Cynthia Spencer and Cransley hospice patients will suffer from cuts – BBC

#cynthia spencer hospice

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Cynthia Spencer and Cransley hospice patients ‘will suffer’ from cuts

Image caption Cransley Hospice (top) at St Mary’s Hospital in Kettering and Cynthia Spencer Hospice (bottom) in Northampton both face funding cuts

NHS cuts proposed at two Northamptonshire hospices will lead to patients and families “suffering”, the Labour party has warned.

The service plans to cut funding at Kettering’s Cransley and Northampton’s Cynthia Spencer hospices to save money.

John McGhee, leader of the Labour group at the county council, said cutbacks “will affect the quality of services”.

The NHS said it had to make savings, but had withdrawn its initial figure of £2m which will be discussed further.

A Nene Clinical Commissioning Group (NCCG) spokeswoman said it planned to meet Labour councillors on Thursday to try and answer their concerns.

Mr McGhee said: “It would seem from the clinical commissioning group’s latest statement that once again the hard working people of Northamptonshire are being left to pick up the tab after cutbacks.

“There is no doubt in my mind that these cuts will affect the quality of the services being provided. Ultimately, patients and their families will suffer.”

‘Enhanced service’

An NCCG statement said: “In the original delivery plan a potential reduction in £2m of funding was mentioned.

“Following the ongoing engagement and feedback with hospice trustees, the original figures stated have been withdrawn.

“We continue to discuss what the alternative position should be, but are considering an enhanced service not a reduced one.”

The NCCG said it hoped to fill any cutback in funding with an increase in charitable fundraising and by making changes to its services that reduce demand on its core funds.

It currently contributes 70% (£3.1m) towards the running costs of the hospices, with charitable trusts putting in 30%, which it says is out of proportion with the rest of the country.

Both hospices provide care for people whose illnesses are no longer curable, including many cancer patients.

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Best Thin Film Solar Panels – Amorphous, Cadmium Telluride or CIGS? Energy


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Best Thin Film Solar Panels – Amorphous, Cadmium Telluride or CIGS?

Thin film solar panels accounted for 11% of all solar panel sales in 2011. [1] Production capacity is expected to grow at an annual rate of 24%, reaching more than 22 GW by 2020 (or a global market share of 38% in terms module production). [2]

There are three primary types of thin film solar panels on the market today: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium selenide (CIS/CIGS). In the overview chart below you can see their main characteristics:

Protocrystalline, nanocrystalline (nc-Si), black silicon, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and other organic solar cells will not be covered in this article. These technologies still have a long way to go in research and development before they are ready for the market.

Amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium selenide (CIS/CIGS) have several other benefits and downsides in addition to what you read in the chart above:

  • Significantly higher temperature resistance compared to crystalline-based solar panels.
  • Many thin-film modules are flexible, which greatly increases the number of potential applications (e.g. curved surfaces, building-integrated photovoltaics).
  • Better resistance against shading.
  • Lower efficiency rates mean you need a physically larger system for the same power output.
  • Installation costs goes up because you need to install more solar panels.
  • Thin film solar panels tend to degrade faster.
  • Silicon costs are declining and silicon-based solar panels (e.g. mono- and polycrystalline) are becoming more affordable.

Amorphous silicon (a-Si)

The first thin film solar cells were based on amorphous silicon. The technology is most commonly used in devices that require very little power (e.g. pocket calculators) because of low efficiency rates.

The future of larger-scale amorphous silicon solar panels does not look very bright: Sharp retired 160 out of their 320 MW production capacity in Japan earlier this year.

Optisolar, Signet Solar, Unisolar, and many other companies that were touting the amorphous technology are acquired, bankrupt or closed.

Energy Matters, one of the leading solar installers in Australia, recommend amorphous thin film solar panels for their customers in far North Queensland and the Northern Territory due to performance advantages in high temperatures (better heat resistance).

Cadmium Telluride (CdTe)

It’s all about First Solar when it comes to cadmium telluride solar panels. Abound Solar has declared bankruptcy and General Electric`s PrimeStar is failing. First Solar is the world-record holder for CdTe thin film module (14.4%) and cell (18.7%) efficiency, and backs their solar panels with a limited 25-year power output warranty. [5] The company is currently building a 230 MW solar power plant in Antelope Valley and looks to generate $0.8 billion to $1.0 billion of operating cash flow in 2013. [7]

In some situations, typically multi-kilowatt systems in higher temperatures, CdTe-based solar panels can beat mono- and polycrystalline solar panels in terms of costs.

