue for other treatments
    • Use of ice packs or ice massage in acute injuries and for pain relief (acute or chronic)
    • Reduces swelling, inflammation, muscles spasm
    • A form of heat using paraffin wax and mineral oil
    • Usually applied to hands or feet where other applications of heat are difficult

    For additional information, please contact us!





    Sports Medicine, MSc #courseresult,sports,medicine,masters,sport,postgraduate,exercise,physiotherapy,therapy,gp,physiotherapist, #smed,injection,therapy,developing,strength, #uclan

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    University of Central Lancashire

    Why study this programme?

    Want to be a leader in Sports Medicine who engages with evidence-based practice to deliver safe and effective care to those engaging in sport and physical activity? The MSc Sports Medicine includes a contemporary collection of modules which offers options to suit General Practitioners, Physiotherapists, Sports Therapists and Sports Rehabilitators – enabling them to develop advanced clinical reasoning skills. This flexible course has been developed with feedback from clinical partners and alumni. Optional modules include Injection Therapy or Developing Strength; two modules unique to our course which will allow you to develop specialist skills to enhance your role as a Sports Medicine professional.

    You’ll be taught by staff and researchers who have worked in the field of Sports Medicine from grass roots sports to National team level. Lecturers from Medicine, Physiotherapy, Sports Therapy and Sport, Exercise and Nutritional Sciences will work concurrently to deliver modules making the most from each of the speciality disciplines.

    You’ll have access to facilities from the School of Medicine, the divisions of Health Sports Sciences as well as the Sir Tom Finney Sports Centre and the UCLan Sports Arena.

    Entry Requirements

    Applicants admitted onto the course will meet the following requirements:

    • Must hold MChB (MBBS) qualification or relevant professional qualification for example in Physiotherapy, Sports Therapy or Sports Rehabilitation. Applications from other related professions will be considered on an individual basis.
    • Be actively engaged in or access clinical experience in a Sports and Exercise Medicine practice in order to support learning within the programme.
    • Have sufficient competency in English language (IELTS Level 7 or equivalent)

    All suitable applicants will be interviewed. Interview procedures and decisions regarding applications will be conducted within the University’s policies on equal opportunities and admissions.

    Programme at a Glance

    Year 1

    Clinical Sports Injuries and Assessment
    Emergency Medical Management in Individual/Team Sports
    Sports Injury Management and Rehabilitation

    Injection Therapy
    OR
    Development of Strength 1
    OR
    Managing Concussion, Head and Neck Injuries in Sport

    Applied Sports Science
    Exercise in Medical Conditions
    Research Methods for Sport

    Postgraduate Advice Event

    Find out more about our Postgraduate courses. Book onto our Postgraduate Advice Event on 13 September 2017

    Further Information

    Whether you are currently working in sport or aspire to work in sport at any level, the course will enhance your skills in assessment, management and rehabilitation of sports injuries and common medical conditions. As a student studying Sports Medicine you will also learn essential skills for health injury screening assisting in prevention of injury and safe participation in sport. You will learn advanced trauma management skills enabling you to feel confident in working with a team, an individual athlete or in populations with common medical conditions. This will be supported by a member of the Medical School who has worked as a Consultant and Lecturer in Emergency Medicine and instructed on both the European Trauma and the FA AREA course.

    The programme can be studied full-time over 1 year or part-time over 2-5 years. If you wish to discuss the flexible part-time study options, please contact the course leader.

    A tuition fee discount applies for UCLan alumni.

    How to Apply

    You can apply for many of the postgraduate UCLan courses using our Online Application System .

    For other postgraduate courses you can apply directly to UCLan by downloading a Postgraduate Application Form (.pdf 190KB) please also see our Postgraduate Application Guidance Notes (.pdf 158KB).

    Course Specification and Handbook

    For a concise summary of the main features of this course, see our course specification.
    For information on possible changes to course information, see our Important Information .

    For detailed information about studying this course at UCLan, please see the course handbook for your year of entry:

    Your UCLan

    Sports Therapy Undergraduate. BSc (Hons), Full-time and Part-time

  • Physiotherapy Undergraduate. BSc (Hons), Full-time

    DBS Checks

    This course will involve access to children and/or vulnerable adults. You will be required to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (formerly termed CRB) and we will guide you through this process.

    Learning Environment and Assessment

    Many modules will have classroom sessions supported with online learning material. Your module tutors will guide you as to the preparation required for teaching sessions and whilst they will sometimes give specific guidance, at master’s level it is expected that you take some initiative to read around the session topic so that you can contribute to classroom discussions. The emphasis will be on problem – based learning where a student will be facilitated to engage in deep learning and enquiry. Blackboard, our online learning platform, will be used to support this process.

    All the staff teaching on the course are experienced clinicians and have many years of experience in education. Each staff member is delivering modules within their area of expertise and so you can be sure that you are being taught by staff who are at the forefront of their field. All staff are involved in research within their clinical and/or academic field, and where it is relevant to the module you are studying, the research will be shared with you. In some modules we also bring in experienced, practising clinicians with current expertise in an aspect of the module; this enables us to blend academic expertise, clinical knowledge and current clinical experience and to give you access to people who are able to ensure that your learning experience enables you to meet the demands of the current clinical environment.

    Opportunities

    On completion of the course you will have the necessary skills to pursue a career in Sports Medicine. You will also have developed valuable research skills that will allow you to continue with your education. After completing the degree, students will be encouraged not only to consider a position in Sports Medicine but to also consider further educational opportunities such as progressing on to a PhD or Professional Doctorate pathway. The course team will be happy to discuss and advise you on these further progression opportunities.

    Social Media





  • Palliative Radiation Therapy #ayrshire #hospice

    #palliative radiation therapy

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    Palliative Radiation Therapy

    Radiation oncology experts describe the process of receiving palliative radiation therapy, side effects that patients commonly experience, and Memorial Sloan Kettering s team approach. Palliative radiation therapy is designed to prevent or relieve symptoms and is not intended to cure the disease.

