When to call in Hospice #at #home #hospice #care

#when to call hospice for cancer

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When to call in Hospice

Mar 08, 2013 – 4:56 am

My husband’s cancer has spread and he has elected not to do anything further. Surgery is out due to the fact that it has spread and he doesn’t want to do anymore chemo since the chemo will be more and harder than what he has done already. Our oncologists have told us that more chemo won’t cure only prolong and could even hasten. Besides that the surgery would be very hard since it would require removal of his esophagus since the cancer was found at the cervical of his esophagus which is a rare place for cancer and has spread to his right lung. This was considered a second primary and not related to his laryngeal cancer of which he has been NED since his laryngectomy 2 years ago.

Right now he is feeling pretty good not much pain at all. Still gets out and goes. Our doctors have talked to me about calling in ho****e and while I’m not against that, I just don’t feel it is necessary at this point. And I also feel that if we call them in now, my husband will just give up right now and I want to give him a chance regarding changing his mind about further chemo.

Anyone been thru this and when do you need to call in ho****e which will be in-home ho****e care.

I hate this beast and it is a shame that a cure can’t be found after all this time and money spent on research.

Posts: 296
Joined: Apr 2011

Mar 08, 2013 – 5:32 am

I read your post with emotion.

Please consider palliative care. someone checking in with you. A step before ho****e perhaps?

This was the “goal” in our situation. My husband passed away 48 hours later. The doctors knew we were open to ho****e when the time was right. We had to force the issue.

Please, trust yourself.

Posts: 3095
Joined: Jan 2010

Mar 08, 2013 – 10:46 am

Shaaron, I’m so sorry to hear this news. I will continue to pray for you and your husband. I don’t know about ho****e so I can’t help there, just wanted you to know you’re in my thots and prayers.

Posts: 1914
Joined: May 2012

Mar 08, 2013 – 12:07 pm

I can’t say enough good about ho****e. My parents fought this right up and to the end of my Mother’s walk with the beast. They can give you specialized plans. and they will tell you Ho****e is not the end. Alot of times people turn around and no longer need their services. They are angels, and will help you through all the bumps and bangs in the road. You don’t have to make a decission today on this. But please do make a call into your local Ho****e provider and just talk. I’ll be sending positive thoughts and prayers your way. We would have been lost without them, and were able to give Mom what she needed. Hugs sent. Katie

Posts: 1570
Joined: Dec 2012

Mar 08, 2013 – 1:20 pm

Please read this and all of it. I believe it will give you, your husband, and loved ones strength, courage, and deep insight on the journey you are beginning. I found it riveting and fascinating and fixated on it front to end Brilliant!

Personal blog – Please join





Gentiva: When is Hospice Appropriate? #melbourne #motels

#when is hospice appropriate

#

When Is Hospice Appropriate?

Signs that you or a loved one may need to consider hospice care can be subtle, but they may include:

  • Multiple trips to the emergency room in a short period of time
  • Shortness of breath while resting
  • Several falls over a six-month period
  • Increasing issues with pain
  • Weight loss with a noticeable difference in the way clothes fit
  • Spending most of the day in a chair or bed

These signs don’t necessarily mean you need hospice immediately. But they are indications that now is a good time to find out about hospice care and that you should ask your doctor about it. Learning how hospice can provide the care, compassion, and support you and your family needs can be a comfort to everyone.

Patients Caregivers

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Hospice Patients Alliance – When It is Inappropriate to Have PRN Medical

#end stage copd hospice

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Allowing PRN Orders for Morphine
May Result in Untimely Death
For COPD Patients

Morphine is an opioid medication often used to relieve severe pain in cancer and some other diseases. When prescribed by a physician appropriately for relief of pain, it is a blessing to those whose symptoms are relieved, and to the families of those patients who had suffered watching their loved one in agony. When the patient has severe pain, hospices aim at achieving good pain control as one of their top priorities.

Because morphine is regularly prescribed in hospices for relief of pain and suffering, physicians and nurses come to rely on its power to relieve pain and promote a death without suffering. A death with symptoms well-managed is one important aspect of what is called a “death with dignity.”

Patients in hospice who have diseases without severe pain may not need morphine for comfort. Some take other analgesics and some take none. But patients who have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or “COPD” may especially be sensitive to the adverse effects of morphine. COPD patients have breathing difficulties and anxiety which can sometimes be lessened by very small dosages of a sedative and/or a very small dosage of morphine. However, given in too high a dose, morphine can seriously interfere with a patient’s ability to breathe. In fact, anyone who is given a dosage of morphine which is much higher than they are accustomed to, may stop breathing.

One of morphine’s main adverse effects is slowing down the respiratory rate, i.e. respiratory depression. If the dosage of morphine is too high for what the patient is accustomed to, the respiratory depression can become severe and actually stop the breathing periodically for a few seconds or many seconds. This pattern of breathing where the patient stops breathing (skipping breaths) and then starts breathing again is termed “apnea.” Apnea commonly occurs as a result of the terminal illness and the dying process, when certain metabolic changes occur in the patient’s body. If the breathing is stopped completely without restarting, the patient dies. Because COPD patients have compromised breathing already. very inefficient breathing, overly high doses of morphine can quickly cause these patients to stop breathing.

Hospice Patients Alliance has received many, many reports from families about patients with COPD who were given morphine in dosages higher than they were accustomed to receiving. who died shortly after getting those morphine dosages. Most of these patients were given these dosages of morphine by nurses in the hospice setting. In all the cases reported, the physician had ordered that the morphine might be given “as needed” or “PRN” within a certain range and at a certain frequency of time intervals between doses given.

Giving a medication “as needed” requires a careful assessment of the patient’s vital signs, pain level and need for the medication being considered. When a physician writes a PRN order for morphine, most nurses are very dedicated to assessing the patient’s actual needs and doing everything possible to meet those needs by administering the medication as needed. But in the case of COPD patients, the need for extra vigilance in determining the appropriate dosage is very urgent. Pharmacy and drug references, such as the Physicians Desk Reference and morphine package inserts warn about the dangers of giving too high dosages of morphine to COPD patients. The package inserts and the Physicians Desk Reference even write that morphine is “contraindicated” in general for COPD patients. However, when a patient is truly terminal, some of the rules of prescribing medications are adjusted to meet the needs of the patient. In the terminal COPD patient, morphine is sometimes ordered by the physician to be given in very small dosages.

If the physician orders the morphine to be given on a PRN or “as needed” basis, when the patient has COPD, and allows a shorter frequency of administration than that needed for the previous dosage to “wear off” or be metabolized, the concentration of morphine actually in the patient’s blood may increase beyond a therapeutic level, causing severe adverse effects, even respiratory shutdown. If you have a loved one with COPD in a hospice care setting and if you are concerned that he may be euthanized before his natural time of passing on, then it is wise to request that the physician NOT write a PRN order for morphine. If the morphine is actually helping your loved one to breathe better, and is comforting, then you may wish to request the physician to consider ordering the morphine on a fixed dosage and schedule, determined by the physician only, not the nurse.

If you have concerns that your loved one may be medically killed or euthanized in a hospice setting, you should discuss these concerns with the physician and request that PRN orders for morphine not be used. If the physician refuses to do so, you may be able to determine whether the physician is sympathetic to your concerns about euthanasia or not. If you believe the physician is determined to euthanize your loved one, involuntarily, or without your knowledge, then you always have the right to change physicians or to change hospices. Any time that you have concrete evidence that a nurse or physician is acting to euthanize your loved one, the patient, or the patient’s representative may act to change the physician and hospice to a setting that will provide true hospice care.