There are, however, environmental issues with products that rely on cadmium – a heavy metal and potential carcinogen that can accumulate in plant and animal tissue. While the threat is minimal as long as the compound is contained within the solar panel, the disposal and recycling can be both dangerous and costly.

Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIS/CIGS)

Solyndra, MiaSolé, Nanosolar, AQT, Solopower and many more – the list of CIS/CIGS companies that have failed goes on and on. In the midst of distress sales and bankruptcies, the Japanese manufacturer Solar Frontier seems to be doing something right. The company recently built out a 1 GW factory and shipped 577 MW worth of solar panels in 2011.

The CIGS-technology might also see some success via Hanergy, a Chinese company that has gained a strong position in the thin film solar market through the acquisition of MiaSolé and Solibro.

In 2013, scientists at Empa, the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, successfully created CIGS solar cells on flexible polymer foils with a new record efficiency of 20.4%. [3] This makes CIGS-based solar panels the highest performing thin film solar panels to date.

Also worth mentioning is that less of the toxic material cadmium is present in CIGS solar cells (compared to solar cells made out of cadmium telluride).

So, which thin film solar panel type is really the best? First of all, a mono- or polycrystalline solar panel is a better choice for the vast majority of homeowners. If you`re looking for a large-scale system, have the extra space required, and live in an area where the temperature is unusually high, thin film solar panels can make sense. If you want a flexible option, your options are amorphous silicon or CIGS.

The next step would be to predict long-term earnings and costs of specific solar modules. Go for a product that is backed up with a good performance guarantee/warranty.

If you want expert guidance to find out which solar panel is better in your situation, simply request a Free Solar Consultation .


Rudlings Wakelam Solicitors Bury St Edmunds Thetford Brandon #rudlings #wakelam, #solicitors, #will


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All of our teams work closely together, sharing ideas and challenging current thinking – pushing the boundaries to give you the service we can. For over 90 years, we have found that this approach works. Our service is founded on strong and long lasting relationships with our clients that are built on trust, and our clients return to us as their ‘trusted advisor’ time and time again throughout their lives.

At Rudlings Wakelam, we do not only strive to do the things right but to do the right thing. When you become a client, we promise to:

  • provide you with the highest standards of client service
  • be open, approachable and friendly
  • treat you with respect and dignity at all times
  • work with you to achieve the best outcome for you
  • provide you with advice that is practical and clear
  • ensure that quality is at the forefront of everything we do for you
  • ensure that our fees are transparent, with no hidden surprises

We have 3 offices across East Anglia – Bury St Edmunds, Brandon and Thetford. We have 4 partners, 25 other solicitors and support staff and offer a broad portfolio of services to our clients, whether they are individuals, businesses or organisations. We have a reputation for being a friendly, approachable and forward thinking practice that truly does provide advice through every aspect of your life.

Quite simply providing ‘. advice for life’ .

The Legal Buzz

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  • Child and Adoption Law
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FRAUD ALERT

Rudlings Wakelam take the security of our systems and data extremely seriously. However it is possible for determined fraudsters to attempt to impersonate an email from any organisation. If you receive an email or telephone call advising you that Rudlings Wakelam’s bank details have changed, do not send any money to the new account. It is extremely unlikely that Rudlings Wakelam will change bank accounts and should we do so, the change will not be notified to you by email or cold call. Rudlings Wakelam cannot accept responsibility for money sent by you to an incorrect account.

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Graphic Design For Beginners (Online) – Central Saint Martins #this #graphic #design


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Graphic Design For Beginners (Online)

Description

Graphic design begins with ideas, and this course encourages the development of ideas through observation and research as well as introducing students to layout and typography. The course includes six diverse but related projects, inspired by the BA degree course at Central Saint Martins. Beginning with a graphic ideas brief, the projects continue with an introduction to typography and layout; including projects to design a logo, a poster and a magazine spread; the final projects are to make a small book and build a portfolio using a template website. You will be required to complete the projects in your own time to maximise your learning process and upload your work for constructive feedback during the live session.

This course is aimed at beginners to graphic design who are keen to experiment and produce an inventive portfolio, either for an application for further study or for those who just want to refresh themselves and exercise an enquiring mind.

Please note that this course does not provide instruction in using computer programs and knowledge of graphic design computer programmes is not required to complete the projects.