    Nurse practitioner Carol Ann Milazzo details the four steps involved in receiving therapy, and common, temporary side effects such as fatigue, radiation dermatitis, nausea, heartburn, diarrhea, and a sensation of burning hemorrhoids. Pain and palliative care specialist Roma Tickoo dispels some common myths associated with palliative medicine. Radiation oncologist Beryl McCormick. Chief of the External Beam Radiotherapy Service, notes that while Memorial Sloan Kettering delivers palliative radiation to hundreds of patients annually, the choice to pursue the therapy is an individual one.

    The video was developed with grant funding awarded to radiation oncology resident Kavita Dharmarajan from the American Medical Association Foundation and Memorial Sloan Kettering s Patient Caregiver Education Department.

    If you have any questions or concerns, contact a member of your healthcare team directly or call 212-639-2000 for help.

    If you have any questions or concerns, talk with a member of your healthcare team. You can reach them Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at ____________________. After 5:00 pm. during the weekend, and on holidays, please call____________________. If there s no number listed, or you re not sure, call 212-639-2000 .

    Palliative Radiation Therapy

    2016 Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center – Generated on September 7, 2016

    Counselling Programs at Ontario Colleges #counselling #programs, #counselling #programs #in #ontario, #college

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    Counselling Programs at Ontario Colleges

    What to expect from a career as a Counsellor

    Helping people overcome addictions, fears, emotional and physical trauma, personal issues and other problems is truly rewarding. As a counsellor, you ll help others by applying different techniques and treatments targeted to each client s situation. Counselling programs at Ontario colleges provide you with the interpersonal skills and trauma and addictions knowledge needed to become a counsellor.

    If you want to help better the lives of people who are struggling by providing counselling services, here s what you need to know. More

    Counselling Courses

    There are many Ontario college counselling programs, and they typically fall into one of two categories:

    • Drug and Alcohol / Addictions Counselling. In these programs, students learn about different types of addictions, approaches to treatment and techniques for screening, assessing and managing client cases. Courses in pharmacology provide students with a thorough understanding of pharmaceuticals and their effects on a person s physical and mental state.
    • Assaulted Women and Child Counselling. These programs examine the issues of violence and abuse from the perspective of women and children. Course subjects will include child development. physical and sexual violence, feminist political action, advocacy of children, women s rights and more. Students will learn specialized techniques for counselling women and children who have suffered abuse.

    Whether you want to focus on addictions counselling or work mainly with abused women and children, all counselling programs have mandatory fieldwork placements, co-ops and / or training practicums that provide you with the practical experience you ll need to start your career.

    General Counselling Program Requirements

    Counselling programs are offered at the diploma and graduate certificate level. Diploma programs require an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent, which includes a grade 12 English credit. Other senior level courses may be required but will vary by program.

    Graduate certificate counselling programs require a diploma or degree in a related field, or significant related work experience. There may be other non-academic requirements, so check program admission details carefully.

    Counselling Jobs and Salaries

    Graduates of counselling programs at Ontario colleges will find counselling jobs in a variety of settings, including (but not limited to):

    Counsellor salaries vary depending on the position, but the average starting salary for program grads is between $34,000 and $39,000 per year. With experience, salaries could be upwards of $50,000 per year.

    Ontario Colleges Offering Counselling Programs

    Use the left-column navigation to refine your search by College, Program Availability, Program Start Date and more, or see the table below for a complete list of counselling programs at Ontario colleges. Less





    Blue Lagoon California Couples Friendly Drug Rehab #addiction #treatment #center #southern #california,

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    Welcome to Blue Lagoon Recovery Centers
    of Southern California

    Blue Lagoon California Pet Friendly Drug Rehab is a premier, client oriented help facility. Our years of experience have allowed us to customize treatments to the individual client. Everyone is different, and having your personal requirements met ensures the most successful treatment available. Needs to be changed to say the following instead: Blue Lagoon California Pet Friendly Drug Rehab is a premier, client oriented drug and alcohol treatment facility located at the beach, in Southern California. Our years of experience and expertise combined with us being a smaller, more private treatment center has allowed us to offer a customized treatment plan based on the unique needs of each individual.

    We have a 24/7 executive treatment center hotline. We take individuals, executive couples and pets. In addition to those suffering from drug, alcohol, or nicotine addiction, we also serve those individuals with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    We also provide Bailbond services in California only.

    Intake Coordinator or Intervention Specialists Family Intervention
    Intervention anytime, anywhere.
    For $3,500.00 on all Intervention Services

    • California Heroin Detox
    • Couple Heroin Detox
    • Couple Opiate Detox
    • Couples Private Rooms Drug Treatment
    • Couples Naltrexone Drug Treatment

    Call and speak to a specialist now!
    714-274-5452

    Blue Lagoon Recovery Centers of Southern California now provide probation approved treatment facilities, couples accepted.

    NOW OFFERING.
    We now have a package deal for a private attorney for drug and alcohol addiction and also provide Bail bond service.

    We accept HMO Insurance for inpatient residential treatment 30 day program, No Co-Pay!

    WE NOW OFFER TREATMENT FOR DRUG AND ALCOHOL AND MENTAL PROBLEMS FOR ADOLESCENTS

    Blue Lagoon Recovery Centers of Southern California will be happy to refer you to a treatment center who can provide for your needs. This FREE Referral service is for clients who go through Blue Lagoon Recovery Centers of Southern California for their initial rehab admission processing. Your assigned treatment center will then arrange for easy and affordable payment on your part. When you are referred by Blue Lagoon Recovery Centers of Southern Californiaa. you know you can trust the treatment center you will be assigned to. We look for quality, competence and credibility because we only want the best for our clients.

    Everything is trademark and owned by Rehabs for You LLC
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    Blood Gases: The Test #blood #gas, #blood #gases, #arterial #blood #gases, #arterial

    #

    Blood Gases

    How is it used?

    Blood gas measurements are used to evaluate a person’s lung function and acid/base balance .

    They are typically ordered if someone is having worsening symptoms of a respiratory problem, such as difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, and a condition such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suspected. Blood gases may also be used to monitor treatment for lung diseases and to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental oxygen therapy.

    Blood gases can also be used to detect an acid-base imbalance, which can occur in kidney failure. heart failure. uncontrolled diabetes. severe infections, and drug overdose. They may be ordered along with other tests, such as electrolytes to determine if an electrolyte imbalance is present, glucose to evaluate blood sugar concentrations, and BUN and creatinine tests to evaluate kidney function.