Real hospice care is NOT about hastening the death of a patient. It is about providing relief from distressing symptoms, supporting the patient and letting them know that they are valued and loved. Hospice patients necessarily choose not to try to cure the terminal illness, because all efforts to cure the disease are believed to have failed and further efforts are believed to be of no use in curing the disease, i.e. the physician has determined that no efforts would succeed in any case. That does NOT mean that treatment for a urinary or respiratory infection is to be withheld, or that food and water are to be withheld if the patient can absorb them. Withholding food and water is a form of euthanasia for the patient who is not already actively dying! Withholding appropriate treatment for an infection when the patient is not actively dying is also a form of euthanasia!

Giving overly high dosages of morphine to a COPD patient, or a patient with another terminal illness, is a form of euthanasia. By being alert, discussing your concerns with the physician and hospice staff and acting promptly to prevent overly high dosages of morphine from being administered, you can save your loved one from an untimely death. Removing your loved one from a setting that is bent on euthanizing your loved one may be the only way to save them from being medical killed.

There are many nurses and physicians who would never even think of doing such a thing, but unfortunately, there are many who would. Surveys and research into the attitudes and practices of physicians and nurses reveals that a significant percentage of nurses and physicians believe that euthanasia is acceptable. If you don’t agree, then you must act to protect your loved one. The best protection is to know what medications are being given, what effect the medications have, what dosages are being given (by being there if possible when they are given) and knowing why the medications are being given. If your instincts tell you that something is not right, act promptly to check with someone you trust who is a nurse, pharmacist or physician who can give you some feedback and further information.

PRN orders for morphine may be totally inappropriate for COPD patients who do NOT have severe pain!

Permission is granted to share these articles with others, to print them, or post them on other websites so long as credit
is given to the author and Hospice Patients Alliance with a link to this original page.





FAQ: What might I expect to happen when someone I – m

#hospice dying process

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This is a difficult topic for many people to think about, and especially to bring up in a public forum, but people still want and need to know what they might expect as they or someone they care for are declining. It is understandable to fear the unknown, and to fear suffering. I would say that there are a few leading points here:

1) Most patients don t suffer much as their cancer progresses and as they transition through the dying process.

2) This process is quite variable from one person to another, but we typically have a good idea of what a patient s leading problems will be weeks to months before a person is experiencing a more rapid decline.

3) Engaging hospice services/palliative care can help guide expectations and generally manage many of the problems effectively by anticipating them, rather than waiting until very late to accept palliative care.

While I would never want to romanticize or minimize the challenges of the dying process, I find that the majority of my patients experience a controlled decline in which they really don t suffer. The most common pattern I see is that someone with a progressing cancer will slow down, eat less, begin to lose weight more steadily, and just gradually become less and less active. They no longer go out on walks, then leave the house less often, then spend more time alternating between sleeping and getting up in a chair, then eventually get to a point where they are sleeping most of the time and are pretty much bed-bound. They have less interest in eating, which is sometimes frustrating to the patient but often more so to the family and supporters of the person, who may pressure the patient to force down food that they have little or no appetite for (the danger is that some patients describe distress from the unyielding pressure from well-intentioned but nagging loved ones). Soon, they are sleeping more and more, to the point that they eventually sleep all of the time and are no longer communicative; this is followed by irregular breathing, more prolonged pauses between breaths (called agonal breathing, though it isn t uncomfortable for the person, just a reflex the last phase of the dying process), and then they stop breathing. It s important to remember that this common pathway of progression isn t a lack of will on the part of the person with progressing cancer: they would eat and be more active if they could, but the cancer pours out toxic proteins that mediate this inexorable process.

It s true that some patients have pain, or a terrible cough, or shortness of breath, agitation, and other problems, but I would say that most of the time, we have signals that these are going to be issues for a long while before the later stages, and it s advisable to deal with them as aggressively as possible before these symptoms become a crisis. Secondly, I most commonly see problems emerge when people (patients and/or their doctors) are very resistant to enlisting hospice support, which typically does a very good job of addressing symptoms proactively, before they become a crisis, and also being able to provide the comfort of helping patients and families/caregivers to understand what to expect in the near future. Just as on a plane, turbulence is much easier to understand if you know to expect it, what it represents, and how you ll get through it.

About 20 years ago, I spent some time in medical school doing home visits with the very compassionate and thoughtful Medical Director of a Boston hospice. I asked him about his feelings on euthanasia, and he told me that he didn t actually feel that it was a pressing need in almost any cases. Specifically, he noted that it was most common for people to fear two things about dying: being alone in being in pain. Though being a primary caregiver is a very hard job, it is a great blessing to have someone there to help as a caregiver to a terminally ill patient something that even attentive medical care can t substitute for. That care and the ability to ensure that people aren t alone is incredibly helpful. But a medical team today can usually do a good job to minimize the physical suffering of the process to relieve pain and other symptoms. And most of the time, what we see is a patient gradually withdrawing and eventually passing comfortably.

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Kansas City Bankruptcy & Injury Attorney #when #to #get #an #attorney #for


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Kansas City Bankruptcy and Personal Injury Attorney

You may only need an attorney once in your life. But, if you do, we are here, right here, to fight for you every step of the way.

Castle Law Office Fights For You

Castle Law Office focuses on injury cases and bankruptcy. We fight to get those who are injured at work or due to someone else s negligence, such as a car or motorcycle accident, distracted and drunk driver victims get suitably compensated. And our bankruptcy attorneys are dedicated to creating solutions for people who are hit hard financially. We help the people we represent get the fresh start they need.

Bankruptcy Law

We offer NO CASH upfront options to some qualified filers!!

At Castle Law, we offer clients free consultations and a free credit repair program. And we have dedicated every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for you to walk in and get answers to questions such as:

  • How do I stop creditor harassment?
  • How do I stop wage garnishment?
  • How can I keep my house and car?
  • What is the difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13?
  • And much more!

Kansas City s Motorcycle Accident Attorney

Motorcycle accidents are among the most devastating traffic accidents. They often result in very serious injuries and may wreak havoc on you or your family s finances and personal lives. Motorcycle accidents often lead to enormous medical expenses, loss of employment or future earning power, and severe pain and suffering for those involved. Victims have the right to make a claim for compensation for the negligent actions of unsafe drivers on the road. If you or a loved one has been involved in a motorcycle accident hiring a Castle Law motorcycle accident lawyer is the best way to protect your legal right to a recovery.

Auto Accident Attorney s

Our car accident lawyers at Castle Law Office have helped thousands of people in your situation. We know the questions that keep you up at night. We are here to answer those questions and put you at ease so you can focus on recovering.

Let us handle these issues for you. We help you get the most out of your claim by launching a thorough investigation into the crash. We ll fight for an appropriate settlement to cover all of your damages, including lost wages and potential long-term medical care.

Workers Compensation

If you have been injured on the job, you deserve Missouri workers compensation benefits to cover your medical needs. That is the grand bargain in worker s comp: employees are guaranteed to get care; and in return they can t sue their employers or coworkers for negligence.

For more than 14 years, we have helped Kansas City area residents get their lives back on track. Castle Law Office is passionate about helping people because we believe that during a difficult time in your life, you deserve to be treated with the utmost respect and as more than just another case.