Course Schedule – 6 weeks: 1.5 hours of live class per week

2nd week
Typography and logotypes

4th week
Magazine layout

6th week
Review of work and building a portfolio

Please note this course is being delivered on UK time.To view more information and a live UK clock, please follow this link:http://www.timeanddate.com/time/zone/uk/london

Please refer to your joining instructions about getting set up for your first session.
Further details about preparing for your online course, and the equipment you need, can be found here:
http://www.arts.ac.uk/csm/courses/short-courses/short-courses-online/frequently-asked-questions/

Please note: This course is for students aged 18 and older

Tutor information

Ruth Sykes is a co-founder of the REG design studio, whose clients include The Crafts Council, Central Saint Martins, English Heritage, Thames and Hudson and UP Projects. Ruth is an associate lecturer on the BA Graphic Design Course at Central Saint Martins, and a graduate of the course.

Materials

Please ensure that you have the following materials to hand:

  • Black ink pen
  • Sketchbook (A4 size)
  • Scissors
  • Scalpel knife
  • Cutting mat
  • Metal safety ruler
  • Glue stick
  • PVA glue
  • A3 white paper (around 80gsm) x 12 sheets
  • A3 tracing paper (around 6 sheets)
  • A camera (any sort, a camera phone is fine)
  • Millboard, A4 size x 2 sheets
  • Cartridge paper, A4 size x 4 sheets
  • Coloured pens and pencils can be useful
  • 1 x USB webcam (external), to easily show work in progress

To complete your projects further materials are usually required, which will depend on your ideas for your projects.

Details for booking


Types of home health care that Medicare will pay for – Medicare

#medicare hospice benefit

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Types of home health care that Medicare will pay for

Log In

Create your free Medicare Interactive profile, and receive the following great benefits:

  • Bookmark your favorite courses and answers for quick reference, whether counseling a client, helping a family member, or simply brushing up on your Medicare knowledge
  • Receive a free exclusive resource: the New to Medicare Guide
  • Keep track of where you left off in MI Pro courses, and complete coursework at your own pace
  • Become part of a Medicare community and receive key Medicare reminders
  • Receive updates about Medicare Interactive and special discounts for MI Pro courses, webinars, and more

If you qualify for the home health benefit, Medicare covers the following types of care:

  • Skilled nursing services and home health services provided up to seven days a week for no more than eight hours per day and 28 hours per week (Medicare can cover up to 35 hours in unusual cases).
  • Medicare pays in full for skilled nursing care, which includes services and care that can only be performed safely and effectively by a licensed nurse. Injections (and teaching patients to self-inject), tube feedings, catheter changes, observation and assessment of a patient s condition, management and evaluation of a patient s care plan, and wound care are examples of skilled nursing care that Medicare may cover.
  • Medicare pays in full for a home health aide if you require skilled services. A home health aide provides personal care services including help with bathing, using the toilet, and dressing. If you ONLY require personal care, you do NOT qualify for the Medicare home care benefit.
  • Skilled therapy services . Physical, speech and occupational therapy services that can only be performed safely by or under the supervision of a licensed therapist, and that are reasonable and necessary for treating your illness or injury. Physical therapy includes gait training and supervision of and training for exercises to regain movement and strength to a body area. Speech-language pathology services include exercises to regain and strengthen speech and language skills. Occupational therapy* helps you regain the ability to do usual daily activities by yourself, such as eating and putting on clothes. Medicare should pay for therapy services to maintain your condition and prevent you from getting worse as long as these services require the skill or supervision of a licensed therapist, regardless of your potential to improve.
  • Medical social services . Medicare pays in full for services ordered by your doctor to help you with social and emotional concerns you have related to your illness. This might include counseling or help finding resources in your community.
  • Medical supplies . Medicare pays in full for certain medical supplies provided by the Medicare-certified home health agency. such as wound dressings and catheters needed for your care.
  • Durable medical equipment. Medicare pays 80 percent of its approved amount for certain pieces of medical equipment, such as a wheelchair or walker. You pay 20 percent coinsurance (plus up to 15 percent more if your home health agency does not accept assignment accept the Medicare-approved amount for a service as payment in full).

*If you only need occupational therapy, you will not qualify for the Medicare home health benefit. However, if you qualify for Medicare coverage of home health care on another basis, you can also get occupational therapy. When your other needs for Medicare home health end, you should still be able to get occupational therapy under the Medicare home health benefit if you still need it.