    When is it ordered?

    A blood gas analysis is ordered when someone has symptoms of an oxygen/carbon dioxide or pH imbalance, such as difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, nausea, or vomiting. It may also be ordered when someone is known to have respiratory, metabolic, or kidney disease and is experiencing respiratory distress.

    When someone is “on oxygen” (ventilation), blood gases may be measured at intervals to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. Other treatments for lung diseases may also be monitored with blood gases.

    Blood gases may also be ordered when someone has head or neck trauma, which may affect breathing, and when someone is undergoing prolonged anesthesia – particularly for cardiac bypass surgery or brain surgery – to monitor blood gases during, and for a period after, the procedure.

    Checking blood gases from the umbilical cord of a newborn may uncover respiratory problems as well as determine acid/base status. Testing is usually only done if a newborn is having difficulty breathing.

    What does the test result mean?

    Normal values will vary from lab to lab. They are also dependent on elevation above sea level as a person’s blood oxygen level will be lower if he or she lives higher than sea level.

    Results from an arterial blood gas analysis are not diagnostic; they should be used in combination with the results of other tests and exams to evaluate someone for a respiratory, metabolic, or kidney problem.

    Abnormal results of any of the blood gas components may indicate one or more of the following issues:

    • A person is not getting enough oxygen
    • A person is not getting rid of enough carbon dioxide
    • There is a problem with a person’s kidney function

    A low partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 ) suggests that a person is not getting enough oxygen, while results that are within normal range usually mean that oxygen intake is sufficient.

    All other components of the blood gas analysis (pH. PaCO2. HCO3 -) are interrelated and the results must be considered together. Certain combinations of results, if abnormal, may indicate a condition that is causing acidosis or alkalosis. These may include the following:

    • Respiratory acidosis is characterized by a lower pH and an increased PaCO2 and is due to respiratory depression (not enough oxygen taken in and carbon dioxide removed). This can be caused by many things, including pneumonia. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). and over-sedation from narcotics.
    • Respiratory alkalosis, characterized by a raised pH and a decreased PaCO2. is due to over-ventilation caused by hyperventilating, pain, emotional distress, or certain lung diseases that interfere with oxygen exchange.
    • Metabolic acidosis is characterized by a lower pH and decreased HCO3 -, causing the blood to be too acidic for proper metabolic/kidney function. Causes include diabetes. shock, and renal failure .
    • Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by an elevated pH and increased HCO3 – and is seen in hypokalemia. chronic vomiting (losing acid from the stomach), and sodium bicarbonate overdose.

    Examples of test results associated with the above conditions are summarized below:





    Physical Therapy, Sports Rehab, Geriatric Rehab, Occupational Therapy #palisades #rehab, #rehab, #physical

    #

    Palisades Physical Rehab, Sports Wellness Center

    Palisades Rehab is the Northern Valley’s leader for physical and occupational therapy, including surgical rehabilitation. Family owned and operated since 1997, the Palisades team believes that the secret to healing lies in treating the whole person. We specialize in delivering skilled, customized care to clients of all ages while creating a warm, accommodating treatment environment. Approaching each client with the compassion, respect and concern they deserve, our staff works to restore function, eliminate pain and expedite the return to activity.

    The Palisades Rehab team is comprised of highly trained therapists experienced in a range of disciplines. Aptly described as a family, our therapy team ensures that clients are fully educated about their condition, and that they feel welcome and supported during therapy visits. In addition, we support aftercare and therapy follow-through, encouraging clients to return for periodic check-ups or to participate in our wellness program.

    Palisades Rehab is Medicare certified, and is a member of the prestigious Hospital for Special Surgery Rehab Network. Highly regarded by surgeons, physicians and nearby hospitals, our team of therapy professionals is trained and certified in the industry’s most progressive therapy and rehabilitation techniques. In addition to physician referrals, many patients come to us after learning of our reputation through friends, family and word-of-mouth.

    Click to learn about our orthopedic & physical therapy services

    Palisades provides comprehensive treatment options for a range of injuries, degenerative conditions and long-term health problems, and can provide home visits for patients who are eligible.

    Orthopedic therapy includes, but is not limited to:

    • Joint Replacement
    • Fracture Management
    • Back and Neck Pain
    • Hand Injuries
    • Arthritis
    • Bursitis & Tendonitis
    • Osteoporosis
    • Sports Injuries
    • Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Neurological rehabilitation includes, but is not limited to:

    • Parkinson’s Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis
    • Stroke
    • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • Vestibular & Balance Disorders

    Home visits are designed to improve your well-being and everyday quality of life. Features include:

    • Home safety assessments
    • Fall prevention training
    • In-home rehabilitative therapy programs
    • Proactive training for home tasks, like climbing stairs, reaching cabinets, showering, cooking & cleaning

    Aging in Place Home Modifications

    “Aging in place” is a catchphrase that describes baby boomers who are choosing to modify their existing home as they age, rather than move to assisted living environments. If you or someone you love is experiencing a decline in safety, or is frustrated by a lack of independence, the Palisades’ team can help. Our occupational therapy practitioners will come to your home, evaluate your environment and recommend adaptations to prevent injury or frustration.

    Through this service, we focus on reducing falls, promoting a healthy lifestyle and teaching clients to safely carry out their activities of daily living. Palisades’ practitioners are a valuable asset to professional teams, and are experienced in working with clients and their caregivers, as well as architects and construction companies who help to carry out modifications. Call today to schedule your “Aging in Place” evaluation, or speak with a Palisades’ occupational therapy practitioner.

    Driver Safety

    For most of us, driving is a way to stay connected to our world: to visit friends, go shopping and remain mobile. Unfortunately, aging can challenge our senses, along with physical and mental capabilities and ultimately may impact our ability to safely transport ourselves and others.

    At Palisades Rehab, our occupational therapy practitioners have the expertise to assess vision, cognition, motor skills and perception. Through this evaluation, therapists can help older drivers compensate for life changes that impact their driving. And, when it’s time to give up driving, our OT team helps patients (1) adjust to the idea, (2) consider other forms of transportation, and (3) remain as independent and safe as possible.