The mission of Castle Law Office of Kansas City is to extend caring and compassionate legal counsel to people that are dealing with financial difficulty and/or personal injuries. Our experienced attorneys and staff will provide peace of mind by listening, advising and guiding individuals to make informed legal decisions. We offer a family friendly environment to each and every client while our staff works diligently to obtain the best results possible.

What Makes Castle Law Office Different

Castle Law takes pride in giving highly individualized, careful attention to each case we pursue. Castle Law does not operate as an assembly line law firm. Every Castle Law Attorney lives in the Kansas City area. That is what makes us unique. We are here, right here, fighting for you every step of the way.

Our attorneys are here to help. We offer a free consultation where we can guide you through the process, and our site has many resources to answer your questions. We have also dedicated every Wednesday as Walk In Wednesday. Stop by from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. to speak with an attorney without an appointment. You ll be glad you did.

Contact us today to discuss your case for free.


When is the right time to call hospice care? Hospice-Care #cheap #luxury

#when to call hospice

#

When is the right time to call hospice care?

Hospice care can help ease the end-of-life transition for your loved one. Many people wait to call hospice until the final days, but that might not be the best option.

Calling Hospice Care: When is the Right Time?

Making the decision to call hospice care for your loved one can be heartbreaking. But in giving your loved one the best end-of-life care possible, hospice is a very good choice. How do you know when it’s time?

What is Hospice Care?

Hospice care is designed to provide medical care, comfort, and compassion during a person’s last days. When all potential treatments have been exhausted and a person decides it is time to let nature take its course, hospice care provides pain management and emotional support. It also offers bereavement counseling for those who are left behind.

Why Hospice Care Matters

Hospice care vows to neither prolong nor hasten death. Hospice workers strive to provide the utmost dignity for a person while allowing death to occur naturally. Hospice support can ease the physical end-of-life transition, but it can also provide the immense relief that peace of mind can bring.

Hospice patients can know that their loved ones are not alone in their struggle to accept death and grieve the loss. That simple yet vital knowledge can make their last days much easier.

Is it Time to Call for Hospice Care?

Each person’s final months and days are unique to that individual. Therefore, setting a certain time frame on how long hospice care will be needed can be a difficult decision. The best way to clarify the situation is to sit down with a hospice professional as soon as a terminal illness or serious medical situation is diagnosed, and discuss what to expect in the near future.

When a patient has decided to forgo any medical treatment or search for a cure, they are probably ready for hospice care. It is important to contact hospice before pain management becomes an issue. Most insurance companies pay for hospice care during the last six months of life. Some might find hospice useful for that entire period of time, while others might prefer to wait until they are closer to the end of their life.

Hospice is Not Just for Patients

Though hospice care focuses on making the last weeks and days comfortable for patients, it is also a great relief to their loved ones. End-of-life decisions are always hard, but hospice workers are trained to help family and friends let go in a peaceful, loving atmosphere.

Hospice support continues for surviving family members after a patient’s death. Hospice care can include supportive discussions, visits, phone calls, and even provide help with funeral arrangements.

When It’s Time.

Choosing hospice is a very personal decision. Keep the lines of communication open with your loved one, and when they mention it might be time to consider hospice, take them at their word and make the call–and then trust the highly trained and compassionate hospice workers to help you with whatever comes next.

Related Articles

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When Should Hospice be Called? #mahabaleshwar #hotels

#when is hospice called in

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When Should Hospice be Called?

An individual does not need to be bedridden or in a hospital to benefit from hospice care. No matter what the person’s physical condition, hospice care focuses on keeping each patient as comfortable, functional, and alert as possible. If needed, hospice care may include help with bathing, dressing, and eating as well as medicine and treatment for all symptoms including pain and anxiety.

Consider hospice care if:

  • A disease or illness is expected to shorten life
  • Treatment that tries to cure the disease or prolong life has become more of a burden than a benefit
  • Living comfortably as possible, for as long as possible is a goal
  • Being surrounded by friends and family during an illness is important
  • An individual who has a serious illness wants to die comfortably at home

A person is eligible for hospice when:

  • A condition is considered incurable. This is called a terminal illness.
  • A doctor has indicated that life expectancy is 6 months or less if the illness runs its normal course. Typically a form must be signed by a patient’s primary doctor as well as the medical director or physician member of a hospice team. Here are Questions to Ask Your Doctor (PDF) .

Some people live longer than expected. If a hospice patient lives longer than 6 months and is still declining from the illness, he or she can continue to receive hospice care. If the patient gets better, hospice care can be discontinued and re-started if the illness becomes active again.

When an individual decides to be cared for by a hospice program, he or she acknowledges that treatment goals will shift from doing everything possible to cure a condition to helping make each day as comfortable as possible and living each day to the fullest.

Patients get the most benefit from hospice support when hospice is called early .





What to Do When Your Poop is Dark Green #what #does #it


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What Does Dark Green Poop Mean?

Why are we here?

Are we alone in the universe?

Why is my poop green?

The first two questions are a bit beyond the purview of this site, but the last one can be answered quite readily.

Dark green poop may be surprising or alarming upon your first encounter, but it actually has a very simple biological explanation and, as far as the brilliant rainbow of feces is concerned, is not normally a cause of significant concern. There are also certain steps you can try taking when your poop is green in order to prevent a reoccurrence. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves. Let’s start with the basic question and move on from there.

What Causes Green Stool?

Understanding why you have dark green feces first requires knowing why it’s normally brown in the first place. Poo is a mix of undigested food, bile, bacteria, and dead blood cells. The brown coloration happens during the stool’s journey through the digestive tract where intestinal bacteria break down and feast on the leftover bile and other cell detritus it contains. The underlying process is surprisingly complicated but the main takeaway here is that poo is normally greenish until exposure to intestinal bacteria, where turns it brown.

It’s also important to distinguish between dark green stool (1 ) in adults and any dark green poop from a baby. During the first few days of life, an infant will pass dark green stool known as meconium. This is normal and is the result of waste that was accumulated during gestation. Meconium usually persists for several days until the baby begins breast or formula feeding, at which point it will start to turn yellow over time. Dark green poop in a breastfed baby or one being bottle-fed is therefore not normally a cause for alarm.

Now that the preliminaries are out of the way, let’s look at what dark green poop might mean.

Excess Nutrition

Sometimes, the color of your poo has less to do with your own body and more with what you’re eating. Consuming large amounts of green, leafy vegetables like kale or broccoli can sometimes result in your poo appearing dark green. Iron-rich foods such as beans or meats will produce a similar effect and may leave you with a dark green, almost black poop. This is more easily seen in the dark green poop a two month old might have if they are fed iron-fortified milk. In all of these cases, the underlying mechanism is the same. There is a biological limit to how much of any nutrient your body can make use, of and anything leftover can get excreted, dyeing the resulting poo. Iron supplements or supplements that contain chlorophyll or fructose can also cause green stools.

Food Coloration

Food dyes are generally not absorbed by the body and will get excreted along with other waste. If you have recently eaten a large number of foods that use green coloring (such as promotional St. Patrick’s Day treats), you may find yourself producing green stool over the following days. How susceptible someone is to food coloring will vary from one individual to the next. It’s fully possible, for instance, for you and a friend to eat the same dyed foods but for only one of you to have a green poo as a result.