Related Answers
Related Courses
  • Level 2: Medicare Coverage Rules –
    Course 1: Part A (Hospital Insurance)
  • Level 2: Medicare Coverage Rules –
    Course 2: Part B (Medical Insurance)
Links




Types of home health care that Medicare will pay for – Medicare

#medicare hospice benefit

#

Types of home health care that Medicare will pay for

Log In

Create your free Medicare Interactive profile, and receive the following great benefits:

  • Bookmark your favorite courses and answers for quick reference, whether counseling a client, helping a family member, or simply brushing up on your Medicare knowledge
  • Receive a free exclusive resource: the New to Medicare Guide
  • Keep track of where you left off in MI Pro courses, and complete coursework at your own pace
  • Become part of a Medicare community and receive key Medicare reminders
  • Receive updates about Medicare Interactive and special discounts for MI Pro courses, webinars, and more

If you qualify for the home health benefit, Medicare covers the following types of care:

  • Skilled nursing services and home health services provided up to seven days a week for no more than eight hours per day and 28 hours per week (Medicare can cover up to 35 hours in unusual cases).
  • Medicare pays in full for skilled nursing care, which includes services and care that can only be performed safely and effectively by a licensed nurse. Injections (and teaching patients to self-inject), tube feedings, catheter changes, observation and assessment of a patient s condition, management and evaluation of a patient s care plan, and wound care are examples of skilled nursing care that Medicare may cover.
  • Medicare pays in full for a home health aide if you require skilled services. A home health aide provides personal care services including help with bathing, using the toilet, and dressing. If you ONLY require personal care, you do NOT qualify for the Medicare home care benefit.
  • Skilled therapy services . Physical, speech and occupational therapy services that can only be performed safely by or under the supervision of a licensed therapist, and that are reasonable and necessary for treating your illness or injury. Physical therapy includes gait training and supervision of and training for exercises to regain movement and strength to a body area. Speech-language pathology services include exercises to regain and strengthen speech and language skills. Occupational therapy* helps you regain the ability to do usual daily activities by yourself, such as eating and putting on clothes. Medicare should pay for therapy services to maintain your condition and prevent you from getting worse as long as these services require the skill or supervision of a licensed therapist, regardless of your potential to improve.
  • Medical social services . Medicare pays in full for services ordered by your doctor to help you with social and emotional concerns you have related to your illness. This might include counseling or help finding resources in your community.
  • Medical supplies . Medicare pays in full for certain medical supplies provided by the Medicare-certified home health agency. such as wound dressings and catheters needed for your care.
  • Durable medical equipment. Medicare pays 80 percent of its approved amount for certain pieces of medical equipment, such as a wheelchair or walker. You pay 20 percent coinsurance (plus up to 15 percent more if your home health agency does not accept assignment accept the Medicare-approved amount for a service as payment in full).

*If you only need occupational therapy, you will not qualify for the Medicare home health benefit. However, if you qualify for Medicare coverage of home health care on another basis, you can also get occupational therapy. When your other needs for Medicare home health end, you should still be able to get occupational therapy under the Medicare home health benefit if you still need it.

Related Answers
Related Courses
  • Level 2: Medicare Coverage Rules –
    Course 1: Part A (Hospital Insurance)
  • Level 2: Medicare Coverage Rules –
    Course 2: Part B (Medical Insurance)
Links




Cynthia Spencer and Cransley hospice patients will suffer from cuts – BBC

#cynthia spencer hospice

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Cynthia Spencer and Cransley hospice patients ‘will suffer’ from cuts

Image caption Cransley Hospice (top) at St Mary’s Hospital in Kettering and Cynthia Spencer Hospice (bottom) in Northampton both face funding cuts

NHS cuts proposed at two Northamptonshire hospices will lead to patients and families “suffering”, the Labour party has warned.

The service plans to cut funding at Kettering’s Cransley and Northampton’s Cynthia Spencer hospices to save money.

John McGhee, leader of the Labour group at the county council, said cutbacks “will affect the quality of services”.

The NHS said it had to make savings, but had withdrawn its initial figure of £2m which will be discussed further.

A Nene Clinical Commissioning Group (NCCG) spokeswoman said it planned to meet Labour councillors on Thursday to try and answer their concerns.

Mr McGhee said: “It would seem from the clinical commissioning group’s latest statement that once again the hard working people of Northamptonshire are being left to pick up the tab after cutbacks.

“There is no doubt in my mind that these cuts will affect the quality of the services being provided. Ultimately, patients and their families will suffer.”

‘Enhanced service’

An NCCG statement said: “In the original delivery plan a potential reduction in £2m of funding was mentioned.

“Following the ongoing engagement and feedback with hospice trustees, the original figures stated have been withdrawn.

“We continue to discuss what the alternative position should be, but are considering an enhanced service not a reduced one.”

The NCCG said it hoped to fill any cutback in funding with an increase in charitable fundraising and by making changes to its services that reduce demand on its core funds.

It currently contributes 70% (£3.1m) towards the running costs of the hospices, with charitable trusts putting in 30%, which it says is out of proportion with the rest of the country.

Both hospices provide care for people whose illnesses are no longer curable, including many cancer patients.

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