    Monthly Maintenance Program

    Upon discharge from therapy services, we offer a monthly maintenance program to help you continue your path to good health. Talk to your therapist for more information!

    Click to learn about Direct Access (DA)

    At Palisades Rehab, we understand that things happen unexpectedly and that you may need to see a therapist before you’ve had the opportunity to see your physician. To assist with this, our facility participates in the Direct Access (DA) program. According to NJ Direct Access Law, you can see a physical therapist for up to 30 days before requiring a prescription for further treatment. NJ Direct Access allows you to begin your treatment program sooner so you can get back on your feet faster.

    *While most health insurances cover physical therapy obtained by using Direct Access, plans differ. Please check with your insurance provider. Note: Medicare does not permit Direct Access.

    For more information about Palisades Rehab, or to inquire about program specialties, insurance coverage and admission requirements, call or email our team of therapists today.

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    Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree #physical #therapy #doctorate #programs

    #

    Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

    The demand for physical therapists is expected to grow nationally by 34% 1 between 2014 and 2024. This far outpaces the average projected growth rate for many occupations. 1 As baby boomers age, they are staying active longer and the need for physical therapy professionals has accelerated.

    With that in mind, West Coast University has created a student-centric, three-year doctor of physical therapy program dedicated to developing proficient physical therapists poised to fill this emerging demand.

    WCU Advantages

    Leveraging innovative learning strategies, West Coast University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program places experience and collaboration at the cornerstone of student achievement.

    Ongoing Experiential Education classroom theory comes alive with a progression of dynamic clinical experiences. At approved clinical sites and in simulated training, students work with and under the supervision of experienced clinicians. Three end-of-program clinical internships will develop skills learned in the classroom and lab and establish the self-confidence graduates will need as they embark upon their career.

    A variety of clinical internship opportunities students will have a total of 51 weeks of full-time clinical internships during the academic program at WCU. These will take place in a minimum of three different practice settings to ensure that students are prepared to be a general practitioner at graduation and equipped to work in a range of clinical settings. WCU has clinical agreements nationwide and students will be required to complete at least one clinical education experience outside of the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Expenses related to the clinical education experience such as housing and other living expenses, are the responsibility of the student.

    Student-focused approach WCU helps prepare graduates to practice physical therapy with both compassion and competence, while reinforcing essential, evidence-based skills.

    Support Beyond Graduation

    West Coast University supports its students beyond the last day of class. We are committed to helping our graduates throughout their careers.

    Through our Career Service Department , we provide ongoing assistance with professional and career development through workshops and guidance for our students and graduates. We partner with industry professionals and enhance the prospects for securing employment and obtaining professional success.

    Since healthcare professionals are life-long learners, WCU assists its graduates by providing them ongoing discounted CEs through a complimentary membership to our partner company, Contemporary Forums .

    Request More Information





    Palliative therapy #hotel #booking #online

    #palliative therapy

    #

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual. Palliative care:

    • provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;
    • affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;
    • intends neither to hasten or postpone death;
    • integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;
    • offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;
    • offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;
    • uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;
    • will enhance quality of life, and may also positively influence the course of illness;
    • is applicable early in the course of illness, in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and includes those investigations needed to better understand and manage distressing clinical complications.

    WHO Definition of Palliative Care for Children

    Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. WHO s definition of palliative care appropriate for children and their families is as follows; the principles apply to other paediatric chronic disorders (WHO; 1998a):

    • Palliative care for children is the active total care of the child’s body, mind and spirit, and also involves giving support to the family.
    • It begins when illness is diagnosed, and continues regardless of whether or not a child receives treatment directed at the disease.
    • Health providers must evaluate and alleviate a child’s physical, psychological, and social distress.
    • Effective palliative care requires a broad multidisciplinary approach that includes the family and makes use of available community resources; it can be successfully implemented even if resources are limited.
    • It can be provided in tertiary care facilities, in community health centres and even in children’s homes.

    Assisted Animal Therapy in Hospice Care #hospice #cost

    #hospice for dogs

    #

    Assisted Animal Therapy (AAT) in Hospice Care

    Updated September 03, 2016

    Assisted Animal Therapy (AAT), also known as pet therapy, is the use of certified cats and dogs as volunteers for the disabled, elderly, or frail and is often used in hospice as part of a comprehensive volunteer program .

    The Benefits of Pet Therapy

    Pet therapy has been shown to increase pain tolerance, reduce stress, lower blood pressure, and bring smiles to patient s faces. It can be especially useful in the hospice setting for patients who have withdrawn from the people around them but find interacting with an animal easier and less painful.

    Hospice patients often turn inward and withdraw from loved ones and the world around them as a way to ease the transition towards death. Talking to loved ones might become difficult and painful but interacting with a friendly animal is easy and offers a temporary reprieve.

    If you are considering volunteering your pet to visit with hospice patients, there are some things you need to consider before starting.

    Consider Your Pet s Temperament

    A pet therapy animal should have a calm temperament and be able to tolerate sudden loud noises and groping hands. The animal should be accepting of friendly strangers and be able to sit calmly to be pet. It should be equally friendly towards other animals and show no aggression. The animal should be confident and consistently obey commands.

    Overly excitable animals do not make good hospice volunteers. Hospice patients need a pet volunteer who is calm and exudes peace and love.

    Older pets typically make the best hospice volunteers but a well-trained puppy might work as well.

    Think Your Pet s Got What it Takes? Get Certified!

    If your pet has the right temperament and is well-trained, the next step is to get your pet certified. Not all pet therapy animals require certification but I believe all hospice volunteer animals should be.

    Certification shows that you care enough about patients to ensure your animal is the best it can be.

    Some hospice agencies provide pet therapy training and certification. Check with the hospice agency you ve decided to volunteer for to inquire about their pet therapy program. (For tips on choosing a hospice agency to volunteer for, see How to Be a Hospice Volunteer ). If the hospice agency doesn t provide training and certification, you ll need to pursue it on your own.

    The American Kennel Club developed the Canine Good Citizen Test in 1989 to evaluate and certify a canine s well-mannered behavior. The test consists of ten parts designed to evaluate a dog s ability to obey commands and his overall temperament.

