Napa Valley Wine Tours #hotels #in #la

#napa valley motels

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Your tasting comes first

Explore Napa Valley by Rail

The Napa Valley Wine Train is one of the most distinctive Napa restaurants, offering an authentic, memorable experience that echoes the glory days of train travel, with fine dining service, multiple course meals, Napa Valley scenery and ultimate relaxation aboard exquisitely restored vintage rail cars. This top dining establishment is housed in a museum quality, antique train that runs on 25-­miles of track in the heart of the Napa Valley. The train itself has two engines, three kitchens on board and a collection of early 20th century Pullman rail cars faithfully restored with Honduran mahogany paneling, brass accents, etched glass partitions and plush armchairs that evoke the spirit of luxury rail travel in the early 1900s. Take a trip into the luxurious American past and experience an unparalleled memory-­making journey.

Make a Reservation

Book your Wine Train Napa Valley trip today

Explore the Train

Learn about the Wine Train

Shop Our Wine Store

Find Wines Gifts

Getting Here

Visit Napa Valley with or without a car





Home Distillation of Alcohol (Homemade Alcohol to Drink) #poteen, #homemade #alcohol, #stills,


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Methanol & Other Impurities

Methanol is formed when fermenting beverages high in pectins – eg grapes and berries. Starting with a grain or sugar based wort, in a clean fermentor with a yeast culture from a well aereated source will result in small/none formed.
Carl from Hambletonbard (makers of Alcotec yeasts) details.

    Methanol, you will typically get around 2 or 3 parts per million (or milligrams per litre if you prefer) of methanol produced during fermentation of a standard 6kg type Alcotec – this is extremely low even compared to commercial products. We don’t have a great deal of data on methanol because whenever we have tested for it we have got extremely low results.

Mike explains about the pectin.

    The methanol comes from the pectin, which mainly composed of methyl esters of galactose. When pectin breaks down, by enzymes introduced by microorganisms, or deliberately introduced, the methyl esters combine with water to produce methanol, so the aim should be to leave the pectin well alone if you can.

    I think Jack would agree that what he means is that fermenting at a high temperature, or adding pectin enzyme, or trying for an abv higher than 12% all increase the risk of methanol being produced, so his advice about low temperature fermentation, adding no exra enzymes, and a target lower than 12%abv is all good stuff.


You are already being exposed to methanol from other sources. Some fruit juices are naturally high in methanol – for example apple juice can have 0.2-0.3% methanol, or if derived from pulp by enzymatic degradation, the levels can be 2 to 3 times higher.

The lethal dose of methanol is at least 100 ml that is equal to about 80000 mg or you need 27000 liters of mash at least to get that amount.

also from the webpage: “Dietary surveys have shown that an extreme consumer of orange juice drinks slightly over 2 litres/day. The estimated maximum intake of methanol based on this consumption would be 455 mg for a 60 kg adult which is below the maximum advisory intake of 600 mg per day for a 60 kg adult, recommended by the Department of Health.”

So if we stay under 600 mg per day we are safe, that’s the same as 200 liters of mash per day or about 70 liters of 40% alcohol per day if you weight is 60 kg.

total amount of methanol in mash expressed in ml is about 0.1 ml = nothing.


Jack comments.

    The Long Ashton Research Station did some studies that showed that ciders and apple juices clarified with pectic enzymes are higher in methanol due to the demethylation of juice pectins. The methanol content varied from 10 to 400 ppm in the test samples. I don’t know which fruits are highest/lowest in pectin content, but apples are commonly considered the highest.

    This is why all the old books on cider making refer to a condition called “apple palsey” – it’s the massively painfull hangover from the high methanol content. In order to prevent this (I’m sure distilling the pectin turns it into methanol) distillers must fully clarify any fruit wine before cooking it. Rather than use clarifiers, put the wine into 2 or 4 liter plastic jugs (only filled half full) and freeze them solid, then thaw them out, this will result in perfectly clear (and chill- stabilized) wine ready for distilling. After the thawing is complete or maybe as much as a week after, the wine will be crystal clear.

Stephen Alexander reports that commercial spirits contain small levels of methanol. ‘Food Chemistry’ by Belitz more methanol is produced in fruit fermentation than in grains. Brewers do not remove the methanol in beer and wine because methanol is not especially toxic at low concentrations. You are looking at between 0.4%-1% methanol in wines and brandies and smaller amounts in beers. Distillers remove almost all the methanol in most cases. Ever notice how vodka produces clean hangovers and wines (particularly reds) give you very nasty hangovers? Methanol. That, and dehydration!