Medication

Antibiotics, particularly the powerful ones that get prescribed for major infections, are capable of reducing the levels of bacteria in your intestinal tract. As mentioned earlier, these are the same bacteria responsible for why poo normally appears brown and their loss means your feces can’t be processed as thoroughly during its trip through the body. Due to this, green stool is a known side effect of some antibiotics.

Gastrointestinal Distress

Anything that causes food to move too quickly through the intestines can produce green stool since this cuts down on the amount of time it can be processed. This means that any situation capable of causing severe diarrhea, such as food poisoning, salmonella, a parasite, or irritable bowel syndrome, would also be able to produce dark green bowel movements. In other words, anything capable of aggravating your bowels will also be capable of producing dark green diarrhea.

Cleansing

A colon cleanse is a type of home treatment some individuals use to try and flush “toxins” from the body. Cleanses come in numerous varieties but typically employ some combination of supplements, enemas, and/or laxatives. Since colon cleanses essentially force-evacuate your bowels, it’s possible for them to produce green stool by virtue of triggering a bowel movement prematurely, before feces has been properly processed.

Pregnancy

It’s also possible to have dark green poop while pregnant. During pregnancy, a woman’s body produces more blood, and if she doesn’t get enough iron, she could become anemic. If that happens, she might then take iron supplements, a side effect of which is black or green poop. Iron supplements can cause other discomfort, such as constipation, so it may be in the best interest of pregnant women to increase their iron intake through diet, by consuming liver, red meat, and leafy greens.

Treating Dark Green Poop

Anyone can be affected by dark green poop; toddlers and adults alike. Treatment for dark green poo begins with identifying what the actual cause was. Fortunately, this is not a difficult task. Meconium is easy to rule out simply by asking whether the person was born recently.

Similarly, you should be able to remember whether or not you recently engaged in a colon cleanse (enemas are kind of hard to forget). If you suspect antibiotics or a nutritional supplement are involved, it’s best to consult with your doctor on how this can be determined. It’s strongly inadvisable to discontinue an antibiotic without your doctor’s approval since you were likely prescribed that medicine for a good reason.

Lastly, conditions such as food poisoning or irritable bowel syndrome come with other associated symptoms that can help identify them. In these instances, the green stool is likely accompanied by diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, or other signs of digestive disagreement.

Once your cause is identified, treatment becomes relatively simple:

  • Meconium goes away on its own, so time is the only remedy needed.
  • Talk to your doctor about switching to a new, less severe antibiotic to give your intestinal bacteria time to recover.
  • Over-enthusiastic eating of green foods or iron-rich items can be curtailed with simple diet adjustments, as can any indulgence in overly-dyed treats.
  • Food poisoning requires bed rest, maintaining fluid intake, and easing in to bland foods once you’re able to keep them down. Most food poisoning cases resolve within a few days with or without treatment.
  • Avoid giving yourself a colon cleanse.

When to See Your Doctor

A one-off incidence of green stool is rarely a cause for concern and can be safely ignored. If you find that you are having recurrent or repeat episodes of green bowel movements, however, a doctor’s appointment may be in order.

Often, an exam for green stool will involve some questions about any recent dietary or lifestyle changes that may be affecting digestion and the stool itself may get examined if nothing can be ruled out.

One important thing to keep in mind is that although most causes of green stool are benign, this does not stop green stool from occurring alongside other more problematic situations.

If your stool seems to have mucus or blood in it (bright red or tarry, almost black) or is very watery, medical attention may be advised. This also applies if you experience rectal pain, intermittent bouts of constipation, fever, or loss of appetite. These symptoms should always be paid attention to and investigated regardless of whether you have dark green poop or not.

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About the Author, Browse Victor’s Articles

Victor Marchione, MD received his Bachelor of Science Degree in 1973 and his Medical Degree from the University of Messina in 1981. He has been licensed and practicing medicine in New York and New Jersey for over 20 years. Dr. Marchione is a respected leader in the field of smoking cessation and pulmonary medicine. He has been featured on ABC News and World Report, CBS Evening News and the NBC Today Show and is the editor of the popular The. Read Full Bio »


Gentiva: When is Hospice Appropriate? #daytona #beach #motels

#when is hospice appropriate

#

When Is Hospice Appropriate?

Signs that you or a loved one may need to consider hospice care can be subtle, but they may include:

  • Multiple trips to the emergency room in a short period of time
  • Shortness of breath while resting
  • Several falls over a six-month period
  • Increasing issues with pain
  • Weight loss with a noticeable difference in the way clothes fit
  • Spending most of the day in a chair or bed

These signs don’t necessarily mean you need hospice immediately. But they are indications that now is a good time to find out about hospice care and that you should ask your doctor about it. Learning how hospice can provide the care, compassion, and support you and your family needs can be a comfort to everyone.

Patients Caregivers

This text will be replaced

Click on the arrow for our video on “Hospice and Your Loved One.”

2016 Kindred at Home. All rights reserved.

1-855-865-5894





Questions to ask when interviewing hospice programs #cheap #hotels #deals

#hospice questions

#

Interviewing a Hospice Agency- What Questions Should I Ask?

Hospice programs are independent from one another and the level of services provided are not the same. For that reason, it’s essential that you interview hospice agencies prior to signing on for care and allowing them into your home.

1. Is the hospice licensed?

2. Is the hospice Medicare certified?

3. Is the hospice non-profit or for profit?

4. Has the hospice been caught committing insurance fraud? (we suggest Googling Medicare hospice fraud or the name of the hospice and Medicare fraud)

5. How many counties does the hospice serve?

6. Can I meet with or speak via phone with the hospice administrator prior to a hospice admission?

7. Can I meet the staff who will be providing care prior to admission?

8. In detail, what types of services are provided?

9. How often will each of these services be provided to me or my loved one?

10. Will services be provided by the same individuals throughout the course of my care?

11. What kind of support is available to my family/caregivers?

12. How are services provided after hours? How long may it take for an on-call nurse to respond to my call? How long may it take for an on-call nurse to get to my home?

13. What do hospice volunteers do? Am I eligible for volunteer services?

14. Can the hospice provide care in a nursing home or personal care home/assisted living?

15. Must someone be with me at all times?

16. Must I commit to a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) status?

17. Can I receive IV fluids and tube feedings?

18. Will I receive a bill for expenses not covered by insurance?

19. What should I do first if I am having a problem with the care my hospice is providing?

20. What should I do if I feel the hospice hasn’t addressed my concerns adequately?





When does hospice step in and who authorizes them? #amsterdam #hotels

#when does hospice get involved

#

When does hospice step in and who authorizes them?

This Site Might Help You. RE: when does hospice step in and who authorizes them? My wife passed away last May but hospice was not in the picture until. show more This Site Might Help You.

RE:
when does hospice step in and who authorizes them?
My wife passed away last May but hospice was not in the picture until three days before her death though the cancer had become worse two months prior. Would I have been the one to authorize this being I was still her husband and responsible for her care?

Others were involved that were throwing.

Source(s): hospice step authorizes them: https://shortly.im/c0kZS

? 1 year ago

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First, I am so very sorry for your wife, and let me say one thing about grief that a psychologist told my wife about when she had a mastectomy and it was. show more First, I am so very sorry for your wife, and let me say one thing about grief that a psychologist told my wife about when she had a mastectomy and it was this, that it takes at least a year to get over a loss because you need to experience it through all seasons. I imagine losing a wife could take a lifetime.