    Clubs and Organizations

    There are several clubs and organizations that support testing and certification. You can contact any of the listed organizations below to inquire about certification:

    Marriage and Divorce #families, #systems, #health,,marital #relations, #marital #separation, #divorce, #child #custody,

    #

    Marriage & divorce

    Marriage and divorce are both common experiences. In Western cultures, more than 90 percent of people marry by age 50. Healthy marriages are good for couples’ mental and physical health. They are also good for children; growing up in a happy home protects children from mental, physical, educational and social problems. However, about 40 to 50 percent of married couples in the United States divorce. The divorce rate for subsequent marriages is even higher.

    Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology

    Research on Marriage & Divorce

    Separation and divorce are emotionally difficult events, but it is possible to have a healthy breakup.

    Keep your romantic partnership in good working order by talking openly, keeping it interesting and seeking help if needed.

    Research on what makes a marriage work shows that people in a good marriage have completed these psychological “tasks.”

    Parents of a “blended family” face plenty of challenges, but there are things you can do to make communication easier and help children adjust to their new reality.

    Scientists have found that the psychological and social aspects of committed relationships between same-sex partners largely resemble those of heterosexual partnerships, that living in a state where same-sex marriage is outlawed can lead to chronic social stress and mental health problems, and that same-sex couples are as fit and capable parents as heterosexual couples.

    Getting Help

    In the United States, couples marrying for the first time have approximately a fifty percent chance of divorcing. Psychologists are helping couples’ “I do” last a lifetime through development and application of scientifically tested relationship education programs.

    Psychologists who work as parenting coordinators help moms and dads keep the peace.





    Miami Counseling – Resource Center #therapy, #therapist, #therapists, #psychologist, #psychological, #counselor, #counseling,

    #

    We Provide The Help You Need.

    Check Out Our New Group Therapy Workshops!

    Miami Counseling Resource Center is a full-service mental health treatment center providing psychological services and therapy to children, teenagers, and adults for a wide range of mental health, emotional, behavioral and relationship issues.

    Miami Counseling Resource Center:

    The Miami Counseling Resource Center is a multidisciplinary mental health treatment center staffed by psychologists, child psychologists, marriage and family therapists, licensed professional counselors, social workers, nutritionists, and both adult and child psychiatrists.

    Psychological Testing is Available:

    Psychological testing conducted by our child psychologist is available to children and adults for a variety of presenting problems, including intelligence and gifted placement, learning disabilities, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), personality testing, and diagnosis of other emotional and behavioral problems.

    Individual Family Therapy:

    Individual and Family therapy are the predominant modes of therapy / counseling offered at our convenient Miami South Florida offices located in the heart of downtown Coral Gables. Group therapy is provided in the areas of assertiveness, eating disorders, depression, anxiety, divorce, parenting, grief and loss, children s issues, self-esteem, stress management, and other relationship issues.

    Psychopharmacological Management

    Psychopharmacological Management of psychiatric symptoms by our talented child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrists are offered in conjunction with our other mental health treatment services.





    Colorado State University Flint Animal Cancer Center – Fort Collins, Colorado –

    #palliative radiation therapy

    #

    Radiation Therapy

    Radiation therapy, surgery and chemotherapy are the 3 most common modalities used in the treatment of cancer. Radiation therapy and surgery are the only modalities that can locally control solid tumors such as carcinomas and sarcomas. Radiation therapy can also be used to provide relief of pain, or improve function in patients suffering from advanced cancers. Radiation therapy has been used for over 100 years, but technical advancements in the last decade have vastly improved the ability to deliver dose specifically to the tumor while sparing normal tissue structures. Learn about the Varian Trilogy Radiation Therapy Machine .

    What is radiation therapy?

    Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to damage the DNA in tumor cells, resulting in tumor cell death. The most common type of radiation therapy is external beam radiation therapy, also known as teletherapy. Teletherapy is delivered by a radiation producing machine like a linear accelerator, or from a machine housing a radioactive source, such as a cobalt machine. The patient is precisely positioned on a table, also called a couch, near the machine. Radiation travels from the machines to the patient, where the radiation dose is delivered to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues. While the patient remains in the exact same position, the machine actually revolves around the patient so that radiation is delivered from many different angles. Each treatment takes just a few minutes and does not cause any discomfort.

    How does radiation therapy work?
    Radiation therapy kills cells by damaging the DNA. The damage is from the localized release of ionizing radiation, which can damage the DNA directly, or more commonly, through the formation of oxygen free radicals. The cells generally do not die until the cell goes to divide. This is known as mitotic cell death. One of the reasons it is effective against cancer cells is that cancer cells are routinely dividing. Radiation can also cause a more immediate death in some cancers cells, called apoptotic cell death. This is seen frequently in tumors such as lymphoma.

    What are the goals of radiation therapy?
    Radiation is usually administered with the goal of achieving long term tumor control. This is referred to as radiation therapy with curative intent . Depending on the part of the body bearing the tumor, most veterinary patients treated with curative intent protocols are treated over a 3-4 week period. A small fraction of radiation is delivered each day. Sometimes,depending on the location, there can be side effects, known as acute effects from this type of treatment. New technology is helping us minimize acute effects.

    What is palliative radiation therapy?
    Sometimes radiation is administered to relieve the patient of pain and/or improve regional function and hygiene. This is referred to as palliative radiation therapy . Palliative protocols are most commonly used when the patient has advanced cancer with tumor spread to other locations, or some other critical condition that would limit life expectancy. These protocols vary and may involve weekly treatments or treatments given over the course of a few days. Palliative radiation therapy usually relieves pain and may even cause the tumors to shrink a bit and rarely cause acute effects. Unfortunately the duration of patient response is far shorter than patients treated with more aggressive (curative) protocols.

    Which patients get acute effects and why?
    Patients treated with curative intent radiation therapy may develop side effects, called acute effects during or shortly after treatment. New radiation technological advances, such as the Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at CSU, are able to decrease the severity of, or even eliminate acute effects for tumors in some parts of the body. Nasal tumors, bladder and prostate cancers, oral tumors and brain tumors now have minimal acute effects. Unfortunately, when tumors are located close to the skin surface, it is necessary for the skin to receive radiation doses that may cause discomfort. Your clinician will discuss potential side effects with you prior to treatment.