Methanol is an especially nasty type of alcohol because the body tries to break it down the same way it metabolizes, or breaks down, ethanol, the type of alcohol in beer, wine and other drinks. Metabolizing ethanol produces chemicals less toxic to the body than alcohol. Unfortunately, if the same chemical action is performed on methanol the result is formic acid, lactic acid and formaldehyde.

Formaldehyde attacks nerve cells, especially the optic nerve and can damage the liver and kidneys. Formic acid and lactic acid also attack the kidneys and liver. Most people who have drunk methanol die of severe and sudden kidney and liver failure.

Chronic methanol drinking will cause optical damage. The stories of moonshine causing blindness comes from U.S. prohibition times where some bootleggers used to cut moonshine with methylated spirits to increase profit.

Gregory writes:

    It isn’t the yeast that controls methanol, it’s what you’re fermenting. I believe yeast has very limited metabolic pathways around methanol. Quoting from http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/jul2000/965090996.Bc.r.html –

    “Basically it can be produced biologically in 2 ways; through the oxidation of methane by methane monooxygenase, or by the reduction of formaldehyde, by methanol dehydrogenase (and this reaction normally works in the reverse direction).

    It’s true that some methanol can be produced during fermentation, but this is not derived from the ethanol or by carbohydrate oxidation. It is produced in small amounts, either by non-enzymatic reactions or through the reduction of formaldehyde.”

    Methane isn’t present in our washes, so the culprit is formaldehyde. I believe the pectins in fruit are methylated and can break down in the wash into formaldehyde. But so long as your wash has only pure fermentable carbohydrates, you can expect essentially zero methanol. There’s a bit more in this discussion of methanol here: http://yarchive.net/med/methanol_poisoning.html

    Ethyl acetate, OTOH, is produced spontaneously whenever acetate is present with ethanol. There are several possible sources of acetate during fermentation. In general, acetate is formed by oxidation of ethanol. (In fact, acetate is the ‘end-product’ of our own metabolism of ethanol). In fermentation, oxidation of ethanol into acetate can happen as a result of desperate yeast metabolizing its own ethanol, or by contamination with other yeasts or bacteria.

    http://homedistiller.org ?>

Bernhardt, sarah ophelia #auction, #art, #exhibition, #online, #catalogue, #bid, #buy, #collect, #contemporary,


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Catalogue Note

“Her clothes spread wide;
And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up:
Which time she chanted snatches of old tunes;
As one incapable of her own distress,
Or like a creature native and indued
Unto that element: but long it could not be
Till that her garments, heavy with their drink,
Pull’d the poor wretch from her melodious lay
To muddy death.”

William Shakespeare
Hamlet, Act IV, Scene VII

Celebrated as one of the greatest actresses of all time, Sarah Bernhardt was also recognised for her talent in the medium of sculpture, a passion which complemented her success as a stage artist. The present marble relief of Ophelia is a rare surviving work signed by Bernhardt, and among her most important to appear at auction in recent memory. Deeply sensuous in form and conception, Ophelia testifies to the iconic actor’s considerable skill as a sculptor, while epitomising Bernhardt’s fascination with the morbid eroticism that surrounds Shakespeare’s heroine.

Born in Paris to a courtesan and an unknown father, Sarah Bernhardt received her first training as an actor at the Comédie-Française from which she was expelled, prompting a brief period of activity as a courtesan. Resuming her acting career in 1866, Bernhardt began to develop a reputation on the stage at prestigious Parisian theatres. She soon found unprecedented fame across Europe and beyond, enjoying several worldwide tours during the 1880s and 1890s. Known in particular for her magisterial portrayals of tragic characters, Sarah Bernhardt’s legendary status continued into the early 20 th century, when she starred in silent films and remained active on the stage until her death in 1923.

Sarah Bernhardt was as flamboyant a personality off the stage as she was in her dramatic roles. Famously, the actress acquired a coffin in the 1860s, in which she would pose and sleep regularly throughout her life. By thus fetishising her hypothetical corpse, Bernhardt displayed an erotically charged obsession with death that was both personal and symptomatic of her time – a time when morgues were places of public spectacle, and morbidly beautiful phenomena such as the death mask of ‘L’Inconnue de la Seine’ captivated the art scene.