A good friend of mine lost two wife s through breast cancer, and now he is happily married to a great woman. Because my wife has had breast cancer it is a fear I live with but don t vocalize. Again things that happened happened and you cannot go back. At the time you did your best through probably the most difficult situation anyone can possibly go through and realize that your wife is no longer suffering, she is happy in heaven and having a wonderful time and someday sooner than you realize because life is short you will be reunited with her.

As far as the hospice in the US goes you can be admitted to one if the diagnosis is six months or less. It would be something the oncologist would recommend. I have had four family members pass away in hospices. As you know the workers there are angels.

Your wife would not want you to stress about what-ifs she wants you to be happy because she is.

Dave 6 years ago

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I am so very sorry to hear of your loss! I lost my father in 2005 from terminal lung cancer! I miss him greatly and know that you must feel the same about. show more I am so very sorry to hear of your loss! I lost my father in 2005 from terminal lung cancer! I miss him greatly and know that you must feel the same about your wife! With my fathers cancer, we found out two months before he passed that he had lung cancer! The doctors told us that the x-rays were pretty bad and that he would have at the most 3-4 months to live! No one ever mentioned hospice! But on one of the doctor visits, we asked the doctor about hospice. They gave a number for us to call and then we had to approve them coming and sign a paper!

I think if a person has had a love one pass and have used hospice, then they know to ask for help! But when it is the first time, it is kind of like a shot in the dark! Someone kind of mentions to ya that you should get hospice. Hospice can get involved only if a patient is terminal and it can be 6 months or less but it could even go up to a year! They helped with all dad s care and meds!

My mom and dad were married for almost 60 years. she had breast cancer at the same time dad was sick with his cancer. She had her surgery a month after he passed away. Mom is doing wonderful now. and we remember the good times with dad now! I hope that time comes really soon for you. REMEMBERING THE GOOD TIMES!

Hope this helps!

Sign in to add a comment

I m sorry you lost your wife. Losing someone is just horrible. With my late father, his GP (General Practitioner) arranged for him to be under the. show more I m sorry you lost your wife. Losing someone is just horrible.

With my late father, his GP (General Practitioner) arranged for him to be under the hospice. That happened during an appointment at the GP s office a few months before he passed away. We just had to agree to it. After that, the hospice got in touch with us and their nurse and when needed their doctor, visited our home on a regular basis.

Source(s): My father s situation.

Jody B 6 years ago

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When hospice is called in #hospice #of #west #alabama

#when hospice is called in

#

hospice

a house of shelter or rest for pilgrims, strangers, etc. especially one kept by a religious order.

Medicine/Medical.

  1. a health-care facility for the terminally ill that emphasizes pain control and emotional support for the patient and family, typically refraining from taking extraordinary measures to prolong life.
  2. a similar program of care and support for the terminally ill at home.

Origin of hospice Expand

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source

Examples from the Web for hospice Expand

We signed him up for hospice care, knowing that we still had limited time with him.

Leukaemia patient Zakwan Anuar, 15, died two weeks after they visited his hospice in Kualar Lumpur, Malaysia, last month.

The next evening, Romero was saying mass in the chapel at the hospice where he lived in a tiny room near the infirm and the dying.

He has also demonstrated compassion for AIDS victims, washing and kissing the feet of 12 patients in a hospice in 2001.

Your loved one cannot be cured in an acute-care hospital but is not ready for hospice.

The pass of Great St. Bernard is celebrated for its hospice.

M. Julien, will you run for the doctor, and send him down to the hospice at once?

He built in fact later the hospice and church of Jesu-Nazareno—in compliance with this vow.

He, himself, was billeted with a French family, just around the corner from the hospice.

This hospice is said to have been first founded in the year 962, by Bernard, a Piedmontese nobleman.

British Dictionary definitions for hospice Expand

hospice

noun ( pl ) hospices

a nursing home that specializes in caring for the terminally ill

( archaic ) Also called hospitium ( hɒˈspɪtɪəm ), ( pl ) hospitia ( hɒˈspɪtɪə ). a place of shelter for travellers, esp one kept by a monastic order

C19: from French, from Latin hospitium hospitality, from hospes guest, host 1

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source

Word Origin and History for hospice Expand

1818, “rest house for travelers,” from French hospice (13c.), from Latin hospitium “guest house, hospitality,” from hospes (genitive hospitis ) “guest, host” (see host (n.1)). Sense of “home for the aged and terminally ill ” is from 1893; hospice movement first attested 1979.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

hospice in Medicine Expand

hospice hos·pice (hŏs’pĭs)
n.
A program or facility that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional, spiritual, social, and financial needs of terminally ill patients at a facility or at a patient’s home.

The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

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  • When is the right time to call hospice care? Hospice-Care #palliative #care

    #when to call hospice

    #

    When is the right time to call hospice care?

    Hospice care can help ease the end-of-life transition for your loved one. Many people wait to call hospice until the final days, but that might not be the best option.

    Calling Hospice Care: When is the Right Time?

    Making the decision to call hospice care for your loved one can be heartbreaking. But in giving your loved one the best end-of-life care possible, hospice is a very good choice. How do you know when it’s time?

    What is Hospice Care?

    Hospice care is designed to provide medical care, comfort, and compassion during a person’s last days. When all potential treatments have been exhausted and a person decides it is time to let nature take its course, hospice care provides pain management and emotional support. It also offers bereavement counseling for those who are left behind.

    Why Hospice Care Matters

    Hospice care vows to neither prolong nor hasten death. Hospice workers strive to provide the utmost dignity for a person while allowing death to occur naturally. Hospice support can ease the physical end-of-life transition, but it can also provide the immense relief that peace of mind can bring.

    Hospice patients can know that their loved ones are not alone in their struggle to accept death and grieve the loss. That simple yet vital knowledge can make their last days much easier.

    Is it Time to Call for Hospice Care?

    Each person’s final months and days are unique to that individual. Therefore, setting a certain time frame on how long hospice care will be needed can be a difficult decision. The best way to clarify the situation is to sit down with a hospice professional as soon as a terminal illness or serious medical situation is diagnosed, and discuss what to expect in the near future.

    When a patient has decided to forgo any medical treatment or search for a cure, they are probably ready for hospice care. It is important to contact hospice before pain management becomes an issue. Most insurance companies pay for hospice care during the last six months of life. Some might find hospice useful for that entire period of time, while others might prefer to wait until they are closer to the end of their life.

    Hospice is Not Just for Patients

    Though hospice care focuses on making the last weeks and days comfortable for patients, it is also a great relief to their loved ones. End-of-life decisions are always hard, but hospice workers are trained to help family and friends let go in a peaceful, loving atmosphere.

    Hospice support continues for surviving family members after a patient’s death. Hospice care can include supportive discussions, visits, phone calls, and even provide help with funeral arrangements.

    When It’s Time.

    Choosing hospice is a very personal decision. Keep the lines of communication open with your loved one, and when they mention it might be time to consider hospice, take them at their word and make the call–and then trust the highly trained and compassionate hospice workers to help you with whatever comes next.

    Related Articles

    Click on the links below to see helpful articles and checklists on various elder care topics.

    Get Free Guidance





    When to Call Hospice – How to Know It s Time #best

    #when to call hospice

    #

    When to Call in Hospice

    Hospice care is often seen as a last-resort option�one to use when the patient no longer can benefit from traditional medical care. The fact is that approximately twice as many older Americans end their lives in hospital care now than they did ten years ago�but hospice care is still seen as a last resort. If it was brought in sooner, it could do patients more good.