    What is SRT and how is it different from curative intent or palliative
    radiation therapy?

    Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SRT) is also called stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife therapy and cyberknife therapy. There is no surgery involved, rather it got the name because the radiation is a precise as a scalpel at focusing on the tumor. SRT protocols are generally delivered in 1-5 fractions (doses) on consecutive or alternating days. SRT requires special radiation therapy equipment including the ability to confirm the location of the patient and tumor right before therapy that is the stereotactic aspect that the Trilogy provides. For some tumors, SRT can be used with curative intent. For other tumors it is used for palliation, but for far more durable palliation than what can be achieved using traditional methods. SRT is easy on the patient and client because treatment can be completed in such a short period of time and acute radiation effects are minimal. However, it is not indicated for all tumor types/location. Ask an ACC oncologist if this is an option for your pet.

    What are the most common tumors treated with radiation therapy?
    The most common tumors treated in dogs and cats are brain tumors, pituitary tumors, tumors of the body and extremities (soft tissue sarcomas, mast cell tumors, vaccine associated sarcomas), lymphoma, nasal tumors, oral tumors, bladder tumors, prostate tumors, perianal tumors, and bone tumors.

    Role of Radiation Therapy in Palliative Care of the Patient With Cancer

    #palliative radiation therapy

    #

    • ©American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Role of Radiation Therapy in Palliative Care of the Patient With Cancer

    1. Stephen T. Lutz ⇑.
    2. Joshua Jones and
    3. Edward Chow
    1. Stephen T. Lutz, Blanchard Valley Regional Cancer Center, Findlay, OH; Joshua Jones, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Edward Chow, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    1. Corresponding author: Stephen T. Lutz, MD, Blanchard Valley Regional Cancer Center, 15990 Medical Dr South, Findlay, OH 45840; e-mail: slutzbvha.org.

    Abstract

    Radiotherapy is a successful, time-efficient, well-tolerated, and cost-effective intervention that is crucial for the appropriate delivery of palliative oncology care. The distinction between curative and palliative goals is blurred in many patients with cancer, requiring that treatments be chosen on the basis of factors related to the patient (ie, poor performance status, advanced age, significant weight loss, severe comorbid disease), the cancer (ie, metastatic disease, aggressive histology), or the treatment (ie, poor response to systemic therapy, previous radiotherapy). Goals may include symptom relief at the site of primary tumor or from metastatic lesions. Attention to a patient’s discomfort and transportation limitations requires hypofractionated courses, when feasible. Innovative approaches include rapid response palliative care clinics as well as the formation of palliative radiotherapy specialty services in academic centers. Guidelines are providing better definitions of appropriate palliative radiotherapy interventions, and bone metastases fractionation has become the first radiotherapy quality measure accepted by the National Quality Forum. Further advances in the palliative radiation oncology subspecialty will require integration of education and training between the radiotherapy and palliative care specialties.

    This Article

    Cancer Supportive and Survivorship Care – The Fifth Dimension of Therapy #compare

    #supportive care

    #

    Of all the ingredients in the will to live, hope is the most vital. Hope is the emotional and mental state that motivates you to keep on living, to accomplish things and succeed. A person who lacks hope can give up on life and lose the will to live. Without hope, there is little to live for. But with hope, a positive attitude can be maintained, determination strengthened, coping skills sharpened, and love and support more freely given and received.

    Even if a diagnosis is such that the future seems limited, hope must be maintained. Hope is what people have to live on. Take away hope and you take away a chance for the future, which leads to depression. When people fall to that low emotional state, their bodies simply turn off.

    Hope can be maintained as long as there is even a remote chance for survival. It is kindled and nurtured by even minor improvements or a remission and maintained when crises or reversals occur.

    There may be times when you will feel exhausted and drained by never-ending problems and feel ready to give up the struggle to survive. All too often it seems easier to give up than to keep on fighting. Frustrations and despair can sometimes feel overwhelming. Determination or dogged persistence is needed to accomplish the difficult task of fighting for your health.

    Veterinary Palliative Radiation Therapy #hospice #rn #jobs

    #palliative radiation therapy

    #

    Veterinary Palliative Radiation Therapy

    Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (VHUP)

    Last Modified: June 5, 2013

    Palliative therapy can be thought of as “comfort care”. It is treatment intended to maintain a good quality of life for patients in which long-term cancer control is not possible. Palliative radiation therapy can be used to control the symptoms associated with many localized tumors that cannot be treated by other methods (such as surgical removal). These symptoms include pain, bleeding, and decreased function. Radiation is usually combined with anti-inflammatory and pain medications to maximize the relief of cancer-related symptoms. The goals of palliative therapy are to provide symptom-relief, and not to increase survival time or cure the cancer. Radiation therapy is particularly useful in alleviating pain associated with tumors that are arising from, or invading into bone. About two thirds of patients have moderate to significant improvement, and the effects can last for a few weeks to several months. Decrease in symptoms can occur as quickly as several days after the first treatment, or it may take a few weeks before improvement is seen.

    Palliative radiation involves delivering a few large doses of radiation over several weeks. The typical plan involves giving three treatments on days 0, 7, and 21 (in other words, two treatments a week apart, followed by a week of rest, and then a third treatment if indicated). In most cases, palliative radiation therapy is a one-time course of treatment and cannot be repeated. Each treatment requires light anesthesia because the patient must be completely still during the procedure—there is no pain or discomfort associated with delivery of the radiation. Your pet must have no food after 8 PM the night before each treatment (water is okay) to insure an empty stomach prior to anesthesia.

    Patients are treated as outpatients, with each treatment requiring about 2-3 hours at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. This time includes preparation for anesthesia, treatment delivery, and recovery. The radiation is focused on the tumor, and the fur in this area will be clipped and pen marks used to outline the treatment area. A small area on a leg will also be clipped for an intravenous catheter (I.V.) used during the anesthesia. Your pet may be a little groggy or sedate for several hours after going home, and should be kept quiet and have limited food and water until fully recovered.