It was the same 19 th -century environment which gave rise to an artistic fascination with the character of Ophelia in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The tragic fate of the heroine, who becomes Hamlet’s lover but falls victim to the Prince’s plotting of revenge and, in her eventual madness, drowns in a stream, was depicted by painters such as Eugène Delacroix and, notably, John Everett Millais.

Bernhardt’s activity as a sculptor began in the 1870s with guidance from Roland Mathieu-Meusnier and Jules Franceschi. Taking a studio in 1873, she went on to model a number of highly accomplished works, such as the group Après la Tempête. which she exhibited at the Salon in 1876.

Despite being the most famous actress of her day, Sarah Bernhardt had never performed the role of Ophelia at the time her marble was conceived – it was not until 1886 that she appeared as Ophelia in a production of Hamlet. followed by a controversial turn as the eponymous character of Shakespeare’s tragedy in 1899. Yet Bernhardt’s prominent obsession with death had led to a long-lived fascination with the tragic heroine, and her sculptural representation of Ophelia became one of her most significant works. Modelled in 1880, the relief accompanied Bernhardt on her first tour of North America before being shown at the Paris Salon in 1881. Reviews of Ophelia were positive, praising it as a work ‘of which any sculptor might be proud’ (see Mason, op. cit. p. 312) – a choice of words which highlights Bernhardt’s unique status as both a woman and a full-time actress active in the profession of sculpture.

The relief is thought to exist in a handful of versions in marble, the present example being an important rediscovery. The only other version whose location is known is that in Copenhagen, which was gifted to the Royal Theatre by Bernhardt in June 1881 and remains on display in its foyer. Another version is recorded to have been a gift to the Austrian painter Hans Makart, while a third was exhibited at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Photographs reveal very slight variations between the marbles, and it is possible that the present version is that which was given to Makart. Bernhardt’s personal attachment to the work is revealed by her inclusion of a photograph of Ophelia – probably the plaster – in her 1907 memoirs.

Bernhardt’s high relief represents Ophelia in bust-form, her head turned, her eyes closed, wearing a garland of flowers, and enveloped by water which merges with her tresses. The subtlety of Bernhardt’s modelling is showcased in the beautifully detailed flowers, as well as the delicate waves of the ‘glassy stream’, whose texture contrasts with the smooth and bulging form of Ophelia’s exposed right breast. Though seemingly depicted in the moment of her death, the woman’s sensuous open-mouthed expression, overt nudity, and languid pose exude an undeniable eroticism. Unaware of her suffering, the heroine appears to embrace her death as an ecstatic consummation. Bernhardt thus offers an original interpretation of the references to female sexuality and deflowering made by Shakespeare throughout the scene of Ophelia’s madness and Queen Gertrude’s speech describing her death, which makes use of sexualised imagery such as ‘long purples / That liberal shepherds give a grosser name’.

In her later theatrical interpretations of the character, Bernhardt would add a heightened level of eroticism to Ophelia’s death by choosing to appear on stage herself as the dead Ophelia – instead of the conventional coffin – in the graveyard scene, in which her brother Laertes throws himself upon her body. Mirroring her sculptural portrait of the heroine, Bernhardt was described thus in a review by Joseph Knight (1886, as quoted in Young, op. cit. p. 23): ‘She is once more seen with her face rigid as marble, and her body, covered with flowers, …’

RELATED LITERATURE
M. E. Mason, Making Love/ Making Work: The Sculpture Practice of Sarah Bernhardt. doctoral thesis, The University of Leeds, May 2007, vol. II, pp. 310-348; A. R. Young, ‘Sarah Bernhardt’s Ophelia’, Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation. 8, no. 1, 2013

Condition Report

the frame with a title plaque inscribed: OPHELIA / PAR / SARAH BERNHARDT
signed: SARAH. BERNHARDT
white marble, in a wood frame
marble: 70 by 59cm. 27½ by 23¼in.
frame: 98.5 by 76.5cm. 38¾ by 30 1/8 in.

Estimate 50,000 70,000

Overall, the condition is good, with minor dirt and wear to the surface consistent with age, in particular to the proper right shoulder and arm, to the side of the proper right breast, and to the water above the sternum and by the bottom right corner. There is minor veining to the marble, consistent with the material, including a few slightly visible yellowish veins to the proper left cheek, the neck, and the proper right breast. There are a few small chips and abrasions to the edges of the flowers, in particular to the two larger flowers lying on the proper left breast. It is possible there may be a few further minor abrasions in the flowers and hair, though these would be difficult to identify due to the extraordinary intricacy of the carving. There is some paint residue to the top of one of the flowers above the forehead, possibly concealing a minor chip. There are a few small abrasions to the edges of the relief. There are some yellowish dirt marks to the proper right side of the nose. The frame is stable, with wear consistent with age, including some stable splitting, consistent with the material, notably to the top section at the front. There are various small holes and specks of paint to the frame.
“In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby’s is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.”