    Hospice care is generally designed to help patients who know they are dying control their pain, stay comfortable, and get their social, emotional, and spiritual needs met in a supportive environment.

    However, studies show that more and more, hospice care is being used as the option of last resort for patients who receive very aggressive hospital care during their final days�care that may not be appropriate.

    For many patients and families, hospice care may be a better option earlier in the care process�skipping the aggressive intensive care that often occurs at the end of life.

    How to Know When It’s Time to Arrange for Hospice

    • When your doctor says there are few other options. Usually, the doctor and the patient decide together when it is time for hospice care. In general, hospice care is recommended when the patient has approximately six months to live if the illness follows its natural course. But the timing can be different for different patients.However, hospice is primarily designed for end-of-life care. Hospice care should be considered when the doctor is saying there is little else to be done, but before a health emergency puts you in the critical care ward at the hospital.
    • When living at home is no longer an option. If you or a loved one has been living at home while managing a terminal disease, the health situation has continued to decline, and living at home has become impossible, it may be time to consider hospice care. Hospice can be helpful for those who can no longer manage activities for daily living, such as chores, cooking, showering, dressing, and basic hygiene tasks, and who have no one to help them on a regular basis�or those who need the type of round-the-clock medical care that a family member is not qualified to provide.
    • When your pain cannot be managed effectively at home. If you or a loved one is in a great deal of pain from a terminal disease and pain medication needs have become overwhelming, it may be time to consider hospice care. In hospice, trained medical professionals monitor patients� pain and can closely observe them, making it possible for pain medication to be more carefully adjusted to accommodate the patient�s changing needs.

    Choosing hospice is never easy. However, hospice care can make the difference between a stressful, negative end-of-life situation and one that is more comfortable. Consider asking your doctor about hospice care sooner�for yourself or for a loved one�and hopefully, you�ll be able to get the care you need.

    Additional Home Health and Hospice Resources

    Elder Options of Texas
    Copyright 2001-2016
    All Rights Reserved

    DISCLAIMER: Links to other websites or references to products, services or publications do not imply the endorsement or approval of such websites, products, services or publications by Elder Options of Texas. The determination of the need for senior care services and the choice of a facility is an extremely important decision. Please make your own independent investigation.





    Click Clack Hotel: The Modern Place to Stay When in Bogota, Colombia

    #hotel click

    #

    Click Clack Hotel: The Modern Place to Stay When in Bogota, Colombia

    If you re looking for a sophisticated place to stay while visiting the city of Bogota (in Colombia), Click Clack Hotel might be just the friendliest and coolest hotel you may stumble upon . With a fresh interior and a stylish and imposing façade, Click Clack adds a touch of class to your trip. The striking design is the work of plan:B Arquitectos in collaboration with Perceptual Studio. Together, they figured out to connect the interior with the outdoors and create an airy, modern, yet a cozy ambience in order to make the clients feel good and comfortable.

    Collect this idea

    The lounge area boasts a giant coffee cup-shaped chandelier. A staircase connects the floors without obstructing the view. The designers blended several styles to obtain this complex and unitary look. The rooms mirror a cosmopolitan NY kind of feel, offering some of the most amazing panoramic views of the city. Glass panels replace some of the regular exterior walls. Each morning is a unique experience: sunsets and sunrises are simply surprising, a pure delight for the eyes, head and heart. In other words, an exclusive place for the modern traveller.

    Collect this idea

    Collect this idea





    When to call in Hospice #quality #hotel

    #when to call hospice for cancer

    #

    When to call in Hospice

    Mar 08, 2013 – 4:56 am

    My husband’s cancer has spread and he has elected not to do anything further. Surgery is out due to the fact that it has spread and he doesn’t want to do anymore chemo since the chemo will be more and harder than what he has done already. Our oncologists have told us that more chemo won’t cure only prolong and could even hasten. Besides that the surgery would be very hard since it would require removal of his esophagus since the cancer was found at the cervical of his esophagus which is a rare place for cancer and has spread to his right lung. This was considered a second primary and not related to his laryngeal cancer of which he has been NED since his laryngectomy 2 years ago.

    Right now he is feeling pretty good not much pain at all. Still gets out and goes. Our doctors have talked to me about calling in ho****e and while I’m not against that, I just don’t feel it is necessary at this point. And I also feel that if we call them in now, my husband will just give up right now and I want to give him a chance regarding changing his mind about further chemo.

    Anyone been thru this and when do you need to call in ho****e which will be in-home ho****e care.

    I hate this beast and it is a shame that a cure can’t be found after all this time and money spent on research.

    Posts: 296
    Joined: Apr 2011

    Mar 08, 2013 – 5:32 am

    I read your post with emotion.

    Please consider palliative care. someone checking in with you. A step before ho****e perhaps?

    This was the “goal” in our situation. My husband passed away 48 hours later. The doctors knew we were open to ho****e when the time was right. We had to force the issue.

    Please, trust yourself.

    Posts: 3095
    Joined: Jan 2010

    Mar 08, 2013 – 10:46 am

    Shaaron, I’m so sorry to hear this news. I will continue to pray for you and your husband. I don’t know about ho****e so I can’t help there, just wanted you to know you’re in my thots and prayers.

    Posts: 1914
    Joined: May 2012

    Mar 08, 2013 – 12:07 pm

    I can’t say enough good about ho****e. My parents fought this right up and to the end of my Mother’s walk with the beast. They can give you specialized plans. and they will tell you Ho****e is not the end. Alot of times people turn around and no longer need their services. They are angels, and will help you through all the bumps and bangs in the road. You don’t have to make a decission today on this. But please do make a call into your local Ho****e provider and just talk. I’ll be sending positive thoughts and prayers your way. We would have been lost without them, and were able to give Mom what she needed. Hugs sent. Katie

    Posts: 1570
    Joined: Dec 2012

    Mar 08, 2013 – 1:20 pm

    Please read this and all of it. I believe it will give you, your husband, and loved ones strength, courage, and deep insight on the journey you are beginning. I found it riveting and fascinating and fixated on it front to end Brilliant!

    Personal blog – Please join





    FAQ: What might I expect to happen when someone I – m

    #hospice dying process

    #

    This is a difficult topic for many people to think about, and especially to bring up in a public forum, but people still want and need to know what they might expect as they or someone they care for are declining. It is understandable to fear the unknown, and to fear suffering. I would say that there are a few leading points here:

    1) Most patients don t suffer much as their cancer progresses and as they transition through the dying process.

    2) This process is quite variable from one person to another, but we typically have a good idea of what a patient s leading problems will be weeks to months before a person is experiencing a more rapid decline.

    3) Engaging hospice services/palliative care can help guide expectations and generally manage many of the problems effectively by anticipating them, rather than waiting until very late to accept palliative care.

    While I would never want to romanticize or minimize the challenges of the dying process, I find that the majority of my patients experience a controlled decline in which they really don t suffer. The most common pattern I see is that someone with a progressing cancer will slow down, eat less, begin to lose weight more steadily, and just gradually become less and less active. They no longer go out on walks, then leave the house less often, then spend more time alternating between sleeping and getting up in a chair, then eventually get to a point where they are sleeping most of the time and are pretty much bed-bound. They have less interest in eating, which is sometimes frustrating to the patient but often more so to the family and supporters of the person, who may pressure the patient to force down food that they have little or no appetite for (the danger is that some patients describe distress from the unyielding pressure from well-intentioned but nagging loved ones). Soon, they are sleeping more and more, to the point that they eventually sleep all of the time and are no longer communicative; this is followed by irregular breathing, more prolonged pauses between breaths (called agonal breathing, though it isn t uncomfortable for the person, just a reflex the last phase of the dying process), and then they stop breathing. It s important to remember that this common pathway of progression isn t a lack of will on the part of the person with progressing cancer: they would eat and be more active if they could, but the cancer pours out toxic proteins that mediate this inexorable process.