    Side effects are minimal, and are limited to the area receiving radiation. They start after about three to four weeks from the first treatment and last for a few weeks. The radiated area will be pink to red and hairless and there may be some mild flaking or crusting of the skin. Treatments of these side effects include the use of topical medications and preventing your pet from licking, rubbing, or scratching at the treated area. Eventually the skin in this area will become very dark to black, and some sparse hair may regrow. Long term side effects (such as the risk of non-healing wounds) take many months or years to occur, and are typically not a problem because most patients undergoing palliative care have a life expectancy of less than one year due to their cancer.

    To learn more about the specialty of veterinary radiation oncology, how to find a specialist and common questions; visit The American College of Veterinary Radiology .

    Keywords

    Click on any of these terms for more related articles

    Colorado State University Flint Animal Cancer Center – Fort Collins, Colorado –

    #palliative radiation therapy

    #

    Radiation Therapy

    Radiation therapy, surgery and chemotherapy are the 3 most common modalities used in the treatment of cancer. Radiation therapy and surgery are the only modalities that can locally control solid tumors such as carcinomas and sarcomas. Radiation therapy can also be used to provide relief of pain, or improve function in patients suffering from advanced cancers. Radiation therapy has been used for over 100 years, but technical advancements in the last decade have vastly improved the ability to deliver dose specifically to the tumor while sparing normal tissue structures. Learn about the Varian Trilogy Radiation Therapy Machine .

    What is radiation therapy?

    Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to damage the DNA in tumor cells, resulting in tumor cell death. The most common type of radiation therapy is external beam radiation therapy, also known as teletherapy. Teletherapy is delivered by a radiation producing machine like a linear accelerator, or from a machine housing a radioactive source, such as a cobalt machine. The patient is precisely positioned on a table, also called a couch, near the machine. Radiation travels from the machines to the patient, where the radiation dose is delivered to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues. While the patient remains in the exact same position, the machine actually revolves around the patient so that radiation is delivered from many different angles. Each treatment takes just a few minutes and does not cause any discomfort.

    How does radiation therapy work?
    Radiation therapy kills cells by damaging the DNA. The damage is from the localized release of ionizing radiation, which can damage the DNA directly, or more commonly, through the formation of oxygen free radicals. The cells generally do not die until the cell goes to divide. This is known as mitotic cell death. One of the reasons it is effective against cancer cells is that cancer cells are routinely dividing. Radiation can also cause a more immediate death in some cancers cells, called apoptotic cell death. This is seen frequently in tumors such as lymphoma.

    What are the goals of radiation therapy?
    Radiation is usually administered with the goal of achieving long term tumor control. This is referred to as radiation therapy with curative intent . Depending on the part of the body bearing the tumor, most veterinary patients treated with curative intent protocols are treated over a 3-4 week period. A small fraction of radiation is delivered each day. Sometimes,depending on the location, there can be side effects, known as acute effects from this type of treatment. New technology is helping us minimize acute effects.

    What is palliative radiation therapy?
    Sometimes radiation is administered to relieve the patient of pain and/or improve regional function and hygiene. This is referred to as palliative radiation therapy . Palliative protocols are most commonly used when the patient has advanced cancer with tumor spread to other locations, or some other critical condition that would limit life expectancy. These protocols vary and may involve weekly treatments or treatments given over the course of a few days. Palliative radiation therapy usually relieves pain and may even cause the tumors to shrink a bit and rarely cause acute effects. Unfortunately the duration of patient response is far shorter than patients treated with more aggressive (curative) protocols.

    Which patients get acute effects and why?
    Patients treated with curative intent radiation therapy may develop side effects, called acute effects during or shortly after treatment. New radiation technological advances, such as the Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at CSU, are able to decrease the severity of, or even eliminate acute effects for tumors in some parts of the body. Nasal tumors, bladder and prostate cancers, oral tumors and brain tumors now have minimal acute effects. Unfortunately, when tumors are located close to the skin surface, it is necessary for the skin to receive radiation doses that may cause discomfort. Your clinician will discuss potential side effects with you prior to treatment.

    What is SRT and how is it different from curative intent or palliative
    radiation therapy?

    Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SRT) is also called stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife therapy and cyberknife therapy. There is no surgery involved, rather it got the name because the radiation is a precise as a scalpel at focusing on the tumor. SRT protocols are generally delivered in 1-5 fractions (doses) on consecutive or alternating days. SRT requires special radiation therapy equipment including the ability to confirm the location of the patient and tumor right before therapy that is the stereotactic aspect that the Trilogy provides. For some tumors, SRT can be used with curative intent. For other tumors it is used for palliation, but for far more durable palliation than what can be achieved using traditional methods. SRT is easy on the patient and client because treatment can be completed in such a short period of time and acute radiation effects are minimal. However, it is not indicated for all tumor types/location. Ask an ACC oncologist if this is an option for your pet.

    What are the most common tumors treated with radiation therapy?
    The most common tumors treated in dogs and cats are brain tumors, pituitary tumors, tumors of the body and extremities (soft tissue sarcomas, mast cell tumors, vaccine associated sarcomas), lymphoma, nasal tumors, oral tumors, bladder tumors, prostate tumors, perianal tumors, and bone tumors.

    Palliative Radiation Therapy #late #hotel #deals

    #palliative radiation therapy

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    Palliative Radiation Therapy

    Radiation oncology experts describe the process of receiving palliative radiation therapy, side effects that patients commonly experience, and Memorial Sloan Kettering s team approach. Palliative radiation therapy is designed to prevent or relieve symptoms and is not intended to cure the disease.

    Nurse practitioner Carol Ann Milazzo details the four steps involved in receiving therapy, and common, temporary side effects such as fatigue, radiation dermatitis, nausea, heartburn, diarrhea, and a sensation of burning hemorrhoids. Pain and palliative care specialist Roma Tickoo dispels some common myths associated with palliative medicine. Radiation oncologist Beryl McCormick. Chief of the External Beam Radiotherapy Service, notes that while Memorial Sloan Kettering delivers palliative radiation to hundreds of patients annually, the choice to pursue the therapy is an individual one.

    The video was developed with grant funding awarded to radiation oncology resident Kavita Dharmarajan from the American Medical Association Foundation and Memorial Sloan Kettering s Patient Caregiver Education Department.

    If you have any questions or concerns, contact a member of your healthcare team directly or call 212-639-2000 for help.