Hunter Valley Wine Country Tourism – Accommodation, Tours, Event Tickets – Conference

#singleton motels

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Welcome to Singleton

Welcome to our town, in the heart of the Hunter Valley. A delightful mix of heritage, country charm and modern sophistication combine to make Singleton, in the heart of the Hunter Valley, an intriguing getaway destination. Singleton is home to all the pursuits you would expect from this region and a few unexpected surprises to keep you entertained, relaxed and inspired.

How to get here

Singleton is situated in the heart of the Hunter Valley – two hours drive north from Sydney and one hour from Newcastle Airport. Singleton is easily accessible from the Hunter Expressway, New England Highway, Putty Road and the Golden Highway, making Singleton an ideal destination.

Singleton is accessible by road, train, coach or from Newcastle Airport, plan your trip to Singleton today! While staying in Singleton there are public transport options available.

Shopping in Singleton

Within the Singleton town centre you will uncover some of the many treasures of the Singleton region. Singleton’s CBD precinct has recently undergone major redevelopment. The picturesque main street is the perfect location to explore a collection of boutique and speciality shops, as well as discover our three shopping centres that provide convenient access to major retailers and essential services. During your time in Singleton treat yourself to some indulgence with the assortment of beauty salons followed by a coffee and cake at one of Singleton’s cafes. Be sure to make a stop along George Street to find unique stores and historic buildings lining the bustling highway. Come and unearth every treasure.

The Villages

Broke Fordwich

Broke Fordwich is one of the oldest wine growing areas in Australia. Considered as one of the produce bowls of the Hunter – the unique blend of boutique style vineyards are elegantly intermingled with olive groves, orchards and farming land. With access to rich, fertile soil these producers are harvesting superior quality, naturally. A fabulous area to enjoy the surrounds, celebrate a special occasion or simply get away from the day to day and indulge in fruits of the land.

Around Hermitage

This 12km stretch of indulgence has been enticing wine lovers for over 30 years. Today its well – deserved reputation is built on award winning wines, outstanding accommodation, arts and crafts and inspired food and produce. If you’re looking to escape to a country hideaway and be dazzled by the reflection of the sun setting on a billabong you’ll find it on Hermitage Road. You’ll discover Hermitage Road is home to the perfect blend of rustic chic and sheer indulgence.

Things to see do

Unwind and relax as you discover and explore the many wonders on offer in Singleton. Tour a host of boutique wineries and fine dining restaurants, unearth the adventure – filled National Parks and take a step back in history when you visit one of our museums or historical villages. Visit local markets and sample fresh regional produce or enjoy the range of local events held annually in the Singleton area. Take your photo next to the Singleton Sundial, experience the beautiful Lake St Clair or discover our entertaining main street. As you explore the area you’ll discover the hidden gems, friendly locals and the indulgent temptations that Singleton has to offer.

Dining in Singleton

With the freshest of ingredients being grown at their back door – the chefs of Singleton are not lost for inspiration. There are a number of fine dining restaurants, cafes and sterling examples of hearty pub meals to be found. No matter what your budget or taste buds crave, you’ll be well looked after in and around Singleton.

Accommodation

Rest assured, in Singleton, you will be looked after as a special guest. The warmth and generosity of Singleton’s accommodation hosts is well renowned. From 5 start luxury accommodation, a tent by the lake or easily accessible caravan facilities, there is an experience perfect for every occasion, desire and budget.

Contact the Hunter Valley Wine and Tourism Association’s reservation team at the Singleton Visitor Information and Enterprise Centre for more accommodation options and enquiries – Ph: (02) 4990 0900.

Events Markets

Come and celebrate some great events held throughout the year. Unearth a unique music event, enjoy the atmosphere at one of our outdoor cinemas or join us to celebrate in style our great town and surroundings – these are just some of the fabulous events that our local area hosts.