    It s true that some patients have pain, or a terrible cough, or shortness of breath, agitation, and other problems, but I would say that most of the time, we have signals that these are going to be issues for a long while before the later stages, and it s advisable to deal with them as aggressively as possible before these symptoms become a crisis. Secondly, I most commonly see problems emerge when people (patients and/or their doctors) are very resistant to enlisting hospice support, which typically does a very good job of addressing symptoms proactively, before they become a crisis, and also being able to provide the comfort of helping patients and families/caregivers to understand what to expect in the near future. Just as on a plane, turbulence is much easier to understand if you know to expect it, what it represents, and how you ll get through it.

    About 20 years ago, I spent some time in medical school doing home visits with the very compassionate and thoughtful Medical Director of a Boston hospice. I asked him about his feelings on euthanasia, and he told me that he didn t actually feel that it was a pressing need in almost any cases. Specifically, he noted that it was most common for people to fear two things about dying: being alone in being in pain. Though being a primary caregiver is a very hard job, it is a great blessing to have someone there to help as a caregiver to a terminally ill patient something that even attentive medical care can t substitute for. That care and the ability to ensure that people aren t alone is incredibly helpful. But a medical team today can usually do a good job to minimize the physical suffering of the process to relieve pain and other symptoms. And most of the time, what we see is a patient gradually withdrawing and eventually passing comfortably.

    Related Posts:





    When is the right time to call hospice care? Hospice-Care #hotels #in

    #when to call hospice

    #

    When is the right time to call hospice care?

    Hospice care can help ease the end-of-life transition for your loved one. Many people wait to call hospice until the final days, but that might not be the best option.

    Calling Hospice Care: When is the Right Time?

    Making the decision to call hospice care for your loved one can be heartbreaking. But in giving your loved one the best end-of-life care possible, hospice is a very good choice. How do you know when it’s time?

    What is Hospice Care?

    Hospice care is designed to provide medical care, comfort, and compassion during a person’s last days. When all potential treatments have been exhausted and a person decides it is time to let nature take its course, hospice care provides pain management and emotional support. It also offers bereavement counseling for those who are left behind.

    Why Hospice Care Matters

    Hospice care vows to neither prolong nor hasten death. Hospice workers strive to provide the utmost dignity for a person while allowing death to occur naturally. Hospice support can ease the physical end-of-life transition, but it can also provide the immense relief that peace of mind can bring.

    Hospice patients can know that their loved ones are not alone in their struggle to accept death and grieve the loss. That simple yet vital knowledge can make their last days much easier.

    Is it Time to Call for Hospice Care?

    Each person’s final months and days are unique to that individual. Therefore, setting a certain time frame on how long hospice care will be needed can be a difficult decision. The best way to clarify the situation is to sit down with a hospice professional as soon as a terminal illness or serious medical situation is diagnosed, and discuss what to expect in the near future.

    When a patient has decided to forgo any medical treatment or search for a cure, they are probably ready for hospice care. It is important to contact hospice before pain management becomes an issue. Most insurance companies pay for hospice care during the last six months of life. Some might find hospice useful for that entire period of time, while others might prefer to wait until they are closer to the end of their life.

    Hospice is Not Just for Patients

    Though hospice care focuses on making the last weeks and days comfortable for patients, it is also a great relief to their loved ones. End-of-life decisions are always hard, but hospice workers are trained to help family and friends let go in a peaceful, loving atmosphere.

    Hospice support continues for surviving family members after a patient’s death. Hospice care can include supportive discussions, visits, phone calls, and even provide help with funeral arrangements.

    When It’s Time.

    Choosing hospice is a very personal decision. Keep the lines of communication open with your loved one, and when they mention it might be time to consider hospice, take them at their word and make the call–and then trust the highly trained and compassionate hospice workers to help you with whatever comes next.

    Related Articles

    Click on the links below to see helpful articles and checklists on various elder care topics.

    Get Free Guidance





    When to Call Hospice – How to Know It s Time #how

    #when to call hospice

    #

    When to Call in Hospice

    Hospice care is often seen as a last-resort option�one to use when the patient no longer can benefit from traditional medical care. The fact is that approximately twice as many older Americans end their lives in hospital care now than they did ten years ago�but hospice care is still seen as a last resort. If it was brought in sooner, it could do patients more good.

    Hospice care is generally designed to help patients who know they are dying control their pain, stay comfortable, and get their social, emotional, and spiritual needs met in a supportive environment.

    However, studies show that more and more, hospice care is being used as the option of last resort for patients who receive very aggressive hospital care during their final days�care that may not be appropriate.

    For many patients and families, hospice care may be a better option earlier in the care process�skipping the aggressive intensive care that often occurs at the end of life.

    How to Know When It’s Time to Arrange for Hospice

    • When your doctor says there are few other options. Usually, the doctor and the patient decide together when it is time for hospice care. In general, hospice care is recommended when the patient has approximately six months to live if the illness follows its natural course. But the timing can be different for different patients.However, hospice is primarily designed for end-of-life care. Hospice care should be considered when the doctor is saying there is little else to be done, but before a health emergency puts you in the critical care ward at the hospital.
    • When living at home is no longer an option. If you or a loved one has been living at home while managing a terminal disease, the health situation has continued to decline, and living at home has become impossible, it may be time to consider hospice care. Hospice can be helpful for those who can no longer manage activities for daily living, such as chores, cooking, showering, dressing, and basic hygiene tasks, and who have no one to help them on a regular basis�or those who need the type of round-the-clock medical care that a family member is not qualified to provide.
    • When your pain cannot be managed effectively at home. If you or a loved one is in a great deal of pain from a terminal disease and pain medication needs have become overwhelming, it may be time to consider hospice care. In hospice, trained medical professionals monitor patients� pain and can closely observe them, making it possible for pain medication to be more carefully adjusted to accommodate the patient�s changing needs.

    Choosing hospice is never easy. However, hospice care can make the difference between a stressful, negative end-of-life situation and one that is more comfortable. Consider asking your doctor about hospice care sooner�for yourself or for a loved one�and hopefully, you�ll be able to get the care you need.

    Additional Home Health and Hospice Resources

    Elder Options of Texas
    Copyright 2001-2016
    All Rights Reserved

    DISCLAIMER: Links to other websites or references to products, services or publications do not imply the endorsement or approval of such websites, products, services or publications by Elder Options of Texas. The determination of the need for senior care services and the choice of a facility is an extremely important decision. Please make your own independent investigation.





    House of Pictures – What, When, Where #motels #in #wildwood

    #hospic

    #

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    When to call in Hospice #goa #hotels

    #when to call hospice for cancer

    #

    When to call in Hospice

    Mar 08, 2013 – 4:56 am

    My husband’s cancer has spread and he has elected not to do anything further. Surgery is out due to the fact that it has spread and he doesn’t want to do anymore chemo since the chemo will be more and harder than what he has done already. Our oncologists have told us that more chemo won’t cure only prolong and could even hasten. Besides that the surgery would be very hard since it would require removal of his esophagus since the cancer was found at the cervical of his esophagus which is a rare place for cancer and has spread to his right lung. This was considered a second primary and not related to his laryngeal cancer of which he has been NED since his laryngectomy 2 years ago.