    If you have any questions or concerns, talk with a member of your healthcare team. You can reach them Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at ____________________. After 5:00 pm. during the weekend, and on holidays, please call____________________. If there s no number listed, or you re not sure, call 212-639-2000 .

    Palliative Radiation Therapy

    2016 Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center – Generated on September 7, 2016

    Video of therapy dog caring for hospice patient goes viral #best #price

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    Video of therapy dog caring for hospice patient goes viral

    A video of a 4-year-old golden retriever therapy dog caring for a hospice patient in Oregon has gone viral, King 5 News reported.

    JJ, who has been a certified therapy dog since she was 1 year old, is the primary therapy dog at Samaritan Evergreen Hospice House in Albany, Oregon.

    In the video, she is shown with her head on a hospital bed as a patient’s hand touches her face. An unseen man is heard reading the poem, “What then?” by W.B. Yeats, according to JJ’s Facebook page. People have shared the video over 200,000 times.

    “This is a lady who has very few people to visit her. She cannot see and often does not wake up, but she did like having her hand on my fur,” JJ “wrote” in her Facebook post. “We fell asleep later with her hand splayed on my head, but of us snoring (but not proof of that!).”

    I often do bed visits, though never without The Bossy One. This is a lady who has very few people to visit her. She cannot see and often does not wake up, but she did like having her hand on my fur. She was very calm during my visit. We were listening to Yeats, by the way. I was very insistent to have her touch me, more so than usual. We fell asleep later with her hand splayed on my head, both of us snoring (but no proof of that!) I sure can be silly at times, but I also know when to be quiet and present. Her caregivers were very appreciative when they saw this video.

    Posted by JJ, Hospice Therapy Dog on Sunday, February 23, 2014

    According to JJ’s Facebook page, a bed visit can vary but typically involves keeping a patient company, helping them be calm, or distracting a person to decrease agitation while medications take effect. The video was originally posted in February 2014. For the past three years, she has worked 12-hour shifts with her “boss lady,” registered nurse Tracy Calhoun.

    What we do is absolutely touching, but the depth of the response to the video is amazing, as well as heart-warming, Calhoun told King 5 News.

    JJ is a certified therapy dog through Project Canine and works with Hope Animal-Assisted Crisis Response, providing comfort and encouragement to those affected by crises and disaster.

    “Wow! We’re a bit overwhelmed at the response of our reposted video, but happy to be able to share,” JJ “wrote” on her Facebook wall. “Apologies to those who got teary watching the video, it comes with the territory here sometimes.”

    Palliative therapy for gallbladder cancer #hospice #of #the #valley #locations

    #palliative therapy

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    Palliative therapy for gallbladder cancer

    Palliative therapy is treatment given to help control or reduce symptoms caused by advanced cancer. It does not try to cure the cancer. If the cancer has spread too far to be removed completely by surgery. doctors may advise palliative operations, radiation. chemotherapy. or other treatments to help make you feel better or to help prevent possible complications from the cancer. Because gallbladder cancers tend to advance quickly, doctors try to use palliative therapies that are less likely to affect a person s quality of life, when possible.

    Biliary stent or biliary catheter

    If cancer is blocking a duct that carries bile from the gallbladder or liver to the small intestine, it can lead to jaundice and other problems. The doctor may insert a small tube (either a stent or a catheter ) into the bile duct or the gallbladder to help the bile drain out. This may be done as part of a cholangiography procedure such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) (see How is gallbladder cancer diagnosed? ) or, in some cases, during surgery.

    • A stent is a small metal or plastic tube that keeps the duct open to allow the bile to drain into the small intestine.
    • A catheter is a thin, flexible tube that drains into a bag outside the body through a small hole in the skin of the abdomen. The bag can be emptied when needed. If you have a catheter, your doctor or nurse will teach you how to care for it.

    These procedures are often done to help relieve or prevent symptoms from more advanced cancers, but they can also be done to help relieve jaundice before potentially curative surgery is done. This helps lower the risk of complications from the surgery.

    The stent or catheter may need to be replaced every few months to reduce the risk of it becoming blocked, which could lead to jaundice or gallbladder inflammation.

    Biliary bypass

    In people who are healthy enough, another option to allow bile to drain from the liver and gallbladder is to use surgery to create a new way for bile to get past the blockage in the bile ducts caused by the cancer.

    There are several different biliary bypass operations, and the decision on which one to use is based on the location of the blockage.

    • A choledochojejunostomy joins the common bile duct to the jejunum (the second part of the small intestine).
    • A gastrojejunostomy (also known as a gastric bypass ) joins the stomach directly to the jejunum.
    • A hepaticojejunostomy joins the duct that carries bile from the liver to the jejunum.

    Sometimes these operations can be done through several small holes made in the abdomen using special long surgical tools. This is known as laparoscopic or keyhole surgery.

    A biliary bypass can often give longer-lasting relief than a stent, which might need to be cleaned out or replaced. Still, this can be a major operation, so it s important that you are healthy enough to withstand it and that you talk with your doctor about the possible benefits and risks before you have the surgery.

    Alcohol injection

    To relieve pain, doctors may deaden the nerves that carry sensations of pain from the gallbladder and intestinal area to the brain by injecting these nerves with alcohol. This can be done during surgery or by guiding a long, hollow needle into place with the help of a CT scan.

    Pain medicines

    Doctors can prescribe strong pain-relieving drugs if needed. Some people with cancer may be worried about taking narcotic drugs such as morphine for fear of being sleepy all the time or becoming addicted to them. But many people get very effective pain relief from these medicines without serious side effects. It s very important to let your cancer care team know if you are having pain so that it can be treated effectively.

    Pain medicines work best when they are taken on a regular schedule. They do not work as well if they are only used when the pain becomes severe. Several long-acting forms of morphine and other opioids are in pill form and only need be taken once or twice a day. There is even a long-acting patch that only needs to be applied every few days.

    Common side effects of these drugs are nausea and feeling sleepy, which often get better over time. Constipation is a common side effect that does not get better on its own, so it needs to be treated. Most people on these drugs need to take laxatives daily.

    To learn more about the options for managing cancer pain, see the Cancer Pain section, or our Guide to Controlling Cancer Pain .

    Last Medical Review: 10/29/2014
    Last Revised: 02/05/2016