The Singleton Visitor Information enterprise centre

The Singleton Visitor Information and Enterprise Centre (SVIEC), located on the New England Highway at Townhead Park is open 7 days a week, 9 to 5. Whilst at the Centre, you can enjoy and purchase from a great range of locally made gifts and produce, as well as browse an extensive range of information such as maps, local brochures and event information. Our friendly staff can also assist you with your accommodation and tour bookings! There are also two conference rooms available for hire at the SVIEC. Facilities include free Wi-Fi, barbecue and picnic area, public toilets, disabled facilities, hot and cold refreshments and easy parking for cars and long vehicles.

Location: Townhead Park, New England Highway

Phone: 1800 499 888

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.





Napa Valley Wine Tours #motels #in #nyc

#napa valley motels

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Your tasting comes first

Explore Napa Valley by Rail

The Napa Valley Wine Train is one of the most distinctive Napa restaurants, offering an authentic, memorable experience that echoes the glory days of train travel, with fine dining service, multiple course meals, Napa Valley scenery and ultimate relaxation aboard exquisitely restored vintage rail cars. This top dining establishment is housed in a museum quality, antique train that runs on 25-­miles of track in the heart of the Napa Valley. The train itself has two engines, three kitchens on board and a collection of early 20th century Pullman rail cars faithfully restored with Honduran mahogany paneling, brass accents, etched glass partitions and plush armchairs that evoke the spirit of luxury rail travel in the early 1900s. Take a trip into the luxurious American past and experience an unparalleled memory-­making journey.

Make a Reservation

Book your Wine Train Napa Valley trip today

Explore the Train

Learn about the Wine Train

Shop Our Wine Store

Find Wines Gifts

Getting Here

Visit Napa Valley with or without a car





Why Canned Wine Needs to Be Your Go-To BBQ Drink This Summer


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Why Canned Wine Needs to Be Your Go-To BBQ Drink This Summer

What Makes Canned Wine Great

  • Easier to carry. Cans, especially aluminum ones, are much lighter than glass so they’re better for taking on a hike or to a picnic. They also stack more easily in a bag or cooler than bottled or boxed wine. And you’ll appreciate their lack of heft when you go to take out the recycling.
  • Stays cool longer. The metal of the can cools the wine down faster, which is great if you’re tossing a six-pack in a communal cooler when you get to the barbecue. Refrigerate the wine before heading out, and the can will keep the vino cold for even longer.
  • Doesn’t break. Cans obviate the risk of broken glass, which is dangerous and can also get you in hot water with authorities that patrol beaches and parks.
  • Bring as much as you want. With a bottle of wine, you’re stuck hauling the whole bottle even though you might not end up drinking it all (I know, I know, there’s no such thing as too much wine, but still.).

What’s Less Than Ideal About Canned Wine

  • Price. Most of the canned wines I’ve come across are between $12 and $20 for a four-pack of 187 mL cans. A standard bottle of wine is 750 mL, so the four-pack is about a bottle of wine (748mL). Personally, I tend not to spend more than $10 on a bottle of wine because I really just want something inexpensive and decent tasting. So for me, most canned wines are more than I would spend on a bottle of wine, except for the Simpler Wines offered by Trader Joe’s, which are $4 for a four-pack. If you tend to spend a little more than I do on wine, than canned wine is a fine deal for your money.
  • Consistent availability. Your canned wine options will vary by store and where you live. If you live in a place known for wine, like California, you might find local canned wine brands in more stores.
  • Variety. I went to a few large chain stores, Target, Whole Foods, and Trader Joe’s, to see what was available and had about five brands to choose from between the three stores. Your local grocery and liquors stores may have more options, but your choices are going to be limited.

Canned Wine Options to Try

  • Many canned wines are sparkling and white or rose (rather than red), since they’re best suited for warm weather drinking. Simpler Wines, Trader Joe’s, $4/four-pack. TJ’s has two sparkling options, a rose and a white. The cans are incredibly light and easy to hold, even with condensation. Very light flavor, great for mixing with liqueurs—try St. Germain or creme de cassis—or drinking on their own.
  • Sofia Mini, Francis Ford Coppola Winery, $16/four-pack. These come with a straw, which I think is supposed to make you feel fancy, but just made me feel like a toddler with a boozy juicebox. Skip the straw and drinking straight from the can like a grownup. This one was my least favorite in terms of taste because it was quite sweet.
  • Presto Sparkling Cuvee, Whole Foods, $12/four-pack. This one is also available in single cans, but the pack is more cost-effective. Very light and refreshing.

These aren’t the only canned wine options out there, so visit your local grocery store to see what other brands are on offer. And be sure to tell us about them in the comments.

Contributing Writer, Lifehacker.com