    Right now he is feeling pretty good not much pain at all. Still gets out and goes. Our doctors have talked to me about calling in ho****e and while I’m not against that, I just don’t feel it is necessary at this point. And I also feel that if we call them in now, my husband will just give up right now and I want to give him a chance regarding changing his mind about further chemo.

    Anyone been thru this and when do you need to call in ho****e which will be in-home ho****e care.

    I hate this beast and it is a shame that a cure can’t be found after all this time and money spent on research.

    Posts: 296
    Joined: Apr 2011

    Mar 08, 2013 – 5:32 am

    I read your post with emotion.

    Please consider palliative care. someone checking in with you. A step before ho****e perhaps?

    This was the “goal” in our situation. My husband passed away 48 hours later. The doctors knew we were open to ho****e when the time was right. We had to force the issue.

    Please, trust yourself.

    Posts: 3095
    Joined: Jan 2010

    Mar 08, 2013 – 10:46 am

    Shaaron, I’m so sorry to hear this news. I will continue to pray for you and your husband. I don’t know about ho****e so I can’t help there, just wanted you to know you’re in my thots and prayers.

    Posts: 1914
    Joined: May 2012

    Mar 08, 2013 – 12:07 pm

    I can’t say enough good about ho****e. My parents fought this right up and to the end of my Mother’s walk with the beast. They can give you specialized plans. and they will tell you Ho****e is not the end. Alot of times people turn around and no longer need their services. They are angels, and will help you through all the bumps and bangs in the road. You don’t have to make a decission today on this. But please do make a call into your local Ho****e provider and just talk. I’ll be sending positive thoughts and prayers your way. We would have been lost without them, and were able to give Mom what she needed. Hugs sent. Katie

    Posts: 1570
    Joined: Dec 2012

    Mar 08, 2013 – 1:20 pm

    Please read this and all of it. I believe it will give you, your husband, and loved ones strength, courage, and deep insight on the journey you are beginning. I found it riveting and fascinating and fixated on it front to end Brilliant!

    Personal blog – Please join





    FAQ: What might I expect to happen when someone I – m

    #hospice dying process

    #

    This is a difficult topic for many people to think about, and especially to bring up in a public forum, but people still want and need to know what they might expect as they or someone they care for are declining. It is understandable to fear the unknown, and to fear suffering. I would say that there are a few leading points here:

    1) Most patients don t suffer much as their cancer progresses and as they transition through the dying process.

    2) This process is quite variable from one person to another, but we typically have a good idea of what a patient s leading problems will be weeks to months before a person is experiencing a more rapid decline.

    3) Engaging hospice services/palliative care can help guide expectations and generally manage many of the problems effectively by anticipating them, rather than waiting until very late to accept palliative care.

    While I would never want to romanticize or minimize the challenges of the dying process, I find that the majority of my patients experience a controlled decline in which they really don t suffer. The most common pattern I see is that someone with a progressing cancer will slow down, eat less, begin to lose weight more steadily, and just gradually become less and less active. They no longer go out on walks, then leave the house less often, then spend more time alternating between sleeping and getting up in a chair, then eventually get to a point where they are sleeping most of the time and are pretty much bed-bound. They have less interest in eating, which is sometimes frustrating to the patient but often more so to the family and supporters of the person, who may pressure the patient to force down food that they have little or no appetite for (the danger is that some patients describe distress from the unyielding pressure from well-intentioned but nagging loved ones). Soon, they are sleeping more and more, to the point that they eventually sleep all of the time and are no longer communicative; this is followed by irregular breathing, more prolonged pauses between breaths (called agonal breathing, though it isn t uncomfortable for the person, just a reflex the last phase of the dying process), and then they stop breathing. It s important to remember that this common pathway of progression isn t a lack of will on the part of the person with progressing cancer: they would eat and be more active if they could, but the cancer pours out toxic proteins that mediate this inexorable process.

    It s true that some patients have pain, or a terrible cough, or shortness of breath, agitation, and other problems, but I would say that most of the time, we have signals that these are going to be issues for a long while before the later stages, and it s advisable to deal with them as aggressively as possible before these symptoms become a crisis. Secondly, I most commonly see problems emerge when people (patients and/or their doctors) are very resistant to enlisting hospice support, which typically does a very good job of addressing symptoms proactively, before they become a crisis, and also being able to provide the comfort of helping patients and families/caregivers to understand what to expect in the near future. Just as on a plane, turbulence is much easier to understand if you know to expect it, what it represents, and how you ll get through it.

    About 20 years ago, I spent some time in medical school doing home visits with the very compassionate and thoughtful Medical Director of a Boston hospice. I asked him about his feelings on euthanasia, and he told me that he didn t actually feel that it was a pressing need in almost any cases. Specifically, he noted that it was most common for people to fear two things about dying: being alone in being in pain. Though being a primary caregiver is a very hard job, it is a great blessing to have someone there to help as a caregiver to a terminally ill patient something that even attentive medical care can t substitute for. That care and the ability to ensure that people aren t alone is incredibly helpful. But a medical team today can usually do a good job to minimize the physical suffering of the process to relieve pain and other symptoms. And most of the time, what we see is a patient gradually withdrawing and eventually passing comfortably.

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    When Is Palliative Care Appropriate? #motel #deals

    #what does hospice care mean

    #

    Palliative Care Center

    Palliative Care: Support for Patients and Cargeivers

    If you’ve been diagnosed with a serious, long-lasting disease or with a life-threatening illness, palliative care can make your life — and the lives of those who care for you — much easier.

    Palliative care can be performed along with the care you receive from your primary doctors.

    With palliative care, there is a focus on relieving pain and other troubling symptoms and meeting your emotional, spiritual, and practical needs. In short, this new medical specialty aims to improve your quality of life — however you define that for yourself.

    Your palliative care providers will work with you to identify and carry out your goals: symptom relief, counseling, spiritual comfort, or whatever enhances your quality of life. Palliative care can also help you to understand all of your treatment options.

    One of the strengths of palliative care is recognition of the human side of illness. In a 2011 survey of palliative care patients, they mentioned these particular needs: “being recognized as a person,” “having a choice and being in control,” “being connected to family and the world outside,” “being spiritually connected,” and “physical comfort.”

    Be assured that you may receive palliative care at the same time that you pursue a cure for your illness. You won’t be required to give up your regular doctors or treatments or hope for a cure.

    Palliative care may also be a good option if you have a serious disease that has prompted multiple hospitalizations or emergency room visits during the previous year.

    Does palliative care mean that you’re dying? Not necessarily. It’s true that palliative care does serve many people with life-threatening or terminal illnesses. But some people are cured and no longer need palliative care. Others move in and out of palliative care, as needed.

    However, if you decide to stop pursuing a cure and your doctor believes that you’re within the last few months of life, you can move to hospice. Palliative care does include the important component of hospice, but it’s only one part of the larger field.

    If your family members also need help, palliative care can provide them emotional and spiritual support, educate them about your situation, and support them as caregivers. Some palliative programs offer home support and assistance with shopping, meal preparation, and respite care to give caregivers time off.